Texas State Library and Archives Commission

An Inventory of the Blueprints and Drawings Collection at the Texas State Archives, 1854-1984, undated, bulk 1936-1938



Title: Blueprints and drawings collection
Dates: 1854-1984, undated
Dates: bulk 1936-1938
Abstract: The Blueprints and drawings collection offers a historical perspective on the construction of public works and public expenditure on art and architecture, particularly in relation to the Texas Centennial. Records comprise blueprints, plats, linen prints, pen and pencil drawings, Photostats, specifications, contracts, leases, bonds, notes, and schedules that detail the plans for additions, renovations, and construction of state buildings and monuments, dating from 1854 to 1984 and undated, with gaps throughout, bulk dating 1936-1938. Most of the prints and drawings document construction of public institutions managed by the Texas State Board of Control and include facilities to house the mentally ill, physically disabled, juvenile delinquent, and other dependent populations. The materials also reflect construction done for special functions, such as building monuments for the Texas Centennial Celebration. A few sets of drawings are present for buildings on state university campuses and for state buildings in the State Capitol Complex area.
Quantity: 41.21 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written in English.

Agency History of the Texas State Board of Control

The Texas State Board of Control was created in 1919 by the 36th Texas Legislature (Senate Bill 147, Regular Session), becoming operational on January 1, 1920. Composed of three members appointed by the Governor, the Board of Control was given several responsibilities and duties after several agencies and offices were abolished by the same legislation that created the Board of Control.

The Board acted as a purchasing agent for several institutions and agencies, and also had control of the state eleemosynary institutions (state schools, hospitals and sanatoriums, orphanages, juvenile training schools). The Board had joint supervision of some state parks (including San Jacinto, Goliad, and Fannin State Parks), as well as control of maintenance of the Capitol and other state office buildings. In this capacity the Board contracted for all construction, repairs, and improvements made for the eleemosynary institutions and other state agencies; designed and prepared the plans and specifications used in construction projects and machinery and equipment repairs; leased public grounds; rented offices and buildings when needed for state agencies; sold property of the state when no longer needed; and prepared the biennial appropriation budget for the state. The Texas Relief Commission was added to the Board in 1934 (House Bill 1, 43rd Legislature, 3rd Called Session) and the Old Age Assistance Commission was added in 1936 (House Bill 8, 44th Legislature, 3rd Called Session).

Over the years many of the duties of the Board were transferred to other agencies. In 1939 the 46th Legislature (Senate Bill 36, Regular Session) created the Texas State Department of Public Welfare, and in 1949 control of all eleemosynary institutions was transferred to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools and the Texas Youth Development Council (House Bill 1, 51st Legislature, Regular Session). Additional legislation in 1949 (House Bill 120, 51st Legislature, Regular Session) transferred control and custody of all state historical parks, except the San Jacinto State Park and Memorial Tower, Fannin State Park and the Battleship Texas, to the control and custody of the Texas State Parks Board.

In 1953 the Board of Control was reorganized (Senate Bill 77, 53rd Legislature, Regular Session). The Board still maintained three members, appointed by the Governor to six-year overlapping terms, but the chair was now appointed by the Governor. Also, an Executive Director was hired to handle administrative and other duties. The duties and responsibilities of the Board remained the same. The Board of Control was abolished in 1979 (House Bill 1673, 66th Legislature, Regular Session); its duties and responsibilities were transferred to the newly created Texas State Purchasing and General Services Commission. In 1991 the agency was renamed the General Services Commission. In 2001 the agency was abolished and replaced by the building and Procurement Commission, with some functions transferring to other agencies (Senate Bill 311, 77th Legislature, Regular Session). In 2007 the agency was renamed the Texas Facilities Commission and its functions not related to state facilities were transferred to the Texas Comptroller's Office (House Bill 3560, 80th Legislature, Regular Session).

(Sources include: the administrative history from Texas State Board of Control records, 1854, 1885-1890, 1909-1979, undated, bulk 1935-1953.)


Agency History of the Texas Centennial Commission of Control

Marking 100 years of Texas independence, the Texas Centennial was officially celebrated in 1936. On February 12, 1924, the Texas Centennial Board of One Hundred was established to help plan centennial celebrations and instruct the legislature on financial planning. A permanent Commission - Texas Commission of Control for Texas Centennial Celebrations was established by the 44th Texas Legislature in 1935 (House Bill 11, Regular Session). Beginning in 1935, celebrations occurred across the state, including in Gonzales, San Antonio, El Paso, Livingston, Galveston, Houston, Dallas, and Fort Worth. Many buildings and forts were restored, multiple statues of Texas heroes were erected, and monuments were created that commemorated the special events of the Centennial.

The Commission of Control worked with the Advisory Board of Texas Historians, the Work Projects Administration (first known as the Works Progress Administration), and the Texas Highway Department to coordinate programs and to provide permanence to the centennial observance by the erection of permanent buildings, monuments, statues, and grave markers. Permanent buildings that received financial assistance from the Commission of Control included the Hall of State at Dallas; the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum at Canyon; the Texas Memorial Museum at Austin; the Sam Houston Memorial Museum at Huntsville; the Corpus Christi Centennial Museum; the West Texas Museum at Lubbock; the Big Bend Historical Museum at Alpine; the Alamo Museum at San Antonio; the Gonzales Memorial Museum; the David Crockett Memorial building at Crockett; the Memorial Auditorium and Stadium at Goliad; the Pioneers, Trail Drivers and Rangers Memorial at San Antonio; and the San Jacinto Monument and Museum of History near Houston.

(Sources include: the administrative history from Texas Centennial Commission of Control records, 1926, 1934-1940.)


Scope and Contents of the Collection

The Blueprints and drawings collection offers a historical perspective on the construction of public works and public expenditure on art and architecture, particularly in relation to the Texas Centennial. Records comprise blueprints, plats, linen prints, pen and pencil drawings, Photostats, specifications, contracts, leases, bonds, notes, and schedules that detail the plans for additions, renovations, and construction of state buildings and monuments, dating from 1854 to 1984 and undated, with gaps throughout, bulk dating 1936-1938. The blueprints include the names of architects, architecture firms and state administrators who approved these plans.

Most of the prints and drawings document construction of public institutions managed by the Texas State Board of Control and include facilities to house the mentally ill, physically disabled, juvenile delinquent and other dependent populations. The materials also reflect construction done for special functions, such as building monuments for the Texas Centennial Celebration. A few sets of drawings are present for buildings on state university campuses and for state buildings in the State Capitol Complex area.

This finding aid was adapted from an item-level inventory created during an initial review of the collection in the 1980s.


 

Organization of the Collection

These records are organized into 71 series alphabetically by the name of the institution, building, or monument. In many cases the building or institutional name has changed over the years, and the most recent or most commonly known name is used.
Abilene State School, 1899-1904, undated, 1.66 cubic ft.
Alamo Cenotaph, 1937, 0.22 cubic ft.
Alamo Chapel, 1936, 0.1 cubic ft.
Alamo Gift Museum, 1913, 1932, 1935-1939, undated, 0.95 cubic ft.
Armory for the State of Texas, Camp Mabry, 1915, 0.22 cubic ft.
Austin State Hospital, 1901, 1907, 1909-1910, 1913-1917, undated, 4.73 cubic ft.
Austin State School, 1916-1917, 1929, 1931, 0.94 cubic ft.
Big Bend Memorial Museum, about 1936, 0.22 cubic ft.
Caddo Lake State Park, 1938, 0.22 cubic ft.
Centennial memorials, 1937, 0.22 cubic ft.
Confederate Woman's Home, 1912, 0.32 cubic ft.
Corpus Christi Centennial Museum, 1938, 0.22 cubic ft.
Corsicana State Home, 1911, 1915, undated, 0.87 cubic ft.
David Crockett Memorial Building, 1936, 0.22 cubic ft.
El Paso Centennial Museum, 1936, 0.35 cubic ft.
Erath Arches, about 1936, 0.17 cubic ft.
Fannin Battleground State Historic Site, about 1937, 0.11 cubic ft.
Fannin Memorial Monument, 1937, undated, 0.47 cubic ft.
Fireproofing and fire protection, 1896, 1912-1913, undated, 0.22 cubic ft.
First Shot Fired For Texas Independence monument, about 1936, 0.18 cubic ft.
Fort Belknap, 1936, fractional
Fort Concho Museum, 1936, fractional
Fort Graham, about 1936, 0.15 cubic ft.
Fort Inglish, about 1936, fractional
Fort Parker, 1935-1936, undated, 0.35 cubic ft.
Fort Richardson, about 1936, 0.11 cubic ft.
French Legation Museum, 1953, 0.11 cubic ft.
Gatesville State School for Boys, 1907, 1911-1912, undated, 0.37 cubic ft.
General Land Office Building, 1854, 1956-1957, 0.5 cubic ft.
Second General Land Office Building, 1916-1917, 0.25 cubic ft.
Goliad Memorial Auditorium, 1936, undated, 1.21 cubic ft.
Gonzales Memorial Museum and Amphitheatre, 1936-1937, 0.47 cubic ft.
Sam Houston Memorial Museum, 1936, 0.35 cubic ft.
Sam Houston Monument, 1907, 1909, 0.22 cubic ft.
Sam Houston Steamboat House, 1935, 0.25 cubic ft.
Irrigation Proposition for Zavala Land and Irrigation Company at La Pryor, 1911, undated, 0.45 cubic ft.
Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building, 1967, 1969, undated, 1.21 cubic ft.
General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument, 1902-1903, undated, 0.32 cubic ft.
Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, 1909-1914, 1958-1960, undated, 1.11 cubic ft.
Monument Hill Tomb, 1936, 0.11 cubic ft.
Old Stone Fort, 1936, 0.22 cubic ft.
Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, 1936, 0.11 cubic ft.
Peabody Memorial Library, Sam Houston State University, 1902, 0.25 cubic ft.
Prairie View A&M University, 1899, undated, 0.54 cubic ft.
Presidio San Sabá, about 1936, 0.21 cubic ft.
San Antonio State Hospital, 1899, 1904, undated, 1.53 cubic ft.
San Jacinto Monument and Museum, 1914, 1935-1939, undated, 2.32 cubic ft.
San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission, 1936-1937, undated, 0.35 cubic ft.
James Smith Memorial Building, about 1936, 0.22 cubic ft.
State Insurance Building, 1960, 1962, 0.53 cubic ft.
Sunken Garden Amphitheatre, 1936-1937, undated, 0.7 cubic ft.
Terrell State Hospital, 1899, 1905, 1909, undated, 2.53 cubic ft.
Texas A&M University, 1899, 1902, 0.77 cubic ft.
Texas Confederate Home, 1901, 1903, 0.45 cubic ft.
Texas Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute for Colored Youth, 1910s, 0.22 cubic ft.
Texas Highway Department, undated, 0.77 cubic ft.
Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers and Rangers Memorial, 1936-1937, undated, 0.45 cubic ft.
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 1902-1903, 1911-1912, undated, 1.73 cubic ft.
Texas School for the Deaf, 1901, 1915-1916, 1920s, undated, 2.48 cubic ft.
Texas State Library and Historical Commission storage areas in the Texas State Capitol, 1909-1914, undated, 0.35 cubic ft.
Texas State University-San Marcos, 1906, 1909, undated, 0.54 cubic ft.
Texas Woman's University, 1902, 0.32 cubic ft.
Texas Woman's University Pioneer Woman Memorial, 1937, 0.11 cubic ft.
Tom Green County Library, 1930s, 0.44 cubic ft.
Troup Experiment Station, 1902, undated, 0.45 cubic ft.
University of North Texas school building, 1903, 0.32 cubic ft.
University of Texas at Austin, 1902, 1904, 1.1 cubic ft.
Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site, 1936, 0.35 cubic ft.
West Texas A&M University, about 1910, 0.35 cubic ft.
West Texas Museum, 1930s-1940s, 0.35 cubic ft.
Western Normal and Commercial School, mid-1880s, fractional

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Some blueprints may be too large to photocopy. Due to age and deterioration, certain blueprints may require assistance to view or may be unavailable for research until preservation measures have been undertaken.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Agopoff, Agop Minass, 1905-1983.
Angel, John, 1881-1960.
Baker, Bryant, 1881-1970.
Cecere, Gaetano, 1894-1985.
Cerracchio, Enrico Filiberto, 1880-1956.
Coppini, Pompeo, 1870-1957.
Friedlander, Leo, 1888-1966.
Josset, Raoul, 1899-1957.
Keck, Charles, 1875-1951.
MacLeary, Bonnie, 1890?-1971.
Muench, Julian Rhodes, 1905-1965.
Ney, Elisabet, 1833-1907.
Tauch, Waldine, 1892-
Tennant, Allie Victoria, 1898?-1971.
Waugh, Sidney, 1904-1963.
Pryor, Isaac Thomas, 1852-1937.
Ayres, Atlee Bernard, 1873-1969.
Giesecke, Frederick E. (Frederick Ernest), 1869-1953.
Nelson, Donald S., 1907-1992.
O'Connor, J.L., (James L.) 1870?-1902.
Page, Charles Henry, 1876-1957.
Phelps, Henry Truman, 1871-1944.
Smith, Harvey Partridge, 1889-1964.
Corporate Names:
Abilene State School--Design and construction.
Austin State Hospital (Austin, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Austin State School--Design and construction.
Texas Confederate Woman's Home--Design and construction.
Corsicana State Home--Design and construction.
Fort Concho Museum--Design and construction.
French Legation (Austin, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Gatesville State School for Boys (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Austin, Tex.)--Design and construction.
North Texas State University--Design and construction.
Old Stone Fort (Nacogdoches, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Prairie View A & M University--Design and construction.
Sul Ross State University--Design and construction.
San Antonio State Hospital--Design and construction.
Texas A & M University--Design and construction.
Texas Confederate Home--Design and construction.
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired--Design and construction.
Texas School for the Deaf--Design and construction.
Texas State Library and Archives Commission--Design and construction.
Terrell State Hospital--Design and construction.
Texas State University-San Marcos--Design and construction.
Texas Tech University--Design and construction.
Texas Woman's University--Design and construction.
University of Texas at Austin--Design and construction.
West Texas A & M University--Design and construction.
Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum--Design and construction.
Sam Houston State University--Design and construction.
Southwestern Insane Asylum (Tex.)--Design and construction.
San Jacinto Museum of History--Design and construction.
Mission San Jose y San Miguel de Aguayo (San Antonio, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Sunken Garden Theater (San Antonio, Tex.)--Design and construction.
North Texas Lunatic Asylum--Design and construction.
Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum--Design and construction.
Texas Agricultural Extension Service--Design and construction.
Texas Centennial (1936: Dallas, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Texas. General Land Office--Design and construction.
Texas. State Board of Control--Public buildings--Design and construction.
Texas. State Orphan Home.--Design and construction.
El Paso Centennial Museum--Design and construction.
Texas. House of Correction and Reformatory.--Design and construction.
Goliad Memorial Museum--Design and construction.
Sam Houston Memorial Museum--Design and construction.
Texas Facilities Commission--Public buildings--Design and construction.
Subjects:
Architects--Texas.
Architecture--Specifications--Texas.
Architecture--Texas--Designs and plans.
Public architecture--Texas.
Public institutions--Texas--Design and construction.
Public institutions--Texas--Maintenance and repair.
Public institutions--Specifications--Texas.
Public buildings--Specifications--Texas.
Public buildings--Texas--Design and construction.
Public buildings--Texas--Maintenance and repair.
Universities and colleges--Texas--Buildings--Design and construction.
Historic parks--Texas--Design and construction.
Memorials--Texas--Design and construction.
Monuments--Texas--Design and construction.
Asylums--Texas--Design and construction.
Juvenile detention homes--Texas--Design and construction.
Orphanages--Texas--Design and construction.
Reformatories--Texas--Design and construction.
Epilepsy--Hospitals--Texas--Design and construction.
Psychiatric hospitals--Texas--Design and construction.
Tuberculosis--Hospitals--Texas--Design and construction.
Blind--Institutional care--Public buildings--Texas--Design and construction.
Children--Institutional care--Public buildings--Texas--Design and construction.
Deaf--Institutional care--Public buildings--Texas--Design and construction.
Mentally ill--Institutional care--Public buildings--Texas--Design and construction.
Armories--Texas--Design and construction.
Museums--Texas--Design and construction.
Places:
Abilene (Tex.)--Public institutions--Design and construction.
Austin (Tex.)--Public institutions--Design and construction.
San Antonio (Tex.)--Public institutions--Design and construction.
Texas--Capitol and capital.
Texas--Centennial celebrations, etc.
Texas--Public works--Design and construction.
Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Caddo Lake State Park (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Camp Mabry (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Fannin Battleground State Historic Site--Design and construction.
Fannin Memorial Monument--Design and construction.
Goliad State Park (Tex.)--Monuments--Design and construction.
Fort Belknap (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Fort Graham (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Fort Inglish (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Fort Parker State Park (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Fort Richardson (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Goliad State Park (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Sam Houston Monument (Huntsville, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Sam Houston Steamboat House (Huntsville, Tex.)--Design and construction.
General Albert Sydney Johnston Monument (Austin, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Monument Hill State Historic Site (Tex.)--Design and construction.
Tom Green County (Tex.)--Public buildings--Design and construction.
Washington State Park (Tex.)--Design and construction.
San Jacinto Monument--Design and construction.
Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers, Rangers Memorial (San Antonio, Tex.)--Design and construction.
Presidio San Luis de las Amarillas--Design and construction.
Document Types:
Architectural drawing (visual works)--Texas--Public institutions--before 1950.
Blueprints (reprographic copies)--Texas--Monuments--before 1950.
Blueprints (reprographic copies)--Texas--Public buildings--before 1950.
Blueprints (reprographic copies)--Texas--Public institutions--before 1984.
Blueprints (reprographic copies)--Texas--Museums--before 1984.
Blueprints--Texas--State libraries--before 1984.
Specifications--Texas--Monuments--before 1950.
Specifications--Texas--Public institutions--before 1950.
Specifications--Texas--Texas centennial celebrations, etc.--before 1950.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Centennial Commission records, 1936, 2 feet, 1 inch
Texas Centennial of Statehood Commission report, 1936, 1947, two items
Texas Centennial records, 1934-1936, 1965, 10 inches
Texas Centennial scrapbooks collection, about 1936, 14 volumes
Texas Commission of Control for Texas Centennial Celebrations records, 1926, 1934-1940, 33.29 cubic ft.
Texas Facilities Commission, Lorenzo de Zavala Texas State Archives and Library Building construction photographs, 1959-1961, 0.5 cubic ft. [There is no finding aid for these records. Call number is PP1216 (2013/159).]
Texas General Services Commission records, 1949-1987, 0.8 cubic ft.
Texas Governor James V Allred records, 1931-1939, bulk 1935-1938, 54.05 cubic ft.
Texas Military Facilities Commission records, 1921-2007, 63.22 cubic ft.
Texas State Board of Control building records and contracts, 1854, 1885, 1909-1949,1967, undated, bulk 1920-1928, 6.44 cubic ft.
Texas State Board of Control records, 1854, 1885-1890, 1909-1979, undated, bulk 1935-1953, 103.47 cubic ft.
Texas State Building Commission records on monuments, 1955-1963, 1 cubic ft.
Alexander Architectural Archive, University of Texas at Austin
Ayres & Ayres, Architects; Atlee Bernard Ayres (1873-1969), Robert Moss Ayres (1898-1977); Architectural drawings, photographs and records, San Antonio, South and Central Texas, 1894-1977, 12,000 drawings, 18 linear feet of architectural records, 9000 photographs. Unprocessed material yet to be measured.
George Dahl papers, 1916-1991, 5.5 linear ft.
Greene LaRoche and Dahl Collection, Drawings, 1902-1953, 839 drawings
Raoul Josset (1899-1957) Archival records and photographs, Public Art Commissions, 1927-1967, 2.5 linear feet of manuscript material, 206 photographs, 22 negatives
Donald S. Nelson (1907-1992) Architectural records, drawings, photographs, Dallas, Texas, 1910-1975, 6,360 drawings, 80 linear feet of architectural records, 1,260 photographs
University of Texas Buildings Collection, Drawings and manuscript material, 1882-ongoing, 10,000+ drawings, 164+ linear feet of manuscript material

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: unknown

This is an artificial collection of blueprints and architectural drawings of Texas public buildings and monuments deposited in the Texas State Archives at various times by different donors. A portion of the materials were conveyed to the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas State Board of Control at some point before its closure in 1979.

