University of Texas San Antonio

A Guide to The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials, 1916-1988 (bulk 1941-1964)



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Cook, Morris
Title: The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials,
Dates: 1916, 1929-1988
Bulk Dates: 1941-1964
Creator Abstract: Morris Cook was a bookseller in Austin, Texas. James Frank Dobie was an American folklorist, writer, and newspaper columnist known for many books depicting the richness and traditions of life in rural Texas during the days of the open range. The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials is a collection of materials by or about the Texas writer J. Frank Dobie.
Content Abstract: The collection incorporates magazines, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, notes and letters from Dobie spanning the years 1916 to 1988.
Identification: MS 148
Extent: 2.8 linear feet (about 2,000 items)
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries Special Collections

Biographical Note

J. Frank Dobie was born on September 26, 1888. He left the ranch when he was sixteen and moved to Alice, where he lived with his Dubose grandparents and finished high school. In 1906 he enrolled in Southwestern University in Georgetown, where he met Bertha McKee, whom he married in 1916, and Professor Albert Shipp Pegues, his English teacher, who introduced him to English poetry, particularly the Romantics, and encouraged him as a writer. He worked two summers as a reporter, first for the San Antonio Express and then the Galveston Tribune. He got his first teaching job in 1910 in Alpine, where he was also the principal, play director, and editor of the school paper. He returned to Georgetown in 1911 and taught in the Southwestern University preparatory school until 1913, when he went to Columbia to work on his master's degree. With his new M.A. he joined the University of Texas faculty in 1914. At this time he also joined the Texas Folklore Society. Dobie left the university in 1917 and served for two years in the field artillery in World War I. In 1919 he published his first articles. He resigned his position at the university in 1920 to manage his uncle Jim Dobie's ranch. During this year on the Rancho de Los Olmos with the vaqueros and the stock and the land that had been part of his formation, Dobie discovered his calling-to transmute all the richness of this life and land and culture into literature.

Dobie returned to Austin and the university in 1921. On April 1, 1922, Dobie became secretary of the Texas Folklore Society. He immediately began a publication program. Legends of Texas (1924) carried the seeds of many of his later publications. Dobie served as the society's secretary-editor for twenty-one years and built the society into a permanent professional organization. When the university would not promote him without a Ph.D., Dobie accepted the chairmanship of the English department at Oklahoma A&M, where he stayed from 1923 to 1925. During these two years he began writing for the Country Gentleman. With considerable help from his friends on the UT campus, he was able to return in 1925 with a token promotion. He began writing articles on Texas history, culture, and folklore for magazines and periodicals.

His Vaquero of the Brush Country, published in 1929, established him as a spokesman of Texas and southwestern culture. Two years later Dobie published Coronado's Children (1931), the tales of those free spirits who abandoned society in the search for gold, lost mines, and various other grails. It won the Literary Guild Award for 1931 and, combined with his continuing success as a popular writer in Country Gentleman, made Dobie a nationally known literary figure. He was also promoted in 1933 to the rank of full professor, the first Texan non-Ph.D. to be so honored at the university. In 1942 he published the Guide to Life and Literature of the Southwest, an annotated reading list. As head of the Texas Folklore Society and author of On the Open Range (1931), Tales of the Mustang (1936), The Flavor of Texas (1936), Apache Gold and Yaqui Silver (1939), and Tongues of the Monte (1947), Dobie was the state's leading spokesman and literary and cultural figure during the Texas Centennial decade, the 1930s. His first period of writing ended with the publication of The Longhorns in 1941.

He spent World War II teaching American literature in Cambridge. After the war he returned to Europe to teach in England, Germany, and Austria. Dobie's request for a continuation of his leave of absence after his European tour in 1947 was denied by the regents, and he was dismissed from the UT faculty under what became known as the "Dobie rule," which restricted faculty leaves of absence to two years except in emergencies.

