Texas Archival Resources Online

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Biographical Sketch

Scope and Contents

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Sources

Description of Series

Series I. Scripts and Actors Sides, 1866-1883

Series II. Instrumental and Vocal Parts, nd

Series III. Song Lyrics, ca. 1880s

Series IV. Financial Journals, 1882-1894

Series V. Programs, 1890-1894

Series VI. Scrapbooks, 1885-1908

Series VII. Sheet Music, 1878-1897

Series VIII. Miscellaneous, 1861-1902

University of Texas, Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center

Tony Pastor:

An Inventory of His Collection at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Pastor, Tony, 1837-1908
Title: Tony Pastor Collection
Dates: 1861-1908 (bulk 1866-1890)
Abstract: Scripts and actors' sides make up the bulk of this collection, which documents much of Pastor's career as a theater manager and, to a lesser extent, as a performer.
RLIN Record ID: TXRC99-A26
Extent: 25 document boxes, 12 oversize boxes, 2 oversize folders (16.6 linear feet)
Language English.
Repository: Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center, University of Texas at Austin

Biographical Sketch

"The Father of Vaudeville," Antonio Pastor was born in Brooklyn in 1837 and spent his life as an entertainer and theater manager. He made his first public appearance at the age of six singing at a temperance meeting. As a child he produced his own plays at home, and his first professional engagement was in 1846 at P. T. Barnum's Museum. The following year he began performing as a blackface minstrel with the Raymond and Waring Menagerie and then joined Welch, Delevan and Nathan's Circus as a clown, staying with the troupe until 1853. He was ringmaster at age fifteen and subsequently he joined Mabie's circus as a singing clown.

Pastor made his debut in variety in 1860 as a comic singer. He achieved acclaim when he appeared at the American Concert Hall at 444 Broadway (known as the "444") in April 1861, just as the Civil War was breaking out, and closed his act with "The Star Spangled Banner." Subsequently he became famous for his topical songs, the subjects of which were often derived from newspaper articles. In 1865 Pastor entered management when he opened Tony Pastor's Opera House in partnership with the minstrel show performer Sam Sharpley. The same year he formed Tony Pastor's Variety Show, the first of his traveling minstrel troupes which would tour the United States throughout the 1890s. In 1866 Sharpley quit the partnership but Pastor continued to manage the Opera House, appearing at every performance, until 1875 when he took over the Metropolitan Theatre at 585 Broadway. It was here that he worked to perfect the form of entertainment known as legitimate vaudeville, variety which was suitable for women and children as well as the traditional male audience.

In 1881 Pastor leased the Germania Theatre and renamed it Tony Pastor's New Fourteenth Street Theatre, announcing that it would be "catering to the ladies, and presenting for the amusement of the cultivated and aesthetic Pure Music and Comedy, Burlesque, and Farce." Tony Pastor's, as it came to be known, played variety shows until 1908. It was the most popular New York theatre of the 1880s, paving the way for the theatrical ventures of the impresarios B. F. Keith and Oscar Hammerstein, but by the first years of the twentieth century theatergoers had gone northward to venues in Times Square. In 1908 the Fourteenth Street Theatre became a motion picture theater; the same year, Pastor decided not to renew the lease. He died that year in Elmhurst, Long Island, survived by his wife Josephine Foley. They had no children.

Pastor's legacy extended beyond "cleaning up" variety entertainment. He recognized the talents of many performers who would later become famous, including Weber and Fields, Lillian Russell, Maggie Cline, and Nat C. Goodwin. It was noted at his death that his estate was valued at a mere $72,500 because he gave away more than $1 million in his lifetime. After he entered theater management, the multitalented Pastor continued to perform on the stage; the resulting rapport with his players doubtless contributed to the success of his shows. Though in many respects he could be considered a nineteenth century figure unable to adjust to twentieth century business, his astute widening of the theater audience to include women and children allowed future theater entrepreneurs to reap great profits.