Processing Information

Collection minimally processed by staff archivists in the 1980s

DACS-compliant finding aid and XML markup completed by Catherine Bell, Franny Gaede, and Austin Hixson of the University of Texas at Austin's School of Information, fall 2012


Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Abilene State School, 1899-1904, undated,
1.66 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located outside the city limits of Abilene, Texas, the Abilene State Epileptic Colony was established in 1901 by the 27th Texas Legislature (House Bill 365, Regular Session). The colony consisted of 640 acres of land, forty of which were used for a campus of brick buildings and the rest reserved for pasture and cultivation. The first patients were admitted on March 26, 1904. The original board of managers was replaced by the Texas State Board of Control when it was created in 1919 by the state legislature. The institution was renamed the Abilene State Hospital in 1925 when it began to admit those with both epilepsy and mental illness. The Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools gained responsibility for the Abilene State Hospital in 1949. Black patients began to be admitted in 1952. The institution changed names again in 1957, becoming the Abilene State School, at which time the institution became a residential center for the mentally ill. By 1964 the original structures had been replaced and livestock operations had ceased. In 1965 the Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools was abolished and replaced by the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation. More additions were made to the institution, and by 1993 there were seventy-five buildings in operation. The institution became known as the Abilene State Supported Living Center in 2009 (Senate Bill 643, 81st Texas Legislature, Regular Session).
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting buildings at the Abilene State Epileptic Colony (later the Abilene State Hospital, Abilene State School, and since 2009 the Abilene State Supported Living Center) consist of plans, elevations, and sections of the laundry building, bakery building and barn, as well as details of tunnels running throughout the grounds. Associated papers contain letters to the Texas General Land Office and specifications for buildings. Dates covered are 1899-1904, undated.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Abilene State School, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1899-1904
Box
821-90 Letters, 1899-1900:
Letter by commissioners to governor about school land, March 13, 1899
Letter from General Land Office, April 16, 1899
Letter from Attorney General's Office, February 23, 1900
Bonds, contracts, and specifications, 1903-1904:
Specifications for the general work
Specifications for plumbing, sewerage and electric work
Contract, September 11, 1903
Contract, September 11, 1903
Bond, September 19, 1903
Bond, September 11, 1903
Specifications for a septic tank
Contract, July 16, 1904
Specifications for a septic tank
Specifications, 1901-1902:
Specifications of the material and labor, October 15, 1901
Specifications of the material and labor for plumbing and electric, January 15, 1902
Specifications for the power and electric plant, water supply system, and heating and ventilation apparatus
Blueprints and drawings, 1901-1904
Box
821-1 Laundry building, William Procter Preston, Architect, September 11, 1903:
Floor plan and longitudinal section
Elevations and sections
Bakery building, plan, elevations and section, William Procter Preston, Architect, September 11, 1903
Barn, William Procter Preston, Architect, September 11, 1903:
Main plan, section, and elevation
Second floor plan and longitudinal section
Plat showing location of buildings, William Procter Preston, Architect, September 11, 1903
Septic tank, plan and sections, William Procter Preston, Architect, May 25, 1904
Box
821-2 Steam heating plans, "Paul system," unknown architect, January 3, 1903:
General boiler room plan
Details of fresh air inlets for D. I. radiators
Basement plan of administration building
First floor plan of administration building
Second floor plan of administration building
Basement plan of hospital
First floor plan of hospital
Second floor plan of hospital
Third floor plan of hospital
Detail of flues in walls of hospital
Basement plan of cottages
First floor plan of cottages
Second floor plan of cottages
Plan of power house
Plat showing location of buildings, J.L. O'Connor, Architect, January 3, 1903
Box
821-3 Jos. McWilliams and Co., contractors, 1901-1903, undated:
Detail of pipe rack for tunnel, undated
Cast iron anchor plates to be used on anchor bolts, May 31, 1902
Sketch showing sections of tunnel and location of pipe in tunnel, May 7, 1902
Details of tunnel showing anchor bolts, May 31, 1902
Profile showing sections of tunnel, January 3, 1903
Details of flues in walls of hospital building, January 3, 1903
Plat of buildings and grounds, January 3, 1903
Box
821-4 Administration building, J.L. O'Connor, Architect, October 15, 1901:
Plat of buildings and grounds
Cover sheet for plans, sections and elevations
Folder
821-4 Basement
First floor
Second floor
Section
Front elevation
Rear elevation
Side elevation
Box
821-5 Hospital building, J.L. O'Connor, Architect, October 15, 1901:
Basement
First floor
Second floor
Roof
Front elevation
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Section



 

Alamo Cenotaph, 1937,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located on the Alamo Plaza in San Antonio, Texas, the Alamo Cenotaph was erected in 1939 by the Texas Centennial Commission. The sculptor of the monument was Pompeo Coppini. Architectural firm Adams and Adams designed the monument and Frank T. Drought was the consulting engineer. The Cenotaph represents the spirit of Texas and features images of James Bowie, James Bonham, William B. Travis and David Crockett, and lists the names of men who died in the battle of the Alamo.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Seven blueprints of the Alamo Cenotaph consist of section and details, as well as elevations and footing plans, prepared by Adams and Adams, Architects, and Pompeo Coppini, sculptor. All prints are dated 1937.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Alamo Cenotaph, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-7 Plans and drawings, November 1937:
Section B-B, November 20, 1937
Footing plan, November 5, 1937
Sections A-A and B-B, November 5, 1937
Plans and sections, November 5, 1937
Plans and details, November 5, 1937
North, west and south elevations, November 5, 1937
Sections, November 5, 1937



 

Alamo Chapel, 1936,
0.1 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located in San Antonio, Texas, the chapel of the Alamo (also referred to as the Shrine building within the Alamo complex) was originally San Antonio de Valero Mission (first referred to as San Antonio de Padua), authorized by the viceroy of Mexico in 1716 and established in 1718. The mission was named in honor of Saint Anthony de Padua and the Duke of Valero, the Spanish viceroy. The present site was selected in 1724, and the cornerstone of the chapel was laid on May 8, 1744. Founded for the purpose of Christianizing and educating the Indians, the mission later became a fortress and was the scene of many conflicts prior to the siege of 1836. The mission was abandoned in 1793. The name Alamo may derive from the occupation of the structure in the early nineteenth century by a company of Spanish soldiers from Álamo de Parras, Coahuila, Mexico, or from a grove of cottonwood (álamo) trees growing on the banks of the acequia. The Alamo was occupied by Mexican forces almost continuously from 1803 to December 1835, when the fortress under Gen. Martín Perfecto de Cos was surrendered to Texan forces. On February 23, 1836, Mexican forces under the command of Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna besieged Col. William B. Travis and his Texas garrison in the Alamo. The siege of the Alamo lasted thirteen days, ending on March 6 with a complete loss of all the combatant Texans and heavy damages to the building. In 1841 the Republic of Texas passed an act returning the church of the Alamo to the Catholic Church.
After Texas was annexed to the United States, the Alamo became the nation's property, and in 1848 the U.S. government took over the building and grounds and used them for quartermaster purposes. Claims of ownership by the city of San Antonio, the Catholic Church, and the U.S. government were settled when the United States eventually leased the property from the Catholic Church and made some improvements. During the Civil War the building was occupied by Confederate forces, and from the end of the war until 1876 it was again used by the U.S. government. Under an act of April 23, 1883, Texas purchased the Alamo property from the church and assigned custody to the city of San Antonio. The Texas Legislature passed a resolution in 1905 allowing the governor to purchase the Alamo fortress for preservation efforts (House Bill 1, 29th Legislature, Regular Session), and the property was transferred in trust to the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. Several appropriations for funds to improve the Alamo have been made, including a significant one in connection with the Texas Centennial. In 2011, the Texas General Land Office became the custodians of the Alamo and its surrounding grounds.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Seven blueprints of the Alamo Chapel consist of section and details, as well as elevations and footing plans, prepared by Henry T. Phelps, Architect. All prints are dated October 19, 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Alamo Chapel, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Folder
821-6 Plans and drawings, October 19, 1936:
Floor plan
Roof plan
South and front elevations
North and east elevations
Cross and longitudinal sections
Cross and longitudinal sections
Details



 

Alamo Gift Museum, 1913, 1932, 1935-1939, undated,
0.85 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Alamo Gift Museum was one of nine museums built as part of the Texas Centennial celebration in 1936. It is located on the grounds of the Alamo Plaza in San Antonio, Texas. The Texas Legislature passed a resolution in 1905 allowing the governor to purchase the Alamo fortress for preservation efforts (House Bill 1, 29th Legislature, Regular Session), and the property was transferred in trust to the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. In 2011, the Texas General Land Office became the custodians of the Alamo and its surrounding grounds. The Alamo Gift Museum houses exhibits about Texas history and the Texas Revolution and is one of two museums on the grounds.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of the Alamo Gift Museum include one set of restoration plans by Henry Phelps, which include the floor plans and elevations of the museum. Remaining blueprints include floor plans, framing plans, and details. Beam, footing, column, and slab schedules are included with these blueprints. Several detailed blueprints are for the show cases and furniture in the museum. Irrigation plans for the grounds, as well as the plot plan for the Alamo and Alamo Plaza are included. Associated papers consist of a newspaper clipping and a translation of Morfi's History of Texas. Dates are 1913, 1932, 1935-1939, and undated.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Alamo Gift Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1932, 1936
Box
821-90 Clippings:
Excerpt from Morfi's History of Texas as translated by Carlos Eduardo Castañeda, June 1932
San Antonio Express newspaper clipping, November 22, 1936
Blueprints and drawings, 1936
Box
821-8 Henry T. Phelps, Architect, December 21, 1936:
Basement and foundation plan
First floor framing plan
Second floor framing plan
Roof framing plan
Details and sections
Footing, column, slab, and beam schedules
Detail of arched roof beams and elevation of end framing
Details of stairs
Basement
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
East and north front elevations, section A-A, and details
South and west elevations and longitudinal sections
Sections and details
Details of iron gates, fences, and windows
Details of hinged and casement sash and frames
Cross section through building
Detail through A-A moulded course front and rear of building and stair details
Furniture plan
Basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Museum
Sprinkling system for Alamo Park
Folder
821-8 Landscape plan, with Day McNeel, Landscape Architect
Box
821-9 Harvey P. Smith, Architect, 1937, 1939, undated:
Irrigation system of the missions, plan of the acequias of the Alamo, undated
Plans for the museum, show cases and structural details, May 1, 1937
Floodlighting for Cenotaph, Alamo Plaza, September 25, 1939
Alamo plot plan, Harvey P. Smith, Architect; H.E. Kincaid, Landscape Architect, undated
Details of furniture to be installed in the museum, Henry T. Phelps, Architect, October 7, 1937
Fire station, Henry T. Phelps, Architect, October 10, 1938:
Floor plan
Roof plan
South and west elevations
North and east elevations
Interior door frames and trim
Exterior door frames
Folder
821-9 Development of grounds about the Alamo, Ernest B. Hays and Joe M. Gomez, Architects, H.E. Kincaid, Landscape Architect, January 1935
Folder
821-8 Alamo Plaza, City Engineer's Office, San Antonio, November 25, 1913



 

Armory for the State of Texas, Camp Mabry, 1915,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
Established in the 1890s, Camp Mabry was initially created for the training of the Texas National Guard. Located in northwest Austin, Texas, the camp is named after Woodford Haywood Mabry, the adjutant general of Texas from January 1891 to May 1898. The camp increased in size in 1909 with the addition of 200 acres, and again in 1911 when 400 more acres were added. Camp Mabry has been used for preparation during the Spanish-American War, World War I, and World War II. The state armory building was constructed in 1915 to house all the military stores that were relocated from the state Capitol. Until 1953, the camp served as a training ground for the Texas Rangers and the Texas Department of Public Safety. In 1954 the state adjutant general's office moved to Camp Mabry and the Texas National Guard State Officer Candidate School was established there in 1959. The Texas National Guard Academy opened at the camp in 1984. Along with warehouses and storage facilities, Camp Mabry is also the headquarters for the Texas Air National Guard, the Texas State Guard, the United States Property and Fiscal Office, the Texas National Guard Armory Board, and the Armory of the 49th Armored Division. With the celebration of Camp Mabry's 100th anniversary in 1992, the Texas Military Forces Museum was opened on its grounds.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Created by C.H. Page and Brother, Architects, blueprints for the Armory for the State of Texas at Camp Mabry consist of concrete support plans, floor plans, elevations, and details. Associated papers are specifications. These materials are dated 1915.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Armory for the State of Texas, Camp Mabry, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1915
Box
821-90 Complete specifications for armory building, C.H. Page and Brother, August 31, 1915
Blueprints and drawings, 1915
Box
821-10 C.H. Page and Brother, August 31, 1915:
Concrete supporting first floor and schedules
Concrete supporting balcony and schedules
Concrete supporting roof and schedules
Details and sections
Plan of first floor
Balcony floor plan
Elevations
Details and sections
C.H. Page and Brother, September 4, 1915:
Concrete supporting first floor and schedules
Concrete supporting balcony and schedules
Concrete supporting roof and schedules
Details and sections
Plan of first floor and schedules
Balcony floor plan
Elevations
Sections and details



 

Austin State Hospital, 1901, 1907, 1909-1910, 1913-1917, undated,
4.73 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Austin State Hospital was established in 1856 by the 6th Texas Legislature as the State Lunatic Asylum, and located in Austin, Texas, to treat and care for the mentally ill. It is the oldest such hospital in Texas. A board of five members appointed by the governor was initially in charge of the hospital. The Texas State Board of Control took over operations in January 1920 (House Bill 119, 36th Legislature, 3rd Called Session) and changed the name to Austin State Hospital in 1925. The hospital was designated an independent school district in 1940 and school-age patients were educated at the facility. Management was turned over to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools in 1949 and to the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation in 1993. As of 2012, the Texas Department of State Health Services operates the Austin State Hospital.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting buildings at the State Lunatic Asylum (later the Austin State Hospital) include blueprints of dormitories for black (colored or Negro was the term in use during this period) male and female patients, as well as additions made to already existing buildings and blueprints of the tuberculosis cottages built in 1909 and 1914. Associated papers contain specifications for each of the buildings represented in the blueprints. Dates covered are 1901, 1907, 1909-1910, 1913-1917, and undated.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Austin State Hospital, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1907, 1909-1910, 1913-1917, undated
Box
821-90 C.H. Page Jr., Architect, undated:
Specifications for two story and basement brick building
Specifications for porch and dome
C.H. Page Jr. and Bro., Architects, 1907:
Specifications for steam heating, electric wiring and plumbing in entire basement and all toilets and bathrooms, December 6, 1907
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, 1909:
Specifications of tuberculosis cottage, female patients, September 1909
Specifications of tuberculosis cottage, male patients, September 1909
Specifications of heating system for tuberculosis cottages, August 23, 1909
Specifications of plumbing and wiring female building
Specifications of plumbing and wiring male building
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 5, 1910:
Specifications of addition to colored male ward building
Specifications of addition to colored female ward building
Specifications of a tunnel
Specifications of steam heating and plumbing and electric wiring
Addition to colored dining hall
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, October 1913:
Specifications of hospital building
Specifications of heating, plumbing, and wiring
Uniform contract
[original]
Uniform contract
[duplicate]
Uniform contract
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, June 4, 1914:
Specifications for hospital building Negro women
Heating, plumbing, and wiring specifications for hospital building Negro women
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 5, 1915:
Heating, plumbing, and wiring specifications
Repair specifications
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, January 4, 1916:
General specifications for laundry building
Mechanical specifications for laundry building
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 28, 1916:
General specifications for cow barn
Plumbing and wiring specifications for cow barn
Blueprints and drawings, 1901, 1909-1910, 1913-1917, undated
Box
821-11 Colored male building addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 5, 1910:
Detail of footing
Basement plan
First floor
Second floor
Plan of roof
Front elevation
Side elevation
Basement wiring and heating
First floor wiring and heating
Second floor wiring and heating
Colored female building addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 5, 1910:
Foundation plan
Basement plan
First floor
Second floor
Plan of roof
Front elevation
Side elevation
Detail showing method of securing wire cage
Basement heating plan
First floor heating
Second floor heating
Colored dining hall addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 5, 1910:
Foundation plan
First floor
Roof plan and front elevation
Box
821-12 Bath and toilet addition to east wing female building, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 5, 1915:
Foundation plan
First floor
Second floor
Third floor
Roof plan
North elevation and section B-B
West elevation
East elevation
Details
Section A-A
Box
821-13 Boiler house addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 5, 1915:
Foundation plan
Floor plan
Roof plan
Front and rear elevations
Roof framing plan
Detail of roof over boiler room addition
Box
821-14 Carpenter shop, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 5, 1915:
Foundation plan
Floor plan
Roof plan
Front and rear elevations and details
Side elevations
Details
First, second, and third floor plans
Box
821-15 Cow barn, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 10, 1916:
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Roof plan
Transverse section A-A
[torn]
North and west elevations, details, and section
[torn]
Detail of bell traps in gutters and septic tanks
[torn]
Electric wiring plan, August 28, 1916
First floor plan and schedules
Transverse section A-A
Detail of bell traps in gutters and septic tanks
Box
821-16 Dormitories for Negro patients, J.L. O'Connor, Architect, undated:
Foundation plans
First floor plans
Second floor plans
Front elevation
Side elevation
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Small kitchen and dining room for colored patients, J.L. O'Connor, Architect, December 12, 1901:
Front elevation
Cross section
Side elevation
Floor plan
Box
821-17 Repairs to hospital building, C.H. Page and Bros., Architects, October 21, 1913:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Tunnel plan, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 5, 1910
Box
821-18 Laundry building, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, January 11, 1917
[all prints torn and brittle]:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Cross section A-A
Box
821-19 Second floor plan
First floor plan
Footing and grade beam plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Roof plan
Cross section A-A
Front and south elevation
Rear and north elevation
Folder
821-20 Main entrance, C.H. Page Jr., Architect, undated:
Floor plan
Front elevation
Detail of porch rail and side elevation
Baluster
Dome plan, C.H. Page Jr., Architect, undated
Box
821-21 Pasteur Institute laboratory addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 5, 1915:
Floor plan
Elevations and sections
Details and sections
Box
821-22 Tuberculosis and ward for female Negroes, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, June 16, 1914:
Basement steel plan and plot plan
First and second floor steel plans
Foundation and basement floor plans
First and second floor plans
Roof plan and details
Elevations
Wall section
Wall section
Stair details, elevation, and sections
Window details
Foundation and basement floor plan
First and second floor plans
Elevations
Basement heating plan
First floor heating plan
Second floor heating plan
Box
821-23 Tuberculosis cottage for females, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, September 8, 1909:
Basement
Plans of first floor
Plan of second floor
Roof plan
Front elevation
Side elevations
Rear elevation
Elevation from line A-B
Detail of top rail showing method of securing wire cage
Section through gallery
Detail of door, windows, stairway and base board
Box
821-24 Tuberculosis cottage for males, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, September 8, 1909:
Second floor heating
First floor heating
Basement heating
Basement
Plan of first floor
Plan of second floor
Roof plan
Front elevation
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Elevation from line A-B
Detail of top rail showing method of securing wire cage
Section through gallery
Details of door, window, stair, and baseboard
Box
821-95 Additions to colored ward, C.H. Page Jr. and Bro., Architects, 1907
[all prints too torn and brittle for use]:
Addition to rear of south and north ward buildings, detail wall section
Details of gallery construction
Basement plan, north ward building
First floor, north ward building
Second floor, north ward building
Typical elevation of ward building, revised plans



