The Benson Latin American Collection

Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports, 1970-1977



Descriptive Summary

Creator Mexico. Dirección Federal de Seguridad
Title Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports
Dates: 1970-1977
Abstract Photocopies of daily reports or briefings provided by the Dirección Federal de Seguridad to the Secretary of Education, Victor Bravo Ahuja, related to student, staff, and faculty organizational and policital activities during the period of 1970 to 1977.
Accession No. 2007-06
OCLC Record No. 176648240
Extent 25.8 linear feet
Language Spanish
Repository Benson Latin American Collection, The University of Texas at Austin

Historical Note

La guerra sucia (dirty war) in Mexico was a period of military and political upheaval that lasted from the late 1960s to the early 1980s. One of the seminal events during this time was the Tlatelolco Massacre. On the night of 2 October 1968 the Mexican army confronted student protesters in La Plaza de las Tres Culturas in Tlatelolco, Mexico City, killing and wounding hundreds. Eye witnesses blamed President Gustavo Díaz Ordaz’s security forces for the violence, while the government pointed toward Communist agitators and other extremists among the protesters. Luís Echeverría Álvarez was Díaz Ordaz’s minister of the interior at the time, and was seen by many as being primarily responsible for the Tlatelolco Massacre.

In 1970 Echeverría won the Mexican presidency as the Partido Revolucionario Institucional (PRI) candidate. While he liberalized many of Mexico’s economic and international policies—he increased public spending and developed closer ties with the socialist governments of Chile and Cuba—Echeverría remained adamant not to allow any left-leaning groups to develop within Mexico. His administration's anti-left program was demonstrated on 10 June 1971 when a right wing paramilitary group known as Los Halcones was allowed to openly attack a group of peaceful marchers in Mexico City. The incident became known as la matanza del Jueves de Corpus or El Halconazo. Although Echeverría claimed his innocence, it was later determined that many of the Halcones were on the payroll of the government. Not wanting another Tlatelolco incident during his administration, Echeverría was resolute that university student, staff, and faculty groups be monitored and controlled during his term in office. It fell to Capitán Luis de la Barreda Moreno and his Dirección Federal de Seguridad agents to infiltrate and gather intelligence on the various leftist organizations.

The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) was a government security agency created in 1947 during the presidency of Miguel Alemán. Organizationally part of the Secretaria de Gobernación, the DFS was assigned the duty of preserving the internal stability of Mexico against all forms subversion and terrorist threats. The DFS traced its immediate origins as a government agency to the Departamento de Investigación Política y Social (1942). Its lineage also included the Oficina de Información Política (1938) and the Departamento Confidencial (1929). However, its ultimate foundation could be found in President Venustiano Carranza’s Sección Primera, which was formed during the Revolution in 1918 and assigned the task of performing espionage on the enemy camp. In 1985 the DFS closed its doors and was replaced by the Dirección General de Investigación y Seguridad Nacional.

Works Referenced:

Aguayo, Sergio. La charola: una historia de los servicios de intelligencia en México. México, D.F.: Grijalbo; Hoja Editorial; Hechos Confiables, 2001.

Carpenter, Victoria. 2005. Tlatelolco 1968 in Contemporary Mexican Literature Introduction. Bulletin of Latin American Research 24 (4), 476–480.

Mabry, Donald J. The Mexican University and the State: Students Conflicts, 1910 - 1971. College Staton: Texas A&M University Press, 1982.

Schmidt, Samuel. The Deterioration of the Mexican Presidency: The Years of Luis Echeverría. Trans. and ed. Dan A. Cothran. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Valdez, Jesús Vargas. "Student Movement of 1968." Encyclopedia of Mexico: History, Society & Culture. Ed. by Michael S. Werner. 2 vols. Chicago: Fitzroy Dearborn, 1997.

Vázquez-Gómez, Juana. Dictionary of Mexican Rulers, 1325-1997. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1997


Scope and Contents Note

The daily reports or briefings of the Mexican Dirección Federal de Seguridad provide detailed and organized record of the activities of student, staff, and faculty groups in Mexico from 1970 through 1977. The reports are arranged in chronological order, though some gaps in coverage do exist. Specific missing dates or gaps in the collection are noted in the folder inventory below.

Each daily report is organized into two parts. The first focuses on the Federal District, especially the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM). The second section covers the states of Mexico, which are further subdivided by group or school. Depending on the level of activity throughout the country, daily coverage varies from two or three states to more than a dozen, and reports vary from a few pages to forty pages per day. Each daily report provides a detailed summary or description of each meeting, activity, or incident observed. The names of leaders, active participants, and any recognized persons are listed. Any handouts or newsletters are quoted or are copied and attached to each report.

A wide range of individual groups and activities were monitored. Groups found in these reports include both local and national organizations. Found herein are reports on communist and socialist organizations such as the Partido Comunista Mexicano and the Movimiento Revolucionario del Magisterio, as well as labor unions like Sindicato Nacional de Trabajadores de la Educación.

Given the breadth of coverage, briefings on group activities run from the mundane—campus elections, having access to equipment, demands for higher pay, and requests for more scholarships or automatic admission to UNAM for secondary school graduates—to the more serious and extreme, such as those involving arrests, abductions, and killings, like the protests against the governor of Puebla or students joining campesinos protesting expulsion in Hidalgo.

In summary, this collection of reports provides a detailed and organized record of the activities of a large and varied group of organizations over a six year period. It documents their concerns, complaints and protests to local and federal educational administrators and describes their expression of opposition to govermental actions and policies. Finally, it demonstrates the scope of federal intelligence relating to these groups, their leaders and their plans.


