Texas State Library and Archives Commission

National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year (U.S.), Texas Coordinating Committee:

An Inventory of the Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee Records at the Texas State Archives, 1971-1978, bulk 1977



Overview

Creator: United States. National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year. Texas Coordinating Committee.
Title: Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records
Dates: 1971-1978
Dates (Bulk): bulk 1977
Abstract: The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights to be presented at the National Women's Conference. The committee planned and held the Texas Women's Meeting in Austin from June 24 to 26, 1977, where participants voted on delegates and resolutions for the National Women's Conference held in Houston later that year. Records of the committee are attendee registration forms, correspondence, delegate nomination forms, memorandums, interviews, resolutions, publications, press material, minutes, photographs, rules and procedures, reservations, budgets, audio and video recordings, résumés, voting tally sheets, maps, buttons, exhibit panels, photo negatives, and slides, dating 1971-1978, bulk 1977. A portion of the records have been digitized and are part of the Texas Digital Archive.
Quantity: 24.6 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with a portion in Spanish.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: This EAD finding aid was created in cooperation with Texas Archival Resources Online.

Organizational History

In 1972, the United Nations declared 1975 as the International Year of the Woman and called for the first international conference concerning women. The 1975 United Nations World Conference on Women attracted 1,300 delegates from 133 countries, while 6,000 non-governmental agencies and organizations attended the International Women's Year (IWY) Tribune forum. Those assembled for the conference created and agreed upon a World Plan of Action for the Implementation of the Objectives of the IWY, with guidelines to initiate within the decade to help support women. Conferences were held in countries around the world to implement the plan of action within their own nations, including Austria, Canada, Finland, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Nepal, Switzerland, the United States, Uruguay, and Zambia.

In the United States, on January 9, 1975, President Gerald Ford issued Executive Order 11832 to create the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year and tasked the committee with preparing a report on how to promote gender equality. On July 1, 1976, the 35 members, with Jill Ruckelhaus as the presiding officer, presented its report, To Form a More Perfect Union…Justice for American Women. The report recommended a national conference be established, with each state creating a coordinating committee to help frame resolutions, issue reports, and elect delegates to the conference.

In December 1975, Congress passed Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977), introduced by U.S. Representatives Bella Abzug and Patsy Mink, to extend the national commission's life, authorize state meetings, task the commission with organizing a national conference, and allot $5,000,000 in federal funding to assist with preparations. The conference was the first national conference to address women's rights since the historic 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Anyone over 16 could participate, and large states such as Texas received federal funding for their states' meetings and for scholarships allowing women to attend the conferences. State meetings were held from February to July 1977 with over 130,000 participants across the nation. The conference and meetings discussed women's role in society and invited all women to participate regardless of their age, race, or religion. The University of Puerto Rico translated the report To Form a More Perfect Union…Justice for American Women into Spanish to make it accessible to Latinas.

The Texas Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year was created in 1975 with Owanah Anderson serving as co-chair for the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee. The Texas Women's Meeting was held June 24-26, 1977, at the University of Texas at Austin, where over 2,600 participants and 58 delegates were elected to represent Texas at the national conference. Texas was part of the Southwest region which also included New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, and Louisiana. The committee selected the slogan "Women at the Grass Roots: Growing toward Unity" for the Texas Women's Meeting and submitted to Congress A Summary of the Final Report to the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year by the Texas Coordinating Committee. The National Women's Conference was held November 18-21, 1977, in Houston with 2,000 delegates from 50 states and six territories (District of Columbia, Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, Virgin Islands, and Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands) and between 15,000 to 20,000 observers.

The Texas IWY Coordinating Committee created an executive committee and five subordinate committees to share the responsibilities associated with planning and implementing the Texas Women's Meeting. Owanah Anderson chaired the executive committee, which was responsible for overseeing and planning the Texas meeting, inviting members to the executive committee and forming subcommittees, acting as a liaison between the Texas committee and the national committee, and which served as the final decision maker for the Texas Coordinating Committee. The public relations committee was chaired by Sarah Weddington and was responsible for flyers, posters, weekly press releases, and public service announcements. Hermila Anzaldua chaired the outreach committee, which determined the demographic makeup of attendees, formed alliances with organizations, managed public relations in the Rio Grande Valley, conducted speak-outs, chartered buses, and awarded grants and scholarships. The Chicano advisory committee was an outreach subcommittee chaired by Marta Cotera, responsible for reaching out to the Latin American community, presenting issues relevant to Latinas, and offering translation services. Carol Hatfield chaired the arrangements committee, which was responsible for child care, credentials, transportation, housing, registration, credentials, resolutions, rules, and personnel. The program committee was chaired by Judith Guthrie and was responsible for programs, exhibits, workshops, social functions, and entertainment. Ann Richards chaired the nominations committee, which oversaw the nomination and voting of delegates and notified members and the national committee of the delegates selected. The Texas IWY Coordinating Committee delegates to the national conference were expected to represent the demographics within the general population of Texas women. As such, the committee tracked demographic information about the delegates in an attempt to be representative of the state as a whole.

The organization was associated with many different names. During an executive meeting held on March 26, 1977, the Texas Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year changed its name to the Texas Committee on the Observance of International Women's Year but never changed its letterhead. It also adopted the following terms: Texas Women's Meeting, National Women's Conference, and the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee. Outside of its official name, the committee was often referred to by several other names including Texas Committee for IWY, IWY Texas Coordinating Committee, Texas IWY Committee, and Texas Committee on the Observance of IWY Decade. It is most often referred to as the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee, or simply the Texas Coordinating Committee.

(Sources include: Cottrell, Debbie Mauldin. "National Women's Conference, 1977," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed October 19, 2016, and the records themselves.)


Bella Abzug

Bella Savitsky Abzug (July 24, 1920-March 31, 1998) was born in the Bronx, New York, to Russian immigrants and earned a law degree from Columbia University in 1947, becoming one of the few female attorneys in the United States at the time. As an attorney she specialized in labor rights, tenants' rights, civil rights, and liberal causes. During the McCarthy era, Abzug opposed the House Un-American Activities Committee and in the 1960s she opposed the Vietnam War and co-founded Women Strike for Peace, which fought against nuclear testing. In 1970, she ran for Congress to represent a Manhattan district and was elected to the House of Representatives as one of only twelve women. She represented her constituents for three terms from 1971 to 1977. In 1977, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the National Advisory Committee on Women and she served as the presiding officer for the National Coordinating Committee. Abzug later went on to found Women USA and became a prominent leader within the United Nations, assisting with several U.N. International Women's Conferences. In 1990, she founded the Women's Environmental and Development Organization. Abzub died shortly after giving her last speech at the United Nations in 1998.

