Texas Archival Resources Online

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Historical Note

Scope and Contents

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Inventory

University of Texas, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

A Guide to the New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company Records



Descriptive Summary

Creator: New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company
Title: New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company Records
Dates: 1879-1905
Abstract: This small collection is comprised of business records of the New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company.
Accession No.: 2013-103
Extent: 3 in.
Language: Materials are written in English.
Repository: Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin

Historical Note

The New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company was planned by Count Joseph Telfener, an Italian engineer and financier, and his father-in-law, Daniel E. Hungerford, a promoter from California, to connect New York City with Mexico City. Texas was chosen as the starting point for this project because of the liberal land grants that the state offered to encourage rail construction.

In a charter signed on October 18, 1880, in Paris, France, and filed in Austin, Texas, on November 17, 1880, Telfener and a group of associates formed a Texas corporation to construct a railroad from Richmond, Texas, south to Brownsville. The road was to begin on the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway at Richmond in Fort Bend County and extend by the most practical route through Fort Bend, Wharton, Jackson, Victoria, Goliad, Bee, Refugio, San Patricio, Nueces, Hidalgo, and Cameron counties and to terminate at Brownsville. Branches were planned from the main line in Jackson County to the headwaters of Lavaca Bay, from the main line in Nueces County to Corpus Christi, and from Brownsville to Brazos de Santiago. The principal business office was in Victoria. The corporation was capitalized at $2 million and planned to issue 20,000 shares of stock valued at $100 each. The company secured the usual Texas land grant of sixteen sections, or 10,240 acres, for each mile of track completed. For the ninety-one miles of track from Rosenberg Junction to Victoria the New York, Texas and Mexican Railway was entitled to about 940,000 acres of land. Actual construction on the project did not get under way until September 1881, when two crews started work at Rosenberg Junction and Victoria simultaneously, one working west and the other working toward the east.

The tools used in the construction were crude, and some of the methods were primitive. After the first state inspection, the company's application for the land certificates was refused on the grounds that the railroad violated its charter by beginning at Rosenberg Junction rather than Richmond. By 1882 the state had issued certificates for eight million acres of land, more than it had for distribution, and before the charter of Telfener's company could be amended to change its point of origin to Rosenberg Junction the state passed a law on April 22, 1882, which repealed "all laws granting lands or land certificates to any person, firm, corporation, or company for the construction of railroads, canals, and ditches."

In 1882 the railroad completed ninety-one miles of track between Rosenberg and Victoria. The cost of the construction of the railroad was $2,036,150, and the rolling stock cost an additional $156,270. Telfener operated the company until June 1, 1884. On July 23, 1884, the directors annulled the construction contract because Telfener had built only ninety-one of a proposed 350 miles. Control of the road was acquired by J. W. Mackay, a wealthy mining engineer from Nevada and a brother-in-law of Telfener, on January 9, 1885. Mackay sold his new holding to the Southern Pacific Railroad in early September 1885, but the line continued to operate as the New York, Texas and Mexican. In 1899 and 1900 thirty-one miles of track were constructed between Wharton and Van Vleck. Between 1901 and 1903 fifty-four miles of track were laid from Van Vleck to Hawkinsville and from Bay City Junction to Palacios. This gave the company 177 miles of main track. In 1903 the New York, Texas and Mexican reported passenger earnings of $116,000 and freight earnings of $347,000 and owned six locomotives and 395 cars.

On August 8, 1905, the line was merged into the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway Company.

Source: John C. Rayburn, "NEW YORK, TEXAS AND MEXICAN RAILWAY," Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/eqn02), accessed May 16, 2013. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

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Scope and Contents

This small collection is comprised of business records of the New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company. Records include legal and financial papers such as the company’s first mortgage and deed of trust, contracts, proxy appointments, and accounts, while correspondence and company records contain rail specifications and stockholder information.

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

The collection is open for research use.

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Index Terms

Subjects (Organizations)
New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company--Archives.
Subjects
Railroads--Texas.
Railroads--Texas, South--History.
Places
Victoria (Tx.)

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

New York, Texas and Mexican Railway Company Records, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

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Detailed Description of the Papers

 

Inventory

box
3G210 Company records
Inventory of property, 1885
Specifications, undated
Stockholders records and meeting minutes, 1892-1905
Correspondence
Financial papers
First mortgage and deed of trust, 1882
Accounts and estimates, 1881-1883
Legal papers
Contracts, 1872, 1885
Case file, 1895
Proxy appointments

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