 

Austin State School, 1916-1917, 1929, 1931,
0.94 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located in Austin, Texas, the Austin State School, renamed the Austin State Supported Living Center in 2009 (Senate Bill 643, 81st Texas Legislature, Regular Session), is a residential and training facility for adults with developmental disabilities under the control of the Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services. Initially established as the State Colony for the Feeble-Minded by the 34th Legislature in 1915 (House Bill 73, Regular Session), it was the state's first institution for the mentally handicapped. It was renamed the Austin State School in 1925. The facilities expanded by 1927 to provide academic and vocational training on-site for residents, which eventually included a broom and mattress factory. Improvements were made in the 1950s and 1960s and seventy-five more acres were annexed for the facility in 1960. With new federal requirements in the 1970s, better housing and skills training was provided for the school. Under the school's system, developmental training centers were set up around Texas by 1977. The Lelsz v. Kavanaugh settlement in 1983 allowed for improved treatment for state school residents, and the Austin State School set out to help residents achieve as normal a life as possible. The Austin State School was able to obtain more commercial work contracts as a result of the settlement, and residents were able to gain wages for jobs. By 1993 the vocational services were moved from the school's campus to a commercial site. The Austin State Supported Living Center continues to operate and has admitted individuals from other state schools that have closed.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Buildings of the Austin State School (later known as the Austin State Supported Living Center) represented in these blueprints include the kitchen, laundry building, power house, and a few dormitories, dating 1916-1917, 1929, 1931. Dormitory blueprints include structural plans, floor plans, elevations, and tunnel details. The power house and laundry buildings each have blueprints for floor plans and elevations. Blueprints also include the plan of the sewage treatment plant and details of the front entrance of the main building. Kitchen plans are for additions made in 1929. Associated papers consist of contracts and specifications for many of the buildings with prints, as well as an accident and liability bond and specifications and agreements for the sewage treatment plant.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Austin State School, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1916-1917
Box
821-90 Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 1916:
Specifications
Specifications for dormitory
Heating specifications, August 10, 1916
Bond, August 23, 1916
Accident and Liability Company bond, August 24, 1916
Bond, August 24, 1916
Contract, August 24, 1916
Contract, August 24, 1916
Contract, August 24, 1916
Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, July 1917:
Specifications for a sanitary sewerage treatment plant
Agreement, July 26, 1917
Agreement, July 30, 1917
Blueprints and drawings, 1916-1917, 1929, 1931
Box
821-25 Central kitchen and dining room, H.F. Kuehne, Architect, September 25, 1929:
Structural plans
Foundation and floor plans
Elevations and section
Details
Details
Stair details
Dormitory number 11, H.F. Kuehne, Architect, September 25, 1929:
Structural plans - foundation
Structural plans - second floor
Structural plans - roof plan
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Elevations
Roof plan
Roof plan
Detail of cabinets
Dormitory number 13, H.F. Kuehne, Architect, August 10, 1931:
Footing schedules
Plot plan and tunnel details
Structural plans - foundation
Structural plans - second floor and sections
Structural plans - roof plan
Foundation
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Elevations
Wall sections
Cabinet details, May 20, 1930
Details
Box
821-26a Plan of general layout, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916
Dormitory, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916:
First floor heating, plumbing, and electric
Foundation plan, heating and plumbing
Power house, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916:
Foundation
First floor
Roof plan
Longitudinal section
North elevation
East elevation
West elevation and section B-B
South elevation
Laundry, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916:
Foundation plan
North front-first floor
Roof plan
East and south elevations
North and west elevations
Dormitory, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916:
Floor steel and foundation
Ceiling and roof steel
First floor plan
One half floor plan
One half elevation
One half elevation
Elevation
Portico and front entrance, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, August 10, 1916:
Detail of portico and front entrance
Sections through entrance door, wall, portico
Box
821-26b Details and sections
[torn and piece missing]
Plan of sewage treatment plant, Kuehne, Chasey and Giesecke, Architects, July 26, 1917
[torn]



 

Big Bend Memorial Museum, about 1936,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Big Bend Memorial Museum, located on the Sul Ross State University campus in Alpine, Texas, began functioning in 1920, though it was not officially founded until December 7, 1925. The museum's mission is to "collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret the cultural, historic and natural materials of the Big Bend of Texas and northern Mexico, with an awareness of the region's rich cultural diversity." The $75,000 in funds for a facility on campus was approved by the Texas Centennial Commission in 1936, in conjunction with the U.S. Works Progress Administration. The museum was designed and construction was overseen by Victor J. Smith, a professor of industrial arts at the university. Pat Morris Neff, former Texas governor, dedicated the Big Bend Memorial Museum on May 1, 1937, where the collections would stay until 1966. At this time, the museum closed and transferred the collections to Sul Ross State University, which moved them to a former bowling alley. The original museum building reopened August 15, 2007, after a $3.3 million renovation which began in 2003. Renovations were performed by Jim Rhotenberry, AIA, of Rhotenberry-Wellen Architects of Midland and facilities were fabricated by Museumscapes of Dallas. Renamed the Museum of the Big Bend, it has 5,000 square feet for permanent exhibits, along with space for temporary exhibits, a gift shop, and a reference library.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting the construction of the Big Bend Memorial Museum (later known as the Museum of the Big Bend) consist of plans prepared by architect V.J. Smith detailing the basement, plot, roof, mechanical, and floor plans, as well as providing elevation and section details, and a truss diagram. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in about 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Big Bend Memorial Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-56 Plans and drawings, about 1936:
Plot plan
Floor plan
Floor plan and details
Basement plan and details
Elevation and details
Roof plan
Main floor, slab, and beam schedule
Details
Sections and details
Left side and rear elevations
Mechanical plan - basement
Mechanical plan - main plan
Truss diagrams and details



 

Caddo Lake State Park, 1938,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
Caddo Lake State Park is a 478-acre park located in Harrison County, Texas, adjacent to Caddo Lake. Land was donated by various individuals between 1933 and 1937, the bulk coming from a gift of 385 acres by Thomas Jefferson Taylor II. The parks facilities include picnic areas, camping, boating, and fishing facilities, and trails for hiking. The visitor center has a nature museum with fish and wildlife specimens and Indian artifact displays.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Three blueprints detail the alterations and additions to cabins, latrines, and the administration building at the Caddo Lake State Park and date February 1938.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Caddo Lake State Park, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-27 Cabins, latrine, and administration building, unknown architect, February 1938:
Details, February 21, 1938
Plans and details, February 18, 1938
Cabin types, February 17, 1938



 

Centennial memorials, 1937,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
Officially celebrated in 1936, the Texas Centennial marked 100 years of Texas independence. On February 12, 1934, the Texas Centennial Board of One Hundred was established to help plan centennial celebrations and instruct the legislature on financial planning (House Bill 11, 44th Texas Legislature, Regular Session). A permanent Texas Centennial Commission was appointed in June 1934. Celebrations occurred across the state beginning in 1935, including at Gonzales, San Antonio, El Paso, Livingston, Galveston, Houston, Dallas and Fort Worth. The state legislature and the U.S. Congress each appropriated $3,000,000 for the project. Some permanent structures were created for the celebration of the Centennial including buildings, monuments, statues, and grave markers. Statues were created for over 20 historical Texans.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Materials consist of blueprints for monuments created during the Texas Centennial for placement throughout the state. The monuments are memorials to Anson Jones, Peter Hansborough Bell, James Butler, Henry Smith, Ben Milam, Mr. and Mrs. Issac van Zandt, David Burnett, Jose Antonio Navarro, Sidney Sherman, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar, Moses Austin, Ben Milam, James Pinckney Henderson, Stephen Fuller Austin, Robert Emmett Bledsoe. Baylor, and George Campbell Childress. Blueprints are dated November 15, 1937 and were drafted by architect Donald Nelson.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received, in alphabetical order by city name where each memorial is located.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Centennial memorials, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-28 Memorial to Anson Jones at south entrance to courthouse grounds, Anson, Jones County, Enrico Cerracchoi, sculptor, 1937
Memorial to Peter H. Bell, southwest corner of courthouse grounds at Belton, Bell County, 1937
Memorial to James Butler Bonham on the southwest corner of the Courthouse grounds, Bonham, Fannin County, 1937
Memorial to Henry Smith at the east limits of school grounds, facing highway at Brazoria, Brazoria County, 1937
Memorial to Ben Milam on southwest corner of courthouse grounds at Cameron, Milam County, 1937
Memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Van Zandt on northwest corner of courthouse grounds at Canton, Van Zandt County, 1937
Memorial to David Burnett on northeast corner of high school grounds at Clarksville, Red River County, 1937
Memorial to J. Antonio Navarro at south entrance of courthouse grounds at Corsicana, Navarro County, 1937
Memorial to Sidney Sherman on west side of 7th Street facing east in center of parkway of Avenue J in Galveston, Galveston County, 1937
Memorial to Thomas Jefferson Rusk in the circle of the city square at Henderson, Rusk County, 1937
Memorial to Mirabeau B. Lamar on the north side of courthouse grounds, at main entrance to courthouse at Richmond, Fort Bend County, 1937
Memorial to Moses Austin opposite the Governor's Palace on the northwest corner of city hall grounds, San Antonio, Bexar County, 1937
Memorial to Ben Milam at west end of Ben Milam Park, San Antonio, Bexar County, 1937
Memorial to James Pinckney Henderson on northwest corner of courthouse grounds at San Augustine, San Augustine County, 1937
Memorial to Stephen Fuller Austin, San Felipe State Park at San Felipe, Austin County, 1937
Memorial to Robert Emmett Bledsoe Baylor on the campus of Baylor University opposite and facing the main entrance of Waco Hall at Waco, McLennan County, 1937
Memorial to George C. Childress in Washington State Park at Washington-on-the-Brazos, Washington County, 1937



 

Confederate Woman's Home, 1912,
0.32 cubic ft.

Agency History
Opened in 1908, the Confederate Woman's Home in Austin, Texas cared for the widows and wives of honorably discharged Confederate soldiers and those who aided the Confederacy. Many were married to men at the Texas Confederate Home. The United Daughters of the Confederacy initially opened and operated the facility, raising money for the property and funding construction. The property was deeded to the state after a constitutional amendment was passed by Texas voters (Senate Bill 275, 32nd Texas Legislature, Regular Session). Additions were made and in 1920 the facility was placed under the Texas State Board of Control (Senate Bill 147, 36th Legislature, Regular Session). In 1949, the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools took control of the facility (House Bill 1, 51st Legislature, Regular Session) until it was closed in 1963. The property was sold by the state in 1986.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Seven blueprints consist of elevations, floor plans and heating, wiring, and plumbing plans for the Confederate Woman's Home designed by C.H. Page and Bro., Architects. Associated papers include a contract and specifications for the building and repairs made to the facilities. These materials are dated September 25, 1912.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate Woman's Home, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, September 25, 1912
Box
821-91 Contract
Specifications
Specifications for repairs and remodeling
Box
821-30 Blueprints and drawings, September 25, 1912
East elevation
West elevation
South elevation
Heating, plumbing, and wiring plan - basement
Heating, plumbing, and wiring plan - first floor
Heating, plumbing, and wiring plan - second floor
Foundation plan
First floor
Second floor
Roof plan



 

Corpus Christi Centennial Museum, 1938
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Corpus Christi Centennial Museum was one of nine museums established as part of the 1936 Texas Centennial and is situated in South Bluff Park in Corpus Christi, Nueces County, Texas. The one-room (60 feet by 40 feet) structure was completed in 1938 and would eventually house the Centennial Art Museum, established by the Corpus Christi Caller-Times Publishing Company, the Corpus Christi Art Guild, and the South Texas Art League, from 1944 to 1972. The museum was renamed the South Texas Museum of Art in the late 1960s to early 1970s in the midst of a fund-raising campaign that enabled it to build and relocate to a 30,000 square-foot facility on Corpus Christi Bay. The Corpus Christi Centennial Museum building is owned by the city of Corpus Christi, which allows it to be used for community purposes.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Two blueprints for the Corpus Christi Centennial Museum prepared by Brock, Roberts and Anderson, Architects show front, side and rear elevations; sections; floor, roof, foundation and plot plans; a typical wall section; and door and window schedules, all dating July 23, 1938.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Corpus Christi Centennial Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-94 Plans and details, July 23, 1938:
Front, side and rear elevations, sections A-A and B-B
Floor, roof, foundation and plot plans, typical wall section, door and window schedules



 

Corsicana State Home, 1911, 1915, undated,
0.87 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Corsicana State Home, located in Corsicana, Texas, was established in 1887 as the State Orphan Asylum by an act of the 20th Texas Legislature to be a facility for orphan or dependent children. Its doors opened on July 15, 1889, and it was renamed the State Orphan Home in 1899. By 1948 there were twenty-one structures on the 417 acres, including cottages and barns. The institution taught academic subjects as well as vocational courses in many of its own farms, stores, kitchen and hospital. From 1919 to 1949 the home was administered by the Texas State Board of Control, after which it was transferred to the Texas State Board of Hospitals and Special Schools. The school within the institution closed in the mid-1950s, after which all children attended Corsicana public schools. The State Orphan Home was renamed as the Corsicana State Home in 1957 when it was put under the administration of the Texas Youth Council (later Commission), and it became racially integrated in the 1960s. Since 1982, the official name of the facility has been the Corsicana Residential Treatment Center. The Texas Juvenile Justice Division took over administration in 2011 after the abolishment of the Texas Youth Commission.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the State Orphan Home (later the Corsicana State Home, then the Corsicana Residential Treatment Center) consist of a plot plan, floor plans, details, sections, and schedules for the dining hall, dormitories, hospital, and pavilion designed by C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, and for dormitories, hospital, and laundry house designed by H.P. Lochhead, Architect. Associated papers include the general and mechanical specifications for the dormitory, pavilion, hospital, and dining hall, prepared by C.H. Page and Bro., Architects. Dates are 1911, 1915 and undated.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Corsicana State Home, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, August 1915
Box
821-91 General specifications for dining hall and dormitory, August 24, 1915
General specifications for pavilion, August 24, 1915
Mechanical specifications for dining hall and dormitory, August 25, 1915
General specification for hospital, August 24, 1915
Mechanical specifications for pavilion, August 24, 1915
Mechanical specifications for hospital, August 24, 1915
Blueprints and drawings, 1911, 1915, undated
Box
821-31 Plot plan, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 7, 1915
Dormitory and dining hall, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 7, 1915:
Foundation plan and schedules
Basement plan, schedules and details
First floor plan, sections, details, schedules
Second floor plan, steel support second floor, detail, schedules
Plan of roof, steel supporting roof
Block elevation of front and rear
Side elevations and sections
Section XX
Section through end entrance
Basement plan - mechanical
First floor plan - mechanical
Second floor plan - mechanical
Plan of refrigerating machinery
Boys' dormitory, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, May 3, 1911:
General foundation plan
First floor
Second floor
One half roof plan
Elevations
Section C-C
Steel plan supporting first floor
One half steel plan supporting second floor
One half steel showing support of ceiling, roof
Heating plan - under side of floor
Heating, plumbing, and wiring plans - first floor
Heating, plumbing, and wiring plans - second floor
Hospital, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 7, 1915:
Plan of foundation
Floor plan and details
Plan of roof
Rear and front elevations
Typical end elevations and section A-A
Pavilion, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, August 7, 1915:
One half foundation and first floor
One half roof and second floor
Typical longitudinal elevation, detail, and section
End elevation
Sections and detail
Full size detail of large windows
Box
821-99 Specifications, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated
[5 sheets]
Dormitory building number 2, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Dormitory building number 1, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Hospital, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated:
East front elevation
Ground floor plan
Dormitory building Number 3, stairway details, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated
Laundry house, sections, elevations, and details, H.P. Lochhead, Architect, undated



 

David Crockett Memorial Building, 1936,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The David Crockett Memorial Building no longer exists. It was erected in Crockett, Texas and received funding from the Commission of Control during the Texas Centennial. The building was a public space for the citizens of Crockett, and also contained a public library and museum. A marker for the site of the memorial building remains in the David Crockett Memorial Park.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Seven blueprints for the David Crockett Memorial Building, created by Moore and Lloyd, Architects, consist of the foundation plan, plot plan, floor plans, elevations and details for the building. Materials are dated November-December 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), David Crockett Memorial Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-32 Plans and drawings, November-December 1936:
Foundation plan, sections, and schedules, December 10, 1936
Plot plan, December 11, 1936
First floor plan and schedule, December 5, 1936
South, north, east walls of auditorium, second floor, sections, and details, November 30, 1936
South and west elevations and section, December 9, 1936
North and east elevations, December 9, 1936
Details, December 5, 1936



 

El Paso Centennial Museum, 1936,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
One of nine museums established as part of the Texas Centennial in 1936, the El Paso Memorial Museum (later renamed the El Paso Centennial Museum) is located on the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso. The museum exhibits artifacts pertaining to the human and natural history of El Paso, the Chihuahuan Desert region, and the American Southwest. The museum also has collections from the Centennial available for scholarly research.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the El Paso Memorial Museum (later the El Paso Centennial Museum) consist of floor plans, elevations, framing plans, and sections of the museum, dating March and April 1936, by architect Percy McGhee.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), El Paso Centennial Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-33 Plans and drawings, March-April 1936:
Plot plan, details, and sections, March 1936
Basement and first floor plan, March 1936
Roof and second floor plan, March 1936
North, south, east, and west elevations, March 1936
Details and sections, March 1936
Details and sections, March 1936
Foundation and first floor framing plan, March 1936
Roof framing and second floor framing plans, March 1936
Plot plan, details, and sections, April 1936
Basement and first floor plan, April 1936
Roof and second floor plan, April 1936
North, south, east, and west elevations, April 1936
Details and sections, April 1936
Details and sections, April 1936
Foundation and first floor framing plan, April 1936
Roof framing and second floor framing plans, April 1936



 