After this separation Dobie devoted all of his time to writing and anthologizing. The next decade saw the publication of The Voice of the Coyote (1949), The Ben Lilly Legend (1950), The Mustangs (1952), Tales of Old Time Texas (1955), Up the Trail From Texas (1955), and I'll Tell You a Tale (1960). Before he died he published Cow People (1964) and almost finished the manuscript for Rattlesnakes, which Bertha McKee Dobie later edited and published in 1965. Dobie began writing for the Southwest Review in 1919, when it was the Texas Review, and continued the association throughout his life. Dobie wrote a Sunday newspaper column from 1939 until his death. Dobie died on September 18, 1964.

From "DOBIE, JAMES FRANK."The Handbook of Texas Online. [Accessed Thurs Jul 5 10:17:00 US/Central 2007].


Scope and Content Note

The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials is a collection by or about the Texas writer J. Frank Dobie. The collection incorporates magazines, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, notes and letters from Dobie spanning the years 1916 to 1988. The non-book items are divided into the series: J. Frank Dobie, Bertha Dobie, and Morris Cook.

The Dobie series is composed of primarily published material written by or about J. Frank Dobie and his writings. It contains letters, pamphlets, book reviews, articles, newsletters, records albums, book covers, bibliographies, periodicals, and photographs. Please note that some of the material is inscribed by Mr. Dobie to Mr. Cook. This series is divided into the following sub-series: Biographical, Letters, Record Albums, Texas Folklore Society, and Writings.

The Bertha Dobie series contains letters and articles written by Bertha Dobie, as well as a pamphlet from a tribute to her. It is divided into the sub-series: Biographical, Letters, and Writings.

The Morris Cook series is composed of letters and essays written by Cook.


 

Arrangement

The papers are arranged into three series:
1. J. Frank Dobie
2. Bertha Dobie
3. Morris Cook

Restrictions

Access Restrictions

This collection is housed at UTSA's Main Campus and must be accessed via the John Peace Library Special Collections reading room. To request access, please use the Collections Request Form.

Use Restrictions

Please contact University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries Special Collections for information about permission to publish material from the collection.


Index Terms

Persons
Cook, Morris G.
Dobie, Bertha McKee, 1890-
Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964
Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964--Bibliography.
Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964--Correspondence.
Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964--Criticism and interpretation.
Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964--Friends and associates.
Hertzog, Carl
Organizations
Texas Folklore Society.
Subject terms
American literature--Texas--20th century.
Authors, American--Texas--20th century.
Folklore--Texas--History--20th century.
Folklore--Texas--Texas Hill Country.
Folklorists--United States.
Ranch life--Texas.
Vaqueros.
Locations
Texas.
Texas--Fiction.
Texas--History--1846--1950--Fiction.
Texas Hill Country (Tex.)
Genre/form
Articles.
Bibliographies.
Book covers.
Clippings.
Correspondence.
Essays.
Magazines.
Notes.
Periodicals.
Photographs.
Local Subjects
Texas History

Related Material

J. Frank Dobie Papers, 1898 -1988 (Bulk: 1914-1964) at Southwestern Writers Collection, Special Collections, Alkek Library, Texas State University-San Marcos - http://www.lib.utexas.edu/taro/tsusm/00019/tsu-00019.html

The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials books, which were received as part of the original collection, have been separated from the collection and incorporated into the Special Collections inventory of the UTSA Library. The books can be found by searching the UTSA Library Catalog (UCAT - https://ucat.lib.utsa.edu/) for the keyword "Dobie Collection."


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials, 1916, 1929-1988 (bulk 1941-1964), MS 148, University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries Special Collections.

Acquisition Information

The Morris Cook Collection of J. Frank Dobie Materials was purchased from Morris Cook for University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries Special Collections in 1974 by the Ewing Halsell Foundation. The original purchase of Dobie materials from Cook included about 650 items, including books, magazines, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, manuscript material, notes and letters from Dobie spanning 1916 to 1988, with the bulk of the material from 1941-1964. The books have been separated from the collection and incorporated into the Special Collections inventory of the UTSA Library.

