University of Texas Arlington

De Lancey Floyd-Jones Letters:

A Guide



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Floyd-Jones, De Lancey.
Title: De Lancey Floyd-Jones Letters
Inclusive Dates: 1846-1862
Bulk Dates: 1846-1848
Abstract: De Lancey Floyd-Jones of New York was a career officer in the United States Army, rising from the rank of second lieutenant upon graduation from the United States Military Academy in 1846 to the rank of colonel at his retirement in 1879. He served in the Mexican War and the Civil War, earning brevet promotions in both wars for gallantry in combat. During the Mexican War, Floyd-Jones served in the garrison force at Monterrey, participated in the battles of Veracruz and Cerro Gordo and the campaign against Mexico City, and served in the occupation force at Mexico City. During the Civil War, Floyd-Jones participated in many campaigns, including the Peninsular Campaign in Virginia in 1862. This collection is comprised of 40 autograph letters (circa 145 pages), signed, in ink, written by 4th U.S. Infantry 1st Lieutenant De Lancey Floyd-Jones to various correspondents, primarily his sister, mother and father, all of Long Island, New York; plus two manuscript maps of battles in Mexico; and three manuscript Mexican Army decrees (circa 8 pages). This is a rare and significant collection of letters written by an American officer during the Mexican War providing an intimate, highly detailed first-hand account of his experiences and observations. Floyd-Jones writes from varied locations - from aboard troop transport ships, to camps at the mouth of the Rio Grande, to Monterrey, Camargo, Vera Cruz and Mexico City - telling of troop positions, strategic movements, travel conditions, news of dispatches, encampment grounds, reconnoitering parties, battles, casualties, and terms of surrender. The letters also offer pointed comments about superior officers (especially General William Jenkins Worth and General Gideon Pillow); low pay and lack of advancement in the Army; volunteer American troops; domestic politics (including the attitudes of civilians toward military service and war); American policy toward Mexico; and Santa Anna and the Mexican troops. Those letters written to the lieutenant's father, fellow Army officer, Major General Henry Floyd-Jones, are perhaps the most noteworthy including one ten-page letter that provides meticulously detailed descriptions of the battle of Monterrey complete with a two-page manuscript map keyed to his narrative.
Identification: AR491
Extent: 1 box (0.14 linear ft.)
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library

Biographical Note

De Lancey Floyd-Jones was born into a prominent Long Island, New York, family on January 20, 1826. His parents were General Henry Onderdonk Floyd-Jones and Helen Watts (De Lancey) Floyd-Jones. De Lancey Floyd-Jones graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point on July 1, 1846, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the United States Army’s Seventh Infantry. His nickname at West Point was “Davy Jones,” and some of the letters in this collection appear to be signed “Davy.”

Lieutenant Floyd-Jones served in the United States Army during the Mexican War from 1846 to 1848. On his way to join his unit in New Orleans, his ship sailed through a major Atlantic hurricane in September 1846; the first letter in this collection describes that experience. On arriving in Mexico, Floyd-Jones served in the garrison at Monterrey and was promoted to second lieutenant in the Fourth Infantry. He saw combat with the Fourth Infantry in the battles of Veracruz (March 1847) and Cerro Gordo (April 1847), as well as in the campaign in August and September 1847 that resulted in the capture of Mexico City. He received a brevet promotion to first lieutenant on September 8, 1847, for gallant and meritorious conduct during the battle of Molino del Rey. He received a regular promotion to first lieutenant on January 1, 1848. After the fall of Mexico City, Lieutenant Floyd-Jones continued to serve in the Fourth Infantry’s occupation force at Mexico City until United States forces withdrew in the summer of 1848 after Mexican ratification of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

On his return to the United States from Mexico, Lieutenant Floyd-Jones served at Camp Jefferson Davis in East Pascagoula, Mississippi, in 1848, and at Detroit Barracks, Michigan, from 1848 to 1850. From 1850 to 1852, he served as a recruiter, and from 1852 to 1861, he served on frontier duty in Washington, Oregon, and California. He received a promotion to captain in the Fourth Infantry on July 31, 1854. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Captain Floyd-Jones returned east and was promoted to major in the United States Eleventh Infantry, Army of the Potomac, on May 31, 1861. He saw combat at the siege of Yorktown and the battles of Gaines’ Mill, Malvern Hill, Second Bull Run, and Antietam in 1862; and Chancellorsville and Gettysburg in 1863. He received a brevet promotion to lieutenant colonel on July 4, 1862, for gallant and meritorious service during the Peninsular Campaign; and another brevet promotion to colonel on July 2, 1863, for gallant and meritorious service at Gettysburg. He received a promotion to lieutenant colonel in the Nineteenth Infantry in 1863 and served as commander of Fort Independence, Massachusetts, from August to October, 1863, and as commander of the fortifications of Boston Harbor from October 1863 to March 1865.