(Sources include: "Women of Valor, Bella Abzug," Jewish Women's Archives and History; and "Abzug, Bella Savitzky," Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives, both accessed October 19, 2016.)


Owanah Anderson

Owanah Anderson (1926-) was born in Choctaw County, Oklahoma as a member of the Choctaw nation. She earned a scholarship to the University of Oklahoma where she studied journalism. In 1977, she served on the Texas planning committee for the Observance of International Women's Year then co-chaired the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee and chaired its executive committee. From 1977 to 1980, Anderson worked on the Committee on Rights and Responsibilities of Women created by the United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. President Jimmy Carter appointed her to his Advisory Council on Women from 1978 to 1981, and in 1979 she reviewed the SALT (Strategic Arms Limitation Talks) Treaty in Madrid. From 1979 to 1980 she chaired the National Committee on Indian Work. In 1979, she founded the Ohoyo Resource Center to assist Native American women with education and employment. Anderson wrote several books about the Episcopal Church and Native Americans, particularly Native American women, including the Ohoyo One Thousand: A Resource Guide to Native Indian/Alaska Native Women in 1982, which highlights women from 231 tribes. After the Ohoyo Resource Center closed in 1983 she moved to New York and assisted the Native American Ministry of the Episcopal Church as a staff officer until 1998. While there, she helped secure Native Americans' religious freedoms and rallied the church to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Anderson became a member of the Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA) and served on the Board of Directors from 1983 to approximately 2000. In 1989, the Seabury-Western Theological Seminary awarded her an honorary doctorate. In 2014 the AAIA created a scholarship for Native American women in her name.

(Sources include: "Owanah Anderson Scholarship," The Association of American Indian Affairs; "Owanah Anderson," ipl2 Special Collections, accessed October 19, 2016; and Sonneborn, Liz. A to Z of American Indian Women. New York: Infobase Publishing, 2014.)


Ann Richards

Dorothy Ann Willis Richards (September 1, 1933-September 13, 2006), who preferred to be called Ann, was born in Lacy Lakeview, Texas. Prior to attending Waco High School, Richards developed an interest in politics and government after attending Girls State, a mock student government assembly. She graduated from Baylor University in 1954 and moved to Austin, where she taught government at Fulmore Junior High School. She became an active member of the Democratic Party and managed the Texas House of Representatives election campaigns of Sarah Weddington in 1972 and of Wilhelmina Delco in 1974. She also acted as Weddington's administrative assistant in the Texas House of Representatives. In 1976, Richards challenged a three-term incumbent to become the first woman elected as Travis County Commissioner, and in 1977 she chaired the nominations committee for the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee. In 1982, she become the first female state treasurer and the first woman elected to a state-wide office in more than 50 years. Richards captured the national spotlight when she gave the keynote speech at the 1988 Democratic National Convention in Atlanta. In 1990, she was elected as the 45th governor of the state of Texas (one of only two women to ever serve as governor of Texas). As governor, Richards appointed more women and minorities to state boards and agencies than anyone in that office before her; supported prison reform; signed the Texas Financial Responsibility Law, which established minimum auto liability insurance; launched the "Robin Hood Plan" to help fund impoverished schools districts; vetoed a concealed carry bill; and purchased the first state lottery ticket after voters passed an amendment to the state constitution to create the Texas Lottery. After her term as governor, she served as the Fred and Rita Richman Distinguished Visiting Professor of Politics at Brandeis University from 1997 to 1998. Richards began planning a school for girls but was diagnosed with esophageal cancer in 2006 and died later that year. In 2007, the Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders opened in Austin, accepting female students in grades 6 through 12.

(Sources include: Sapper, Neil. "Richards, Dorothy Ann Willis (Ann)," Handbook of Texas Online and "Richards, Dorothy Ann Willis (Ann)," Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders, both accessed October 19, 2016.)


C. DeLores Tucker

Cynthia DeLores Tucker (October 4, 1927-October 12, 2004) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the tenth of eleven children. She attended Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business. During her lifetime she earned two honorary law degrees from Morris College in Alabama and Villa Maria College in Philadelphia. In 1965, she joined Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for the historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. In 1968, Tucker was elected as the first African-American woman to the Philadelphia Zoning Board. In 1970, she became the vice president of the Pennsylvania Democratic Party and went on to serve as the first African-American woman elected as Pennsylvania's Secretary of the Commonwealth from 1971 to 1977. As secretary, she initiated mail-in voter's registration, lowered the voting age to 18, formed the first commission on the Status of Women in Pennsylvania, and helped Pennsylvania become one of the first states to pass the Equal Rights Amendment. In 1977, the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee invited her as the keynote speaker for the Texas Women's Meeting. In 1984, she was chair of the Democratic National Committee Black Caucus, and she founded the National Political Congress of Black Women in 1985. Tucker established the Bethune-DuBois Institution in 1991 to help African-American youth with education and scholarships. In 2003, she became a member of the national coalition to support the creation of a National Women's History Museum. She was an outspoken critic of misogynistic lyrics in gangsta rap in the 1990s. Although a lifelong member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she picketed the NAACP Image Awards in 1994, when Tupac Shakur was nominated for an acting award while he was under investigation for sexually assaulting a fan and shooting two police officers during a traffic stop. Tucker died in Philadelphia in 2004.

(Sources include: Martin, Douglas. "C. DeLores Tucker, a Voice for Minorities and Women, Is Dead at 78," The New York Times, November 6, 2005; "Dr. C. Delores Tucker," National Women's History Museum; "Dr. C. Delores Tucker," National Congress of Black Women; and Nelson, H. Viscount. "Tucker, C. DeLores," BlackPost: An Online Reference Guide to African American History, all accessed October 19, 2016.)


Sarah Weddington

Sarah Weddington (February 5, 1945-) was born in Abilene, Texas and graduated from McMurry College with a degree in English. In 1965, the University of Texas admitted her into its law program as one of 40 women in a class of 1,600 law students. She graduated in 1967 and has since earned several honorary degrees. After traveling to Mexico to have an abortion exposed her to the dangers women face when attempting to control their own reproduction, Weddington and other students started a referral service to help women safely terminate pregnancy while it was illegal in the United States. This led to her arguing in favor of women's reproductive rights before the United States Supreme Court and the court's historic 1973 Roe v. Wade decision, which affirmed a woman's right to legally terminate her pregnancy. Weddington became the youngest person ever to win a case before the Supreme Court. In 1973, she was elected to the Texas House of Representatives and served for three terms. She was the first woman to serve as the general counsel of the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1977, and from 1978 to 1981 she assisted President Jimmy Carter and advised him on women's issues and leadership. In 1977, she served on the Texas planning committee for the Observance of International Women's Year and chaired the public relations committee for the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee. From 1983 to 1985, Weddington served as the first female director of the Texas Office of State-Federal Relations. She was a distinguished lecturer at Texas Woman's University (TWU) from 1981 to 1990 and an adjunct professor in the Department of History and Government in 1993. While at TWU she hosted the Sarah Weddington Centennial Leadership Conference in 2001. Weddington later moved to Austin and for 28 years taught law at the University of Texas.