Processing Information

Processed by Traci JoLeigh Drummond, Archivist, and Mathew C. Martin, Collections Assistant, June 2007

Encoded by: Nikki Lynn Thomas, Manuscripts Archivist, October 2007


Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Dobie

The Dobie series is composed of primarily published material written by or about J. Frank Dobie and his writings. It contains letters, pamphlets, book reviews, articles, newsletters, records albums, book covers, bibliographies, periodicals, and photographs. Please note that some of the material is inscribed by Mr. Dobie to Mr. Cook. This series is divided into the following sub-series: Biographical, Letters, Record Albums, Texas Folklore Society, and Writings.
Box
1 Biographical
Advertisements
For Various Books Written or Edited by Dobie, undated
A Portrait of Pancho by Winston Bode, undated
Bibliographies
Articles by J. Frank Dobie, undated
Checklist of Dobie Periodicals, undated
"A Contribution towards a Bibliography," by Price Daniel, Jr., in Texana, 1964
J. Frank Dobie, Bibliography, complied by Spruill Cook, 1968
J. Frank Dobie items, undated
Book Cover for A Portrait of Pancho by Winston Bode, undated
Book Reviews (of Dobie's books)
Coronado's Children, review by unknown author, in the Texas Weekly, February 21, 1931
[Coronado's Children], Frances Swan, in the Texas Weekly, April 11, 1931
In the Shadow of History, by Ima C. Barlow, in Panhandle Plains Historical Review, 1940
John C. Duvall, First Texas Man of Letters, by Duncan Robinson, in Panhandle Plains Historical Review, 1940
The Longhorns, by L. F. Sheffy, in Panhandle Plains Historical Review, 1941
Tales of Old Time Texas, by Stanley Walker, in Saturday Review, November 26, 1955
Texian Stomping Grounds, by Novella Goodman, in Panhandle Plains Historical Review, 1941
Ephemera, 1964 and undated
Invitation to an event for the Caxton Club with Dobie presenting on the cowboy in American literature, 1952
Memorials and Tributes, 1964-1965, 1967, 1969, 1988
Paisano Project, solicitation letter and pamphlet, undated
Portraits (photographs), undated
Photograph with Walter Prescott Webb, undated
Box
OM2 Oversize: Portraits by Tom Lea (framed and unframed) and Dobie Quote, undated
Box
1 Senate resolution No. 787 in memory of J. Frank Dobie, 1964
Writings by others about Dobie
Box
OM2 "Oversize: Auction to Preserve Dobie 'Paisano'" by Winston Bode from The Austin American-Statesman, May 8, 1966
Box
1 "Chips from the Woodpile" from The American West (complete issue), Winter 1965
Collected remarks presented at the Dobie Folklore Dinner, Austin, TX, April 23, 1955, undated
"A Collection of Works by and about J. Frank Dobie" from The Discourse – UTSA Bulletin. October 1973
Concerning Mr. Dobie and the University of Texas, by Walter Prescott Webb, September 30, 1947, reprinted in 1964
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Dobie Collection Chronicles Southwest" from Texas Times (2 copies), February 1974
Box
1 "Dobie: Fired According to Plan" by Bill Kittrell and "A New University" by Hart Stilwell in The Texas Spectator, October 6, 1947
"Dobie" from Riding Line – publication of the TSHA, RE: the purchase of the Dobie Collection by UTSA, September 1974
Box
OM2 "Oversize: Dobie Funeral Services Held, State Cemetary Burial Site" by Nancy Kowert from The Daily Texan, September 22, 1964
Box
1 "Dobie" in the Seer, author unknown, November 1970
"The Dobie Legacy," by R. Henderson Shuffler, in Texas Parade, October 1964
"Dobie on First Classism" by David Crossley in The Ranger [interview], September 1961
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Dobie Works Come to Alamo City" by O'Lene Stone from The San Antonio Light, January 13, 1974
Box
1 "Friend's Program" (summary of talk on Dobie) in News Bulletin of the Houston Public Library, May 1965
Foreword by Warren Roberts regarding J. Frank Dobie and Walter Prescott Webb, unidentified title, undated
Box
OM1 "Oversize: The Great Mentor of Texans" from The Daily Texan, Septmber 19, 1964
Box
1 "I have that honor," tributes to J. Frank Dobie by Frank H. Wardlaw, 1965
Box
OM2 Oversize: "I Helped Frank Dobie Cut Down a Tree" by John Haller from The Texas Observer, February 14, 1959
Box