Following the Civil War and until his retirement from the Army in March 1879, Colonel Floyd-Jones served at Detroit and in Kentucky, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Montana, Idaho Territory, and Indian Territory. He was Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Idaho Territory from June 1869 to November 1870. He retired from the Army as a full Colonel, having been promoted on January 2, 1873.

After his retirement, Colonel Floyd-Jones was elected a member of the Aztec Club of 1847, a military society for veterans of the Mexican War and their descendants. He served as vice president of the club in 1894-1895 and as president in 1895-1896. In 1892, Colonel Floyd-Jones presented the club with a silver centerpiece crafted by Tiffany’s, the Teocali, representing a pyramidal Aztec temple. The centerpiece is still used by the club at its annual meetings.

Colonel Floyd-Jones traveled widely after his retirement and authored a book about some of his travels, Letters from the Far East; Being Impressions of a Tour Around the World by Way of England, India, China, and Japan During 1885-86 (New York: Public Service Publishing Co., 1887). In the late 1890s, Colonel Floyd-Jones donated a library to Massapequa, Long Island, New York. The De Lancey Floyd-Jones Free Library continues to operate.

De Lancey Floyd-Jones died on January 19, 1902, nearly at the age of 76, in New York City.

Sources:


  • Breithaupt, Richard Hoag, Jr. Aztec Club of 1847 / Military Society of the Mexican War / Sesquicentennial History, 1847-1997. Universal City, CA: Walika Publishing Company, 1998.
  • “De Lancey Floyd-Jones Dead.” New York Times. January 20, 1902.
  • “Early Nineteenth Century.” http://www.hpc.ncep.noaa.gov/research/roth/vaerly19hur.htm (accessed June 18, 2011).
  • U.S. Department of Commerce. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Council on Environmental Quality. "Resolution of the October 16, 2001 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration referral to the Council on Environmental Quality of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Army Corps of Engineers’ Manteo (Shallowbag) Bay Project." http://www.publicaffairs.noaa.gov/releases2003/may03/noaa03r126b.html (accessed June 18, 2011).
  • Walter, Kelly. “Historic Places to Visit in and around Massapequa.” massapequaNEWS.com. http://www.massapequanews.com/recreation/historicplaces.html (accessed May 2, 2007).
  • Who Was Who in America. Vol. 1, 1897-1942. Chicago: A.N. Marquis Company, 1942.

Scope and Contents

This collection, in one manuscript box containing six folders, consists primarily of 31 letters written by De Lancey Floyd-Jones during his service in the United States Army in the Mexican War, eight letters written during his service shortly after the Mexican War, and one letter written during his service in the Civil War. Also included are three captured Mexican documents (in Spanish) and one manuscript map showing the relative positions of American and Mexican troops during the fighting at and around Mexico City in August and September 1847.

The recipients of the 39 letters dated from 1846 to 1850 were his father, Major General Henry O. Floyd-Jones; his mother, Helen Floyd-Jones; his sisters, Sarah (“Sis”), Helen (“Nel”), and Cate Floyd-Jones; and his brother, Edward Floyd-Jones (“Ned”). Over 40% of the letters were written to his sister Sarah, with whom he appears to have been especially close. The 1862 letter from Virginia was written to a person named “John” whose last name and exact relationship to De Lancey Floyd-Jones are unknown, but who, based on the closing of the letter, likely was a brother-in-law. Also included is a manuscript map drawn by De Lancey Floyd-Jones showing the relative positions of American and Mexican troops during the fighting at and around Mexico City during August and September, 1847. This map was likely sent to one of his family members as an enclosure to a letter, but since it could not be definitively associated with any particular letter in the collection, it was housed in a separate folder.