Erath Arches, 1936,
0.17 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Erath Arches were constructed in Stephenville, Texas during the Texas Centennial in 1936 to commemorate George Bernard Erath (1813-1891), a soldier and Texas Ranger who served in the Texas Revolution, fighting at the battle of San Jacinto. He was also a surveyor and state legislator. The memorial was designed by local architect C.V. Head and constructed by rock mason Arthur Maxwell of Dublin, Texas. Located at Erath and Washington streets, the arches were resituated at an angle in the 1960s to allow more room for traffic. A Texas State Historical marker was dedicated at the site in 2010.
Scope and Contents of the Records
One blueprint of the Erath Arches in Stephenville, Texas prepared by C.V. Head, Architect shows details, elevations, and sections of the monument and dates from the monument's design in 1936. The cartouche area of the print is missing, but the architect and date have been verified from the original Centennial marker and the Texas State Historical marker at the monument site.
Arrangement
Materials consists of one blueprint.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Erath Arches, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-89 Details, elevations, and sections for Erath Arches, 1936



 

Fannin Battleground State Historic Site, about 1937,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
Formerly called Fannin State Park, the Fannin Battleground State Historic Site is located in eastern Goliad County near Fannin, Texas. The land for the park was donated by Mr. and Mrs. H.B. Hanley of Fannin in 1913, through a bill in the state legislature supported by Goliad County officials, the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, and State Representative Leopold Morris of Victoria. The site marks the grounds of the battle of Coleto which was fought during the Texas Revolution in 1836 and led by James W. Fannin Jr. The thirteen-acre park was placed under the control of the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department in 1965 (House Bill 102, 59th Texas Legislature, Regular Session), and then transferred to the control of the Texas Historical Commission in 2010.
Scope and Contents of the Records
A single blueprint of the pavilion and improvements made at the Fannin Battleground State Historic Site shows details and elevations of the pavilion, by S.C.P. Vosper and Raiford L. Stripling, Architects. The blueprint is undated but dates from the building's design in about 1937. A plot plan of the grounds and the Fannin Memorial Monument is in the State Archives' Map collection, map #8009.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fannin Battleground State Historic Site, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-34 Pavilion details, elevations, and sections, about 1937



 

Fannin Memorial Monument, 1937, undated,
0.47 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located in the Goliad State Historical Park, the Fannin Memorial Monument was erected as part of the Texas Centennial Celebrations. The Goliad State Historical Park is located on the north side of the San Antonio River, south of Goliad, Texas. The park contains the La Bahía Mission, a museum, campground and picnic areas, hiking trails, and the Fannin Memorial Monument. The park was created by the Civilian Conservation Corps to preserve historic sites and commemorate the historical events that took place in the area. The property was acquired by the City of Goliad and Goliad County in 1930, and the 42nd Texas Legislature approved this transfer of property from the Texas Highway Commission on March 24, 1931 (Senate Bill 156, Regular Session).
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and plans for the Fannin Memorial Monument include granite and marble base bids for the Fannin's Men Memorial detailing each side of the base, and elevations and details for the memorial, dating December 30, 1937, and undated. The sculptor for the base is Raoul Josset and the architect is David Nelson. S.C.P. Vosper and Raiford L. Stripling were architects for the Fannin Battleground State Historic Site where the memorial is located. A plot plan of the grounds and the Fannin Memorial Monument is in the State Archives' Map collection, map #8009.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fannin Memorial Monument, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-34 Donald Nelson, Architect; Raoul Josset, sculptor, December 30, 1937:
Granite base bid and alternate, elevations, and plot plan
Granite base bid
Granite base bid, details
Granite base bid, sections
Granite alternates to base bid, sections
Granite base bid, foundation, substructure
Granite base bid, sections
Marble base bid, elevations, foundation
Marble base bid, substructure, marble layout
Marble base bid, details
Marble base bid, sections, details
Box
821-101 Memorial, S.C.P. Vosper and Raiford L. Stripling, Architects, undated:
Elevations
Details and elevations



 

Fireproofing and fire protection, 1896, 1912-1913, undated,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Century Building in downtown St. Louis, Missouri was a ten-story building designed by the Chicago architectural firm of Raeder, Coffin, and Crocker in the Classical Revival style and completed in 1896. Though listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002, it was razed in 2005 to make room for a parking garage deemed necessary to support the redevelopment of the 1880s Old Post Office across the street, part of a renewal project that received financial assistance from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The demolition of the Century Building was challenged in court by local preservationists and received national press.
C.B. Roulet was educated at Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken, New Jersey and was employed with the Texas Rating and Inspection Bureau, a privately-run predecessor to the Fire Insurance Rating Board (created in 1909 by Senate Bill 25, 31st Texas Legislature, 3rd Called Session), which the founders of the bureau helped draft legislation to create, as they also did for the State Insurance Board. Roulet was later employed by the National Board of Fire Writers and then by the National Fire Insurance Company of Hartford (Chicago, Illinois) in 1913.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Six blueprints created by the St. Louis Expanded Metal Fireproofing Company for the St. Louis Century Building show the details of columns for the Century Building, as well as the fireproof floor and ceiling plans and specifications. One print is dated June 9, 1896, the others are undated. It is not known how these prints for a building outside of Texas came to be included in this collection.
Five blueprints created by the fire insurance actuary, C.B. Roulet, are for Texas state-supported institutions. Two are for the University of Texas, showing the proposed underground layout for vertical pipes for the Medical Department and the system of fire protection for the university. The three remaining blueprints are sketches for the proposed underground layout for fire protection for the State School for the Blind, the State School for the Deaf, and the North Texas Insane Asylum (later known as Terrell State Hospital). These blueprints are dated 1912 and 1913. See the series Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Texas School for the Deaf, and Terrell State Hospital for further records of those institutions' buildings.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fireproofing and fire protection, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-35 Century Building, St. Louis, Missouri, St. Louis Expanded Metal Fireproofing Co., 1896, undated:
Details of column covering
Patent fire proof partition
Patent fire proof floor and ceiling
Detail of covering for channel iron columns, second story and above, June 9, 1896
System of hollow partitions
Systems of fire proof floor construction
C.B. Roulet, fire insurance actuary, 1912, 1913:
Sketch showing underground layout for proposed inside vertical pipes for Medical Department, University of Texas
Sketch showing underground layout for proposed private fire protection for State School for Blind
Sketch showing underground layout for proposed private fire protection for Texas School for Deaf
Sketch showing underground layout for proposed private fire protection for North Texas Insane Asylum
Present system of fire protection for University of Texas



 

First Shot Fired For Texas Independence monument, about 1936,
0.18 cubic ft.

Agency History
The battle of Gonzales is commemorated by a monument situated seven miles southwest of Gonzales, Texas, near the site of the battle. The monument features The First Shot Fired For Texas Independence, a life-sized bronze bas-relief set in granite that was sculpted by Waldine Tauch in 1935. This is one of three Centennial memorials completed by Tauch, the protégé and eventual artistic partner of sculptor Pompeo Coppini.
Scope and Contents of the Records
One drawing prepared by landscape architect Jac L. Gubbels shows the site of The First Shot Fired For Texas Independence monument near Cost, Texas in Gonzales County, which commemorates the battle of Gonzales. The drawing is undated but dates from the monument's design in about 1936.
Arrangement
Material consists of one drawing.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), First Shot Fired For Texas Independence memorial, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-89 Proposed setting for monument, about 1936



 

Fort Belknap, 1936,
fractional

Agency History
Founded on June 24, 1851, Fort Belknap is a United States Army post located three miles south of Newcastle in Young County, Texas. Part of a chain of forts founded along the Red River and the Rio Grande to protect the Texas frontier, Fort Belknap did not have any defensive works. The fort was abandoned before the Civil War, and reoccupied after the war for only a few months, being abandoned the last time in September 1867. Local citizens helped restore and rebuild some of the buildings during the Texas Centennial in 1936. More restoration was completed in the 1970s under the Fort Belknap Archives' supervision. The fort is supported by the Young County Commissioners Court and the Fort Belknap Society.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Five blueprints of the restoration of Fort Belknap by the architects Voelcker and Dixon, dating August 15, 1936, show the plot plan, the barracks, and the plans for the kitchen and well house. There are two blueprints for the commissary, showing the floor plans and elevations of the building.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Belknap, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-36 Plans and drawings, August 15, 1936:
Plot plan, corn house, magazine building, and details
Barracks
Plans of kitchen and well house
Commissary-floor plans
Commissary-elevations, details, and sections



 

Fort Concho Museum, 1936,
fractional

Agency History
Established in San Angelo, Texas, Fort Concho was a military post at the Main and North Concho rivers that helped maintain law and order as settlers moved into West Texas in 1867. Replacing Fort Chadbourne, Fort Concho was first commanded by Captain George Gibson Huntt who named the post Camp Hatch. The name was then changed to Camp Kelly before it became Fort Concho in March 1868. The soldiers of the fort helped build roads and telegraph lines, escort stagecoaches and cattle drives, mapped portions of West Texas, and acted as a general police force. As the town of San Angelo grew, Fort Concho was no longer valuable as a military post and was abandoned in 1889.
A fund-raising campaign in 1929 helped to save the Fort Concho administration building from demolition. In 1930 the building became the new site of the West Texas Museum (to be distinguished from the West Texas Museum established in Lubbock in 1929), established two years before by Ginevra Wood Carson in a room within the county courthouse, and it was renamed the Fort Concho Museum. In 1935, the city of San Angelo took over control of the museum and began restoring and rebuilding fort properties. The fort became a National Historic Landmark in 1961 and was also designated a Texas Historic Landmark. The Fort Concho Museum holds over 35,000 artifacts in its collection, acts as an archive and research library, and maintains an education department.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Four blueprints detail the floor plans and elevations for the Fort Concho Museum remodeling efforts, dated July 22, 1936. Plans were drafted by architect John G. Becker.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Concho Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-36 Plans and drawings, July 22, 1936:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
West and north elevations
East elevation, plot and roof plans, and details



 

Fort Graham, about 1936,
0.15 cubic ft.

Agency History
Established in March 1849, Fort Graham was a United States Army post near the eastern bank of the Brazos River and Little Bear Creek in what later became Hill County, Texas. The post was named either for James D. Graham of the Corps of Topographical Engineers, or Lt. Col. William M. Graham who was killed in 1847 during a battle in the Mexican War. Fort Graham acted as a defense between the Towash Indian village and Fort Washita along the northern Texas frontier. Soldiers of the fort acted as escorts for travelers and supply trains and also protected citizens. The post closed in 1853 after the spread of the northern frontier beyond the fort, causing it to no longer be a necessary defense. The fort offered protection from Indian raids, which allowed the expansion of settlement into the Hill Country.
As part of the Texas Centennial, in 1936 the Texas Centennial Commission arranged for the purchase of the site by the state. Barracks were reconstructed, and a marker was erected at the site of the fort. The site was flooded in the 1970s by the development of Lake Whitney, but the fort was later rebuilt at the site of Old Fort Park.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Two blueprints represent the floor plans and the elevations for the Army Building at Fort Graham. Associated papers include the specifications for the building and the contractor's proposal. Architect for this project was J.O. Galbraith. These materials have an incomplete date of June 193_ but likely date from about 1936.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Graham, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, about 1936
Box
821-91 General contractor's proposal
Specifications
Blueprints and drawings, about 1936
Box
821-36 Army Building, foundation and floor plans
Army Building, front and rear elevations



 

Fort Inglish, about 1936,
fractional

Agency History
Fort Inglish was a two-story blockhouse built in the summer of 1837 by Bailey Inglish, the founder of the city that would become Bonham, Texas. It served as a private refuge for the settlers of Fannin County near the Red River frontier and as a strategic meeting-point for the Army of the Republic of Texas in 1838 and 1840. Fort Inglish fell into disrepair in the 1840s and was dismantled. The Sam Rayburn Memorial Veterans Center was constructed on the site in 1948. Fort Inglish was rebuilt in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial and again in 1976 as a Fannin County Bicentennial Project, with Faye Jones drawing up both sets of specifications and blueprints and Lawton Wilson contracted to build both replicas. Fort Inglish Park operates as a living history museum and is managed through the Sam Rayburn House Museum, a property of the Texas Historical Commission.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Unsigned blueprints for Fort Inglish show the elevations, plot plans, supports, first and second floor plans, sections, and details. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in about 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Inglish, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-36 Plans and drawings, about 1936:
Elevations
Plot plan, elevations, and details
Details
Plan of first floor support
First and second floor plans, sections, and details
Louvre details



 

Fort Parker, 1935-1936, undated,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
Fort Parker was a private fort built in March 1834 by brothers Silas M. and James W. Parker close to the Navasota River in Limestone County near present-day Groesbeck, Texas. The fort was attacked on May 19, 1836 by a large party of Comanche Indians where five inhabitants were killed and five were kidnapped, including Cynthia Ann Parker. It was henceforth abandoned and decayed over time. A replica was constructed in the original location with the assistance of the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial. It came to be known as Old Fort Parker and was operated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department as part of the Fort Parker State Recreation Area (later becoming Fort Parker State Park). In 1992, the City of Groesbeck assumed operations and formed the Fort Parker Historical Society to manage the site, which operates as a living history museum and hosts local events throughout the year.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and maps of Fort Parker prepared by J.E. Denning and the Texas State Park Board show elevations, plots, and plans for settlers' cabins, a Cynthia Ann Parker cabin museum, and a caretaker's residence. Dates covered are 1935-1936 and undated.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Parker, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-37 J.E. Denning, Architect, January 30, 1935 and undated:
Map showing the original site in Limestone County of Old Fort Parker, undated
Boulevard connecting Fort Parker State Park with Old Fort Parker (prepared by Texas State Park Board), January 30, 1935
Plan of early settlers cabins - floor plan and elevations, undated
Log cabin for keeper - floor plan and elevations, undated
Log cabin for keeper - cross section and details, undated
Facsimile of Cynthia Ann Parker cabin to be used as a museum - floor plans, undated
Facsimile of Cynthia Ann Parker cabin to be used as a museum - elevations and details, undated
Elevations, sections, plans, and details, undated
Caretaker's residence for unit no. 2 - roof and foundation plans, details, and schedule, undated
Caretaker's residence for unit no. 2 - detail of frames and elevations, undated
Unknown architect, 1936:
Caretaker's residence - floor plan, elevations, and section, September 2, 1936
Plot plan, March 21, 1936
Plans, details, and elevations, March 19, 1936
Plans and details of cabins, March 19, 1936



 

Fort Richardson, about 1936,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
Fort Richardson was a United States Army installation established in February 1868 outside of Jacksboro, Texas. Fort Richardson was named in honor of General Israel B. Richardson, who died in the Battle of Antietam during the Civil War. The fort was the northernmost of a line of federal forts established after the Civil War. Expeditions sent from Fort Richardson arrested those responsible for the Warren Wagon Train Massacre in 1871 and fought Comanche Indians in Palo Duro Canyon. The fort was abandoned in May 1878. In 1936, the surviving fort buildings and surrounding land were purchased and renovated by the Texas Centennial Commission before being handed over to the City of Jacksboro and the Jack County Historical Society. The National Park Service declared Fort Richardson a National Historic Landmark in 1963, and in 1968 the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department took over operations and began further renovations. Fort Richardson State Historic Park opened in 1973 and as of 2012 is known as the Fort Richardson State Park, Historic Site and Lost Creek Reservoir State Trailway.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of Fort Richardson prepared by Terrill Isbell, Architect show elevations, plans, and details of the restoration of the hospital, bakery, officers' quarters, and morgue. The blueprints are undated but date from the buildings' restoration in about 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Fort Richardson, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-38 Plans and drawings, about 1936:
Hospital - half front elevation
Hospital - second floor
Hospital - first floor
Hospital - porch, details
Hospital - rafter diagrams
Bakery
Officers' quarters
Morgue



 

French Legation Museum, 1953,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
The structure known as the French Legation was ordered built by Alphonse Dubois de Saligny, who headed the French legation to the Republic of Texas as chargé d'affaires in 1840-1841, to be his residence in Austin, the capital of the Republic. The house is a blend of Greek Revival and Mississippi Valley French architectural styles, made of loblolly pine from Bastrop and built in the raised fashion of a bayou house. Dubois occupied the house only briefly and left Austin for Louisiana in 1841 amid political friction with the administration of Republic of Texas President Mirabeau B. Lamar. Dr. Joseph W. Robinson's family owned the house for a hundred years before it was sold to the State of Texas on August 11, 1948 and placed in the custody of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas. Restoration began in 1953 and the French Legation opened to the public on April 5, 1956. In 1969, the building and its surroundings were added to the National Register of Historic Places. The area on which the structure was built is known as Robinson Hill.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints prepared by architect August W. Harris show plans, details, elevations, sections, and specifications for the repair and renovation of the French Legation and date March 28, 1953.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), French Legation Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-38 Plans and drawings, March 28, 1953:
Plot plan, details
Plan and details
Front elevation, profiles, and details
Side elevation, sections, details
Floor plan, schedules, specifications



 

Gatesville State School for Boys, 1907, 1911-1912, undated,
0.37 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Gatesville State School for Boys was established in 1887 (House Bill 21, 20th Texas Legislature, Regular Session) and opened in January 1889 as the House of Correction and Reformatory three miles northeast of Gatesville in Coryelle County. In 1909, the legislature changed the name to the State Institution for the Training of Juveniles and appointed a board of five trustees to manage the institution (Senate Bill 202, 31st Legislature, Regular Session). The Texas State Board of Control took over operations in 1919 (Senate Bill 147, 36th Legislature, Regular Session) and changed the name to Gatesville State School for Boys in 1939. Management was turned over to the Texas State Youth Development Council in 1949 (House Bill 705, 51st Legislature, Regular Session) and the Texas Youth Council (later, the Texas Youth Commission) in 1957. A class-action lawsuit filed in 1971 on behalf of juvenile offenders resulted in the closure of the Gatesville school in 1979.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records consist of plans for the early 20th century expansion and remodel of the State Institution for the Training of Juveniles (later the Gatesville State School for Boys), 1907, 1911-1912, undated. H.C. Barlow prepared blueprints dated September 14, 1907 that show plans for each floor, sections, details, and elevations. C.H. Page and Brothers prepared blueprints for the dormitory dated December 5, 1911 that show plans for each floor, supports, elevations, details, and plans for the heating, plumbing, and wiring of the building. They also prepared blueprints for an industrial building that were filed April 17, 1912 and show the plans for each floor, elevations and a side detail. Associated papers dated 1911-1912, and undated include specifications for a dormitory; heating, plumbing, and wiring; an industrial building; and a reformatory. Also included are bonds and a uniform contract.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Gatesville State School for Boys, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1911-1912, undated
Box
821-91 Bonds, contracts, and specifications, 1911
Bond, November 3, 1911
Uniform contract, November 3, 1911
Contract bond, November 3, 1911
Bond, November 7, 1911
Bond, November 9, 1911
Specifications of dormitory building, November 3, 1911
Specifications of heating, plumbing, and wiring, November 3, 1911
Specifications, 1912, undated
Specifications of industrial building, April 5, 1936
Specifications of reformatory materials, undated
Blueprints and drawings, 1911, 1912, undated
Box
821-39 H.C. Barlow, Architect, September 14, 1907:
Plan of foundation
Plan of first floor
Plan of second floor
Transverse sections, longitudinal section
Detail of cast iron column and dowel at second floor
Connection
Details
Front elevation
East side elevation
Dormitory plans, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, December 5, 1911:
Foundation plan
Plan of first floor and schedule
Plan of second floor and schedule
Steel supporting second floor
Roof plan showing support
Front and rear elevations
East and west elevations
Cast Iron column details
Heating, plumbing, and wiring - foundation plan
Heating, plumbing, and wiring - first floor plan
Heating, plumbing, and wiring - second floor plan
Heating, plumbing, and wiring - attic plan
Heating, plumbing, and wiring - riser plan
Industrial building plans, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, April 17, 1912:
Foundation plan
First floor
Second floor
Roof plan
Front elevation
Typical side
Rear elevation



 

General Land Office Building, 1854, 1956-1957,
0.5 cubic ft.