(Sources include: "Summary Bio" The Weddington Center and Parks, Scott K. "For Sarah Weddington, the lawyer who won Roe vs. Wade, celebrity - or notoriety - came early, " The Dallas Morning News, January 2013, both accessed October 19, 2016.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The Texas IWY Coordinating Committee records illustrate the activities associated with the Texas Women's Meeting held in Austin from June 24 to 26, 1977, and the election of delegates to represent Texas at the National Women's Conference held in Houston from November 18 to 21, 1977. The records consist of attendee registration forms, correspondence, delegate nomination forms, memorandums, interviews, resolutions, publications, press material, minutes, photographs, rules and procedures, reservations, budgets, audio and video recordings, résumés, voting tally sheets, maps, buttons, exhibit panels, photo negatives, and slides, and date from 1971 to 1978 with the bulk of the records dating 1977. One letter dated 1971 was probably dated in error as the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee had not yet formed and no other dates appear until 1973. The records provide a brief history about International Women's Year (1975), later changed to International Women's Decade (1975-1985); the creation of the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year in the United States; the Texas Women's Meeting; and the National Women's Conference.

The records document preparation for the Texas Women's Meeting, activities associated with the meeting including delegate nominations and selections, resolutions discussed and passed at the meeting, criticism of the meeting and conference and the delegates and resolutions passed, the Texas exhibit booth at the National Women's Conference, and information about the National Women's Conference. The executive committee created five subordinate committees to organize the events. The documents associated with each committee are included within that committee's series; some of the records are duplicated in multiple series. Noteworthy participants include Bella Abzug, Owanah Anderson, Ann Richards, C. DeLores Tucker, and Sarah Weddington. Prominent issues discussed include women's rights, the ERA (Equal Rights Amendment), childcare and reproductive rights, women employees, homemakers, lesbians, women's health services, and International Women's Year. Both the University of Texas at Austin and Texas Woman's University played important support roles for the Texas Women's Meeting.

Records from eight Executive binders, dating 1977, were transferred to folders for preservation purposes. The binders constitute their own series not only to preserve context, but also because they contain information from multiple committees. They contain correspondence, minutes, agendas, rules and procedures, applications, résumés, press releases, and transcripts of floor interviews taken at the Texas Women's Meeting.

Executive committee files provide a comprehensive record of how the meeting was organized. The bulk of the documents were created in 1977, but they range from 1973 to 1977. Owanah Anderson chaired the executive committee, which was responsible for overseeing and planning the Texas meeting, inviting members to join, forming subordinate committees, acting as a liaison between the Texas committee and the national committee, and serving as the final decision makers for the Texas Coordinating Committee. The records in this series consist of correspondence, memos, requests for information, minutes, agendas, proposals and recommendations, budgets, résumés and applications, invitations, and speeches, with many of the records created by Bella Abzug, Owanah Anderson, Ann Richards, and Sarah Weddington. An open-reel video recording of the first planning session is included in this series.

Public relations committee files date from 1971 to 1978, with the bulk of the records from 1977. Since the committee was not yet created in 1971, it is believed the one document with that date was dated in error. Sarah Weddington chaired the committee and many documents were created by her, which include correspondence, press releases, photographs, a press kit, press clippings, public service announcements, an open-reel video recording of a press conference, publications, brochures, an audiocassette of an English and Spanish radio news feed, press contacts, and slides. The committee was in charge of press releases and public service announcements as well as establishing contacts with news organizations.

Outreach committee files documents consist of correspondence, scholarship and grant applications and those awarded, brochures from auxiliary organizations, alliance organization contacts, information about other state meetings, regional maps of Texas, demographic information, and efforts to secure Spanish translators at the Texas meeting, and are dated 1977. The committee, chaired by Hermila Anzaldua, determined the six regions of Texas for balanced representation, analyzed the demographic makeup of delegates based on Texas' population, established alliances with organizations, and awarded grants and scholarships. Most of the Spanish language material is in the Chicano advisory committee folder within this series.

Arrangement committee files, dated 1977, is the largest series, consisting mostly of individual registration forms providing basic information from attendees such as name, address, phone number, registration fee amount, childcare needs, intention to vote or only observe, and the option to attend the Saturday night activities. Many, but not all, of the forms also denote the attendees' age, income, religion, race, occupation, homemaker status, and any women's group affiliations. This committee was responsible for registration, childcare, transportation, logistics, and writing the final resolutions adopted at the meeting. The types of records found in this series other than registration forms are correspondence, bus and hotel reservation forms, child care bids, child care schedules and menus, child care agreements and medical releases, agreements for meetings sites, copies of final resolutions adopted, and a few rejected resolutions.

Program committee files from 1977 document the committee's work to produce the programs that were given to attendees and include packets for the Texas Women's Meeting and the National Women's Conference. The series also includes five audiocassette recordings of floor interviews conducted at the Texas Women's Meeting, a photograph album, correspondence and photographs for the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference, notes about the workshop, reaction session and caucus room discussions, and inquiries and notes about entertainment and exhibits at the Texas meeting. The program committee arranged for entertainment, workshops, reaction sessions, and caucus rooms for the meeting and was also in charge of arranging to have the Texas exhibit and the photograph album created.

Nominations committee files contain delegate nominee registration forms, correspondence, copies of delegate nomination forms with the number votes each delegate received, rules and procedures, volunteer assignments, floor plans, printed copies of election results, and election tally sheets, all dating 1977. This committee was chaired by Ann Richards and was responsible for overseeing the delegate nominations and voting as well as notifying members and the national committee of the delegates selected. Records related to adhering to the delegate demographics are included in this series.

Opposition files consist of two folders of material that were not obviously associated with any committee, dated 1977. One folder contains a request for the University of Texas to provide security and methods to handle protestors, while the other folder includes material and flyers from organizations which opposed IWY, the National Women's Conference, and the Texas Women's Meeting.

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.