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Scope and Contents

Scripts and actors' sides make up the bulk of the Tony Pastor Collection which documents much of Pastor's career as a theater manager and, to a lesser extent, as a performer, 1861-1908 (bulk 1866-1890). The collection is organized into eight series: I. Scripts and Actors' Sides, 1866-1883 (18.5 boxes), II. Instrumental and Vocal Parts, nd (3.5 boxes), III. Song Lyrics, ca. 1880s (2.5 boxes), IV. Financial Journals, 1882-1894 (1.5 boxes), V. Programs, 1890-1894 (2 boxes, 1 oversize folder), VI. Scrapbooks, 1885-1908 (6.5 boxes, 1 oversize folder), VII. Sheet Music, 1878-1897 (0.5 box), and VIII. Miscellaneous, 1861-1902 (2 boxes). Within each series, material is arranged alphabetically by title of work or chronologically where appropriate.

Series I contains autograph scripts and actors' sides (a script with the dialogue for one actor) for more than one hundred sketches, burlesques, and pantomimes dating from Pastor's earliest days as the manager of Tony Pastor's Opera House in 1866 on up to his heyday at the Fourteenth Street Theatre in the 1880s. The range of topics is narrow, with rags to riches stories and abductions being common. Many scripts include African-American, Irish, and German characters. Almost every item in the series contains the notation "Property of Tony Pastor," suggesting that Pastor commissioned or bought many of the works for exclusive use in his shows. Many of the unsigned sketches may have been written by Pastor himself. Identified authors include John F. Poole, Charles F. Seabert, James Coleman Glynn, and J. C. Stewart. Commonly, the names of the actors are noted in the dramatis personae or on the actor's sides. The occasional clipping or playbill affixed or tipped into the scripts provides further evidence that the work was actually performed. In addition to the actors' lines, the scripts may also include stage managers' notations, an indication of when music was to be played (including song lyrics), a property list, or a synopsis. Many scripts are written in dialect, and many, but not all, instances of dialect are indicated in the following Folder List. Researchers will note that idiosyncratic spellings in the titles of scripts resulted from transcription from the original.

Many of the sketches that were performed in Tony Pastor's theaters included songs, overtures, and finales, and Pastor himself sang his topical songs regularly. The Instrumental and Vocal Parts Series contains autograph instrumental and vocal parts for six sketches and over two hundred songs. Some of the songs may have been interpolated into sketches, while others, like the topical songs, were performed as a single "turn" on a vaudeville bill. Like the scripts, the majority of the parts bear Pastor's name on the title page, possibly indicating authorship but more likely pointing to proprietary performance rights. Much of the music contains performance annotations. Parts for Sketches (Subseries A) precede parts for Songs (Subseries B).

Supplementing the scripts and music parts, the Song Lyrics Series comprises autograph, typed, and printed lyrics for about sixty songs, most from later in Pastor's career. Parodies of popular songs are common. A scrapbook, ca. 1889, contains lyrics for about forty-five songs written by Tony Pastor, Charles Osborne, Felix McGlennon, and others. They are frequently annotated by Pastor. The series also contains two boxes of printed lyrics in the form of song sheets that were meant to be sold to theater patrons.

The Financial Journals Series is divided into Subseries A. Touring Companies, 1882-1887, and Subseries B. Fourteenth Street Theatre, 1886-1894, arranged chronologically within the subseries. The season for Pastor's traveling troupe ran from April to October and included stops in small towns and large metropolitan areas in the American Northeast and Midwest. The journals contain detailed daily entries on receipts and the amount spent on advertising, properties, salaries, carriages, and the like. Also given is non-financial information such as the name of the hall, the agent, the "opposition" (competing performances), and the weather. Frequently the journal keeper commented on the success of the show; for example, in 1882 it was written of Dubuque, Iowa, "Town no good" and "Price 1 00 is too high." In contrast to the rich detail of the touring journals, the journals for the Fourteenth Street Theatre contain weekly summaries of receipts and expenses. At the back of these journals are separate sections for performers' salaries and advertising costs.