Agency History
The General Land Office was established on December 22, 1836 by an act of the first Congress of the Republic of Texas in Houston. The office moved to Austin in 1839 and the original General Land Office Building was designed in 1854 by Christoph Conrad Stremme, one of its draftsmen who was also one of the first professionally trained architects in Texas. Construction of the two-and-one-half story Romanesque Revival structure of stuccoed stone and brick was completed in the spring of 1858 and used a design known as Rundbogenstil, or "Rounded Arch." The General Land Office moved to a new building in 1917 and the legislature appropriated funds for the renovation of the Old General Land Office Building and placed it in the joint custody of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas and the Texas Division of the Daughters of the Confederacy (House Bill 831, 35th Texas Legislature, Regular Session), who each operated separate museums there. In 1970, the building was added to the National Register of Historic Places. The Old General Land Office Building was returned to state control in 1989, restored to its original style, and repurposed as the Capitol Visitors Center in 1992. It is managed by the Texas State Preservation Board.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Drawings by architect Christoph Conrad Stremme for the General Land Office Building include elevations, details, and sections. The only drawing inscribed with a date is the front view, dated December 1854, but the other drawings are considered to have been created at about the same time, including two undated drawings of the fireproof ceiling and cast iron columns that had been among records of the General Land Office held at the State Archives. Drawings by architect August Watkins Harris Sr. for restoration of the General Land Office building include first and second floor plans, various elevations, and a longitudinal section and date 1956-1957.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), General Land Office Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Folder
821-93 Christoph Conrad Stremme, Architect, December 1854:
Fire-proof ceiling with cast iron column and brick arch
[2 sheets]
Front door details
Window horizontal and vertical sections and hinge
Front door and cast iron ornament of panel
[also 1 digital color copy and 1 black-and-white photocopy]
Front view
[also 1 digital color copy and 3 black-and-white photocopies]
[Signatures of Land Commissioner Stephen Crosby and Q. Nichols, Architect are dated July 28, 1856.]
End elevation
[also 1 black-and-white photocopy]
[Signatures of Land Commissioner Stephen Crosby and Q. Nichols, Architect are dated July 28, 1856.]
Plan of the sidedoor
[also 1 digital color copy]
Vertical and horizontal sections
August Watkins Harris Sr., Architect, 1956-1957:
First floor plan, October 26, 1956
Second floor plan, October 26, 1956
Longitudinal section, October 26, 1956
South front elevation and half east elevation, October 31, 1956
First and second floor plans, April 4, 1957
Front and side elevation, April 4, 1957



 

Second General Land Office Building, 1916-1917,
0.25 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Second General Land Office Building officially opened in 1918 to house the Texas General Land Office after it relocated from the first General Land Office Building (which later become the Capitol Visitors Center in 1992) directly opposite across 11th Street in downtown Austin, Texas. The four-story structure was designed by architect Atlee B. Ayres and features 18-foot ceilings and terrazzo and marble flooring. The building was later named for Land Commissioner James Earl Rudder. After the General Land Office moved once more to the Stephen F. Austin Building, the Rudder Building became home to the Texas Department of Agriculture, the Texas State Highway Department, and then to the Texas Secretary of State. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places on January 7, 1998.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Plans, elevations, details, and sections for the Second General Land Office Building (later the James Earl Rudder Building) prepared by Atlee B. Ayres, Architect date 1916-1917.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), James Earl Rudder Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-40 Plans and drawings, 1916-1917:
South alley elevation, framing plan
Interior details
Roof plan
Brazos Street elevation
East 11th Street elevation
East alley elevation
Exterior details, elevations, sections



 

Goliad Memorial Auditorium, 1936, undated,
1.21 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Goliad Memorial Auditorium was constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps adjacent to the Goliad State Historical Park in Goliad, Texas, as part of the Texas Centennial in 1936. The construction was financed jointly with state and federal government allocations and the assistance of the U.S. Works Progress Administration. The Texas State Board of Control Executive Director supervised the construction, plumbing, and electrical contractors as part of their maintenance and supervision of the historical state parks. The auditorium bears three memorial plaques in honor of the filibusters who battled at La Bahía during the Mexican War of Independence, the Goliad Massacre, and the teachers of La Bahía, the Aranama College and the Payne Female Institute.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Goliad Memorial Auditorium blueprints prepared by S.C.P. Vosper and Raiford L. Stripling show plans, details, schedules, elevations, sections, and plans for plumbing, electric, heating, and ventilation, dating 1936 and undated. Associated papers consist of general notes to accompany all schedules, dated August 31, 1936.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials in the second group are arranged as received, by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Goliad Memorial Auditorium, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1936
Box
821-91 General notes to accompany all schedules, August, 31, 1936
Blueprints and drawings, 1936, undated
Box
821-41 S.C.P. Vosper, Raiford L. Stripling, and Temple Phinney, Architects, 1936:
Scheme B - floor plan
Stadium plan, July 23, 1936
Scheme B - elevations and longitudinal section
Scheme B - elevations and Cross section, July 23, 1936
S.C.P. Vosper and Raiford L. Stripling, Architects, 1936, undated:
Plot plan
Main floor plan, details, and schedules
Upper floor plan, details, and schedules
Roof plan and details
Elevations
Details
Half inch detail plans
Details and sections
Main floor plan, November 25, 1936
Upper floor plan, November 25, 1936
Details, November 30, 1936
Details, November 30, 1936
Details, August 31, 1936
Details, August 31, 1936
Plot plan
North, south, front west, and east elevations
Details and sections
Details and elevations
Details and sections
Elevations and sections
Details
Details
Window details and schedules
Plot plan
Front west, north, south, stadium east elevations
Details and sections
Half inch details
Sections and details
Elevations, details, and sections
Details
Details
Window details
Plumbing and electric - first floor plan
Upper floor plan - electrical
Heating and ventilating plan - first floor
Details and elevations
Folder
821-101 Elevations



 

Gonzales Memorial Museum and Amphitheatre, 1936-1937,
0.47 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Gonzales Memorial Museum is a historical museum owned by the City of Gonzales, Texas, constructed as part of the Texas Centennial celebrations. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on January 4, 1937 and Governor James V. Allred spoke at the dedication ceremony on October 30, 1937. In 1952, the Gonzales Memorial Museum Board was created to manage the operations of the museum, led by the Thomas Shelton Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. In September 1983, the museum was designated a State Archaeological Landmark, and in January 2004 it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting construction of the Gonzales Memorial Museum and Amphitheatre consist of two sets of prints prepared by Phelps and Dewees showing plans for the plot, first floor, and foundations, along with sections, elevations, and details, dating September 24 and November 3, 1936, and July 2, 1937.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Gonzales Memorial Museum and Amphitheatre, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-42 Plans and drawings, September 24, 1936:
Plot plan
Half first floor framing plan and half foundation plan
Plans and sections
Longitudinal section and elevations
Detail plans, sections and elevations
Detail plans, sections, and elevations
Detail plans, sections, and elevations
Folder
821-42 Plans and drawings, November 3, 1936:
Plot plan
Half first floor framing plan and half foundation plan
Structural plans and details
Plans and sections
Longitudinal section and elevations
Detail plans, sections and elevations
Detail plans, sections, and elevations
Detail plans, sections, and elevations
Details
Plot plan, July 2, 1937



 

Sam Houston Memorial Museum, 1936,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Sam Houston Memorial Museum is a history museum located in Huntsville, Texas on the campus of Sam Houston State University. The museum is one of several buildings on the eighteen acres that were once part of General Sam Houston's homestead. The original museum consisted of Houston's Woodland home and his law office, both of which were restored in 1927 with a $15,000 appropriation from the Texas Legislature and dedicated on May 3, 1929 (Senate Bill 149, 40th Legislature, Regular Session). A new museum was constructed in 1936 as part of the Texas Centennial through a $35,000 grant to build the modern facility and its rotunda. The museum is owned by Sam Houston State University and is under the leadership of a director appointed by the university. In May 1974, the Woodland home was declared a National Historic Landmark and the complex was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of Sam Houston Memorial Museum prepared by Harry D. Payne show plans for the basement, main floor, ceiling, roof, and foundation, as well as sections, elevations, and details, dating June 23, 1936. A plot plan dated June 1, 1936 is also included.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Sam Houston Memorial Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-45 Plans and drawings, June 23, 1936:
Sections, elevation, and details
Elevations
Basement, main floor, ceiling, and roof plans
Sections and schedules
Foundation and first floor framing plans, details, and sections
Plot plan, June 1, 1936



 

Sam Houston Monument, 1907, 1909,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Sam Houston Monument was designed by sculptor Pompeo Coppini in 1907 and construction was completed in 1910. It is located in Huntsville, Texas at the gravesite of Sam Houston in Oakwood Cemetery. The symbolic iconography shows Lady Victory and Lady History flanking Houston on horseback riding into battle. Inverted torches within laurel wreaths beneath Houston indicate a life extinguished surrounded by peace. An inscription on the monument reads, The world will take care of Houston's fame, attributed to U.S. President Andrew Jackson. The monument is surrounded by a decorative fence constructed by Alamo Iron Works.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records of the Sam Houston Monument are a contract to build the monument, a side elevation view, and a watercolor prepared by Pompeo Coppini, dating 1907 and revised August 19, 1909.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Sam Houston Monument, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-98 Plans and drawings, 1907, revised August 19, 1909:
Contract to build
Side elevation
Watercolor of the monument



 

Sam Houston Steamboat House, 1935,
0.25 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Sam Houston Steamboat House was built in 1858 by Austin College professor Rufus W. Bailey in Huntsville, Texas. Sam Houston and his family rented the Steamboat House in late 1862 after he was deposed as governor, and he died there on July 26, 1863. The house was sold by Rufus Bailey's son Frank in 1863 to A.C. McKeen, who then sold it to Pleasant W. Kittrell in 1866. He died shortly thereafter and his widow traded the property to Major Thomas J. Goree in 1874. Major Goree remodeled the front of the house and hosted a famous dinner there on October 16, 1879, where it was decided to renew the movement to build the University of Texas at Austin. Goree sold the house in 1891, which changed hands four more times before J.E. Josey, publisher of the Houston Post, gave the disintegrating house to the state on March 2, 1936. That year, the Steamboat House was dismantled, moved to the Sam Houston Memorial Museum grounds, and restored as part of the Texas Centennial celebrations. The restorations were completed by Texas Independence Day in 1937 and supervised by architectural firm Wilkinson and Nutter. In 1988, the house was repaired again under the supervision of architectural firm David Hoffman, Inc. The Steamboat House remains one of the most popular destinations at the Sam Houston Memorial Museum complex, with over 40,000 people per year visiting the site.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of the Sam Houston Steamboat House prepared by Wilkinson and Nutter show plans for the foundation and the first and second floors, and sections and elevations of the site, dated May 1935.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Sam Houston Steamboat House, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Folder
821-47 Plans and drawings, May 1935:
Foundation plan, May 1935
First floor plan, May 1935
Second floor plan, May 1935
Front and rear elevations, May 1935
Side elevation, May 1935
Sections, May 1935
Longitudinal section, May 1935



 

Irrigation proposition for Zavala Land and Irrigation Company at La Pryor, 1911, undated,
0.45 cubic ft.

Agency History
Colonel Isaac (Ike) T. Pryor, cattleman and owner of the 100,000-acre 77 Ranch in Zavala County, founded La Pryor, Texas. He formed the Zavala Land and Water Development Company which in the 1910s sold small parcels of farmland from the 30,000 acres of property he held west of the Nueces River. The well-advertised sales offer brought prospective buyers to the area who toured the site on organized train excursions and were shown the wide variety of produce grown on an experimental farm south of town. Farmsteads of 20 to 160 acres were sold and were planted with cotton, milo, corn, other grain and red-top cane for hay. The Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer underlying much of Zavala County provides water for agricultural irrigation, as well as for municipal and industrial uses.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Plans and maps prepared by Young Engineering and Construction Company show a power and ice plant, a pumping station, and well pumps as part of an irrigation proposition for Zavala Land and Irrigation Company (later known as the Zavala Land and Water Development Company). The maps show the general situation of the irrigation district, different sections of the district, a profile and section of the river dam, the situation of the river dam, and the Nueces River. Of particular interest is a map showing Colonel Isaac T. Pryor's 77 Ranch and the surrounding land ownership in Zavala County. Materials are dated 1911 and undated. Associated papers, undated, include the text of the proposition for the irrigation project prepared by Young Engineering and Construction Company.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Irrigation proposition for Zavala Land and Irrigation Company at La Pryor, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, undated
Box
821-91 Irrigation proposition for Zavala Land and Irrigation Company pamphlet, undated
Blueprints and drawings, 1911, undated
Box
821-48 Water shed, 1911
General situation of irrigation district, September 23, 1911
Section map, November 9, 1911
Section map, November 10, 1911
Profile and section of river dam, November 8, 1911
Situation of river dam, November 8, 1911
Mustang Slough earth dam, November 8, 1911
Power and ice plant, November 15, 1911
Pumping station, November 16, 1911
Well pumps, November 25, 1911
Map of Nueces River, undated
Map of County, I.T. Pryor's 77 Ranch and Surrounding Land Ownership, Zavala County, undated



 

Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building, 1967, 1969, undated,
1.21 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building in downtown Austin, Texas was designed by architectural firms Golemon and Rolfe; Joiner, Coburn and King; and Lundgren and Maurer in 1967. Construction was completed in 1968 and the building housed the Texas State Board of Control until it was abolished in 1979 (House Bill 1673, 66th Texas Legislature, Regular Session). As of 2012, the office of the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts occupies the Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building.
Scope and Contents of the Records
The records consist of blueprints of the Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building prepared by architectural firms Golemon and Rolfe; Joiner, Coburn and King; and Lundgren and Maurer showing plans for the first through eighth floors and the penthouse, dating November 21, 1967. Blueprints include basement floor plans with revisions dating April, July, and September of 1967; first floor plans with revisions dating April, July, August, and September of 1967; power plans for the ground and first floors, dating November 21, 1967, with revisions dating December 26, 1967; and plans for a drive-up teller window dated January 31, 1969. Undated materials include Photostat reproductions of telephone locations and Texas State Board of Control engineering plans for the basement and first floor. Undated associated papers include equipment descriptions and pricing for Diebold office machines.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Lyndon B. Johnson State Office Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, undated
Box
821-91 Equipment description and prices for Diebold equipment, undated
Blueprints and drawings, 1967, 1969, undated
Box
821-49 Revisions to plans, April 1967:
Partial basement floor plan
Partial basement floor plan
First floor plan - Treasury
Revisions to plans, July 1967:
Partial basement floor plan
Partial basement floor plan
First floor plan - Treasury
Revisions to plans, August 1967:
First floor plan - Treasury
Revisions to plans, September 1967:
Partial basement floor plan
Partial basement floor plan
First floor plan - Treasury
Plans, November 21, 1967:
Partial ground and first floor plans
Partial ground floor plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Fourth floor plan
Fifth floor plan
Sixth floor plan
Seventh floor plan
Eighth floor plan
Penthouse floor plan
Power plans, November 21 and December 26, 1967:
Supplement to Partial ground and first floor plans
Ground floor plan
Partial ground and first floor plans
Partial ground and First floor plans, revised May 1969
Plans, January 31, 1969:
Special building window (for drive-up teller)
Telephone line plans, undated:
Location of Telephones A
Location of Telephones B
Location of Telephones C
Blueprints and drawings, Engineering Division, State Board of Control, undated:
Basement floor plan - Unit A
Basement floor plan - Unit B
First floor plan - Unit A
First floor plan - Unit B



 

General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument, 1902-1903, undated,
0.32 cubic ft.

Agency History
Albert Sidney Johnston was an officer in the Texas Revolution and the Mexican-American War and a Confederate general in the Civil War who was killed at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6, 1862. He was the highest-ranking casualty on either side of the conflict. Initially buried in New Orleans, the Texas Legislature passed a joint resolution in 1866 to have Johnston re-interred in Austin, Texas. He was buried in the Texas State Cemetery in 1867. In 1905, a sarcophagus carved by noted sculptor Elisabet Ney was erected at the site. The tomb was repaired by the Texas State Board of Control in 1973 at the request of the 63rd Texas Legislature (House Resolution 122, Regular Session).
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records illustrating the design of the General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument consist of two undated and unsigned pen and pencil sketches of the granite and concrete foundation. Associated papers include undated letters of authorization, specifications, and contractor agreements. Of particular interest are two partial color sketches on paperboard by Elizabet Ney, dating 1902-1903.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), General Albert Sidney Johnston Monument, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1902-1903, undated
Box
821-91 Unknown architect, undated:
Letter of authorization
Specifications of monument
Contractor agreements
Elizabet Ney, 1902-1903:
Partial sketch of monument
Partial sketch of monument
Blueprints and drawings, 1902-1903, undated
Box
821-50 Ground plan of the whole monument
Side view of the granite work



 

Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, 1958-1960, undated,
1.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
The premise for the state library was established on January 24, 1839 by the third Congress of the Republic of Texas. It was placed within the Capitol building on the third floor and by the 1870s had 5,000 volumes. Under the Constitution of 1876, the Department of Insurance, Statistics, and History was established and took control of the State Library. The first commissioner was Valentine O. King, who helped establish the Texas State Archives division of the library. A fire on November 9, 1881 destroyed the Capitol, along with most of the library's collection. When the new Capitol was built, the State Library was placed in the north wing of the second floor. In 1909, the Texas State Library and Historical Commission was created (renamed in 1979 as the Texas State Library and Archives Commission).
In January 1957, Governor Marion Price Daniel Sr. recommended to the 55th Texas Legislature that a building be constructed to house the State Library and Archives. The new building, situated east of the Capitol in Austin, Texas, was dedicated on April 10, 1962 and used the same granite quarry as the Capitol. The building is 257 feet long, 77 feet wide, and 60 feet tall, with five main floors and seven stack floors. The Texas General Land Office was located in the building until January 1974. The Texas State Library and Archives Commission works to preserve historical documents, including those of the state government; aids researchers; and helps improve library facilities through the state by stimulating the use of libraries by the public.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building were prepared by Adams and Adams, Architects; Snead and Co. Iron Works; and Art Metal Construction Co. Included are plot, site, floor, foyer, and stack area plans, as well as wall sections, elevations, and details for granite, interior, electrical, tunnel, shelving and equipment. Materials are dated 1909-1914, 1958-1960, and undated.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-71 Adams and Adams, Architects, December 20, 1958:
Site plan - existing conditions
Site plan - new conditions
Ground floor and first stack floor plan
First floor and second stack floor plan
Second floor and third and fourth stack floor plan
Third floor and fifth stack floor plan
Fourth floor and stack roof plan
Fourth floor and sixth and seventh stack floor plan
Penthouse floor and roof plan
Door and finish schedules
Door details
Window schedule and details
West elevations
North, south, and east elevations
North, south, and east elevations (Alt. 1 - A, B, C, D)
Cross section and longitudinal section
Wall sections
Wall sections
Foyer plan - elevations and details
South lobby plan - elevations and details
Interior elevations - reading room - first floor corridor
Interior elevations and details
Interior details
Toilet room interior elevations and details
Stair floor plan and details
Stair sections
Elevator plans and details
Granite details
Granite details
Granite details
Foundation, ground floor and first stack floor framing plan
First floor and second stack floor framing plan
Second floor and third and fourth stack floor framing plan
Third floor and fifth stack floor framing plan
Fourth floor and sixth and seventh stack floor and stack roof
Framing plan
Roof and penthouse roof framing plans
Columns and footings - schedules
Beams - schedules
Beams - schedules (continued)
Beams and slabs - schedules and test hole data
Sections and details in stack area and stair section
Stair section and details
Miscellaneous sections
Tunnel details
Plot plan - Mechanical and Electrical
Mechanical plans:
Underfloor plan and tunnel profile
Ground floor and first stack floor plan
First floor and second stack floor plan
Second floor and third and fourth stack floor plan
Third floor and fifth stack floor plan
Fourth floor and stack roof plan
Fourth floor and sixth and seventh stack floor plan
Penthouse floor and main roof plan
Plumbing riser diagrams and details
Mechanical schedules and symbols
Mechanical details
Stack alternates - diagram and floor plans
Electrical plans:
Ground floor and first stack floor plan
First floor and second stack floor plan
Second floor and third and fourth stack floor plan
Third floor and fifth stack floor plan
Fourth floor and stack roof plan
Fourth floor and sixth and seventh stack floor plan
Penthouse floor and main roof plan
Electrical details
Electrical details, diagrams, and symbols
The Marmon Mok Partnership, August 20, 1984:
Notes, schedules and details, fire deficiency corrections