Common threads running through the letters during the 1846 to 1850 period include family and social activities and relationships, as well as the unreliability of the mail and banking systems. These letters reflect the concerns and issues one might expect to affect a young man sent far from home in the service of his country for the first time. But more significantly, De Lancey Floyd-Jones’ letters show a young man with keen powers of observation and a knack for communicating what he observed. Floyd-Jones’ letters provide detailed and entertaining descriptions of sailing through a powerful Atlantic hurricane only days after leaving New York on his way to New Orleans to join his unit; the fighting at Monterrey, Veracruz, Cerro Gordo, and Mexico City, including troop positions, strategic movements, travel conditions, news of dispatches, encampment grounds, reconnoitering parties, battles, casualties, and terms of surrender; as well as the land, structures, and people he encountered during his service in Mexico. Those letters written to the lieutenant's father, a fellow Army officer, are perhaps the most noteworthy including the ten-page letter dated November 17, 1846, that provides meticulously detailed descriptions of the battle of Monterrey complete with a two-page manuscript map keyed to his narrative. The letters also offer pointed comments about superior officers (especially General William Jenkins Worth and General Gideon Pillow); low pay and lack of advancement in the Army; volunteer American troops; domestic politics (including the attitudes of civilians toward military service and war); American policy toward Mexico; and Santa Anna and the Mexican troops.


 

Organization

The collection is arranged alphabetically by type of material, and chronologically thereunder.

Restrictions

Access

Open for research.

Literary Rights Statement

Permission to publish, reproduce, distribute, or use by any and all other current or future developed methods or procedures must be obtained in writing from Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library. All rights are reserved and retained regardless of current or future development or laws that may apply to fair use standards.


Index Terms

These materials are indexed under the following headings in the catalog of The University of Texas at Arlington Library. Researchers desiring materials about related topics, persons or places should search the catalog using these headings.
Persons
Floyd-Jones, De Lancey,--1826-1902--Correspondence.
Worth, William Jenkins,--1794-1849.
Pillow, Gideon Johnson,--1806-1878.
Subjects
Cerro Gordo, Battle of, Mexico, 1847.
Hurricanes--Atlantic Coast (U.S.)
Mexican War, 1846-1848--Battlefields--Manuscript maps--1846.
Mexican War, 1846-1848--Battlefields--Manuscript maps--1847.
Mexican War, 1846-1848--Battlefields--Mexico, North.
Mexican War, 1846-1848--Campaigns--Mexico.
Mexican War, 1846-1848--Personal narratives, American.
Mexico City, Battle of, Mexico City, Mexico, 1847.
Monterrey, Battle of, Monterrey, Mexico, 1846.
Places
Mexico City (Mexico)--History--American occupation, 1847-1848.
Alternate Titles
Historical Manuscripts Collection

Related Material

De Lancey Floyd-Jones Letters, 1852-1855 (WA MSS S-346 F6698). Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Yale University.(6 items)

De Lancey Floyd-Jones Letters to his Wife, Jennie, 1852 (WA MSS S-1115 F6698). Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Yale University. (9 items)

Floyd-Jones Family Correspondence, 1848-1878 (BANC MSS C-B 625). Bancroft Library, University of California at Berkeley. (27 letters written by De Lancey Floyd-Jones from 1852-1853 and 1861-1862; finding aid is on Online Archive of California: http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf8h4nb3b5/, accessed June 18, 2011.)

Floyd-Jones Family Papers and Artifacts. De Lancey Floyd-Jones Free Library, Massapequa, NY.

Henry O. and Helen Watts Floyd-Jones Family Papers (NUCMC / RLG Control No.: NYHV93-A1229). Long Island Studies Institute, West Campus Library, Hofstra University, Hempstead NY.

John W. Ames Papers, 1860-1863 (NUCMC/OCLC 49777131). U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, Carlisle, PA. (includes correspondence involving De Lancey Floyd-Jones)


Administrative Information

Provenance

Gift/purchase from Michael Vinson, 2004.

Citation

De Lancey Floyd-Jones Letters, AR491, Box Number, Folder Number, Special Collections, The University of Texas at Arlington Library.

Acquisition

Gift/purchase, 2004.

Accessioned as number 2004-14.

Processing Information

The Floyd-Jones collection was processed by Dennis Conrad who completed the finding aid in May 2007. Brenda McClurkin made minor changes to the finding aid while encoding it in June 2011.

The letters were tipped into an album when received by the University of Texas at Arlington. The letters were removed from the album and cleaned by paper conservator Gayle Young of Weatherford, Texas. Document fragments from the conservation process are contained in folder 5.