Organization of the Records

Partial processing during the 1980s resulted in the records being separated to distinguish between documents relating to the national conference and those for the Texas meeting. Separating the records proved ineffective, and they were reintegrated when processing resumed in 2016; some original context may have been lost. In an attempt to restore as much context as possible, the records are divided according to the organizational committees that the Texas Coordinating Committee created to plan and implement the Texas Women's Meeting. Folders that were not included in the first phase of processing retain their original order, documents, and folder titles when possible; however, many folders did not have titles and were assigned titles based upon their contents. When integrating the partially processed documents, they were placed under the committee series responsible for those activities and within a folder that logically correlates to these documents.
The records are organized into eight series:
Executive binders, 1977, 1.1 cubic ft.
Executive committee files, 1973-1977, bulk 1977, 1.65 cubic ft.
Public relations committee files, 1971-1977, bulk 1977, 2.05 cubic ft.
Outreach committee files, 1977, 0.4 cubic ft.
Arrangements committee files, 1977, 2.8 cubic ft.
Program committee files, 1977, 15.7 cubic ft.
Nominations committee files, 1977, 0.8 cubic ft.
Opposition files, 1977, 0.1 cubic ft.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Researchers wishing to access the artifacts from the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference must contact State Archives staff to make arrangements.

Records containing restricted information (social security numbers) in the series Executive committee files and Nomination committee files have been redacted in accordance with Texas Government Code, Section 552.101 (common law privacy).

Restrictions on Use

Under the Copyright Act of 1976 as amended in 1998, unpublished works are protected for the life of the author plus 70 years. The term of copyright for published material varies. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the State Archives when reviewing photographic materials.

Due to the fragility of the audiocassettes, the digital copies must be used instead of the original tapes. Transcripts are not available at this time. Researchers may examine the physical tapes but are not allowed to listen to them on playback equipment.

The State Archives may not have the correct audio-visual equipment to access the U-matic videocassette. Researcher access to open-reel audio recordings and film is dependent upon first arranging to digitize that media at the researcher's expense; contact Archives staff for available options.

Oversized maps and election tally sheets may be too large to photocopy.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Abzug, Bella S., 1920-1998.
Anderson, Owanah.
Richards, Ann, 1933-2006.
Tucker, C. DeLores.
Weddington, Sarah Ragle.
Corporate Names:
University of Texas at Austin.
Texas Woman's University.
Subjects:
Child care--Texas.
Equal rights amendments--Texas.
Homemakers--Texas.
International Women's Year, 1975--Texas--Houston--Congresses.
Lesbians--Legal status, laws, etc.--Texas.
Reproductive rights--Texas.
Women employees--Texas.
Women's health services--Texas.
Women's rights--Texas.
Places:
Austin (Tex.)
Houston (Tex.)
Document Types:
Administrative records--Texas.
Administrative regulations--Texas.
Brochures--Texas.
Election returns--Texas.
Fliers (printed matter)--Texas.
Interviews--Texas.
Negatives (photographs)--Texas.
Photographs--Texas.
Regional maps--Texas.
Serials (publications)--Texas.
Slides (photographs)--Texas.
Sound recordings--Texas.
Video recordings--Texas.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Publications
Manual for State and Territorial IWY Coordinating Committees: For Planning and Conducting the Meetings for Women. National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, Washington D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1976.
Radin, Beryl A. and Purvis H. Hoyt, Women in Public Life: Report of a Conference. Austin, TX: Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, 1976.
Stravato, Claudia, editor, Texas Women's Meeting: Summary of the Final Report to the National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, 1971.
To Form a More Perfect Union...Justice for American Women. National Commission on the Observance of International Women's Year, Washington D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1976.
Texas Tech University
Betty Anderson Papers, 1961-1996, 5 linear ft.
Hermine Tobolowsky Papers, 1932-1995, 14 linear ft.
Texas Woman's University
Barbara Vacker Papers, 1972-1979, 1.5 cubic ft.
Texas Federation of Business and Professional Women Records, 1918-2004, 88 cubic ft.
University of Houston Libraries
Betty Barnes NOW Collection, 1967-1986, 1.5 linear ft.
Linda May Papers, 1969-2006, bulk 1970-2000, 6 linear ft.
Houston Women's Caucus for Art Records, 1978-1997, 12.5 linear ft.
Marjorie Randal National Women's Conference Collection, 1974-1982, 2 linear ft.
Nikki Van Hightower Papers, 1967-1997, 7.5 linear ft.
Norma Lee Feminist Correspondence, 1975-1979, 0.5 linear ft.
Professor Bette Ann Stead Papers, 1967-2007, 1 linear ft.
Tucker and Myers Texas Council on Family Violence Records, 1974-2001, 15 linear ft.
University of Texas at San Antonio
Rosalie Laxton Papers, 1970-1980, 2.4 linear ft.
University of Texas at Austin
Margaret Muñoz Simon Papers, 1937-1994, bulk 1970-1989, 4 linear ft.
Martha Cotera Papers, 1964-, 20 linear ft.
Mexican American Business and Professional Women's Association Records, 1974-1995, 10 linear ft.
University of Texas at Arlington
Betty Andujar Papers, 169-1979, bulk 1973-1975, 56.5 linear ft.
University of Texas at Arlington Women's Center Records, 1969-1984, 4.17 linear ft.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 1978/032

Records created by the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by Owanah Anderson on November 7, 1977, and January 4, 1978. Texas Woman's University transferred the contents and records associated with the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference in January 1978.

Processing Information

Partially processed by Mary Paxton and Michael Green, 1980s

Further processing and arrangement by Texas State University student intern Mary Murphy, December 2016

Revisions to description by Rebecca Romanchuk, February 2017

Other Formats for the Records

Photographs, voting tally sheets, maps, negatives, and slides have been digitized and are part of the Texas Digital Archive, available online at https://tsl.access.preservica.com/manuscripts/tx-intl-womens-committee.