 

Monument Hill Tomb, 1936,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Monument Hill Tomb is located within the Monument Hill-Kreische Brewery State Historic Site near La Grange, Texas in Fayette County. The site was chosen as a cemetery in 1848 for the Texans who died in the 1842 Dawson Massacre and during the 1843 Black Bean Episode of the failed Meir Expedition. A German immigrant named Heinrich Kreische bought the site in 1849 and built one of the first commercial breweries in Texas into the side of the bluff. After his death, both the brewery and the cemetery site deteriorated. In 1907, the state condemned a 0.36-acre tract of land surrounding the cemetery, but it wasn't until a representative of the Texas State Historical Association visited the site in 1931 and suggested the remains be moved to the State Cemetery in Austin that action was taken. The local members of the Daughters of the Republic of Texas cleared the area, erected a fence, and commissioned a new granite vault, which was dedicated on September 18, 1933, the ninety-first anniversary of the Dawson Massacre. A forty-eight-foot tall shellcrete monument was constructed in 1936 by the Texas Centennial Commission featuring an Art Deco-style mural and ten-foot-tall bronze statue. The Texas State Board of Control transferred the site to the Parks Department in 1949. In 1956, the citizens of Fayette County purchased and donated 3.58 acres of the surrounding land to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. The state acquired an additional thirty-six acres of surrounding land in 1977 from private interests, including the Kreische brewery, and declared the area part of the state park system.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of Monument Hill Tomb prepared by Page and Southerland show the front and rear of the monument, half of the foundation, a side elevation, details, and sections, and date August 25, 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Monument Hill Tomb, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-51 Plans and drawings, August 25, 1936:
Front elevation
Rear elevation
Half foundation plan
Side elevation
Details
Sections



 

Old Stone Fort, 1936,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
La Casa Piedra (later known as the Old Stone Fort) was built by the Spanish in 1779 as the first mercantile house in Nacogdoches. It remained the tallest structure in town for nearly a century, and often served as the seat of civil authority and as a military headquarters. In 1834, Vicente Córdova bought the property and used it as a courthouse until he was forced to flee following the failure of his 1838 rebellion. John S. Roberts purchased the stone house in 1838 and ran a saloon out of it. In 1902, it was dismantled and replaced with a commercial building. The original stones were saved by the Cum Concilio Club, a women's literary club in Nacogdoches, Texas, and used to rebuild the original structure on the campus of Stephen F. Austin State Teachers College in 1936 in honor of the Texas Centennial. Because of its many uses by Spanish, Mexican, and American military forces, the reconstructed building became known as the Old Stone Fort.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the Old Stone Fort prepared by H.B. Tucker show plans for the foundation, first and second floors, and roof, and include elevations, sections, details, and plans for electric light fixtures. Materials are dated April 1, 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Old Stone Fort, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-53 Plans and drawings, April 1, 1936:
Foundation plan
Floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation and section through roof
Right and left side elevation, details, and sections
Rear elevations
Details and sections
Right Side elevation
Second floor framing plan
Details of electric light fixtures



 

Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, 1936,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Panhandle-Plains Historical Society was organized on February 1921 in Canyon, Texas in Randall County. It was established to collect and preserve materials relating to the natural history, pioneer life, and development of the Panhandle and High Plains region of Texas and to encourage study of the region. Its annual journal, the Panhandle-Plains Historical Review, was first published in 1928. Pioneer Hall, which houses the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, was constructed in 1932 on the campus of West Texas State Teachers College (later West Texas A&M University) and opened to the public on April 14, 1933. An addition to the museum was funded with a grant from the Texas Centennial Commission and allowed more room for its growing artifacts collection. Several major expansions have since increased the museum space to over 285,000 square feet. The historical society owns and manages the nearly two million artifacts contained in the museum, while West Texas A&M University and the Texas A&M University Board of Regents provide and maintain the building facilities. Collecting focuses for the museum include anthropology, geology, paleontology, natural history, the cattle industry, the Plains Indians, firearms, transportation, the fine arts, decorative arts, textiles, and historical artifacts from the region. The museum continues to function as headquarters for the society and hosts a library and archives that include manuscripts, photographs, oral histories, and newspapers reflecting the economic, social, cultural, and political life in the region.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of an addition to the Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum prepared by Rittenberry and Carder show plans for terraces, the foundation, a basement, and the first floor, as well as details, sections, and elevations of the site, and date May 19, 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-54 Plans and drawings, May 19, 1936:
Plan showing terraces
Footing and foundation plan and schedule
Basement floor plan, section, and schedule
First floor framing plan and sections
Elevations and details
Details and sections



 

Peabody Memorial Library at Sam Houston State University, 1902,
0.25 cubic ft.

Agency History
Sam Houston State University was founded as Sam Houston Normal Institute by the 16th Texas Legislature on October 10, 1879 to train the teachers of Texas. It is located in Huntsville, Texas in Walker County at the site formerly occupied by Austin College. Its construction was financed with state taxes and the assistance of the George Peabody Fund. The institute was initially managed by the State Board of Education, which appointed three Huntsville citizens as a board of directors. In 1909, the scope of the curriculum expanded to include vocational training and home economics and in 1919, the first baccalaureate degree was awarded. The name of the school was changed to Sam Houston State Teachers College in 1923 and the college was admitted to the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, the American Association of Teachers Colleges, the Association of Texas Colleges, intercollegiate athletic conferences, and received associate membership in the American Association of University Women. With the reorganization of the school and further expansion of the curriculum in 1965, the state legislature changed the school's name to Sam Houston State College (Senate Bill 374, 59th Legislature, Regular Session) and finally to Sam Houston State University in 1969 (House Bill 577, 61st Legislature, Regular Session).
The Peabody Memorial Library was built in 1902 at Sam Houston Normal Institute and financed by George Peabody's Southern Education Fund. It fell into disrepair after the larger Estill Library was built on campus in 1928 but was restored and rededicated as an archival library in 1991. The Texas Historical Commission designated the library a Texas Historic Landmark in 1990. The Peabody Memorial Library no longer hosts the university archives but functions as a campus social center, hosting meetings, receptions, and special events.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the Peabody Memorial Library built at Sam Houston Normal Institute (later to become Sam Houston State University) prepared by J.L. O'Connor show plans for the basement, floor, and roof, as well as sections, elevations, and details, and date June 26, 1902. Of particular interest are details of the mantle and vaulted ceiling in the reading room.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Peabody Memorial Library at Sam Houston State University, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-46 Plans and drawings, June 26, 1902:
Roof plan
Longitudinal section
Cross section
Detail for mantel in reading room
Detail of truss over stack room
Profile of vaulted ceiling in reading room
Front elevation
Side elevation
[torn and pieces missing]
Floor plan
Folder
821-46 Basement plan



 

Prairie View A&M University, 1899, undated,
0.54 cubic ft.

Agency History
Prairie View A&M University, the second oldest public institution of higher education in Texas, originated in the Texas Constitution of 1876. On August 14, 1876, the Texas Legislature established the "Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas for Colored Youths" and placed responsibility for its management with the Board of Directors of the Agricultural and Mechanical College at Bryan. The A&M College of Texas for Colored Youths opened at Prairie View, Texas in Waller County on March 11, 1878. The university's original curriculum was designated by the Texas Legislature in 1879 to be that of a normal school for the preparation and training of teachers. This curriculum was expanded to include the arts and sciences, home economics, agriculture, mechanical arts and nursing after the university was established as a branch of the Agricultural Experiment Station (Hatch Act, 1887) and as a Land Grant College (Morrill Act, 1890). The four-year senior college program began in 1919 and in 1937, a division of graduate studies was added, offering master's degrees in agricultural economics, rural education, agricultural education, school administration and supervision, and rural sociology. In 1945, the name of the institution was changed from Prairie View Normal and Industrial College to Prairie View University (Senate Bill 228, 49th Texas Legislature, Regular Session), and the school was authorized to offer, "as need arises," all courses offered at the University of Texas. In 1947, the Texas Legislature changed the name to Prairie View A&M College of Texas and provided that "courses be offered in agriculture, the mechanics arts, engineering, and the natural sciences connected therewith, together with any other courses authorized at Prairie View at the time of passage of this act, all of which shall be equivalent to those offered at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas at Bryan" (Senate Bill 140, 50th Legislature, Regular Session). On August 27, 1973, the name of the institution was changed to Prairie View A&M University (Senate Bill 487, 63rd Legislature, Regular Session).
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting buildings at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas for Colored Youths (later Prairie View A&M University) include blueprints of a dormitory and cottages, 1899 and undated. The dormitory blueprints prepared by F.E. Giesecke show plans for the foundation, first, second, and third floors, and roof along with sections, details, and elevations of the site. Materials are dated December 8, 1899. Blueprints of cottages prepared by an unknown architect show specifications, floor and roof plans, elevations, details, and schedules and are undated. Associated papers include December 8, 1900 specifications of material for the dormitory and a list of estimate costs.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Prairie View A&M University, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1899
Box
821-91 F.E. Giesecke, Architect, December 8, 1899:
List of estimate costs for dormitory
Specifications of dormitory material
Blueprints and drawings, 1899, undated
Box
821-55 F.E. Giesecke, Architect, December 8, 1899:
Front elevation
End elevation
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Roof plan
Cross section AA - BB
Details
Folder
821-100 Plans for cottages, unknown architect, undated:
Specifications for cottages
Cottage floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
Constructed details
Photocopy of column schedule



 

Presidio San Sabá, about 1936,
0.21 cubic ft.

Agency History
Presidio San Sabá, originally known as Presidio San Luis de las Amarillas, was established in April 1757 to protect the Santa Cruz de San Sabá Mission near the San Saba River and modern-day Menard, Texas. Spanish-Indian conflict was rife in the area and after fifteen years of raids, food shortages, and epidemics, the fort was abandoned in 1772. In 1936, the Texas Centennial Commission reconstructed the northwest portion of the Presidio San Sabá with a grant from the Texas Legislature (House Bill 11, 44th Legislature, Regular Session), but the reconstruction quickly fell into disrepair. In 2009, the Menard County Historical Commission received a grant from the Texas Historical Commission to reconstruct the original footprint of the site.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records of the restoration of Presidio San Sabá consist of unsigned linen prints showing a restoration proposal, including a site plan, elevations, and details. Also included is a rough map of the area on poster paper. Materials are undated but date from the building's restoration in 1936. Undated associated papers include a list of materials and cost, a letter of estimate costs, and a printed map of the San Saba River.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Presidio San Sabá, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, about 1936
Box
821-91 List of materials and cost
Letter of estimated costs
Printed map of San Saba River
Blueprints and drawings, about 1936
Box
821-51 Plot plan
Elevations
Elevations
Rough map of area



 

San Antonio State Hospital, 1899, 1904, undated,
1.53 cubic ft.

Agency History
In 1889, the Texas Legislature approved construction for the Southwest Insane Asylum. The first building was completed in April 1892 at a location five miles south of San Antonio, Texas in Bexar County. The facility was placed on a site of 672 acres and at its peak could comfortably house approximately 2,600 patients. In 1925, the Southwest Insane Asylum was renamed the San Antonio State Hospital. At the end of the first year, the patient population was approximately 142, but by 1912 the facility was equipped to serve 1,140 patients. The next year capacity was increased to 1,800 as overcrowding continued to be a constant issue with the facility. Five new buildings were added by 1939 and by 1940 the San Antonio State Hospital housed 2,854 patients. By this time, the power of oversight had been transferred to the Texas State Board of Control, which ensured patients were placed in other accommodations while expansions to the facility occurred. At this time new patients were placed on a list that exceeded 700, with many being left in local jails to wait for available bed space. By 1960, the San Antonio State Hospital was servicing several thousand patients. Shortly thereafter, the ratio of patients to staff was reduced under federal court orders. By the 1990s, the San Antonio State Hospital was equipped to handle acute, extended care, multiple disability, psychiatric intensive care, adolescent, bicultural, geriatric care, and chemical dependency.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Records documenting buildings at the Southwest Insane Asylum (later the San Antonio State Hospital) consist of blueprints and specifications prepared by H.T. Phelps, Architect, for additions and alterations; McAdoo and Woolley, Architects, for proposed new wards and hospital; Larmour and Watson, Architects for a boiler house; and J. Reily Gordon for improvements and repairs. Shown are plot, floor, framing, basement, and roof plans, as well as elevations and plumbing details. materials dated January 15, 1904 and undated. Associated papers consist of specifications dated 1899 and undated.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), San Antonio State Hospital, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1899 and undated
Box
821-91 Handwritten letter, McAdoo and Wooley, Architects, undated
Specifications of labor and materials, unknown architects, 1899
Blueprints and drawings, January 15, 1904 and undated
Box
821-58 H.T. Phelps, Architect, January 15, 1904:
Present basement, basement plan of hospital remodeled
First floor plan
Framing plan of first floor
Second floor plan
Framing plan of second floor
Third floor plan remodeled
Plan showing framing of roof on third story addition and disposition of new fire proofing
Roof plan
Roof plan of addition
Front elevation
End elevation
Rear elevation
Section
Details showing disposition of wire and frame in windows
Present first floor and second floor
Basement plan
First floor plan
Framing plan of first floor
Second floor plan
Framing plan of second floor
Roof plan
Framing plan of roof
Front and rear elevations
Elevation
Side elevation
Longitudinal section
Transverse section
Proposed new wards and hospital, McAdoo and Woolley, Architects, undated:
Side elevations
Floor plan of ward and elevation of ward before additions
Side elevation when added to Ward A
Floor plan of ward when added to Ward A
First floor plan and front elevation
Second floor plan
Floor plan and front elevation
Front and end elevation, floor plan, and section
Floor plan and elevation of new ward
Building plot plan
Boiler house, Larmour and Watson, Architects, undated:
First floor and front elevation
Second floor and attic story
Side elevation and section
Connections
Box
821-59 J. Reily Gordon, undated:
Basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Fourth floor plan
Plumbing details



 

San Jacinto Monument and Museum, 1914, 1935-1939, undated,
2.32 cubic ft.

Agency History
Located near the city of La Porte, twenty-two miles southeast of Houston in Harris County, Texas, the San Jacinto Monument and Museum was constructed beginning in 1936 with both state and federal funds as part of the Texas Centennial celebration. Costing $1.5 million, the monument is considered one of the best examples of modern architecture in the nation. The museum is the building's base and forms 125 square feet. Engravings and a frieze depict events from the history of Texas. Originally the facility was operated by the San Jacinto Museum of History Association, organized on November 9, 1938 by the Texas State Board of Control. In September 1966 the Board of Control transferred oversight to the Texas State Parks and Wildlife Commission.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications prepared by Alfred C. Finn, Architect show plans for the San Jacinto Monument and Museum, the Park, and the Pavilion. The documents contain floor, plumbing, electrical, plot, basement, and roof plans, elevations and stair details, and plans for terraces and an amphitheatre. Materials date 1914, 1935-1939, and undated. Associated papers consist of specifications dated 1936. Related photographs of the San Jacinto Monument Construction (1964/151) are in the State Archives' Prints and Photographs collection.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), San Jacinto Monument and Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1936
Box
821-91 Alfred C. Finn, Architect, letters, 1936
Blueprints and drawings, 1914, 1935-1939, undated
Box
821-60 Alfred C. Finn, Architect, March 25, 1936:
Proposed landscape plan of San Jacinto Battlefield showing location of monument, with Ms. C.B. Whitehead, Landscape Architect
[reduced size]
Plan of terraces and amphitheatre and section
Plan of basement floor and details
Plan of entrance floor
Roof plan and one-half of reflected ceiling plan
Front elevation and plans
Front elevation
Front and rear elevations of base
Right and left side elevations and sections
Section through entrance and elevator lobbies, sections, and elevations
Sections and elevations
Sections, details, and elevations
Details
Diagrammatic details of Stair No. 1
[2 sheets]
Souvenir floor plans
Alfred C. Finn, Architect, March 25, 1936, approved June 4, 1936:
Proposed landscape plan of San Jacinto Battlefield showing location of monument, with Ms. C.B. Whitehead, Landscape Architect
[reduced size]
Plan of terraces and amphitheatre and section
Plan of basement floor and details
Plan of entrance floor
Roof plan and one half of reflected ceiling plan
Front elevation and sections
Front elevation and plans
Front and rear elevations of base
Right and left side elevations and sections
Section through entrance and elevator lobbies, sections, and elevations
Sections and elevations
Sections, details and elevations
Sections and details
Diagrammatic details of Stair No. 1
[2 sheets]
Souvenir floor plans
Plan showing bars and footing
Plan of footing and section
Basement plan and framing
Plan of terraces and amphitheatre
First floor framing plan, section, and details
Framing at Historical Society floor level and sections
Sections and elevations and details
Schedules for first floor beam and roof and Historical
Floor beams
Sections, details, and schedule
Plans, sections, and schedule
Diagrammatic sketch showing method of placing
Reinforcing bars for tower walls
Plan of basement floor and diagrams of lights
Plan of entrance floor and amphitheatre and terraces
Plans of various floors and details
Plumbing and electrical riser diagrams
Alfred C. Finn, Architect, July 23, 1936:
Plan of terraces and amphitheatre and section
Plan of basement floor and details
Plan of entrance floor and details
Roof plan and one-half of reflected ceiling plan
Front elevation and plans
Front elevation, sections, and details
Front and rear elevation of base
Right and left side elevations, details of stair and steps
Section through entrance and elevator lobbies, elevations and sections
Section elevations
Sections, elevations, and details
Details
Diagrammatic details of Stair No. 1
[2 sheets]
Souvenir floor plan, sections, and details
Details of front entrance
Details, sections, and elevations
Footing plans
Plan of footing, Section A
Basement plan and framing
Plan of terraces and amphitheatre and sections
First floor framing plan and sections
Framing at Historical Society floor level and sections
Sections, elevation
Schedules
Sections and details
Plans and sections
Diagrammatic sketch showing method of placing
Reinforcing bars for tower walls
Plan of basement floor and diagram of flood lights
Plan of entrance floor and terraces and amphitheatre
Plans of various floors
Plumbing and electrical riser diagrams
Box
821-61 Proposed landscape plan of San Jacinto Battlefield showing location of monument, with Ms. C.B. Whitehead, Landscape Architect, about March 25, 1936
[full size]
Box
821-62 Alfred C. Finn, Architect, 1935-1939:
Front elevation, October 25, 1935
Floor plans, October 21, 1935
Terrace plans, October 22, 1935
Detail of cornerstone, January 14, 1937
Detail of right-hand half of cornerstone, October 5, 1938
Detail of left-hand half of cornerstone, April 14, 1937
Detail of typical stone anchor, February 1, 1937
Detail of bronze tablet, March 9, 1937
Details of lightning protection equipment, May 24, 1937
Revised detail of areaway wall and footings, December 31, 1936
Pedestals in large halls, Type "J" Alt., September 19, 1939
Pedestals in large halls, Type "G" Alt., September 19, 1939
Rear entrance lobby, Type "I" Alt., September 19, 1939
Terrace standard, Type "M", revised, September 19, 1939
Hall of Honor, Type "F" Alt., September 19, 1939
Details of chair for meeting hall and art gallery, October 7, 1938
Details of table for meeting hall and art gallery, October 7, 1938
Details of cases, benches, and chairs, January 6, 1939
Bronze letters "Women," October 7, 1939
Details of protection bars occurring in observation floor and plan of anchor and rod, October 7, 1939
Section, October 7, 1939
Plan of basement floor and details, October 7, 1939
Plan of entrance floor and details, October 7, 1939
Front elevation and plans, October 7, 1939
Front and rear elevations of base, October 7, 1939
Plans and details, October 7, 1939
Plans and details mostly re: star, August 19, 1937
Revised details at top of shaft, August 19, 1937
Setting plans and sections, August 14, 1936
Plans and details, December 15, 1936
Landscape plans, superintendent's house, R. Graham Jackson, Architect; Ms. C.B. Whitehead, Landscape Architect, undated:
Section
Floor plan and schedules
Floor and rear elevations
Left and right side elevations
Ms. C.B. Whitehead, Landscape Architect, undated:
Proposed relocation of highway crossing, San Jacinto Battleground
J.C. McVea, engineer, March 1936:
Bulkhead for shoreline protection - bulkhead details
Bulkhead for shoreline protection - location plan
Unknown architect, undated:
San Jacinto Monument and Park - map of area
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, October 5, 1914:
Pavilion San Jacinta [sic] Battlefield



