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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Historical Note

Scope and Contents Note

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Description of Series

2014 Lozano Long Conference Micro Oral History Collection, 2014 February 20 - 2014 May 23

The Benson Latin American Collection

Archiving the Central American Revolutions Micro Oral History Collection



Descriptive Summary

Creator Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, and Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection
Title "Archiving the Central American Revolutions" Micro Oral History Collection
Dates: 2014
Abstract The "Archiving the Central American Revolutions" Micro Oral History Collection contains unedited oral history interviews conducted in conjunction with the 2014 Lozano Long Conference, "Archiving the Central American Revolutions." Interviews are with conference participants as well as scholars of Central America's revolutionary period who were unable to attend the conference. The conference was organized by LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections.
Accession No. 2014-19
OCLC Record No.
Extent 20 digital audio files
Language English,and Spanish
Repository Human Rights Documentation Initiative, The University of Texas at Austin

Historical Note

In February 2014, LLILAS Benson Latin American Studies and Collections hosted the annual Lozano Long Conference around the theme of "Archiving the Central American Revolutions." The inter-disciplinary conference featured keynote talks by participants of the revolutionary movements in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Nicaragua; panels with speakers from El Salvador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Mexico and the United States; a screening of the documentary Fire from the Mountain with the filmmaker; an archiving workshop with Benson Latin American Collection archivists; and the exhibition, ¡Venceremos! Posters and Ephemera of the Central American Revolutions that highlighted the archival holdings of the Benson Latin American Collection and the Human Rights Documentation Initiative. The conference featured a wide range of participants, from revolutionary actors and activists to clergy members, journalists, documentary filmmakers, solidarity activists, and scholars.[1]

In addition to providing an academic forum to discuss critical interpretations of Central American history by multiple generations of scholars, the conference also aimed to initiate an ongoing project of acquisitioning documentary materials related to the revolutionary eras in Central America. To this aim, LLILAS Benson invited conference participants to record micro oral histories about their lives, research, and activism within Central America for archiving at the Benson Latin American Collection. The micro oral history project paired interviewees with University of Texas at Austin graduate student interviewers whose research interests closely aligned with the life and professional experience of the person they were interviewing. The loosely structured interviews discussed the interviewees’ work, scholarship, and experiences living and working in Central America. These oral histories contain personal anecdotes, reflections on the intersection of revolution, activism, solidarity and governmental transition in Central America, in addition to aspirations for and discussion of current and future events in Central America.

References

  • [1] "Archiving the Central American Revolutions" Conference Program, Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies, University of Texas at Austin. Accessed 22 May 2014. http://www.utexas.edu/cola/insts/llilas/_files/conferences/lozanolong2014/LL2014_program.pdf

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Scope and Contents Note

Audio files in the collection are arranged in alphabetical order by interviewee's last name.

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Three of the fourteen oral histories are unavailable online, per the request of the participants. All audio files are available on-site in the rare books and manuscripts reading room at the Benson Latin American Collection.

Use Restrictions

These materials are made available by the University of Texas Libraries solely for the purposes of research, teaching and private study. All intellectual property rights are retained by the legal copyright holders. The University of Texas does not hold the copyright to the content of this file. Formal permission to reuse or republish this content must be obtained from the copyright holder.

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Index Terms

The "Archiving the Central American Revolutions Micro Oral History Collection" is classified under the following Subject Headings:
Cabezas Lacayo, Omar
Clements, Charles
Henríquez Consalvi, Carlos, 1945-
Menchú, Rigoberta
Rigoberta Menchú Tum Foundation
Shaffer, Deborah
Somoza, Anastasio, 1925-1980
Téllez, Dora María
Activism
Civil war--El Salvador--History--20th century--Personal narratives
Civil war--Nicaragua--History--20th century.
Desaparecidos
Ejército Guerrillero de los Pobres (Guatemala)
El Salvador -- History -- 1979-1992.
Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional
Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional
Guatemala--History--Civil War, 1960-1996--Personal narratives
Guerrillas -- El Salvador.
Human rights--Guatemala--History--20th century.
Liberation theology--Central America.
Liberation theology--El Salvador--History--20th century.
Mayas--Crimes against--Guatemala--History--20th century.
Mozote Massacre, El Mozote, El Salvador, 1981
Political violence--Guatemala--History--20th century.
Radio broadcasting -- El Salvador -- History -- 20th century.
Radio Venceremos (El Salvador)--History.
Solidarity--Nicaragua--History--20th century.
Torture--El Salvador
Central America
El Salvador
Guatemala
León (Nicaragua)
Managua (Nicaragua)
Matagalpa (Nicaragua)
Morazán (El Salvador)
Mozote (El Salvador)
Nicaragua
San Salvador (El Salvador)
Texas--University at Austin
Texas--United States