The Programs Series comprises over one hundred weekly programs for the Fourteenth Street Theatre, 1890-1894, and two copies of an undated playbill.

The Scrapbooks Series, 1885-1908, contains publicity materials: advertisements for upcoming shows, reviews, and promotional articles about Pastor or the acts appearing at his theater. The series is subdivided into two subseries, Touring Companies and Fourteenth Street Theatre. In two of the New York scrapbooks, the clippings are organized by newspaper. A special anniversary scrapbook contains clippings regarding Pastor's twenty-fifth anniversary in theater in March 1890. Clippings were taken from the New York Recorder, New York Herald, New York Journal, World, New York Daily Tribune, Mail and Express, New York Press, Telegram, New York Clipper, Telegraph, New York Daily News, Sun, New York Dramatic Mirror, New York Dramatic News, and other newspapers.

Series VII contains sheet music for music hall songs published between 1878 and 1897. Much of the sheet music was given to Pastor as a complimentary copy by the lyricist, composer, or singer who popularized the song; hence, nearly half of the songs bear an inscription by variety performer Lillie Western. The songs were written by E. Jonghmans, Frederick Bowyer, Harry Adams, T. S. Lonsdale, Felix McGlennon, Harry Randall, Joseph Tabrar, and others. The series is arranged by song title; dates in brackets in the folder list indicate date of inscription, not publication.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a managers' report book with typed evaluations of vaudeville acts that appeared in 1902 in New York, the Midwest, and Washington, D.C. The often candid appraisals were written by theater managers judging the success of their own acts. The series also contains two notebooks, one from 1861 with a partial script in Pastor's hand, and the other containing undated lyrics for speaker and chorus in another hand.

For a fuller description of the collection, see:

Kattwinkel, Susan. "Tony Pastor's Vaudeville: Serving the New York Community."Library Chronicle of the University of Texas at Austin 25, no. 3 (1995): 50-75.

For an analysis of selected scripts in the collection, see also:

Kattwinkel, Susan. Tony Pastor Presents: Afterpieces from the Vaudeville State. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1998.

Information regarding the scripts in Series I, including plot synopses, is available in an earlier finding aid in the Reading Room.

Abbreviations in the Folder List


  • b=box
  • ff=flat file
  • ob=oversize box

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Restrictions

Access

Open for research, except for the scrapbooks in boxes 35 and 36 which are not available due to their fragile condition.

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Index Terms

Correspondence
Bowyer, Frederick
Jonghmans, E.
McGlennon, Felix
Osborne, Charles, fl. 1885-1900
Poole, John F., 1835-1893
Subjects
Tony Pastor's New Fourteenth Street Theartre
Music-halls--New York (N.Y.)--1866-1890
Vaudeville--New York (N.Y.)--1866-1890
Traveling Theatre--United States--1866-1890
New York--Social life and customs
Document Types
Financial records
Programs
Scores
Scrapbooks
Scripts
Sheet music
Songs

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Related Material

Elsewhere in the Ransom Center are photographs, articles, programs, songs, posters, correspondence, and other materials relating to Tony Pastor, which can be found in the Variety Performers Collection. Researchers may also wish to consult playbill and scrapbook holdings in the Performing Arts Collection. Other Pastor papers are located at the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts Collection.

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Administrative Information

Acquisition

Purchase, 1984

Processed by

Helen Baer, 1999

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Sources

"Antonio Pastor" in Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1958-1964.

Slide, Anthony. "Tony Pastor" in The Encyclopedia of Vaudeville. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1994.

Zellers, Parker. Tony Pastor: Dean of the Vaudeville Stage. Ypsilanti, Mich.: Eastern Michigan University Press, 1971.