Detailed Description of the Records

Executive binders, 1977,
1.1 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. This series contains documents originally bound together in eight binders that were probably assembled by staff at the executive office and were collected before, during, and after the Texas Women's Meeting to keep a record of their activities. The documents consist of correspondence, minutes, speeches, transcripts of meeting floor interviews, scholarships, outreach, registration, nomination forms, workshop and reaction room comments, resolutions submitted by individuals, voting results, and press clippings. The binders and their contents were created in 1977. The folders for these documents retain the same titles as were written on the tabbed dividers inside the binders, which kept the documents grouped together and separated. An untitled folder was included with the binders. A portion of the documents in the binders are duplicated elsewhere in other series, with the exception of correspondence. The binders themselves were not numbered, but were assigned numbers to denote which documents were found together in each binder.
Binder 2 contained labeled dividers, but some sections were empty. The first empty section was labeled "List of Comm" with a handwritten note that said "List of other committees needed 1) Coordinating is all that is here" inside the section. The second empty section was labeled "Characterize." with a handwritten note that said "Characterizations" inside the section. The last empty section, labeled "Fri – enter. Report," was completely empty. Binder 6 contains transcripts of meeting floor interviews from the Texas Women's Meeting and press clippings.
The transcriptions of random interviews taken at the Texas Women's Meeting differ from the audio recorded interviews in the series Program committee files.
Arrangement
These records are arranged in the order as they appeared in the binders. The titles for the files are the same as the titles given to the tabbed dividers within the binders. Folder titles for sections of the binders without titles begin with "untitled." Topics with dates such as meeting minutes, memos, and press clippings are arranged chronologically. Topics with proper names of people and organizations are arranged alphabetically. Several folders, such as budgets, workshops, and resolutions, are loosely arranged by topic. Interviews are not arranged in any order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Executive binders, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Box
1978/032-1 Chrono file, 1977
[2 folders]
[These are the contents of binder 1. The message, "This notebook contains a copy of almost all materials and correspondence sent out of this office; file order is by date, latest one on top," was taped to the side of the binder.]
Correspondence, 1977
[Part 1 of 8 from binder 2; this section was not labeled.]
Minutes, 1977
[Part 2 of 8 from binder 2.]
Budgets, 1977
[Part 3 of 8 from binder 2.]
Registration, 1977
[Part 4 of 8 from binder 2.]
25th, Saturday – oral speeches, rules, nomin(ations), transcript tapes, workshops, 1977
[Part 5 of 8 from binder 2.]
[Contains Owanah Anderson's opening speech, C. DeLores Tucker's speech, a statement from national commissioner Gloria D. Scott, procedures, rules, memos, correspondence, election floor plan, a list of delegates with demographic distribution, and a list of election results with vote tallies. No recordings are included in this folder.]
Saturday - workshops, 1977
[Part 6 of 8 from binder 2.]
Reactions, 1977
[Part 7 of 8 from binder 2.]
Sun(day) - voting, reg(istration), ballot results, 1977
[Part 8 of 8 from binder 2.]
[Also contains correspondence about a nominee's challenge of results.]
Scholarships, 1977
[Part 1 of 3 from binder 3.]
Outreach, 1977
[Part 2 of 3 from binder 3.]
[Contains correspondence, list of community action agencies, potential contacts, meeting proposal, plans of action, and regional breakdowns.]
Correspondence, 1977
[Part 3 of 3 from binder 3; this section was not labeled.]
Box
1978/032-2 Correspondence, printed material, and other documents, 1977
[Contents from binder 4; this section was not labeled.]
Nomination forms and résumés, originals, A-M, 1977
[Part 1 of 2 from binder 5.]
[Contains predominately floor nominations.]
Nomination forms and résumés, originals, N-Z, 1977
[Part 2 of 2 from binder 5.]
[Contains predominately floor nominations.]
Oral histories, 1977
[Part 1 of 2 from binder 6.]
Press clippings, Texas, 1977
[Part 2 of 2 from binder 6.]
Resolutions submitted by individuals, 1977
[folder 1 of 2]
[Contents from binder 7.]
Box
1978/032-3 Resolutions submitted by individuals, 1977
[folder 2 of 2]
[Contents from binder 7.]
Press releases, 1977
[Contents from binder 8.]



Executive committee files, 1973-1977, bulk 1977,
1.65 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's executive committee was appointed by the interim steering and advisory committees on February 19, 1977, with Owanah Anderson as chair. The executive committee was responsible for overseeing and planning the Texas meeting, inviting members to the executive committee, forming subcommittees, acting as a liaison between the Texas committee and the national committee, and acting as the final decision maker. The series is comprised of correspondence, memos, request for information, minutes, agendas, rules and procedures, proposals and recommendations, budgets, résumés and applications, blank administrative forms, invitations, and speeches. The information pertains to initial meeting planning, the history of the organization, executive committee members, potential resources and allies, personnel, and volunteers. The records were created from 1973 to 1977 with the bulk created in 1977.
The meeting minutes for all committees in this series are housed together because many members served on the interim steering committee, the advisory committee, and on the executive committee. The meetings for the committees were held back-to-back or on sequential dates, and the minutes for the committees were filed together. This makes it difficult to discern at what point in time the executive committee actually took over planning the Texas Women's Meeting. While the meeting minutes for the committees in this series are housed together they are divided by date within the series. Meeting minutes prior to March and the formation of the executive committee are housed in the advisory committee, interim steering, and initial planning folders, while meeting minutes occurring in or after March are housed in their own folder.
Agenda letters within these records are numbered 1 through 41, though numbers 38 and 40 were missing when the records were received. Press releases within the public relations series are numbered 1 through 101, though numbers 7, 34, 54-76, and 78-100 were also missing when the records were received.
Arrangement
These records are arranged topically according to the activities that fell under the executive committee responsibilities and within each folder are arranged as closely to how they were received as possible. Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing. Correspondence, minutes, meeting agendas, and other dated records are arranged mostly chronologically with some portions in reverse chronological order. Agenda letters from the national committee are arranged numerically. Information about members and personnel are loosely arranged alphabetically, as they were received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Executive committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Records within this series contained restricted information (social security numbers), which has been redacted in accordance with Texas Government Code, Section 552.101.
Box
1978/032-3 General information and fact sheets, 1977
[Note: A Spanish version of "International Women's Year Background Information" is also found in "Chicano advisory committee, 1977," within the series Outreach committee files.]
[Contains background information, emblem description, fact sheets, Q&A, staffing tasks, and Public Law 94-167.]
Advisory committee, interim steering, and initial planning, 1976-1977
[Note: Five open-reel video recordings of the first planning meeting are found within the series Public relations committee files.]
[Contains notes, correspondence, memos, appointments, parameters and agendas for planning, and meeting minutes.]
Finances, 1977
Member list, mail labels, and addresses, 1977
Résumés, 1977
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
[Contains résumés for recommendations as potential committee members including one for Owanah Anderson.]
Coordinating committee appointments, recommendations, and invitations, 1977
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
Resources, 1977
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
[Contains correspondence to and from people and organizations able to assist the Texas Coordinating Committee and their members with planning and arrangements.]
Box
1978/032-4 Responses to ad for executive director, 1977
[2 folders]
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
Executive director applications, 1977
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
Personnel and volunteers – miscellaneous, 1977
Federal officer, bond, and liability, 1977
Procedures, rules, and instructions, 1977
[Includes correspondence about a woman who fell at the Texas Women's Meeting and whose son requested insurance coverage.]
Proposals, reports, and recommendations, 1977
Agenda letters, 1977
[Contains memos, suggestions, instructions, and other material sent to all state coordinating committees from the National Commission on the Observance of IWY, numbered 1 through 41, with 38 and 40 missing.]
Box
1978/032-5 State and national meeting updates, 1977
[Contains numbers 1, 2, and 6; numbers 3-5 were never received.]
Program agendas and schedules, 1977
Meeting agendas, 1977
Meeting minutes and notes, 1977
Newsletters, memos, and bulletins, 1971-1977, bulk 1977
[The member letter dated February 10, 1971 is probably misdated since the United States had yet to create the National Commission on the Observance of IWY. Also contains the memo sent to members announcing the hiring of Barbara Langham as the executive director.]
General correspondence, 1976-1977
Request for IWY material or information, 1977
[folders 1-2 of 4]
Box
1978/032-6 Request for IWY material or information, 1977
[folders 3-4 of 4]
Blank forms, 1977
Executive admin(istration) - miscellaneous, 1977