OM1 Oversize: "J. Frank Dobie" from Gossip!, November 8, 1935
Box
1 "J. Frank Dobie" in The Story of Texas, December 7-11, 1964
J. Frank Dobie Memorial from Texas Libraries (complete issues), Winter 1964
"J. Frank Dobie of Texas" tribute issue of The Texas Observer (2 copies), July 24, 1964
"J. Frank Dobie on Folklore: Passages Collected by William D. Wittliff," from the Sunny Slopes of Long Ago, undated
Box
OM2 Oversize: "J. Frank Dobie" special supplement in tribute to Dobie from The Austin American-Statesman, October 25, 1964
Box
1 "Life Goes to a Tall Tale Session in Texas" from Life, June 1, 1942
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Maverick Professor" by Jeanne Douglas and Liz Wharton from The Saturday Evening Post, September 11, 1943
Box
2 "Maverick Professor" by Martin Staples Shockley, in Western Review, Summer 1965
Mody Boatright, Secretary and Editor 1943-1964, Texas Folklore Society, 1965
"Mr. Southwest: J. Frank Dobie of Texas," by Lawrence Clark Powell, in Arizona Highways, June 1957
"News of Our President, J. Frank Dobie" from The English Westerners' Tally Sheet (complete issue), March-April 1964
"Night of the Armadillos," Bertram Rota, 1960
"The Pleasure Frank Dobie took in Grass," by Bertha Dobie, 1972
"Portrait of Pancho, some recollections of J. Frank Dobie," by Winston Bode, in Texas Quarterly, Winter 1964
"A Remarkable Letter" by Carl Hertzog, in The Library Chronicle of the University of Texas at Austin (complete issue), November 1970
Several Articles on J. Frank Dobie's death from The English Westerners' Tally Sheet (2 complete issues), November-December 1964
Short tribute to Dobie after his death, W. Gordon Whaley, in the Graduate Journal, fall 1964
"The Voice of the Coyote…a Tribute to J. Frank Dobie (September 26, 1888 – September 16, 1964)" in Montana the Magazine of Western History (complete issue), Winter 1965
"The Voice of the Horned Toad" from the Cactus Garden section of Arizona and the West (complete issue), Spring 1962
"A 'Way Bill' to Texas Literature" author unknown, in the Texas Weekly, March 14, 1931
Assorted clippings, 1943, 1960, 1973
Letters
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to Ruth Dodson, March 23, 1944
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to Hope Macintosh, December 30, 1958
Letter from J. frank Dobie to Elizabeth G. Baldwin regarding Hope Macintosh, August 3, 1959
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to Bill Lucas, January 21, 1964
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to J. E. Weems, regarding Texas Institute of Letters, March 24, 1964
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to J. F. Albright, regarding Cow People (draft), April 22, 1964
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to Jerome Palms, August 4, 1964
Letter from J. Frank Dobie to Governor John Connally (copy), September 10, 1964
Letter to J. Frank Dobie from Paul Horgan, July 4, 1964
Record Albums
Box
OM1 Oversize: "An Informal Hour With…J.Frank Dobie", 1956
Oversize: "J. Frank Dobie Tells The Ghost Bull of the Mavericks and Other Tales", 1960
Box
2 Texas Folklore Society
El Paisano, March, September and December 1949
Letter to membership, 1916
Letter to membership, 1940
Letter to membership, 1941
Letters to membership, 1942
Box
3 Writings
Articles and stories
"Ab Blocker: Trail Boss," from Cow People, in Arizona and the West, Summer 1964
Box
OM1 Oversize: Advertisement for The Texas Weekly in The Texas Weekly (complete issue), January 9, 1932
Box
3 "The Alamo's Immortalization of Words," includes Bertha Dobie's "Old Alf" reprint from Southwest Review, Summer 1942
"Andy Adams, Cowboy Chronicler," 1964 reprint from the Southwest Review, January 1929
"The Art of Charles Russell," from the American Scene, Fall 1958
"The Archives Wars of Texas," undated
"As the Moving Finger Writ," reprinted from Southwest Review, Autumn 1955
"The Atomic Age," in the Saturday Review of Literature, January 5, 1946
"Babicora," reprinted from the American Hereford Journal, January 1, 1954
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Bedichek and the Coffee Pot" from The American-Statesman Show World, August 4, 1963
Box