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Cite as: [Name of file], "Archiving the Central American Revolutions" Micro Oral History, Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, the University of Texas at Austin, [link to file if applicable].

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Box and Folder Inventory

 

2014 Lozano Long Conference Micro Oral History Collection, 2014 February 20 - 2014 May 23
[20 digital audio files]

box folder
ll2014 14 Interview with Phillip Berryman, 2014 May 23
Interview conducted in English. Phillip Berryman, author and professor of Latin American Studies at Temple University, speaks about his experiences in Central America as both a minister and a solidarity activist. Berryman details his initial studies within the seminary, his travels to Panama as a minister, and his experiences with the growth of liberation theology in Central America during the 1960s-1980s. In addition to his work in Central America, Berryman details his transition from living and working in Panama to becoming an author and professor of Latin American history, focusing specifically on liberation theology in Latin America, and in translating or interpreting Latin American issues and history for a primarily United States audience. This interview was conducted by Blake Scott, a graduate student in History, whose research focuses upon US citizens living and working in Panama and the greater Caribbean, and the tourism industry in those regions.
12 Interview with Donna DeCesare, 2014 May 02
Listen
Interview conducted in English. Donna DeCesare, a photojournalist, educator, writer, and professor of Journalism at University of Texas at Austin, details her experiences living and working in Central America, primarily El Salvador. In this interview, DeCesare begins by describing her initial involvement in photojournalism and her interest in Central America. DeCesare describes her time living in El Salvador during the Salvadoran Civil War, the relationships she formed while working as a photojournalist, and her current work in Central America. In addition to her work in El Salvador, DeCesare describes living and working in Guatemala, Costa Rica, and Nicaragua, and her photographic work in each of those countries. This interview was conducted by Gabriel Pérez, a graduate student in Journalism, whose research focuses on photojournalism and issues of identity and cultural heritage within Latin America.
13 Interview with Molly Dougherty, N.d.
Listen
Interview conducted in English. Molly Dougherty, Executive Director for Vecinos Inc., a non-profit support organization for Asociación Salvadoreña Pro-Salud Rural (ASAPROSAR), describes her work with Vecinos, Inc., in Austin, and her time in Nicaragua and El Salvador in the early 1980s. In this interview, Dougherty speaks about her first experiences volunteering with the Sandinistas after the revolution and in El Salvador during the Civil War. This interview was conducted by Miguel Gutierrez Jr., a graduate student in Journalism and Latin American Studies, whose research focuses upon issues of migration during the Salvadoran Civil War, specifically the deportation of adults who were brought to the United States as children during the period of the civil war.
05 Interview with Jeff Gould, 2014 February 21
[3 files]
This interview has access restrictions and is not available online. It may be accessed onsite at the Benson Latin American Collection.
Interview conducted in English. Jeff Gould, professor of History at Indiana University Bloomington, recounts his experiences living in Nicaragua during the Sandinista Government. In Part 1, Gould describes his academic history and initial interest in Central America. In Part 2, Gould chronicles the time he spent in Nicaragua in the 1979, during the time of the Sandinista Revolution, and in the 1980s while conducting PhD research. In Part 3, Gould tells specific stories about his experiences moving to Managua, Nicaragua in 1983 after the Sandinista government, and offers his perceptions of the events in Nicaragua occurring in the 1980s and early 1990s. This interview was conducted by Claudia Rueda, a graduate student in History, whose research focuses upon the Cold War in Central America and student protests in Nicaragua from 1937-1979.
02 Interview with Carlos Henríquez Consalvi, "Santiago", 2014 February 20
Listen