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Tony Pastor Collection--Folder List

 

Series I. Scripts and Actors Sides, 1866-1883

Box-Folder
b1.1 15, or the Great Puzzle, by Elliott Barnes. Script, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b1.2 Actors by Daylight, 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b1.3 After the War, 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b1.4 Americans in Turkey, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b1.5 Brigand Chief, script and 7 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b1.6 Broadway and the Bowery, 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b1.7 Bunker Hill, or the First Shot for Freedom, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b2.1 Chip Girl of the Dry Dock, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b2.2 City Messenger, or Ups and Downs of Life in New York: A Local Drama in One Act, by John F. Poole. Script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b2.3 Clown and the Ghost, script
Box-Folder
b2.4 The Consitution, script and 8 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b2.5 The Cooper, by Foster and Denier. Script
Box-Folder
b2.6 Cormac of the Cave, script and 9 actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b2.7 The Counterfeiters of Hoboken, or the Murderer's Den, by Charles F. Seabert, Script and actors' sides
Box-Folder
b3.1-2 Dan Donnelly, Champion of Ireland, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b3.3 The Demon's Revel, script and 4 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b3.4 The Devil's Brother, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b3.5 Don't Go Molly Darling, an Irish Sketch, by Frank Dumont. Script, 1872
(2 copies)
Box-Folder
b3.6 Drunkard's Doom, script and 6 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b3.7 Dutchman in London, 9 actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b4.1 Dutchman's Wife, script and 5 actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b4.2 East River Boatman, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b4.3-4 The Eight Hour Strike, 13 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b4.5 Escaped from the House of Refuge, by John F. Poole. Script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b4.6 The Fairy Guardian, or the Patriot of Poland, A Drama in One Act, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b5.1-3 The Fastest Boy in New York, script and 15 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b5.4 The Fatal Marriage, by James Coleman Glynn. Script and synopsis
Box-Folder
b5.5 The Fawn, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b5.6-7 Fistiana, or the Prevailing Mania, script and 15 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b6.1 The Folleys of a Crabed Old Man, or the Woodn Leged Hero and the Clown, by Willis J. Armstrong. Script
Box-Folder
b6.2 The Forest Fiend, or the First Crime and the Last, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b6.3 Formosa, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b6.4 Gambler's Fate, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b6.5 Gamblers of the Mississippi, script and 8 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b6.6 Go West, or the Emigrant Palace Car, by William Carleton. Script and 16 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b7.1 Grandmother Grump, or Harlequin Little Tom Tucker, script and 4 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b7.2 The Happy Family, Farce in One Act, One Scene, by J. C. (John Cerassef) Stewart, script
Box-Folder
b7.3 Hero of Scotland, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b7.4 High Life and Low Life in New York, script and 13 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b7.5 Hills of Kerry, script and 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b7.6 The Idiot of Killarney, or the Fenian's Oath, a Drama in Two Acts, by W. B. Cavanagh. Script, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b8.1 Idiot of the Hudson, 5 actors' sides, some incomplete
Box-Folder
b8.2 Ireland in 1866, or the Dark Hour Before the Dawn, a Drama in One Act, by John F. Poole. Script, [1866?],
and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b8.3 Ireland's Champion, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b8.4 Irish Insurgents, 2 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b8.5 Irishman in Cuba, script and 8 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b8.6 An Irishman in Greece, by John F. Poole. Script, 1867,
and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b9.1 Jack Blunt the Detective, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b9.2 Jack Sheppard, script (incomplete) and 6 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b9.3-4 Joe Kidd, or Fistiana, script, 10 Aug. 1869, 2 copies of actors' sides, and 2 programs, 3 April 1884
Box-Folder
b9.5 Jonathan Wild, a Drama in One Act, original by John F. Poole. Script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b10.1 Kidnapped, or the Stolen Child, by John F. Poole. Script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b10.2 The Lawyer's Clerks of Nassau Street, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b10.3 Life in Ireland, or the Fair of Clogheen, by John F. Poole. Script and 14 actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b10.4 Life on the Prairie, script and 13 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b10.5 Lost at Long Beach, or a Tragedy on the Beach, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b11.1 Lucy Ashton, script and 2 actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b11.2 MacBeth, script, 7 April 1870,