 

San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission, 1936-1937, undated,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
Founded in the early eighteenth century, the San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission is one of five missions established in San Antonio, in what would later become the state of Texas. The mission was requested on December 26, 1719 by the president of the Franciscans of the College of Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe de Zacatecas. By February 23, 1720, a tract of land on the east bank of the San Antonio River was approved and assigned to 240 Indians of the area, primarily Pampopa, Pastia, and Sulujam. An epidemic hit in 1739, and the mission moved to high ground, more than a half mile from the former site. Though there are over 21 known groups of Indians known to have resided at the mission, the baptismal, marriage, and burial registers are lost, preventing further knowledge of the inhabitants. While at the mission, Indians were converted to Christian teachings and European values. During the early nineteenth century the mission was secularized and portioned off. Troops also began using the grounds during this time and did considerable damage to the structure. By the early twentieth century part of the north wall of the church, the dome, and the roof, along with the bell tower and stairs had collapsed. In 1932 major restoration was started on the mission structures by the church, the San Antonio Conservation Society and Bexar County, assisted by the U.S. Works Progress Administration and the Civil Works Administration under the supervision of architect Harvey P. Smith. In 1941, the mission grounds were declared a national and state historical site and were operated by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department from 1941 to 1983. The mission is a part of the San Antonio Missions National Historical Park.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications prepared by Harvey P. Smith for the San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission show plans for the north wall, basement, floor, and plot plans, as well as elevation and section details. Materials are dated December 5, 1936, November 27, 1937, and undated.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), San José y San Miguel de Aguayo Mission, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-63 Plans and details, December 5, 1936:
Plan along north wall
Elevations, details, and sections
Longitudinal section, cross section, and first floor and basement plans
Plans and details, November 27, 1937:
Plan along north wall
Elevations and details
Elevations, plan, details, and sections
Plot plan, elevation, and details
Plans and details, undated:
Plan No. One
Plan No. Eight
Elevations
Longitudinal and cross sections and first floor and basement plans



 

James Smith Memorial Building, about 1936,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The James Smith Memorial Building was constructed during the 1936 Texas Centennial in Fair Park in Tyler, Texas. It comprised one large room, 26 feet by 36 feet, paneled in stained knotty pine, and was owned and maintained by the City of Tyler. The facility was built in honor of James Smith, a captain in the Texas Revolution, who used his home to protect neighbors during the Indian troubles of 1837-1838. Smith was later a brigadier general in command of the Third Brigade on the northwest frontier with Mexico, and he represented Rusk County in the Texas House of Representatives, 1846-1847. In the 1970s, the building was torn down because of rot and termites. The former location is in the Tyler Rose Gardens.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the James Smith Memorial Building designed through the office of W. Keith Maxwell show foundation and floor plans, side elevations and section details. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in about 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), James Smith Memorial Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-68 Plans and drawings, about 1936:
Rear and front elevations and floor plan
Right and left side elevations and foundation plan
Plans, elevations, details, and sections



 

State Insurance Building, 1960, 1962
0.53 cubic ft.

Agency History
The State Insurance Building, sometimes called the Texas Insurance Building or the Insurance Building, is located in the Capitol Complex in Austin, Texas. It was built in the early 1960s and was originally occupied by the Industrial Accident and State Insurance Boards. Since the late 20th century, it serves as headquarters for the organization of offices, councils, and commissions within the Office of the Governor.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the State Insurance Building prepared by architect W. Clark Craig show floor plans, frame types, and window details, with prints dating November 9, 1960 and revisions dating October 5, 1962.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), State Insurance Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-96 Plans and details, November 9, 1960, revised October 5, 1962:
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Penthouse floor and roof plan, details
Third floor and frame types
Window details



 

Sunken Garden Amphitheatre, 1936-1937, undated,
0.7 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Sunken Garden Theater is located adjacent to the southwest corner of Brackenridge Park in San Antonio, Texas at the site of a former limestone quarry. Alamo Roman and Portland Cement Company, later called Alamo Cement Company, used the quarry from 1880 until 1908 when it moved to a new facility with rail access north of the city limits. By the 1920s, landscaping improvements included a lily pond named the Japanese Garden on the northern portion of the site, and to the south, the Texas Star Garden with patterns formed by rocks and flowers. The acoustical qualities of the site were noticed and performances began to be held there. Sculptor Gutzon Borglum drew the first plans for the theater in a Grecian style, the design of which appeared in the San Antonio Light on January 19, 1930. Borglum's design differed from the final design that was completed by local architect Harvey P. Smith. Construction of the theater was authorized to begin in February 1930 and was completed in time for the dedication on July 14, 1930.
The Sunken Garden Theater facility was completed in 1937 as part of the Texas Centennial celebration. Renovation and additions at that time included dressing rooms, stage improvements and a concrete floor for the theater seating area. Architects for the Centennial project, completed by the U.S. Works Progress Administration, were Harvey P. Smith, George Willis and Charles T. Boelhauwe. A concession area was built by the National Youth Administration in 1937-1938. A bronze plaque installed on the east wing wall reads, "1836-1936. Sunken Garden Theatre, a memorial to the Heroes of the Texas Revolution." Another plaque recognized the San Antonio Civic Opera Co., founded by Mrs. Lewis Krams-Beck. The amphitheater is used for both commercial functions and city co-sponsored events.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for additions and alterations to the Sunken Garden Amphitheatre were prepared by Harvey P. Smith, George Willis, and Charles T. Boelhauwe, Architects and show floor, elevation, and plot plans, elevation and section details and details on the placement of the bronze tablets. Materials are dated November and December 1936 and February 1937. The first set of drawings has no date but are identical (with the addition of one sheet) to the second set.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Sunken Garden Amphitheatre, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-72 Plans and drawings, about November 28, 1936:
Division A-E - half plan of entrance and plot plan
Division A-B - sections, details, and plan
Division C - first and second floor plans, Building No. 1, and elevations
Division C - first and second floor plans, Building No. 2, and typical details
Division C - foundation, first and second floor, and roof framing plans, Building No. 1, schedules, and sections
Division C - foundation, first and second floor, and roof framing plans, Building No. 2, schedules, and sections
Division D - details
Plan under stage floor
Division E - plan of slab
Division E - elevation, plans, and sections
Division E - sections and plans
Division E - sections
Box
821-73 Plans and drawings, November 28, 1936:
Division A-E - half plan of entrance and plot plan
Division A-B - sections, details, and plan
Division C - first and second floor plans, Building No. 1, and elevations
Division C - first and second floor plans, Building No. 2, and typical details
Division C - foundation, first and second floor, and roof framing plans, Building No. 1, schedules, and sections
Division C - foundation, first and second floor, and roof framing plans, Building No. 2, schedules, and sections
Division D - details
Division E - plan of slab
Division E - elevation, plans, and sections
Division E - sections and plans
Division E - sections
Plans and drawings, undated:
Detail showing title and placement of bronze tablets
Full size detail of bronze tablet (A)
Full size detail of bronze tablet (B)
Plans and drawings, 1936-1937:
Division A - plan of foundation piles and grade beams, December 24, 1936
Division C-D - Transverse section through present tunnel and plan of present tunnel, December 10, 1936
Details, February 2, 1937
Steel placing plan, toilet rooms, February 10, 1937



 

Terrell State Hospital, 1899, 1905, 1909, undated,
2.53 cubic ft.

Agency History
Due to overcrowding in the state's only psychiatric treatment facility, the State Lunatic Asylum (later the Austin State Hospital) in Austin, State Representative John S. Wood introduced a bill in 1881 for a new branch to be placed in North Texas. On February 16, 1883, the 18th Texas Legislature passed Wood's bill, and a 672.65 acre site was chosen northeast of Terrell, Texas to house the new facility. Originally known as the North Texas Lunatic Asylum, the facility opened on July 14, 1885 with the purpose of treating and caring for the chronically incurable insane. Oversight of the facility, then known as the North Texas Hospital for the Insane, was passed to the Texas State Board of Control in 1920. Five years later it was renamed the Terrell State Hospital. Responsibility for the institution was transferred to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools in 1949, and then to the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation in 1965. As of 2004, the hospital has operated under the direction of the Texas Department of State Health Services. The facilities have continued to be renovated and improved.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the North Texas Lunatic Asylum (later Terrell State Hospital) prepared by C.A. Gill and Son, Architects, and an unnamed architect show plans for a female annex, laundry building, and pavilion consisting of floor, foundation, and roof plans, elevations, and specification details. Materials are dated October 10, 1899 and December 11, 1905. Associated papers consist of specifications dated 1899 and undated. See the series Fireproofing and fire protection for blueprints of the proposed underground layout for fire protection for the asylum.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Terrell State Hospital, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1899 and undated
Box
821-92 Specifications for infirmary annex, undated
Specifications for female annex, October 10, 1899
Specifications for laundry building, October 10, 1899
Blueprints and drawings, 1899, 1905, 1909, undated
Box
821-74 Female annex, C.A. Gill and Son, Architects, October 10, 1899:
Plan of foundation
Plan of first floor
Plan of second floor
Plan of third floor
Plan of roof
Front elevation
West end elevation
Rear elevation
Half of transverse section at A-A
Cross sections
Details
Details, plans, sections, and elevations
Details
Box
821-75 Female infirmary, C.A. Gill and Son, Architects, December 11, 1905:
Front elevation
South elevation
East elevation
North elevation
Section A-A
Section B-B
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Details
Details, sections, and elevation
Box
821-76 Laundry building, C.A. Gill and Son, Architects, October 10, 1899:
Foundation plan
First floor
Second floor plan
Attic plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
Side elevation
Transverse section
Cross section
Details of window and door frames
Plan of proposed pavilion, elevation, and details, June 29, 1909
Box
821-97 J.N. Preston and Son, Architect, October 15, 1883:
Stone balustrade for outside steps, boiler house cornice
Section through wards
Front elevation
Roof plan
First floor plan
Third floor plan
Window details
Window details
Window, roof, spire details
Administration building details
Stair detail
Longitudinal section
Plans for water tower, boilers
Sections and details
Elevations and details
Second floor plan
Cross-section
Sections through ward
Side elevation



 

Texas A&M University, 1899, 1902,
0.77 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College was established by an act of the Texas Legislature on April 17, 1871 as a branch of the University of Texas for instruction in agriculture, the mechanic arts, and the natural sciences. It opened its doors on October 4, 1876 in College Station, Texas. Although it was the second institute of higher learning to be approved by the state legislature, since the University of Texas had still yet to be built, the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas was the first to admit students. Originally only white males were admitted, and all students were required to participate in military training. The college was expanded and renamed on August 23, 1963 by the 58th Texas Legislature as Texas A&M University. That year, the first African American students were enrolled, and a limited co-educational policy was initiated for women. By the early 1970s the school was fully co-educational.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for Texas Agricultural and Mechanical College (later renamed Texas A&M University) prepared by F.E. Giesecke, and Dodson and Scott, Architects show plans for a dormitory, chemical-veterinary laboratory, and four residences and contain floor plans, side elevations, and building details. Materials are dated February and September 1899, and April 8, 1902. Associated papers consist of specifications dated 1899 and 1902.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas A&M University, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1899, 1902
Box
821-92 F.E. Giesecke, Architect, September 3, 1899:
Cost and specifications for dormitory
Specification for four residences
Dodson and Scott, Architects, 1902:
Specifications for chemical-veterinary laboratory building
Blueprints and drawings, 1899, 1902
Box
821-77 Dormitory, F.E. Giesecke, Architect, February 1899:
End elevation
Section
Front and rear elevation
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Fourth floor plan
Roof plan
One-quarter size details
One-quarter size details
One-sixteenth size details
Four residences, F.E. Giesecke, Architect, September 17, 1899:
Side elevation
Side elevation and detail
Floor plan
Foundation plan
Joist plan
Front elevation
Side elevation
First joist plan
First floor plan
Second joist plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Details of columns, cornices, and belt courses
One-eighth size details
Box
821-78 Chemical-veterinary laboratory, Dodson and Scott, Architects, April 8, 1902:
Footing plan
Basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Transverse section, front elevation
Longitudinal section, right - left elevation
Section lines, rear elevation
Elevation of dome, truss partition
Details - section through dome
Details - dome, exterior
Details - pediment over front entrance
Details - section of porch, general section
Details - small domes
Details - front door, circle head windows
Details - outside doors, inside doors, trusses
Details - stairway
Details - window sills



 

Texas Confederate Home, 1901, 1903,
0.45 cubic ft.

Agency History
After receiving a charter from the state on November 28, 1884, the John B. Hood Camp of United Confederate Veterans established a home for disabled Confederate veterans with financial help from the Albert Sidney Johnston Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. The home opened on November 1, 1886 on West Sixth Street in Austin, Texas and operated privately until 1891, when the state assumed control and officially named it the Texas Confederate Home. The facility included private cottages, living quarters, an administrative building, and a hospital. The Texas State Board of Control administered the institution from 1920 until 1949, when the 51st Texas Legislature assigned management to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools (House Bill 1, Regular Session). The Texas Confederate Home began admitting veterans and their spouses from the Spanish American War and World War I after 1939. Mental patients considered senile were allowed to be transferred to the Confederate Home from other state institutions beginning in 1943. The last Confederate veteran died in 1954 at the age of 108. In 1963, the remaining patients were transferred to the Kerrville State Hospital, and the Texas Confederate Home buildings became an annex to the Austin State School before being demolished in 1970.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Plans for the dining hall and hospital building of the Texas Confederate Home, designed by C.H. Page Jr., Architect include elevations, floor plans, and details for both buildings. Associated papers include specifications for the dining hall and the hospital building, and a paper for the specifications of the facilities. Dates are December 4, 1901 and August 7, 1903.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, by building.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Confederate Home, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1903
Box
821-91 Plans and specifications of Confederate Home cover sheet, August 7, 1903
Specifications - brick dining hall
Specifications - hospital building
Blueprints and drawings, 1901, 1903
Box
821-29 Dining hall building, December 4, 1901:
North elevation
West and east elevations
Plan for first floor
Plan of foundation
Plan of second floor
Hospital building, August 7, 1903:
Foundation plan
Plan of basement
Plan of first floor
Plan of second floor
Roof plan
North elevation
South elevation
Section
Details of gallery and window frame



 

Texas Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute for Colored Youth, 1910s,
0.22 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Institute for Colored Youth was established by the 18th Texas Legislature in 1887 with a $50,000 appropriation and located on a 100-acre tract about four miles northwest of downtown Austin, Texas, on Bull Creek Road between 38th and 45th streets. The charity-sponsored institution for black children opened on October 17, 1887, with seventeen pupils and two teachers. Initially occupying only an eleven-room residence, in 1888 a new two-story brick building was added to provide more classroom and dormitory space. In 1919, oversight of the school was assigned to the newly created Texas State Board of Control. By the 1940s the school had twelve brick buildings and one stone building, including dormitories, classrooms, hospital, superintendent's residence, and dining room. Instruction at the accredited high school emphasized training in trades and industries. Among the courses offered were manual labor, broom making, mattress making, shoemaking and repair, tailoring, cleaning and pressing, cooking, sewing, rug making, and other handicrafts.
When the State Colored Orphans' Home was combined with the institute in 1943, the name of the facility was changed to the Texas Blind, Deaf, and Orphan School. The school was moved southeast to 601 Airport Boulevard in 1961, after the legislature appropriated $1.5 million for the construction of eleven buildings to accommodate the 1,208 students. The school was placed under the jurisdiction of the Texas Education Agency in 1965, and its name was changed to Texas Blind and Deaf School. That year the students began to be racially integrated with the white students at the Texas School for the Blind and the Texas School for the Deaf. The campus of the former Texas Blind and Deaf School served as the East Campus facility of the Texas School for the Deaf, and housed programs in early childhood and elementary education and the department for multi-handicapped deaf students. All programs moved to the School for the Deaf's South Campus on South Congress Avenue after its renovation in the 1990s. The former East Campus facilities were converted to use by the Austin-Travis County Health and Human Services Department.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the Texas Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute for Colored Youth consist of unsigned plans (though possibly by C.H. Page Jr., Architect) for the foundation and first floor, and a partial front elevation and pier detail. Associated papers are specifications for repairs and new foundation for mess hall and dormitory, prepared by C.H. Page Jr., Architect. Materials are undated but likely date from the 1910s.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute for Colored Youth, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1910s
Box
821-67 Texas Deaf, Dumb and Blind Institute for Colored Youth, specifications for repairs and new foundation for mess hall and dormitory, 1910s
Blueprints and drawings, 1910s
Box
821-67 Foundation plan
Part of front elevation and detail of pier
First floor plan



 