3 "Between the Comanche and the Rattlesnake," reprinted from the Southwest Review, winter 1955
"The Blue Egg of Silver and the Golden Hope" from The Westerners New York Posse Brand Book, Vol. 17 No. 1, 1960
"Bob More: Man and Bird Man," reprinted from Southwest Review, autumn 1941
"Bolson de Mapimi," from Mexican Life, March 1956
"Books and Christmas," reprinted from the Southwest Review, winter 1951
"Br'er Rabbit watches out for himself in Mexico," from Mesquite and Willow, 1957
"Brush Country," excerpt from A Vaquero of the Brush Country, 1956
Cabeza de Vaca's Great Journey, (prepared with the cooperation of J. Frank Dobie), 1945
"Caesar's Meat," from the Atlantic, September 1960
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Cambridge," from Holiday, June 1950
Box
3 "Captain John G. Bourke as Soldier, Writer and Man," in Arizona Quarterly, Autumn 1958
"Cattlemen of Old Texas," proof copy for Ford Times, 1964
"Censors and Satire," from Bacchanal, March 1962
"Change, Change, Change…" from The Texas Observer, January 8, 1959
"A Christmas Remembrance," 1951
"A Close Touch with Wild Turkeys" from Texas Ornithological Society Newsletter, November 29, 1956
"The Conservatism of Charles M. Russell," in Montana: the Magazine of Western History, October 1958
Contribution to "A man, his land, and his work: Walter Prescott Webb," in the Graduate Journal, 1964
"A Corner forever Texas," undated
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Coronado's Children," from Holland's, January 1929
Box
3 "The Coyote's Charm," from Audubon, January-February 1963
"A Deer Hunter's Camp," in What's New?, Christmas 1952
"Divided We Stand," [1943]
"Divided We Stand," originally printed in Dallas Morning News, 1943
"Do Rattlesnakes Swallow their Young ?," reprint from Publications of the Texas Folklore Society, 1946
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Dobie Charges Men of Power are at Work in U.S. Stirring Up Vicious Hatred Against Labor, Administration, Rationing System" from Southwest Teamster, February 20, 1943
Oversize: "Dobie: Webb in Thought Power" from The Daily Texan, March 10, 1963
Box
3 "Dobie's Speech on Negro Education" from The Texas Spectator, December 20, 1946
"E. Douglas Branch, Singularisimo," reprint from the Southwest Review, 1962
"E. L. Shettles, Man, Bookman, and Friend," in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January 1941
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Ella Byler Dobie and Christmas," from Houston Now supplement in The Houston Post, December 24, 1961
Box
3 "Ella Byler Dobie and Christmas," supplement to the Austin American-Statesman, December 24, 1961
"The English Character," in the American Mercury, April 1945
Box
4 "English vs. American Newspapers," in the American Mercury, September 1946
"Enlightened is the Word for The Houston Post" – advertisement in Saturday Review, January 30, 1960
"Fabulous Frontiersman: Jim Bowie," in Montana, the Magazine of Western History, April 1959
"The Fire," in Texas Game and Fish, June 1962
"The First Bookseller to Enrich my Life," in the Bulletin of the Southern California Chapter of the Antiquarian Booksellers Association of America, Summer 1957
"The First Cattle in Texas and the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns," in the Southwestern Historical Quarterly, January 1939
"The First Cattle in Texas and the Southwest Progenitors of the Longhorns," reprint [1964]
"Folklore of the Southwest: What is being done to preserve it?," reprint [1964]
"For Years We Three Sat Together" from The Texas Observer, July 26, 1963
"Gene Rhodes: Cowboy Novelist," from The Atlantic, June 1949
"The Genius of Gusto," reprint, undated
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Hash and Humanity in White House" from The Austin American-Statesman, May 17, 1954
Box
OM1 Oversize: "The Heraldry of the Range," from The Saturday Evening Post, December 20, 1930
Box
4 "His Looks and my Ways would hang any man," reprint 1956
"Horns" in The Cattleman, March 1952
"The Humanity of Brother Coyote," from Defenders of Wildlife, January 1964
"Hunting Cousin Sally," reprints 1963
"Indians and Mustangs: Part II, Cheyennes and Apaches Were Best" from The Western Horseman, July 1951