and 13 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b11.3-4 Masaniello, by Tony Pastor. Script and 19 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b11.5 The Match Girl of New York, script, 12 Nov. 1873,
and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b11.6 Mechanics Strike, or the Eight Hour System, script and 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b12.1 Men About Town, script, 12 April 1869,
and 7 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b12.2 Might and Right, or the Days of 76, A National Drama in One Act, by John F. Poole. Script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b12.3 A Miner's Life, or the Poor Man's Home, by Charles F. Seabert. Script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b12.4 Mother Goose, script and actor's side
Box-Folder
b12.5 The Mother Goose Party, or Christmas in New York, by H. S. Sanderson. Script, 12 Dec. 1883, 9 typed and autograph actors' sides, orchestra parts (Violin I and II, bass, b flat clarinet, flute, cornet, trombone, and drums), and sheet music for "Quadrilles or Country Dances, Set to Nursery Rhymes" by John Farmer
Box-Folder
b12.6 Mysteries of Gotham, by John F. Poole. Script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b13.1 New Tour Around the World, script, 14 Dec. 1868,
and 17 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b13.2 New York as It Was, an Original Drama in One Act, by James Colman Glynn. Script
Box-Folder
b13.3 New York Before and After Dark, 14 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b13.4 New York Hackman, script, 22 April 1869,
and 13 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b13.5 New York in 1867, by John F. Poole. Script, [1867?],
and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b13.6 New York Mechanics, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b14.1 New York River Rats, by John F. Poole. Script, 25 March 1866,
and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b14.2 The New York Volunteers, or the Last of Libby Prison, by John F. Poole. Script, 11 Feb. 1867,
and 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b14.3 No Pay, No Cure, by A. J. Leavitt. Script
Box-Folder
b14.4 Noll the Newsboy, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b14.5 Oily Vet, a Comic Operettura in One Act, by George Cooper. Script and actor's side
Box-Folder
b14.6 Our School Girls, or Fun in a Boarding School, script and 8 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b14.7 Pantomime, script and actor's side
Box-Folder
b14.8 The Pie-Rats of Penn Yan, song lyrics for burlesque
Box-Folder
b14.9 Pier 41, or Crime in New York, by Henry Mason. Script, 21 Oct. 1872,
and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b15.1 Riflemen at Vassar, 2 actors' sides with 21 sets of chorus lyrics (10 male, 11 female)
Box-Folder
b15.2-3 Richard the 3rd, by John F. Poole. Script, 26 Oct. 1868,
and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b15.4 Rival Artisans, script
Box-Folder
b15.5 The Robber King, a Drama in One Act, script and 6 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b15.6 Robinson Crusoe, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b15.7-8 Romeo and Juliet, or the Young Lady Who Was Born a Blonde and Never Dyed One, script and 14 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.1 School Girls of the Period, script and 5 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.2 The Segar Girl, script and 3 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.3 The Soldier's Wife, a Drama in One Act, script and 6 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.4 Stage Struck, or the Six Escapes of John Johnson, script, 17 May 1869,
and 8 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.5 The Steerage, or Life on the Briny Deep, an Original Dramatic Composition, script and 12 typed and autograph actors' sides, written in dialect
Box-Folder
b16.6 Ten of Diamonds, or Hearts are Trumps, by Fred J. Shaw. Script, 1871,
and 6 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.7 The Tenth Ward by Day and Night, by Charles F. Seabert. Script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b16.8 The Three Chiefs, by J. C. (John Cerassef) Stewart. Script
Box-Folder
b17.1 The Three Confidence Men, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b17.2 Toil, script
Box-Folder
b17.3 The Trojan War, script
Box-Folder
b17.4 True Blue, or the Heart of a Sailor, script and 10 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b17.5 The Two Off Uns, script and 7 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b17.6 Uncle Antony, actor's side
Box-Folder
b17.7 Uncle Sam's Veterans, or the Soldier's Return, a Drama in One Act, script and 9 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b17.8 Unidentified sketch, script (incomplete)
Box-Folder
b17.9 The Upper and Lower Ten Thousand, a Local Drama in One Act, by John F. Poole. Script, 8 Oct. 1866,
and 12 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b18.1 Voyage Around the World, 15 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b18.2 The White Crook, script and 11 actors' sides
Box-Folder
b18.3 Who Owns the Baby?, by Johnny Wynne, music by Tiny Tim. Script
Box-Folder
b18.4 Yeast Lynne, or the Humours of Lady Isabel, by Thomas R. Hann (performed as Yeast Lynne! or the Gay Young Swell and the Woman Who Fell), Script, 12 June 1876,
and 6 actors' sides

