University of Texas, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History

A Guide to the Francis Richard Lubbock Papers, 1829-1904



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Lubbock, Francis Richard, 1815-1905
Title: Francis Richard Lubbock Papers
Dates: 1829-1904
Abstract: Correspondence, financial and legal records, printed material, and photographs document Francis Richard Lubbock’s (1815-1905) career as a Texas businessman, politician, and officer in the Confederate Army.
Accession No.: 72-1; 2009-263
Extent: 8 in.
Language: Materials are written in English.
Repository: Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin

Biographical Note

Francis Richard Lubbock (1815-1905) was an influential Texas businessman and politician, who held many public offices during his life, including a term as governor of Texas (161-1863). Born in South Carolina on October 16, 1815, Lubbock moved to Texas in 1836. Beginning in 1837, he ran a general store in Houston, before beginning ranching operations in the 1840s. Lubbock was a staunch Democrat and became active in politics in 1832 during the nullification crisis in South Carolina. In Texas, he continued his political activities, holding a string of public offices such as, Comptroller of the Republic of Texas, clerk of the Harris County court (1847-1851), and lieutenant governor (1857-1859). Lubbock was the Texas delegate to the national Democratic Convention in 1861, where the southern delegates walked out in protest of the platform and candidate, Stephen A. Douglas. Furthermore, Lubbock chaired the southern Democratic Convention, which nominated John C. Breckinridge for president. Winning by only 124 votes, Lubbock was elected governor of Texas in 1861. However, when his term expired in 1863 he entered the Confederate Army as a lieutenant colonel, serving under Major General John Bankhead Magruder, General Nathaniel P. Banks, Brigadier General Thomas Green, and Major General John A. Wharton. While working as aide-de-camp to Jefferson Davis, Lubbock was captured by Union forces and imprisoned for eight months in Fort Delaware. Following his parole, Lubbock was a tax collector in Houston, as well as the state treasurer of Texas (1878-1890). Lubbock died in Austin in 1905.


Scope and Contents

Correspondence, financial and legal records, printed material, and photographs document Francis Richard Lubbock’s (1815-1905) career as a Texas businessman, politician, and officer in the Confederate Army. The correspondence consists of both Lubbock family letters as well as Lubbock’s correspondence with business and political associates. Furthermore, the collection contains two photographs, one of Lubbock and one of Lubbock’s Austin residence.


Restrictions

Access Restrictions

Unrestricted access.


Index Terms

Subjects (Persons)
Lubbock, Francis Richard, 1815-1905–Archives.
Subjects
Politicians.
Governors--Texas.
Places
Texas.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.

Separated Material

Broadsides and printed material separated to Broadside Collection.


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Francis Richard Lubbock Papers, 1829-1904, Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, The University of Texas at Austin.

Processing Information

Revisions were made by Megan Mummey, October 2009.


Detailed Description of the Papers

 

Inventory

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3K131 Correspondence, 1839-1904
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3K132 Financial records, 1835-1900
Legal records, 1829-1862
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3Y75 Photographs
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2.325/V12 Commission, 1862
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Broadsides Collection Notice! Special Military Tax!, Limestone County, Texas, October 24, 1871
Texas Comptroller’s Annual report for 1875
Issue of New Hampshire, “Portsmouth Journal,” containing President Zachary Taylor’s inaugural address, 1846
Seguin, Texas, circular, re: a committee to put an end to “trafficking” in slaves, August 26, 1854
U.S. Army Special Orders no. 216, 5th Military District, appointments to fill vacancies, November 30, 1867
U.S. Army, Special Orders no. 151, 5th Military District, re: registered voters in Texas are eligible to serve as jurors, September 28, 1867