"Islands of the Birds on the Texas Coast," in Audubon Magazine, September – October 1954
"J. Frank Dobie on Libraries" in The Library Chronicle of the University of Texas at Austin, March 1930
"James Bowie, Big Dealer" in The Southern Historical Quarterly, January 1957
"James Bowie, Big Dealer" reprint, 1957
"The Jeepy Jackrabbit" from Natural History, January 1943
"Jim Williams and Out Our Way" in Bullmanac, 1958
"John A. Lomax" Reprinted from The Sunny Slopes of Long Ago, 1966
Box
OM1 Oversize: "The Last of the Grizzly Hunters" from The Saturday Evening Post, December 11, 1937
Box
4 "Mark Twain called Lincoln of US Literature" from theAustin American Statesman, September 20, 1964
"Mesquite" from The Southwestern Sheep and Goat Raiser, 1938
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Mexico City" from Holiday, March 1953
Box
4 "The Mezcla Man," (3 copies) 1954
"Midas on a Goatskin" from The American Mercury, November 1929
Box
OM2 Oversize: "'Midnight' the Out-Pitchingest of All Pitchers" from Rodeo Edition of The Echo, Vol. XXX No. 11, 1959
Box
4 "Mister Ben Lilly: Bear Hunter East and West" in The Saturday Review of Literature, May 16, 1942
"The Monument of the Seven Mustangs," reprint from The Cattleman, 1948
"More Ballads and Songs of the Frontier Folk" reprint from Publications of the Texas Folklore Society, 1928
"Mustang Gray: Fact, Tradition and Song" reprinted from Publications of the Texas Folklore Society, 1932
"My Horse Buck" from The Atlantic, June 1952
"My Salute to Gene Rhodes," 1947
"Mystery of the Lost Apache Mine" in Mechanix Illustrated, December 1954
Box
5 "…Not the Will of God" from Old West, Spring 1965
"Old Bill" from The Atlantic, October 1946
"Old Bill, Confederate Ally," unidentified source, undated
"An Old Cowman" rough draft, undated
"On My Friend, Walter Prescott Webb" from Great Plains Journal, Spring 1963
"On Libraries" reprint, 1970
"…On Such as Writers" from Panorama, May 12, 1963
"Out of Regionalism, a Larger View" from Saturday Review, May 21, 1960
"Out of the Original Rock," reprinted from The Brand Book of Denver Posse of the Westerners, 1963
"Outlaws of the Brush" from Old West, Winter 1964
"Paisano" in Texas Game and Fish, October 1960
"Payment in Full" from Town North (complete issue), February 1954
"Pedro Loco" from Old West, Fall 1964
"A Phimister Proctor: Master Sculptor of Horses" by Vivian A. Paladin (Dobie is quoted in the story), in Montana the Magazine of Western History (complete issue), Winter 1964
"Pitching Horses and Panthers" reprinted from Mustangs and Cow Horses, 1940
"A Plot of Earth" reprinted from Southwest Review, 1953
"Poetry and Prose at Georgetown: 1,"Southwest Review, 1956
"A Question of Hides," from Ranch Romances, November 6, 1942
Box
OM1 Oversize: [Quotation] Printed broadside on handmade paper, undated
Box
5 Quote on "The Brush Country" in Lake Mathis and State Park brochure, undated
"The Razorbacks: The Wild Hogs of Early Days" in The Texas Monthly, April 1929
"The Roadrunner in Fact and Folk-Lore," reprinted from In the Shadow of History, 1939
"The Roadrunner in Fact and Folklore" from Natural History, September 1939
"The Roadrunner in Fact and Folklore" from Arizona Highways, May 1958
Box
OM2 Oversize: "Roy Bedichek" from The Texas Observer, June 27, 1959
Box
5 "Samples of the Army Mind" in Harper's Magazine, December 1946
"A Schoolteacher in Alpine," reprinted from Southwest Review, 1962
"The Seven Mustangs" (2 copies), 1948
"The Seven Mustangs" in the Texas Literary Quarterly, Autumn 1948
"The Seven Mustangs" in The Mustang, newsletter of the Texas Memorial Museum, 1964
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Shakespeare's Home Town" from Holiday, July 1951
Box
5 "The Smart Coyote" from Natural History, February 1942
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Southern Personalities: J. Frank Dobie, Legend Hunter" by John William Rogers in Holland's: The Magazine of the South, March 1931
Box
4 "A Sow's Ear and a Hero" , undated
Box
OM1 Oversize: "The Spanish Cow Pony" from The Saturday Evening Post, November 24, 1934
Box
5 "The Stallion and His Mares" in The Texas Horseman, November 1962
Statement sent to Edward R. Murrow for the "This I Believe" Program from The Austin Unitarian, January 18, 1953