 Note to the Researcher 

Several of these documents are written on fragile paper. Please handle them with care. The chronological order of the materials must be maintained, as the handwriting is difficult to read and the order would be difficult to reconstruct.

The biography of De Lancey Floyd-Jones in Breithaupt’s book on the Aztec Club of 1847, and the Aztec Club of 1847’s web site (http://www.aztecclub.com/bios/floydjones.htm), list Floyd-Jones’ date of birth as May 31, 1824. But most sources consulted by the processing archivist, including more contemporary sources such as the story in the New York Times on the day after Floyd-Jones’ death and his biography in the 1942 edition of Who Was Who in America, give his birth date as January 1826. Therefore, the January 1826 date was used in the biographical sketch.

A discrepancy in the sources also exists with respect to the date of Floyd-Jones’ promotion to colonel. The Aztec Club of 1847 gives the date of the promotion as June 25, 1867, while Who Was Who gives the date as January 2, 1873. The New York Times story on the day after his death says Floyd-Jones was promoted to colonel in 1873. Thus, the 1873 date was used in the biographical sketch.

The spelling of Floyd-Jones’ given name sometimes appears as “DeLancey.”


Container List

 
Box Folder
1 1 Correspondence, 1846
Ten letters written by Lieutenant Floyd-Jones as he traveled from New York to New Orleans, to the mouth of the Rio Grande, and then to Camargo and Monterrey, Mexico.
Item: 1.1.1
Letter to his sister Helen (nicknamed "Nel") from on board a ship (perhaps called the St. Mary.) September 21, 1846
Describes sailing through a hurricane on September 9 through 11 and rescuing the crew of the schooner Anna Maria, including one crew member from the McCloud, which sank during the storm. This appears to have been the hurricane that created Oregon Inlet off the North Carolina coast.
Item: 1.1.2
Letter to his mother from on board a steamer at the mouth of the Rio Grande, September 29, 1846
Discusses impressions of New Orleans ("perfect mud hole") and the South, as well as the Army’s planned move by river to Camargo and then overland to Monterrey.
Item: 1.1.3
Letter apparently to his father from Brazos Santiago, September 30, 1846
Discusses General Taylor’s capture of Monterrey and lists the names and units of regular Army officers killed or wounded in the battle.
Item: 1.1.4
Letter to his sister Sarah from the mouth of the Rio Grande October 2, 1846
Discusses the planned move upriver to Camargo and then overland to Monterrey, as well as the terms of the Mexican capitulation at Monterrey.
Item: 1.1.5
Letter to his father from Camargo, Mexico, October 13, 1846
Discusses the size of the force in which he will travel from Camargo to Monterrey.
Item: 1.1.6
Letter to his mother from Monterrey, October 25, 1846
Describes the march to Monterrey, as well as the city of Monterrey and its environs. Also mentions the conduct of American troops in Monterrey and his duties in administering discipline.
Item: 1.1.7
Letter to his father from Monterrey, November 17, 1846
Ten-page letter with a detailed account of the movements and actions of General Worth’s division in the battle of Monterrey, based on reports of participants, with a manuscript map keyed to the narrative. Mentions Texas troops. Describes General Worth as the “hero of Monterey [sic].” Mentions problems with volunteer troops.
Item: 1.1.8
Letter to his sister Sarah from Monterrey, December 7, 1846
Discusses the planned march from Monterrey to Victoria, Mexico, including the expected size and composition of the force. Mentions that General Worth has declared himself governor, apparently of the city of Monterrey.
Item: 1.1.9
Letter to his father from a camp 20 miles from Monterrey, December 20, 1846
Discusses General Worth’s concern that Santa Anna was advancing on Saltillo with 20,000 troops and Worth’s request for help, which caused Floyd-Jones’ unit to be diverted from its march to Victoria. Refers to Worth as “something of an alarmist” and also discusses criticism in the Army of President Polk’s conduct of the war. Includes comments about insufficiency of American troops given the size of the country and questions about where the additional 50,000 troops promised by the President are.
Item: 1.1.10
Letter to his mother from camp near Monterrey, December 22, 1846
Discusses the plan to resume the march to Victoria after General Worth’s false alarm, as well as Army food and the hardships of life on the march.