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Series II. Instrumental and Vocal Parts, nd

Subseries A. Sketches
Billee Taylor, comic opera, music by E. Solomon. Parts for:
Box-Folder
b24.1 Flute
Box-Folder
b24.2 Clarinets
Box-Folder
b24.3 Horns I and II
Box-Folder
b24.4 Cornets I and II
Box-Folder
b24.5 Bass trombone
Box-Folder
b24.6 Petit drum (snare drum?)
Box-Folder
b24.7 Violin I
Box-Folder
b24.8 Violin II
Box-Folder
b24.9 Viola
Box-Folder
b24.10 Cello and bass
Box-Folder
b24.11 The Mascot, a burlesque, part for flute
Box-Folder
b24.12 Palace and the Streets, parts for trombone, flute, clarinet, leader (Violin I), Violin II, bass, and cornet
Pie-Rats of Penn-Yann, burlesque by Charles E. Pratt
Box-Folder
b24.13 Piano and vocal score
Box-Folder
b24.14 Vocal parts
Pinafore. Parts for:
Box-Folder
b24.25 Flute
Box-Folder
b25.1 Clarinet
Box-Folder
b25.2 Cornet
Box-Folder
b25.3 Trombone
Box-Folder
b25.4 Small drum (snare drum?)
Box-Folder
b25.5 Violin I
Box-Folder
b25.6 Violin II (plus others)
Box-Folder
b25.7 Bass
Box-Folder
b25.8 Pet of the School (sketch?), comp. by Leo Le Brunn. Part for conductor
Subseries B. Songs
Box-Folder
b18.5 "Tony Pastor's Comic Songs." Bound autograph part for cornet (233 songs) with photocopy of two pages of part book
102 songs. Bound autograph parts for:
Box-Folder
b18.6 Violin I, with photocopy of list of songs in front cover of bound part
Box-Folder
b19.1 Violin II
Box-Folder
b19.2 Drums
Box-Folder
b19.3 Trombone
Box-Folder
b19.4 Flute
Box-Folder
b20.1 10 songs. Autograph parts for flute, clarinet, viola, and bass
Box-Folder
b20.2 9 songs. Autograph parts for flute, cornet, and clarinet

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Series III. Song Lyrics, ca. 1880s

Box-Folder
b20.3 Autograph song lyrics for "Girls"
Box-Folder
b20.4 Autograph song lyrics for "You Have to Have 'Em," 1897?
Box-Folder
b20.5 Autograph and typed lyrics for about 45 songs in scrapbook, ca. 1889
Box-Folder
ob26-27 Broadside with lyrics for 3 of "Toney [sic] Pastor's Comic Songs" (ca. 300 copies). Songs: "Root Hog or Die," "What'll You Take to Drink,"  "The Yankee Quilting Party"

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Series IV. Financial Journals, 1882-1894