"Storytellers I Have Known," reprinted from Singers and Storytellers, 1961
"Strange Animal Friendships" in Reader's Digest, August 1945
"Strictly Personal" in The Saturday Review of Literature, August 3, 1946
"Tales of Don Coyote" in The Pacific Spectator, Vol. III No. 2, Spring 1949
"Talk Under the Ramada" from Mexican Life, January 1956
"Talking Back to the Censors" (Dobie et al), Southwest Review, 1962
"Tall Tales of Texas" in Mechanix Illustrated, November 1956
"A Texan in England" in The Saturday Review of Literature, April 14, 1945
"The Texan Part of Texas: The Distinctive Charms of the Biggest State" from Nature Magazine, December 1930
"A Texan Teaches at Cambridge" in The National Geographic Magazine, April 1946
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Texas part I" from Holiday, October 1948
Oversize: "Texas part II" from Holiday, November 1948
Box
6 "Texas Jacks" in Texas Parade, February 1954
"The Texas Longhorn" reprint from The Cattleman, 1938
"Texas Longhorns Out of History" from Old Trail Drivers Yearbook 1960 Convention, 1960
"Texas' Wild Flowers Having a Tough Time" from Wild Flower (Table of Contents only), April 1951
"Texas' Wild Flowers Having a Tough Time" reprinted from The Houston Post, 1950
"Thomas Gilcrease" from Arizona Highways, 1962
"Three Apache Women and a Lone White Man" from Arizona Highways, September 1957
"Through the Bolsón" from Mexican Life, April 1956
"Titans of Western Art" in American Scene, v.5 n.4, 1964
"Tracks of Frederick Remington,"Southwest Review, 1961
"Tracks on the Land – An Editorial" from The Junior Historian of the Texas State Historical Association (complete issue), April 1941
"The Traveling Anecdote,"Folk Travelers, 1953
"Two Kinds of People," reprinted from the Southwest Review, 1950
"Two Treasure Tales," undated
A Vaquero of the Brush Country, excerpt, printed 1955
"Walter Prescott Webb" in Texana, Spring 1963
"Wanderlust of the Wild: The Mystery of Migration Among Non-Migratory Creatures" from Nature Magazine, October 1932
"Weather Wisdom of the Texas-Mexican Border," reprinted from Texas Folklore Society Publication, 1923, undated
"What I Saw Across the Rhine" in The National Geographic Magazine, January 1947
"Wild and Free," 1952
Box
OM1 Oversize: "Wildcatter" from Holidays, December 1948
Box
6 "The Writer and His Region" in the Sul Ross State College Bulletin, June 1953
"The Writer and His Region" reprinted from Southwest Review, [1962]
Bibliography
Book and Pamphlets Turned over for Repairing to David Norwood, April 17, 1963
Forty-Four Range Country Books, 1941
Life and Literature of the Southwest compiled by J. Frank Dobie, 1938
Book Covers for The Flavor of Texas and Carl Sandburg and Saint Peter at the Gate, 1966 and undated
Book Reviews (reviews by Dobie)
Anson Jones: the Last President of Texas by Herbert Gambrell from The Saturday Review of Literature, October 16, 1948
The Changing Humanities by David H. Stevens, in the The Saturday Review of Literature, December 12, 1953
Fever in the Earth, by William A. Owens, 1958
Ghost Lore by Henry Yelvington, reprinted from the Journal of American Folklore, 1937
The West of Alfred Jacob Miller, by Alfred Jacob Miller, in the Saturday Review of Literature, August 18, 1951
The White Scourge, by Edward Everett Davis, in the Panhandle-Plains Historical Review, 1940
A brief history and directory of the Texas Institute of Letters, 1936-1956
Christmas Card, 1949
Encyclopedia Britannica entry, "Longhorn," 1966
Forewards
English 342: Life and Literature of the Southwest, No. 1, University of Texas, May 1940
English 342: Life and Literature of the Southwest, No. 2, University of Texas, May 1941
English 342: Life and Literature of the Southwest, No. 3, University of Texas, May 1942
"Some current folk songs of the negro," by Will H. Thomas, 1912, reprinted 1936
Tall Tales from Texas, by Mody C. Boatright, 1946
Box
7 Introductions
"Helen Hunt Jackson" and Ramona, 1959
"James Cox and His Cattle Industry", 1960
Minority Report of the Advisory Board of Texas Historians to Commission of Control for Texas Centennial Celebrations, 1935
"Salute to Senator Ralph W. Yarborough", October 1963