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Unrestricted.

Use Restrictions

Standard copyright restrictions apply.


Index Terms

The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports are classified under the following Subject Headings:
Mexico. Dirección Federal de Seguridad -- History -- Sources
Student movements -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century
College students -- Mexico -- Political activity -- History -- 20th century
Intelligence service -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century
Higher education and state -- Mexico -- History -- 20th century

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Cite as: Dirección Federal de Seguridad (Mexico) Security Reports, Nettie Lee Benson Latin American Collection, University of Texas Libraries, the University of Texas at Austin.


Box and Folder Inventory

 

1970

box folder
1 1-2 December 9 - 31
Briefings are missing for the following dates: December 24,26,31
(Hereafter, only the month and date of any missing reports will be listed.)



 

1971

box folder
1 3-7 January 1 - February 5
January 3,14,17,18,25,28,30
box folder
2 1-8 February 6 - March 15
February 15; March 6
box folder
3 1-7 March 16 - April 21
March 26,27; April 3,7,8,9,10,11
box folder
4 1-8 April 22 - May 31
April 25,28,29,30; May 6,14,22,24,25,27
box folder
5 1-7 June 1 - July 31
June 6,9-30
box folder
6 1-8 August 1 - September 15
August 3,14,20; September 11,15
box folder
7 1-7 September 16 - October 10
box folder
8 1-7 October 11 - November 8
October 16,30; November 1
box folder
9 1-6 November 9 - December 31
November 16-30; December 11,24,25,27



 

1972

box folder
9 7 January 1 - 10
January 1,2,8
box folder
10 1-6 January 11 - February 24
January 22,29; February 1-14
box folder
11 1-6 February 25 - March 15
March 8,11
box folder
12 1-7 March 16 - April 12
March 24,29
box folder
13 1-7 April 13 - May 7
April 29; May 3
box folder
14 1-7 May 8 - June 8
box folder
15 1-7 June 9 - July 12
June 23, 24; July 7,9,10
box folder
16 1-7 July 13 - August 31
July 21,30; August 4,16,18,19,27
box folder
17 1-7 September 1 - September 30
September 1,9,30
box folder
18 1-7 October 1 - October 22
October 7
box folder
19 1-7 October 23 - November 15
November 4,5
box folder
20 1-7 November 16 - December 7
November 19
box folder
21 1-3 December 8 - December 31
December 21,23,24,25,27,28,31



 

1973

box folder
21 4-8 January 1 - January 25
January 1,4
box folder
22 1-7 January 26 - February 28
January 26; February 5,10,14
box folder
23 1-7 March 1 - March 31
March 25
box folder
24 1-6 April 1 - April 30
April 20,21
box folder
25 1-7 May 1 - May 21
May 10,21
box folder
26 1-7 May 22 - June 22
June 3,7
box folder
27 1-8 June 23 - July 25
July 5,21
box folder
28 1-9 Jul 26 - August 31
August 10,21,25
box folder
29 1-8 September 1 - October 19
box folder
30 1-7 October 20 - December 16
December 15, 16
box folder
31 1 December 17 - December 31
December 22,24,25,26



 

1974

box folder
31 2-7 January 1 - January 31
January 3,5
box folder
32 1-8 February 1 - March 10
February 9,23; March 2
box folder
33 1-6 March 11 - April 15
March 30; April 11, 13
box folder
34 1-7 April 16 - May 10
April 20
box folder
35 1-7 May 11 - June 6
May 25,27; June 1
box folder
36 1-8 June 7 - July 4
June 15,22,29
box folder
37 1-7 July 5 - August 10
July 20; August 2
box folder
38 1-6 August 11 - September 15
August 17,18
box folder
39 1-7 September 16 - October 14
box folder
40 1-7 October 15 - December 6
October 18-31; November 8, 16-30
box folder
41 1-3 December 7 - December 31
December 21,22,23,25,27,29,30,31



 

1975

box folder
41 4-7 January 1 - January 26
January 1,5
box folder
42 1-7 January 27 - February 28
box folder
43 1-7 March 1 - March 24
March 1
box folder
44 1-8 March 25 - April 22
March 29, April 12
box folder
45 1-8 April 23 - May 21
April 27; May 4,8,10
box folder
46 1-7 May 22 - June 19
June 10,13
box folder
47 1-8 June 20 - July 20
July 20
box folder
48 1-7 July 21 - September 11
August 3,9,10,13,14,21,23,30; September 5
box folder
49 1-8 September 12 - October 15
September 15,26; October 2,12
box folder
50 1-7 October 16 - November 10
October 31
box folder
51 1-7 November 11 - November 30
November 16,17,18
box folder
52 1-3 December 1 - December 31
December 5,19,20,23,25,27,28,30,31



 

1976

box folder
52 4-7 January 1 - January 26
January 1,2,3,17
box folder
53 1-7 January 27 - February 23
February 21
box folder
54 1-8 February 24 - March 21
March 13
box folder
55 1-7 March 22 - April 23
April 9,14
box folder
56 1-7 April 24 - May 27
box folder
57 1-8 May 28 - June 28
June 5,12,26
box folder
58 1-7 June 29 - August 7
July 5,7,8,9,11,12,14
box folder
59 1-7 August 8 - September 26
September 7,11,12
box folder
60 1-7 September 27 - October 28
October 9,22,23,24
box folder
61 1-6 October 29 - November 20
November 21, 1976 - May 9, 1977



 

1977

box folder
61 7-8 May 10 - May 13
May 14 - June 9
box folder
62 1-5 June 10 - Jun 21
June 11,12