Subseries A. Touring Companies, 1882-1887
Box-Folder
b20.6 April-Oct. 1882
Box-Folder
b21.1 April-Oct. 1885
Box-Folder
b21.2 April-Oct. 1886, April-Oct. 1887
Subseries B. Fourteenth Street Theatre, 1886-1894
Box-Folder
b21.3 Oct. 1886-April 1887
Box-Folder
b21.4 Oct. 1889-Oct. 1890
Box-Folder
b21.5 Oct. 1891-Oct. 1892
Box-Folder
b22.1 Oct. 1892-Oct. 1893
Box-Folder
b22.2 Oct. 1893-Oct. 1894

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Series V. Programs, 1890-1894

Box-Folder
ob28.1 Nov.-Dec. 1890
(9 programs)
Box-Folder
ob28.2 Jan.-March 1891
(12)
Box-Folder
ob28.3 Oct.-Dec. 1891
(12)
Box-Folder
ob28.4 Jan.-March 1892
(13)
Box-Folder
ob28.5 Oct.-Dec. 1892
(19)
Box-Folder
ob29.1 Jan.-March 1893
(17)
Box-Folder
ob29.2 April-June 1893
(13)
Box-Folder
ob29.3 July-Sept. 1893
(9)
Box-Folder
ob29.4 Sept. 25 [1893], Oct. 9 [1893?], Dec. 24, 1893
Box-Folder
ob29.5 Nov.-Dec. [1894?]
(9)
Box-Folder
ff1 Playbill, [1883]

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Series VI. Scrapbooks, 1885-1908

Subseries A. Touring Companies, 1885-1893
Box-Folder
b22.3 April-Oct. 1885
Box-Folder
b22.4 Preservation photocopy
Box-Folder
b22.5 Aug. 1890-Oct. 1893
Box-Folder
b23.1 Preservation photocopy
Subseries B. Fourteenth Street Theatre, 1890-1908
Box-Folder
ob30 Anniversary scrapbook, March 1890
Box-Folder
ob31 Jan. 1892-Aug. 1893
Box-Folder
ob32 May-Dec. 1894
Box-Folder
ob33; ff2 Oct.-Nov. 1895
Box-Folder
ob34 Feb. 1896-March 1898 [*fragile, do not circulate]
Box-Folder
ob35 March 1898-May 1900 [*fragile, do not circulate]
Box-Folder
ob29.6, 36 Jan. 1903-Sept. 1905

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Series VII. Sheet Music, 1878-1897