Public relations committee files, 1971-1977, bulk 1977,
2.05 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's public relations committee was chaired by Sarah Weddington and was responsible for creating fliers, posters, weekly press releases, and public service announcements. The records include correspondence, press releases, photographs, a press kit, press clippings, public service announcements, an open-reel video recording of a press conference, publications, brochures, an audiocassette of a Texas Women's Meeting radio news release in Spanish and English, press contacts, and slides. The records were created from 1971 to 1978, although the 1971 date is probably in error, with the bulk dated 1977.
The Texas IWY Coordinating Committee did not create all of the brochures or publications within this series. Many were sent to the committee by other organizations or acquired in another way, and all relate to women or women's rights.
Arrangement
These records are arranged primarily by media type and purpose. Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing. Press announcements are arranged chronologically by date of release and national press releases are arranged numerically from 1 to 101. Numbers 7, 34, 54-76, and 78-100 of the national press releases were missing when the records were received. Correspondence is arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Public relations committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Other Formats for the Records
Photographs, the Texas Women's Meeting radio news release, and a slide of the Texas Women's Meeting logo have been digitized and are part of the Texas Digital Archive, available online at https://tsl.access.preservica.com/manuscripts/tx-intl-womens-committee.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the State Archives when reviewing photographic materials.
Due to the fragility of the audiocassette, the digital copy must be used instead of the original tape. Transcripts are not available at this time. Researchers may examine the physical tape but are not allowed to listen to it on playback equipment.
The State Archives may not have the correct audio-visual equipment to access the U-matic videocassette. Researcher access to open-reel video recordings is dependent upon first arranging to transfer that outdated media to more contemporary media, at the researcher's expense; contact Archives staff for available options.
Box
1978/032-6 National press releases, 1976-1977, bulk 1977
[Contains PR 1 through PR 101, missing PR 7, PR 34, PR 54-76, and PR 78-100.]
Press releases, news conferences, and public service announcements, 1977
[Note: Spanish translations of some press releases are found in "Chicano advisory committee, 1977," within the series Outreach committee files.]
Press clippings and copies of clippings, 1977
Press kit, 1977
[loose packet]
Brochures and fliers, 1977
[Contents include Texas Women's Meeting: A Mini-Report produced by the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee.]
Box
1978/032-7 Publications, 1977
[Contains the Legal Rights of Women and The Legal Status of Homemakers in Texas. Additional publications and newsletters are available in the Oversized publications folders in this series.]
TWU (Texas Woman's University) images, 1977
[one 4 3/8 x 6 3/8-inch black-and-white photograph, one 5 x 7-inch black-and-white photograph, three 8 x 10-inch black-and-white photographs, five 8 x 10-inch color photographs]
[Note: These items have been digitized.]
[Includes photographs of female leaders from the Denton area sent by Texas Woman's University to the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee, a photograph of the quilt raffled off at the Texas Women's Meeting, a letter from Colleen S. Collier (the winner of the quilt), and an explanation for the IWY symbol used in the quilt.]
Unmarked images, November 10, 1975
[two 8 x 10-inch black-and-white photographs]
[Note: These items have been digitized.]
[Photographs are of an International Women's Year press conference with photo credit to Frank Wolfe, formerly contained in a U.S. Government Messenger envelope.]
Extra photographs, 1977
[twenty-three 5 x 7-inch black-and-white photographs]
[Note: These items have been digitized.]
Photocontacts, 1977
[fifteen 8 x 10-inch black-and-white photo contact sheets]
[Note: These items have been digitized.]
[These photo contact sheets were sent to Claudia Stravato, Texas IWY Coordinating Committee secretary. Includes letter, memo, and ordering notes.]
Contacts, 1977
Public relations correspondence and notes, 1977
Box
1978/032-8 Texas Women's Meeting radio news release (Spanish and English), May 20, 1977
[1 audiocassette]
[Note: This recording has been digitized.]
Video recordings of an Austin press conference, May 17, 1977
[2 open-reel videotapes]
Video recordings of the first planning meeting, February 5, 1977
[5 open-reel videotapes]
Logo used for the Texas Women's Meeting, 1977
[5 slides]
[Note: These slides (all duplicates of the same logo) have been digitized.]
Remember the Ladies, produced by the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs, 1977
[1 U-matic videocassette]
Box
1978/032-17 Oversized publications: folder one, 1977
[Contains Career News & Views: Girl Scouting U.S.A., Coyote Howls, Daily Breakthrough: Where Women are News, Equal Times: the Voice of Women in Dallas, and Getting Outdoors.]
Oversized publications: folder two, 1977
[Contains The Militant: A Socialist Newspaper, National NOW Times, Tell Me Why, I.W.Y.?, Texas Women's Political Times, and WomanTime.]
Oversized publications: folder three, 1977
[Contains Women: 1977, the Status of American Women, a map of Texas outreach regions; "Women's prison facility found a home in Gatesville" newspaper clipping; Gris Gris: Inside (and Outside) the National Women's Conference; Lucy Parsons Women's Coalition; and the National Organization of Women.]



