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Great Mathematicians Are Made, Not Born

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Great Mathematicians Are Made, Not Born
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The notion that mathematics cannot be learnt easily is a deep-rooted myth among students. Many students hate Mathematics because they find it difficult to comprehend unlike other subjects.

They wouldn’t hesitate dropping it if given the option. But all students must take Mathematics right from elementary to high school, at least.

Most students who prefer to take subjects in the Arts department do so not for their love for literature, but for their aversion for Maths and its related subjects.

But how difficult is Maths? Is it as challenging as climbing a mountain without a rope; or as tough as traversing the ocean with a canoe? The plain truth is that students who hate Maths have had a bad perception about it right from the outset – and perception is everything.

The greatest mathematicians of the world weren’t born with a Mathematics DNA. Neither did they inherit such knowledge from their ancestors. They strived immensely to attain such lofty status, and it’s because of their great works that many problems are today solved.

They also had difficult moments but were never daunted in their missions. Albert Einstein, that Nobel scientist who had mastered differential and integral calculus before he was fifteen, once said:

“Do not worry about your difficulties in Mathematics; I can assure you that mine are still greater.”

To make Mathematics more appealing to students, a new approach must be evolved in the way it is being taught.

Apart from this, students must also develop strategies for firm comprehension. So if you want to be good in maths, the four tips mentioned below will help you immensely:

1. Dispel false perceptions

You’ve read Ben Carson’s story, right?

He was a boy who thought he was dumb and therefore couldn’t understand anything he was taught in school. His friends at school jeered him and made him feel more miserable every day.

But all that stopped when he changed his perception about learning. He stopped feeling lowly about himself and focused on his weaknesses. His story changed from being a villain to a hero and soon he became the toast of his peers and tutors.

Today, he is one of the foremost and highly celebrated neurosurgeons the world has produced. The principle here is simple: never say you can’t!

2. Practise consistently

The common aphorism that ‘practice makes perfect’ holds true at all time and clime.

Although, it’s a general life principle, it is more sacrosanct in Mathematics. You must practise Maths questions frequently. You don’t need to spend the whole day at it; a study pattern that allows you practise at regular intervals may just be okay for you.

3. Learn the required formulas

In Mathematics, every principle or theorem is represented with a formula. This formula is the key to understanding and solving all problems.

Students must appreciate this fact as well as put it in practice. You need to keep a separate notepad for mastering the formulas, where the formulas are arranged by topic. This will facilitate quick solutions to Mathematical problems.

4. Conceptualize the principles

A smart student must be able to relate Mathematical principles to real life occurrences. Topics like probability, trigonometry, mensuration, algebra, and bearing are easy to conceptualize.

All you need do is understand the basic principles behind these topics and relate them to the things around you.

Conclusion

One can say it takes a high level of dedication and commitment to become a great mathematician, but mathematicians aren’t born. They’re made. You too can become one if you’re prepared to walk the talk and bury your fears.

Author/Artist/Director of Item Being Reviewed: 
Muhammed A.
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Muhammed A.
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Mathematical principles of mental philosophy

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Mathematical principles of mental philosophy
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An attempt to use topology and other mathematical tools, to model human thought.

The prose is dry, presumptious, and overwritten, in the turgid para-academic style favored by pseudointellectuals seemingly the world over. But the book is one of those “almost made it” works that simply must be produced every so often.

It could be studied by a psychologist, statistician, philosopher, mathematician, or even a mystic, and provide numerous tangential ideas or “rabbits” to chase down strange holes of thought.

The author has a few interesting ideas, and a great many uninteresting ones gussied up in this pseudo-academic prose. The author shows _great_ endurance elaborating both kinds of them in occasionally agonizing detail. His approach is organized and methodical overall, even though the prose is far worse than Spencer-Brown’s Laws of Form, most of R. Buckminster Fuller’s work, or anything by Marshall McLuhan, for instance. Like the preceding three authors, if anyone extracts a useful set of concepts or practices from this book, it isn’t the author’s fault….

Shibahara promised a completed work in three volumes. This volume 1 was printed in a run of 500 copies, and one of them somehow finding its way to Texas. This weird book has found a home in Austin.

I am going to skim this strange volume deeply, and I hope he publishes the whole thing some day. Good Luck to him, he’s 87 at this writing.

essdee

Author/Artist/Director of Item Being Reviewed: 
Sadao Shibahara.
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OCLC # (found in the UT Library Catalog): 
9687523
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Steve Devine
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scdevine@gmail.com
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