Box-Folder
b25.9 "Actions Speak Louder than Words," George Horncastle and Felix McGlennon, 1891
Box-Folder
b25.10 "All Bad! Very Very Bad," Joseph Tabrar. 2 copies, [1887], [1889]
Box-Folder
b25.11 "Arthur and Martha," Arthur Lloyd
Box-Folder
b25.12 "Baa! Baa! Baa!, or The Lawyer and the Sheep Stealer," Walter Greenaway and Vincent Davies, [1887?]
Box-Folder
b25.13 "By-and-Bye," Harry Adams and E. Jonghmans
Box-Folder
b25.14 "Dancing round the Apple Tree," Harry Adams and E. Jonghmans, [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.15 "The Dotlet on the 'i'," Sydney Rosenfeld (arr. by Edmund Foreman from Johann Strauss' "Methusalem"), [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.16 "Exhibition Lodgers," Frederick Bowyer (arr. by John Baker)
Box-Folder
b25.17 "Get Away, Johnnie," Wilton Jones and Alfred Lee
Box-Folder
b25.18 "The Ghost of Benjamin Binns," Harry Dacre, [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.19 "Goodbye! Goodbye!! Goodbye!!!," Joseph Tabrar, [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.20 "He Wore a Worried Look," J. B. Dickson and Harry Randall, 1893
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b25.21 "Hi Cockalorum," John Stamford (arr. by William Sim), 1878
Box-Folder
b25.22 "Hundreds and Thousands," Joseph Tabrar
Box-Folder
b25.23 "I Can't Get at It," Herbert Cole and Harry Randall
Box-Folder
b25.24 "I Don't Like London," T. S. Lonsdale and W. G. Eaton
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b25.25 "I Just Stood So," Joseph S. Long and Kate Royle, [1887]
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b25.26 "I've Jointed 'Em, or Yea, Yea, Yea," T. S. Lonsdale and E. Jonghmans, [1882]
Box-Folder
b25.27 "The Keepsakes in the Old Cupboard Drawer," Charles Warren, 1890
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b25.28 "Later On," Charles Osborne (arr. by Warwick Williams), [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.29 "Leaning on the Garden Gate," Frank B. Converse, 1887
Box-Folder
b25.30 "Little Tommy Topweight," Frederick Bowyer (arr. by John Baker), [1887]
Box-Folder
b25.31 "Money," C. A. Page, [1887]
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b25.32 "My Katty Kiss'em," Alfred Thompson and Arthur Cecil
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b25.33 "Of Course," J. H. Rohdé, 1891
Box-Folder
b25.34 "Oh, Love, Beautiful Love," Harry Adams and E. Jonghmans
Box-Folder
b25.35 "Oh! My Tooth," Harry Randall
Box-Folder
b25.36 "On Union Square," Edward Harrigan and Dave Braham, 1884
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b25.37 "Over and over Again," Charles Cornell and George Le Brunn
Box-Folder
b25.38 "Ring That Chestnut Bell," N. Straight, 1886
Box-Folder
b25.39 "Run for the Doctor," G. W. Hunt (arr. by William Sim), 1878
Box-Folder
b25.40 "Sister Mary Walked like That," G. Levaine and A. Massagé
Box-Folder
b25.41 "So It Was," Geo. Horncastle and John Cooke, Jr.
Box-Folder
b25.42 "Some Girls Do and Some Girls Don't," T. S. Lonsdale and W. G. Eaton
Box-Folder
b25.43 "The Sun Shines Bright at Last," J. W. Dunn
Box-Folder
b25.44 "Take Her Little Hand in Yours, or The Art of Love," Felix McGlennon (arr. by Andrew Byrne), 1894
Box-Folder
b25.45 "That Is Love," Felix McGlennon (arr. by Connolly), 1889
Box-Folder
b25.46 "They're All Very Fine and Large," Frederick Bowyer (arr. by John Baker). 2 copies, [1887], nd
Box-Folder
b25.47 "The Three Fisherman," Geo. Ware (arr. by Victor Scott)
Box-Folder
b25.48 "Tiddy Fol Lol," Tom Brown and Fred. Bullen
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b25.49 "Wait till the Bus Rolls By," Edwin French, [1885]
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b25.50 "We Won't Go Home 'till Morning," George Wall and E. Jonghmans, [1883]
Box-Folder
b25.51 "When the Tart Is Young," Frederick Bowyer and John S. Baker
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b25.52 "Wilhemina Wimple," E. V. Page and Vincent Davies
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b25.53 "Wot cher!, or Knock'd 'Em in the Old Kent Road," Albert Chevalier and Chas. Ingle
Box-Folder
b25.54 "You Have to Have 'Em," Charles Osborne (arr. by Henry E. Pether), 1897

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Series VIII. Miscellaneous, 1861-1902

Box-Folder
b23.2 Leaves of disbound notebook containing title page for sketch "Ridi Ridittis Ridens,"1861, script for "Love Never Sleeps," and possibly related song lyrics
Box-Folder
b23.3 Preservation photocopy
Box-Folder
ob37 Managers' report book, Jan.-May 1902
Box-Folder
b23.4 Leaves of disbound notebook with autograph song lyrics for speaker and chorus. Songs:  "The Farmer's Daughter,"  "Oh My Ki Riddle Ki Roodle-um,"  "Down by the Village Well,"  "Whilst the Sun Is Shining Make Your Hay,"  "The Punch and Judy Man,"   "Crossed in Love,"  "Polly Loves Her Sailor"
Box-Folder
b23.5 Preservation photocopy

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