Interview conducted in Spanish. Carlos Henriquez Consalvi, also known as "Santiago," is the founder and director of El Museo de la Palabra y la Imagen (MUPI) in San Salvador and one of the founders of Radio Venceremos, the rebel radio station formed by the Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN) during the first guerrilla offensive of the civil war. In this interview, Santiago describes his involvement with the FMLN, the formative years of Radio Venceremos, and the work of El Museo de la Palabra y La Imagen. Santiago discusses moments during the Salvadoran Civil War that he considers pivotal in the role of Radio Venceremos, such as the Massacre at El Mozote in December 1981; the current use of Radio Venceremos recordings; and other archival materials from El Salvador’s civil war that are housed in MUPI. This interview was conducted by Miguel Gutierrez Jr., a graduate student in Journalism and Latin American Studies, whose research focuses upon issues of migration during the Salvadoran Civil War, specifically the deportation of adults who were brought to the United States as children during the period of the civil war.
06 Interview with Katherine Hoyt, 2014 February 21
[2 files]
This interview has access restrictions and is not available online. It may be accessed onsite at the Benson Latin American Collection.
Interview is in English. Katherine Hoyt, Co-Director of the Nicaragua Network Education Fund, details experiences from her 16 years spent living in Nicaragua. In Part 1, Hoyt discusses her first trips to Nicaragua, her life in Matagalpa in the 1960s and 1970s, and as a translator for the Sandinista Government. In Part 2, a follow up interview conducted over Skype, Hoyt details her personal experience with the events of the Frente Sandinista’s Final Offensive in 1979, the events leading up to the May Final Offensive, and how her life in Nicaragua changed after the Sandinista Government. The first portion of this interview was conducted in Austin, Texas, with the second portion being conducted via Skype at a later date. This interview was conducted by Claudia Rueda, a graduate student in History, whose research focuses upon the Cold War in Central America and student protests in Nicaragua from 1937-1979.
01 Interview with Carlos R. Mauricio, 2014 February 20
Listen
Interview conducted in Spanish. Carlos Mauricio, Director of the Stop Impunity Project, discusses the two-week period he was held and tortured by the Salvadoran military and his activism in El Salvador and the United States. In this interview, Mauricio begins by recounting his childhood and education in El Salvador, his involvement with the student union, and his eventual imprisonment and torture by the Salvadoran government. Mauricio details the after effects of his detainment and torture, his legal suit against the two generals responsible for his imprisonment, and the ongoing work of the Stop Impunity Project. This interview was conducted by Miguel Gutierrez Jr., a graduate student in Journalism and Latin American Studies, whose research focuses upon issues of migration during the Salvadoran Civil War, specifically the deportation of adults who were brought to the United States as children during the period of the civil war.
08 Interview with Gustavo Meoño Brenner, 2014 February 21
Listen to Part 1
Listen to Part 2
Interview conducted in Spanish. Gustavo Meoño, Coordinator of the Archivo Histórico de la Policía Nacional (AHPN), discusses his life and experiences during Guatemala's Civil War and his current work in the AHPN and as former Director of the Rigoberta Menchú Foundation. In Part 1, Meoño details his childhood in Guatemala, his involvement with student organizations in the 1970s, and his eventual role in the Ejército Guerrillero de los Pobres (EGP) in Guatemala during the civil war. In Part 2, he describes his current role as Coordinator of the AHPN, how his previous work with the Rigoberta Menchú Foundation complements his current work, and the goals and aspirations of the archive moving into the future. This interview was conducted by Brenda Estela Xum Palacios, a graduate student in Latin American Studies whose research focuses upon indigenous pedagogy/educational reform and the history of the Guatemalan Civil War.
11 Interview with Matt Samson, 2014 April 02
Listen
Interview conducted in English. Matt Samson, a professor in Anthropology at Davidson College, discusses his experiences living and working in Guatemala between 1980-2000, during the height of the Guatemalan Civil War and after the signing of the Peace Accords. In this interview, Samson begins by explaining his background studying and working in Guatemala, conducting academic research in Guatemala during the Civil War, and what he sees for the future of Guatemala. Samson describes his research in indigenous movements and communities and how the culture of Guatemala has shifted during the civil war and in its aftermath. This interview was conducted by Brenda Estela Xum Palacios, a graduate student in Latin American Studies whose research focuses upon indigenous pedagogy/educational reform, and the history of the Guatemalan Civil War.
04 Interview with Deborah Shaffer, 2014 February 21