Outreach committee files, 1977,
0.4 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's outreach committee was chaired by Hermila Anzaldua and was responsible for determining the demographic makeup of delegates, forging alliances with organizations, managing public relations in the Rio Grande valley, conducting speak-outs, chartering buses, and awarding grants and scholarships. The series contains correspondence, scholarship and grant applications, lists of scholarship recipients by region, brochures from auxiliary organizations, alliance organization contacts, information about other state meetings, regional maps of Texas, and demographic information. The records were created in 1977. One folder documents the Chicano advisory committee, an outreach subcommittee chaired by Marta Cotera that was responsible for reaching out to the Latin American community, presenting issues relevant to Latinas, and providing translation services.
The two auxiliary organization folders reintegrate materials that had been separately foldered by organization during initial processing. Most of those folders contained only one document with no context as to how the organizations' documents found their way into the Texas IWY Coordinating Committee records. It is clear why some documents are included, such as the National Organization for Women and a Ms. Magazine issue with an article about FBI surveillance of women's rights organizations. A few of the documents possibly pertain to discussions that occurred in the workshops, such as those about J.P. Stevens's alleged mistreatment of workers. There is no clear indication as to how information about other organizations made their way into the records, for example, a brochure for Project Safewater.
Arrangement
These records are arranged topically and within each topic they are arranged as closely to how they were received as possible. Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing. Correspondence and scholarship applications are arranged chronologically. Auxiliary organizations are arranged alphabetically. Scholarships awarded are arranged by region.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Outreach committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Box
1978/032-7 Demographics and maps, 1977
[Note: A large map of the Texas outreach regions is in the folder "Tally sheets and map, 1977," within the series Nominations committee files and has also been digitized. A mid-sized map of the Texas outreach regions outlined in black is available in "Oversized publications: folder three," within the series Public relations committee files.]
Scholarship applications and requests, 1977
Late scholarship applications, 1977
Scholarships awarded, 1977
Scholarship correspondence, 1977
Grants, 1977
Potential outreach contacts, 1977
Auxiliary organizations A-P, 1977
Auxiliary organizations S-Z, 1977
Box
1978/032-9 Other states' meetings, 1977
[Note: Contains limited information from Colorado, Connecticut, Georgia, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Wisconsin. A letter from Ann Ashmore dated June 22, 1977, outlining protestor's tactics in Oklahoma is found in "Ann Richards' files on elections, 1977," within the series Nominations committee files. Two memos from Bella Abzug are found in "Newsletters, memos, and bulletins, 1977," within the series Executive committee files; one dated June 2, 1977, contains a "shopping list of charges against the Georgia Coordinating Committee" and the other dated June 9, 1977, opposes the adoption of the phrase "racism - Zionism" at the Connecticut conference.]
Outreach correspondence and notes, 1977
Chicano advisory committee, 1977
[Note: An audiocassette of a Texas Women's Meeting radio news release in Spanish and English is found within the series Public relations committee files.]



Arrangements committee files, 1977,
2.8 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's arrangements committee was chaired by Carol Hatfield and was responsible for child care, credentials, transportation, housing, registration, resolutions, rules, and personnel. The bulk of the records are individual registration forms providing basic information from attendees such as name, address, phone number, registration fee amount, child care needs, intentions to vote or only observe, and to attend Saturday night activities. Many, but not all of the forms, also denote the attendees' age, income, religion, race, occupation, homemaker status, and any women's group affiliations. Additional types of records found in this series are correspondence; bus and hotel reservation forms; child care bids; schedules, menus, permission slips, and medical release forms for children; agreements for meetings sites; copies of final resolutions adopted; and a few rejected resolutions. All records were created in 1977.
Arrangement
These records are arranged topically according to the activities that fell under the arrangement committee responsibilities and within each topic they are arranged as closely to how they were received as possible. Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing. Registration lists were printed alphabetically. Door registrants and completed pre-registration forms are arranged alphabetically. Correspondence is arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Arrangements committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Box
1978/032-9 Child care, 1977
Transportation, 1977
Housing and sites, 1977
Printed registration list, 1977
Door registrants, 1977
Completed registration forms, A, 1977
Box
1978/032-10 Completed registration forms, B, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, C, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, D, 1977
Completed registration forms, E, 1977
Box
1978/032-11 Completed registration forms, F, 1977
Completed registration forms, G, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, H, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, I-J, 1977
Box
1978/032-12 Completed registration forms, K, 1977
Completed registration forms, L, 1977
Completed registration forms, M, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, N, 1977
Completed registration forms, O, 1977
Box
1978/032-13 Completed registration forms, P-Q, 1977
Completed registration forms, R, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, S, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, T, 1977
Box
1978/032-14 Completed registration forms, U-V, 1977
Completed registration forms, W, 1977
[2 folders]
Completed registration forms, X-Z, 1977
1st draft resolutions in order appeared in printer, 1977
Resolutions adopted, 1977
Not used resolutions due to duplication, adding, 1977
Resolutions – miscellanous, 1977
Arrangements – miscellaneous, 1977