 

Bertha Dobie

The Bertha Dobie series contains letters and articles written by Bertha Dobie, as well as a pamphlet from a tribute to her. It is divided into the sub-series: Biographical, Letters, and Writings.
Box
7 About
"Bertha McKee Dobie: An Exhibition at Southwestern University", 1988
Letters
Letter from Bertha Dobie to Janice M. Smith RE: Sale of Morris Cook's Dobie Collection, January 20, 1964
Letter from Bertha Dobie to B.H. Stiefel, RE: Cancellation of "Paisano Editions" Project, January 3, 1968
Letter from Bertha Dobie to B.H. Stiefel, RE: Cancellation of "Paisano Editions" Project (copy), [January 1968]
Writings
"His Kindly Nature" (RE: Roy Bedichek) from The Texas Observer, June 27, 1959



 

Morris Cook

The Morris Cook series is composed of letters and essays written by Mr. Cook.
Box
7 Essays
Essay about his Dobie Collections, undated
"Here's Why I Collect – and Love – Books" by H.C. Arbuckle III, 1971
Letters
Letter from Dudley R. Dobie (Found in Tales of the Mustangs), July 6, 1966
Letter from J. Frank Dobie, May 19, 1963
Letter from Sterling Evans RE: A Keepsake Publication about Jeff Dykes' Dobie Collection, 1971
Letters from Carl Hertzog
RE: Image of Dobie and Walter Prescott Webb, September 22, 1964
RE: Snapshot (Follows September 22, 1964 Letter), [September 1964]
Postcard RE: Photograph, [October 19, 1964]
RE: Photo of Dobie and Walter Prescott Webb, October 29, 1964
RE: Photo of Dobie and Walter Prescott Webb, [October 1964]
RE: Typeset for Dobie Book, ca. 1964
RE: Unrealized Dobie Projects, undated
With Original Signature from Dobie Bookplate, undated
With Sample of Small Booklet RE: Dobie Project, undated
Letter from Ann Hornak, RE: Exhibit, undated
Letter from Dick Mohr, December 8, [1980]
Letter from Ellen Sutherland RE: Shipment of First Editions, November 5, 1964
Letter from Tom, May 26, 1967
Austin American Statesman article about Cook's book collection, March 11, 1973
Photograph of Cook, undated