Listen
Interview conducted in English. Deborah Shaffer, independent filmmaker, discusses her history as a documentarian and discusses the development of three of her films related to the Latin American revolutionary period: Witness to War (El Salvador), Fire from the Mountain (Nicaragua), and Dance of Hope (Chile). Shaffer describes her introduction to documentary filmmaking; the relationships she established with Dr. Charles Clements, an American physician who provided medical aid in El Salvador, and Omar Cabezas, a former Sandinista commander and government minister, as a result of the production of Witness to War and Fire from the Mountain; as well as her experiences travelling in Nicaragua and Chile while filming. This interview was conducted by Kathryn Darnall, a graduate student in Information Studies and Latin American Studies, whose research focuses on archival issues and documentation relating to human rights.
09 Interview with Norma Stoltz Chinchilla, 2014 February 22
Listen
Interview conducted in English. Norma Stoltz Chinchilla, professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at California State University Long Beach, chronicles her experiences with Central American solidarity movements, her initial experiences in Central America, specifically Guatemala, and how her participation in the solidarity movement affected her both academically and personally. In this interview, Chinchilla outlines her history of living and working in Guatemala, how she initially developed an interest in Central America, and her participation with Central American migrant communities in Los Angeles. This interview was conducted by Regina Mills, a graduate student in English, whose research focuses upon Central American immigrant literature and feminism in Latin America.
10 Interview with Douglass Sullivan-Gonzalez, 2014 February 22
[2 files]
This interview has access restrictions and is not available online. It may be accessed onsite at the Benson Latin American Collection.
Interview conducted in English. Douglass Sullivan-González, associate professor of History at the University of Mississippi, chronicles his experiences living and working in Central America, primarily Nicaragua, during the 1970s and 1980s. In Part 1, Sullivan-González details his initial research and interest in Central America as an undergraduate and graduate student, and his work with liberation theologists and Baptist missionaries in Nicaragua during the beginnings of the Sandinista Government. Sullivan-González discusses his decision to return to school for a PhD in Latin American Studies and how his education further directed his solidarity and activism within Central America. In Part 2, Sullivan-González speaks about his experiences related to the Sandinista movement in Nicaragua, the changes he witnessed in the Sandinista government and his ideas about "revolutionary religious faith." This interview was conducted by Blake Scott, a graduate student in History, whose research focuses upon US citizens living and working in Panama and the greater Caribbean, and the tourism industry in those regions.
07 Interview with Dora Maria Tellez, 2014 February 21
Listen
Interview conducted in Spanish. Dora María Téllez, former Frente Sandinista de Liberación Nacional (FSLN) commander and Minister of Health (1979-1990) in Nicaragua, discusses her childhood, education, and role in the Sandinista movement of the 1970s and 1980s. In this interview, Téllez begins with her childhood in Matagalpa, Nicaragua, attending medical school and living in León during the Somoza regime, and then details her involvement in the Sandinista Revolution and the Sandinista government in the 1980s. This interview was conducted by Claudia Rueda, a graduate student in History, whose research focuses upon the Cold War in Central America and student protests in Nicaragua from 1937-1979.
03 Interview with George Vickers, 2014 February 20
Listen to Part 1
Listen to Part 2
Interview conducted in English. George Vickers, International Operations Director for the Open Society Institute, discusses his experiences living and working in Central America, primarily in Nicaragua. In Part 1, Vickers offers background on his interest in civil rights issues and concerns over US interventionism in Central America that led to his work in El Salvador and Nicaragua, and how he developed a personal connection to Central America through his work. In Part 2, Vickers describes the profound impact working in Central America had on him as both a person and an academic. This interview was conducted by Gabriel Pérez, a graduate student in Journalism, whose research focuses on photojournalism and issues of identity and cultural heritage within Latin America.

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