Program committee files, 1977,
15.7 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's program committee was chaired by Judith Guthrie and was responsible for scheduling entertainment, workshops, reaction sessions, and caucus rooms for the meeting, and for arranging to have the Texas exhibit and a photograph album created. Program committee files, dating 1977, consist of registration packets for the National Women's Conference and the Texas Women's Meeting; five audiocassette recordings of floor interviews conducted at the Texas Women's Meeting; a photograph album (dismantled for preservation purposes); correspondence and photographs for the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference; notes about the workshop, reaction session and caucus room discussions; correspondence about entertainment and exhibits at the Texas meeting; and conference buttons. Several large exhibit panels were assembled by Texas Woman's University on behalf of the Texas Coordinating Committee for the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference.
The photograph album contains letters and photographs from prominent Texas women. Each received a letter inviting her to share her thoughts on "what they hope to see accomplished at the upcoming National Women's Conference in particular and in the remaining years of the International Women's Decade." The letters received are accompanied by a photograph of the writer, though not all writers sent a photograph with their letter. The album includes the letter of invitation and a black-and-white image of the Pioneer Woman statue by Leo Friedlander at Texas Woman's University, which was placed on the first page of the album. The Texas exhibit committee, a subcommittee of the program committee, sent the letters of invitation on behalf of Texas Woman's University, which created the Texas exhibit for display at the National Women's Conference.
The folder of material for the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Committee contains mainly press releases about the exhibit. The exhibit was deconstructed when it was received by the State Archives.
A U-matic videocassette of Remember the Ladies, produced by the Lyndon Baines Johnson School of Public Affairs, is included in the series Public relations committee files.
Arrangement
These records are arranged topically according to the activities that fell under the program committee's responsibilities, and within each topic they are arranged as closely to how they were received as possible. Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Program committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Other Formats for the Records
Photographs, the photograph album, and floor interviews have been digitized and are part of the Texas Digital Archive, available online at https://tsl.access.preservica.com/manuscripts/tx-intl-womens-committee.
Restrictions on Access
Researchers wishing to access the Texas exhibit panels from the National Women's Conference must contact State Archives staff to make arrangements.
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the State Archives when reviewing photographic materials and negatives.
Due to the fragility of the audiocassettes, the digital copies must be used instead of the original tapes. Transcripts are not available at this time. Researchers may examine the physical tapes but are not allowed to listen to them on playback equipment.
Box
1978/032-8 Floor interviews conducted at the Texas Women's Meeting, June 24-26, 1977
[5 audiocassettes]
[Note: These recordings have been digitized. One of the audiocassettes is blank and is not included in the Texas Digital Archive.]
Box
1978/032-14 National Women's Conference registration packet, 1977
Box
1978/032-15 Texas Women's Meeting registration packets, 1977
[Four loose registration packets, each with a different composition.]
Conference buttons, 1977
[in loose envelope]
Texas exhibit at the national conference, 1977
Box
1978/032-17 Exhibit mounted photographs, 1977
[34 black-and-white photographs ranging between 3 3/4 x 5-inch to 6 x 10-inch]
[Note: These items have been digitized.]
Artifact
ATF0512 Exhibit panels, 1977
[These are six wood panels, each measuring 42 x 48 inches and hinged in pairs. The title "texas women on the move" in lowercase text appears above black-and-white graphic designs featuring images of women. The panels are stored in a crate.]
Box
1978/032-15 Photograph album, 1977
[includes 11 black-and-white photographs ranging from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2-inch to 7 x 10-inch and 2 color photographs measuring 2 1/8 x 3 1/4-inch and 4 x 4 1/2-inch]
[Note: The contents of the photo album have been digitized.]
[This photograph album was placed on the table with the Texas exhibit at the National Women's Conference. It contained an invitation letter and responses from many leading Texas women about their hopes for IWY including Betty Anderson, Lupe Anguiano, Deane Armstrong, Vivian Castleberry, Lila Cockwell, Edith Deen, Carol Hatfield, Anita Hill, Sarah T. Hughes, Mary Evelyn Blagg Huey, Iola Johnson, Chris Miller, Jane H. Macon, Owanah Parker, Barbara B. Reagan, Ann Richards, Lorene L. Rogers, Lola W. Smith, Dora Dougherty Strothers, Hermine D. Tobolowsky, and Nikki R. Van Hightower.]
Exhibits, 1977
Films, 1977
[Note: No film recordings are included in this folder.]
Entertainment and social functions, 1977
Workshops, reaction sessions, and caucus rooms, 1977
Keynote speaker (C. DeLores Tucker), 1977
[includes one 4 x 6-inch black-and-white photograph and one negative strip]
[Note: The photograph and negatives have been digitized.]



Nominations committee files, 1977,
0.8 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. The Texas Coordinating Committee's nominations committee was chaired by Ann Richards and was responsible for overseeing the delegate nominations and voting as well as notifying members and the national committee of the delegates selected. The records are delegate nominee registration forms and résumés, correspondence, copies of delegate nomination forms with the number votes each delegate received, rules and procedures, volunteer assignments, floor plans, printed copies of election results, and election tally sheets, all dating 1977. The Texas delegates to the national conference were to represent the general population of Texas women. To ensure equal representation, the committee tracked demographic information. The nomination forms denote demographic information.
Arrangement
These records are predominately arranged in the order they were received and are divided into different phases of the election process (nominees, voting results, and delegates selected). Some documents are duplicated elsewhere and some were reintegrated after the initial processing. Nomination forms and résumés are loosely arranged alphabetically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Nominations committee files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Other Formats for the Records
Tally sheets have been digitized and are part of the Texas Digital Archive, available online at https://tsl.access.preservica.com/manuscripts/tx-intl-womens-committee.
Restrictions on Access
Records within this series contained restricted information (social security numbers), which has been redacted in accordance with Texas Government Code, Section 552.101.
Technical Requirements
The size of the tally sheets may impose photocopy limitations on researchers.
Box
1978/032-15 Ann Richards' file on the nominating committee, 1977
[Contains reports, correspondence, rules and procedures, demographic tallies of potential nominees, and delegate nominees selected by the nominations committee.]
Ann Richards' file on elections, 1977
Box
1978/032-16 Demographic tallies, 1977
Nominee and delegate lists, 1977
Nomination forms and résumés, originals, A-L, 1977
[Social security numbers have been redacted from these materials for privacy reasons.]
Nomination forms and résumés, originals, M-Z, 1977
Nomination forms and résumés, copies, 1977
Election records with number of votes, 1977
[2 folders]
[Note: See also "Tally sheets and map" folder below.]
Nominations correspondence, 1977
Nominations – miscellaneous, 1977
Map-drawer Folder
139 1978/032-18 Tally sheets and map, 1977
[Note: These oversize items have been digitized. They were originally filed within the "Election records with number of votes" folders above.]



Opposition files, 1977,
0.1 cubic ft.

The Texas International Women's Year (IWY) Coordinating Committee, also known as the Texas Coordinating Committee, was created by Congress in December 1975 with the passage of Public Law 94-167 (HR 9924, 94th Congress, 1975-1977) for the purpose of holding state meetings to elect delegates and adopt resolutions that promoted equal rights for women to present at the National Women's Conference, which presented the nationally adopted resolutions to Congress. No committee was created by the Texas Coordinating Committee to handle protestors, as security was not addressed until other state meetings were disrupted or monopolized by critics. This series was created by grouping together two individual folders received with the records but not identified as belonging to any specific committee. The folders contain correspondence, fliers, and press material, dating 1977, about dissenting organizations such as the Eagle Forum, suggestions of how to maintain control during state meetings and workshops, and adverse publicity published about IWY and its subsequent activities.
Other materials regarding opposition to the meeting are found in other series: "Newsletters, memos, and bulletins, 1977," within the series Executive committee files contains two memos from Bella Abzug; one dated June 2, 1977, includes a "shopping list of charges against the Georgia Coordinating Committee," and the other dated June 9, 1977, opposes the adoption of the phrase "racism – Zionism" at the Connecticut conference. A letter from Bella Abzug dated April 4, 1977, with a response to a misleading article opposing the IWY and the article is found in "Public relations correspondence and notes, 1977," within the series Public relations committee files. "For Immediate Press Release," written by Frances Easley (not a member of the Texas Coordinating Committee) admonishing the Texas meeting and the national conference, and a letter from Ann Ashmore dated June 22, 1977, outlining protestor's tactics in Oklahoma, are found in "Ann Richards' files on elections, 1977," within the series Nominations committee files.
Arrangement
The records are arranged as they were received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Opposition files, Texas International Women's Year Coordinating Committee records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Box
1978/032-16 Protests – minority reports, 1977
Security, 1977