 
Box Folder
1 2 Correspondence, January-May 1847
Eleven letters written by Lieutenant Floyd-Jones describing his experiences leading up to, during, and following the battles at Veracruz and Cerro Gordo, as well as the Army’s advance toward Mexico City.
Item: 1.2.1
Letter to his brother Edward (nicknamed "Ned") from camp near Victoria, Mexico, January 13 and 20, 1847
Discusses his marches over the past month and descriptions of the countryside through which he passed; his promotion from the 7th Infantry to the 4th Infantry; his concern that he will be assigned garrison duty at Monterrey and miss out on combat; and planned troop movements to Tampico.
Item: 1.2.2
Letter to his sister Sarah from the mouth of the Rio Grande, February 9 and 12, 1847
First two pages are very difficult to read because the writing is "cross-hatched" to save space. Discusses criticisms of volunteer troops (New York volunteers excepted); the size and composition of American forces preparing for the attack on Veracruz; and the murder of an American lieutenant (the name appears to be Bickley) at the town of Villa Grande and the Mexicans’ capture of the plans carried by the lieutenant for the attack on Veracruz.
Item: 1.2.3
Letter to his sister Sarah from Camp Page at the mouth of the Rio Grande, February 13, 1847
Discusses plans to embark for Lobos Island, and a souvenir that he purchased in Monterrey for his sister.
Item: 1.2.4
Letter to his sister Helen from off Lobos Island, February 27, 1847
First two pages are very difficult to read because the writing is "cross-hatched" to save space. Discusses criticisms of volunteer troops (New York volunteers excepted); the size and composition of American forces preparing for the attack on Veracruz; and the murder of an American lieutenant (the name appears to be Bickley) at the town of Villa Grande and the Mexicans’ capture of the plans carried by the lieutenant for the attack on Veracruz.
Item: 1.2.5
Letter to his sister Cate from the transport North Carolina off Lobos Island, March 2, 1847
An abridged description of movements between Monterrey, Victoria, the Rio Grande, and Lobos Island discussed in other letters.
Item: 1.2.6
Letter to his father, from Camp Washington, Veracruz, March 28, 1847
Reports the capture of Veracruz and the castle of San Juan Ulloa, as well as the terms of surrender.
Item: 1.2.7
Letter to his sister Sarah from castle of San Juan Ulloa March 30 and April 3, 1847
Discusses the fighting at Veracruz (Floyd-Jones’ first combat experience) and the damage to the city; estimates of military and civilian casualties; the surrender ceremony at Veracruz and the occupation of San Juan Ulloa; and impressions of the defeated Mexican troops and the city. Following the letter is a captured Mexican document dated November 18, 1846, signed by the commandant of the castle.
Item: 1.2.8
Letter to his mother from castle of Perote April 24, 1847
Provides a detailed description of the castle, which was used by the Mexicans as a prison for Texans during the days of the Republic of Texas, as well as a detailed description of the battle of Cerro Gordo (which he spells "Sierra Gordo") and a discussion of the march from Veracruz to Jalapa (which he spells "Xalapa").
Item: 1.2.9
Letter to his sister Sarah from castle of Perote April 24, 1847
Discusses casualties in the battle of Cerro Gordo; the quality of volunteer versus Regular Army troops; items captured in the battle, including Santa Anna’s carriage, bed, and artificial leg; comments about Jalapa; and eating ice cream made from mountain snow.
Item: 1.2.10
Letter to his sister Sarah from Tepeyahualco, May 1, 1847
Discusses Mexican morale, as well as his own morale (which was suffering from lack of opportunity for promotion and from resentment toward volunteers).
Item: 1.2.11
Letter to his sister Helen, from Puebla, May 26, 1847
Describes the city of Puebla, mentions guerilla raids on the mail, and appears to criticize General Worth.



 
Box Folder
1 3 Correspondence, October 1847-July 1848
Ten letters written by Lieutenant Floyd-Jones between the capture of Mexico City and the Army’s withdrawal from Mexico.
Item: 1.3.1
Letter to his mother from Mexico City, October 15, 1847
Describes the fighting around Mexico City, including the death at Chapultepec of his West Point classmate and long-time friend Lt. Rodgers; American attacks on St. Antonio and Churubusco; the armistice following the fighting at Churubusco, and the Mexicans’ violation of the armistice; the American attack on Molino del Rey; and American casualties. Also includes comments criticizing the accuracy of reporters’ accounts of the fighting and expressing hope that the performance of the American troops will discourage Congress from cutting the troops’ pay and make the British ("our brethren across the Water") less inclined to want to go to war with the United States. Mentions the conduct of American troops occupying Mexico City.
Item: 1.3.2
Letter to his brother Edward from Mexico City, October 28, 1847
A short letter saying that a box is being sent with items for the family; the gun captured in Mexico City is for Edward.
Item: 1.3.3
Letter to his father from Mexico City, October 31, 1847
Describes in detail a box of items he has collected and is sending to the family. Following the letter are two documents in Spanish captured from the cabinet of General Tornel, Mexico’s Minister of War, one of which bears the signature of General Tornel.
Item: 1.3.4
Letter to sister Sarah from Hospital Terceros December 7 and 8, 1847
Discusses American officers’ quarters and lifestyle in Hospital Terceros, which was next to the College of Mines. Describes the Mexicans’ celebration of the Conception of the Virgin Mary and makes other observations about Mexico City and its people. Comments about the prospect that Mexico will become part of the United States, about low pay in the military, and about how civilian attitudes about the glory of war would change if they experienced it.
Item: 1.3.5
Letter to his sister Cate from Hospital Terceros, December 13, 1847
Discusses the arrival of American reinforcements, service on a court-martial, rumors about whether the Mexicans will try to continue to fight, and the prospect of Mexico becoming part of the United States. Relates the story of the Virgin of Guadalupe and describes the interior of the church built near the site where Mexican tradition says she appeared to farmer Juan Diego.
Item: 1.3.6
Letter to his sister Sarah from Tacubaya, Mexico, January 12, 1848
Discusses rumors of peace.
Item: 1.3.7
Letter to his sister Sarah from Tacubaya, Mexico, March 12, 1848
Mostly illegible because the writing is “cross-hatched.” Appears to include an explanation of the “Halls of Montezuma” and a mention that Floyd-Jones prefers living in Tacubaya to Mexico City.
Item: 1.3.8
Letter to his sister Sarah from a courtroom in Tacubaya, Mexico, April 15, 1848
Sitting on a court-martial. Long discussion of the defendant in the first case, a Lt. Bussy [sp?] who had been appointed to Floyd-Jones’ regiment from the Guard House of the 14th Infantry. Mentions his promotion to First Lieutenant. Includes critical comments about General Worth, General Pillow, and the conduct of volunteer troops. Talks about how the Mexicans will observe Good Friday and his plans to go into Mexico City and attend church services.
Item: 1.3.9
Letter to his sister Sarah from Mexico, May 20, 1848
Written on Ministro de Estado y del despacho de Guerra y Marina letterhead captured from “the Palace.” Discusses Mexican politics (election of an interim president, and prospects for approval of a peace treaty by the Mexican legislature); potential danger to Americans who remain in Mexico after the Army leaves; and efforts by the Mexican government to raise a Foreign Legion of American troops. Says the U.S. government should not be surprised if some American officers join the Foreign Legion because of how the Regular Army is mistreated in comparison to the volunteer troops. Describes in detail a week-long trip to Cuernavaca to see the cave of Cacahuamilpa as well as Aztec and Spanish ruins.
Item: 1.3.10
Letter to his sister Sarah, from Camp two miles from Jalapa, July 6, 1848
Last letter from Mexico. Discusses the withdrawal of American forces from Mexico City after Mexican ratification of the peace treaty; the ceremony when the last American troops left the city; prediction of future political instability in Mexico; criticism of President Polk and volunteer troops; and limited prospects for promotion in the Army. The last page of this letter is very difficult to read.



 
Box Folder
1 4 Correspondence, August 1848-1862
Seven letters written by Lieutenant Floyd-Jones from his stations at East Pascagoula, Mississippi, in 1848 and Detroit, Michigan, in 1849-50; one letter written from New Orleans in 1848 as he was trying to travel back to New York; and one letter written in July 1862 from the banks of the James River in Virginia following the Seven Days’ battles in the Civil War. The letters from Mississippi and Detroit generally recount the life of a young, single Army officer. The letter from New Orleans describes his experiences in a hurricane or tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico in October 1848, including the death of Lt. Perry, “son of the old Commodore so distinguished in Naval history.” The letter from Virginia appears to have been intended to counter reports of a Union disaster in the Army of the Potomac’s Peninsular Campaign.



 
Box Folder
1 4 Document Fragments, undated
Fragments of documents resulting from the conservation work on the collection.



 

Manuscript Map of the Battle of Mexico City, approximately 1847

Manuscript map showing the relative positions of American and Mexican troops during the fighting at and around Mexico City, August-September 1847.