Texas Highway Department, undated,
0.77 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Texas (State) Highway Department (merged into the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation in 1975, and merged again into the Texas Department of Transportation in 1991) was responsible for the building and maintenance of the state's roads and highways from its creation in 1917. Its governing body was a three-member Highway Commission who appointed the state highway engineer, held public hearings, had the authority to create geographical divisions within the department, and formulated plans or policies for the location, construction, and maintenance of a comprehensive system of state highways and public roads in cooperation with the counties of the state, or under the direct supervision and control of the State Highway Department.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints prepared by an unknown architect for the Texas Highway Department are undated and show floor plans and sections for a Quonset hut storage building (possibly similar to the one built at Camp Hubbard in Austin that was used to store the State Archives in 1956).
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Highway Department, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-96 Quonset hut storage building, floor plan and sections, unknown architect, undated
[2 duplicate sheets]



 

Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers, and Rangers Memorial, 1936-1937, undated,
0.45 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers, and Rangers Memorial (known as Memorial Hall or Pioneer Hall) in San Antonio, Texas was created for the 1936 Texas Centennial to house a museum depicting the history of pioneers and trail drivers in the state, and of the Texas Rangers. San Antonio architects Atlee B. and Robert M. Ayres and Phelps and Dewees designed the structure. The plaque on the building reads, "Pioneers - Old Trail Drivers - Texas Rangers - Memorial Hall." Two statues in front of the museum feature trail drivers and a Texas Ranger. The trail drivers statue, sculpted by Gutzon Borglum, was commissioned by the Trail Drivers Association. Borglum completed the model in 1925, but due to lack of funds it was not cast until 1940, and then was only a fourth of its originally planned size. The Texas Ranger portion of the museum relocated to the Buckhorn Museum in San Antonio in 2006.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers, and Rangers Memorial prepared by Atlee B. and Robert M. Ayres and Phelps and Dewees, Architects show plans and schedules for the first floor, second floor, basement, and roof, as well as section and elevation details. Materials are dated December 17, 1936, January 27, 1937, and undated. Associated papers consist of undated specifications.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Pioneers, Trail Drivers, Rangers Memorial, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, undated
Box
821-92 General notes to accompany schedules, undated
Blueprints and drawings, 1936
Box
821-79 Plans and drawings, December 17, 1936:
Plans and schedules
First floor plan and schedules
Second floor plan and schedules
Front and north elevations, details, and sections
Rear elevation, sections, and details
Transverse section, elevations, and details
Details and sections
Basement and upper floor piping plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Plans and drawings, December 30, 1936:
Foundations and basement framing plan, sections, and details
First floor framing plan, details, and sections
Second floor framing plan, sections, and details
Roof framing plan
Plans and schedules
First floor plan and schedule
Second floor plan and schedule
North side and front (east) elevations, details, and section
Rear elevation and details
Transverse section, elevations, and sections
Details, sections and plans
Basement and underfloor piping plan
First floor plan and schedule
Second floor plan and schedule
Plans and schedules
Basement and underfloor piping plan
First floor plan and schedule
Second floor plan and schedule
Plans and drawings, undated:
Foundation and basement framing plan and details
First floor framing plan, details, and sections
Second floor framing plan and sections
Roof framing plan



 

Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, 1902-1903, 1911-1912, undated,
1.73 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Asylum for the Blind was established by the 6th Texas Legislature on August 16, 1856. Originally located on San Gabriel Street in Austin, west of the University of Texas, the school was moved to 45th Street and Lamar Boulevard in 1917. The costs for operating the institution were covered by Austin citizens through appropriations approved in the 34th and 35th Legislatures. The Asylum for the Blind became known as the Texas Institution for the Blind (also referred to as the Blind Institute) in 1905, the Texas School for the Blind in 1915, and the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired in 1989. A complete remodeling of the campus was completed in 2012. The school's mission is to help all those with a blinding disability gain skills and knowledge to enjoy fulfilling and satisfying lives. The Texas State Board of Control began oversight of the facility in the early 1920s, and continued until the late 1940s when control was transferred to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools, and then again to the Texas Education Agency in 1953. The Texas School for the Blind integrated with the all-black Texas Blind and Deaf School in the 1960s.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the Texas Institution for the Blind (later the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired) prepared by C.H. Page Jr., C.H. Page and Bro., and R.M. Thomson, Architects show plans for a school building, mattress factory, heating, factory building, boiler house, stable, and additions to the barn. Foundation, floor, and roof plans are included, as well as elevations and support details. Materials are dated 1902-1903 and 1911-1912. Associated papers consist of specifications, 1903, 1911-1912, and undated. See the series Fireproofing and fire protection for blueprints of the proposed underground layout for fire protection for the school.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1903, 1911-1912, and undated
Box
821-91 C.H. Page Jr., Architect, specifications for boiler house, undated
C.H. Page Jr., Architect, 1903:
Specifications for school building, July 27, 1903
Letter accompanying specifications, September 1, 1903
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, 1911:
Letter to governor, October 9, 1911
Specifications of industrial building
Specifications of industrial building
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, 1911-1912:
Uniform contract, January 3, 1912
Bond, January 11, 1912
Uniform contract, January 5, 1912
Bond, January 12, 1912
Uniform contract, January 5, 1912
Bond, January 11, 1912
Specifications of heating, December 28, 1911
Blueprints and drawings, 1902-1903, 1911-1912, and undated
Box
821-64 School building, C.H. Page Jr., Architect, July 27, 1903:
Plan of basement
Plan of foundation
Plan of first floor
[torn]
Plan of second floor
Plan of roof
Section
Front elevation
Rear elevation
Side elevation
Detail of cornice and gutter
Detail of front entrance
Details
Detail of State Opening
Detail of roof truss
Mattress factory, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, October 19, 1911:
Front elevation and detail
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Foundation plan
First floor
Second floor
Steel plan - support of second floor
Support of roof
Roof plan
Detail of C.I. column
Wall section
Full size detail frames for windows, section, and plan
Heating plans, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, January 3, 1912:
First floor
Second floor
Factory building, first floor, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, undated
Addition to barn, first plan and elevations, C.H. Page Jr., Architect, undated
Stable, floor plan, elevations, and section, R.M. Thomson, Architect, February 1, 1902
[brittle and torn]
Box
821-65 Boiler house, C.H. Page Jr., Architect, undated:
Plan of foundation
Plan of first floor
Second floor plan
Front and side elevations



 

Texas School for the Deaf, 1901, 1915-1916, 1920s, undated,
2.48 cubic ft.

Agency History
Established as the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum in 1856 by a legislative act, the school was placed on a tract of fifty-seven acres just south of the Colorado River in Austin, Texas. In 1858 the Texas Legislature appropriated $5,000 to buy the rented land, and construct an improved school. Another building program began in 1875, which allowed the school to provide additional educational opportunities. An oral system of teaching was added to supplement the manual form of communication in 1893, in an effort to develop residual speech ability. The deaf-blind department was transferred to the Texas School for the Blind in 1934. The Texas State Board of Control began oversight of the facility in 1919. This power was transferred to the Texas Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools in 1949, and the name of the facility was changed to the Texas School for the Deaf. In 1951 the legislature reclassified the school under the jurisdiction of the Texas Education Agency. In 1965 the school was racially integrated with the Texas Blind and Deaf School, whose facilities became the East Campus of the School for the Deaf. The Texas School for the Deaf became an independent school district in 1981.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum were prepared by Kuehne, Chasey, and Giesecke, Architects for a primary building; C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, for an auditorium addition; Olle J. Lorehn, Architect, for a school building; and C.H. Page Jr., Architect, for building repairs. Shown are floor, side elevation, and section plans, as well as mechanical layouts. Materials are dated December 11, 1901, October 13, 1915, September 25, 1916, and undated. Associated papers for the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum include specifications dated 1901, 1915-1916. See the series Fireproofing and fire protection for blueprints of the proposed underground layout for fire protection for the school.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas School for the Deaf, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1901, 1915-1916
Box
821-92 Olle J. Lorehn, Architect, 1901:
Specifications for the school building
Specifications for plumbing, sewers, and electric work
Specifications for heating the school building
Specifications for a two-story frame residence with attic
C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, November 2, 1915:
General specifications for auditorium
Mechanical specifications for auditorium
Kuehne, Chasey, and Giesecke, Architects, October 4, 1916:
Specifications
Mechanical specifications
Blueprints and drawings, 1901, 1915-1916, undated
Box
821-66 Primary building, Kuehne, Chasey, and Giesecke, Architects, September 25, 1916:
Plot plan
Footing plan and schedules
Concrete frame - first floor slab and schedule
Concrete frame - second floor slab and schedule
Concrete frame - roof slab and beams and schedule
Second floor plan
Beam and slab alternate for support of first and second
Floors and schedule
Basement plan
First floor plan
Roof plan
East and west elevations
North and south elevations and sections
Sections AB and CD
Basement plan
Details
Second floor plan
Detail of front portico
Detail of dormitory wing
Details
Details, elevations, and sections
Details and sections
Mechanical - basement floor plan
Mechanical - first floor plan
Mechanical - second floor plan
Auditorium addition, C.H. Page and Bro., Architects, October 13, 1915:
Foundation plan
First floor and steel supporting auditorium
Auditorium plans and steel supporting balcony
Balcony plan
Roof plan and steel supporting roof and suspended
Ceiling
South elevation
North elevation
West elevation
Longitudinal section on axis line
Elevations and sections
Details and sections
One half inch scale details of truss
First floor mechanical
Auditorium mechanical
Balcony mechanical
School building, Olle J. Lorehn, Architect, December 11, 1901:
North elevation
South elevation
East elevation
West elevation
Cross section
Longitudinal section
Basement and foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Roof plan
Basement plan - plumbing and heating



 

Texas State Library and Historical Commission storage areas in the Texas State Capitol, 1909-1914, undated,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
The premise for the state library was established on January 24, 1839 by the third Congress of the Republic of Texas. It was placed on the third floor of the Capitol building in Austin, Texas, and by the 1870s had 5,000 volumes. Under the Constitution of 1876, the Department of Insurance, Statistics, and History was established and took control of the State Library. The first commissioner was Valentine O. King, who helped establish the Texas State Archives division of the library. A fire on November 9, 1881 destroyed the Capitol, along with most of the library's collection. When the new Capitol was built, the State Library was placed in the north wing of the second floor. In 1909, the Texas State Library and Historical Commission was created (renamed in 1979 as the Texas State Library and Archives Commission). The State Library remained based in the Capitol until 1962 when the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, built adjacent to the Capitol to the east, was completed. The Texas State Library and Archives Commission works to preserve historical documents, including those of the state government; aids researchers; and helps improve library facilities through the state by stimulating the use of libraries by the public.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints of areas in the Texas Capitol occupied by the Texas State Library and Historical Commission were prepared by Snead and Co. Iron Works, Art Metal Construction Co., and an unknown architect. Materials include plot, site, floor, foyer, and stack area plans, as well as wall sections, elevations, and details for granite, interior, electrical, tunnel, shelving and equipment. Materials are dated 1909-1914, and undated.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received in each group, by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-80 Snead and Co. Iron Works, 1909-1914:
Glass schedule, October 9, 1909
Snead newspaper stack, November 21, 1911
Second tier of bookcases over portion now floored, September 12, 1912
Diaphragms, September 12, 1912
Steel cornice, September 12, 1912
Range fronts and partitions, September 12, 1912
Proposed book stack, plan of second floor, July 22, 1914
Plan of first deck, second tier, August 27, 1914
Sections A-A and B-B, August 27, 1914
Newspaper stacks, August 27, 1914
Hinged door, September 10, 1914
C.I. (cast iron) uprights, September 10, 1914
Diaphragms and cornice, September 10, 1914
Deck framing, September 10, 1914
[4 sheets]
Wire mesh screens, September 10, 1914
[2 sheets]
Steel bars at top of wire screens - second story, September 11, 1914
Stair stringers and risers, September 11, 1914
Stair newels, September 11, 1914
Newspaper uprights, September 11, 1914
C.I. (cast iron) stools, September 11, 1914
Diaphragms and cornice, September 11, 1914
Pipe handrails, September 12, 1914
[2 sheets]
Deck framing, September 14, 1914
First deck glass plan and plan of slate treads, September 14, 1914
Art Metal Construction Co., April 22, 1909:
First and second floor plans, sections, and elevations
Plan of new book stacks, unknown architect, about 1909-1914



 

Texas State University-San Marcos, 1906, 1909, undated,
0.54 cubic ft.

Agency History
In 1899, the 26th Texas Legislature passed an act authorizing a normal school at San Marcos, named Southwest Texas Normal School. Eleven acres were donated by the citizens of San Marcos, and in 1901, the 27th Legislature appropriated $25,000 for a building. The school opened two years later to an initial class of 303 students. The name was changed in 1918 to Southwest Texas State Normal College, and again in 1923 to Southwest Texas State Teachers College when the school was admitted to the American Association of Teachers Colleges. In 1975, the Texas State University System was established by the 64th Legislature. The institution became known as Texas State University-San Marcos in 2003.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for Southwest Texas Normal School prepared by G.W. Ashby and A.O. Watson, Architects show plans for a laboratory building and a superintendent residence that include foundation, roof, and floor plans, as well as side elevations and building details. Materials are dated March 6, 1906, February 5, 1909, and undated. Associated papers for Southwest Texas Normal School include undated specifications for a laboratory and an addition to the science building prepared by G.W. Ashby.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas State University-San Marcos, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, undated
Box
821-92 G.W. Ashby, Architect, undated:
Specifications for science building addition
Specifications for laboratory
Blueprints and drawings, 1906, 1909, undated
Box
821-69 Laboratory building, G.W. Ashby, Architect, March 6, 1906:
Front elevation (south)
Rear elevation (north)
West side elevation
East elevation
Foundation and basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Details
Box
821-70 Superintendent residence, A.O. Watson, Architect, February 5, 1909:
Foundation plans
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
Side elevation
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Longitudinal section
Details
Details of stairway
Full size detail of section through head and side of window frame
Full size detail of section through sill, subsill, and meeting rails of window frames
Full size detail sections head, transom bar and outside casing to door
Full size details of interior trimmings
A.O. Watson, Architect, undated:
Front elevation
Side elevation
Side elevation
Rear elevation
Longitudinal section
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan



 

Texas Woman's University, 1902,
0.32 cubic ft.

Agency History
Texas Woman's University was founded as Girls' Industrial College by the Texas Legislature in 1902 (House Bill 25, 27th Legislature, Regular Session), as a result of lobbying for a state women's college. Denton, Texas was selected as the site for the college, and in 1903 classes began at the school, which focused on traditional literary education with instruction in the domestic sciences, child care, and practical nursing. The name was changed in 1905 to College of Industrial Arts, in 1934 to Texas State College for Women, and in 1957 to Texas Woman's University (Senate Bill 232, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The first dormitory was built in 1907, and the second classroom building in 1911. In 1914 the first Bachelor of Science degrees were awarded. In 1916 the State Department of Education recognized the institution as a college of the first class. After World War I, the curriculum was changed from the level of a junior college vocational school to that of a four-year, college-level curriculum. The college was admitted to the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools in 1923, the American Association of University Women in 1925, and the Association of American Universities in 1929. In 1927, a legislative mandate required that four of the nine members of the board of regents be women (Senate Bill 147, 40th Legislature, Regular Session). The university granted its first master's degrees in 1930. An extensive building program was undertaken through the Works Progress Administration and the Public Works Administration during the 1930s. In 1938 the state gave the Pioneer Woman statue to the Texas State College for Women for the Texas Centennial. In 1941, the college became a member of the Southern University Conference. Doctoral degrees were awarded for the first time in 1953, and the college built a national reputation as a center for research in textiles, food, and nutrition. Male students were admitted for the first time in 1972.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for Girls' Industrial College (later Texas Woman's University) prepared by Dodson and Scott, Architects show plans for the basement, first floor, second floor, third floor, and roof, as well as elevations and section details. Materials are dated September 6, 1902. Associated papers consist of stairway, dome, and door specifications dated 1902.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Woman's University, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1902
Box
821-92 Specifications for building and basement, 1902
Blueprints and drawings, September 6, 1902
Box
821-82 Footing plan
Basement heating plan
Basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
Side elevation
Longitudinal section
Transverse section
Rear elevation
Section through basement and details
Section through first story
Section through second story
Section through third story
Section through sill detail of window frames
Elevations of stairways
Detail of stairways
Plans of stairways
Details of doors, dome



 

Texas Woman's University Pioneer Woman Memorial, 1937,
0.11 cubic ft.

Agency History
In 1938, a statue of the Pioneer Woman, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long, was unveiled on the Texas Woman's University campus in Denton, Texas, in honor of the Texas Centennial. Fifteen feet in height and made from Georgian white marble, it was sculpted by New York City artist Leo Friedlander over three years at a cost of $25,000. The statue is situated in a green space between the music and visual arts buildings. Long has been called the "Mother of Texas" due to her claim that her third daughter, Mary James Long, born on Bolivar Peninsula on December 21, 1821, was the first child born to an English-speaking woman in Texas, though this is contradicted by censuses that show children born in Texas to Anglo-American mothers prior to that date. She was born on July 23, 1798, in Charles County, Maryland and after being orphaned at about age five she lived with her older sister's family on their plantation near Natchez, Mississippi. It was there she later met and married James Long, who would lead the Long expedition organized in 1819 to help achieve independence for Texas from Spain. After the filibustering expedition's failure he established a headquarters known as Fort Las Casas on the Bolivar Peninsula. He led another expedition that captured and then lost La Bahía in 1821, after which he was taken prisoner to Mexico City where he was killed by a guard in 1822. After being widowed, Jane Herbert Wilkinson Long received title to a league of land in Fort Bend County and a labor in Waller County from empresario Stephen F. Austin on August 24, 1824, though she remained resident in San Felipe. Returning to Texas after educating her only surviving first daughter in Mississippi, she bought W.T. Austin's boarding house at Brazoria in 1832 and operated it for five years. She then moved to her league of land in 1837, opened another boarding house there and developed a profitable plantation two miles south of the town of Richmond, using slave labor. After the Civil War, the land was worked by tenants and the value of her estate continually diminished. She died on December 30, 1880 and was buried in the Morton Cemetery in Richmond.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints for the Pioneer Woman Memorial at the Texas State College for Women (later Texas Woman's University) prepared by architect Donald Nelson and sculptor Leo Friedlander show a plot plan, elevations of the site, sections, details, and plans for the base of the statue, dating December 30, 1937.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Woman's University Pioneer Woman Memorial, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-54 Plans and drawings, December 30, 1937:
Sections, elevations, and plot plan
Base plan and elevation
Elevations, sections, detail
Base plans
Sections and elevations
Base plans and section



 

Tom Green County Library, 1930s,
0.44 cubic ft.

Agency History
The Tom Green County Library in San Angelo, Texas was built in 1938 through donations from Mrs. Sol Mayer. In 1957 a wing was added to the structure, which doubled the space. In the 1980s the building became the county health department and the library moved to the Edd B. Keyes Building, and then moved again in 2010 to the former Hemphill-Wells department store building.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for Tom Green County Library prepared by John G. Becker, Architect show a plot plan, foundation plan, floor plans, elevations, and section details. Materials are undated but date from the design of the building in the 1930s.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Tom Green County Library, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-57 Plans and drawings, 1930s:
Plot plan, balcony and balcony framing plans
Foundation plan
Roof framing plan
First floor plan
East and west front elevations and section
South and north elevations, sections and details
Box
821-83 West elevation and section
North and east elevations
First floor plan
Ground floor plan



 

Troup Experiment Station, 1902, undated,
0.45 cubic ft.

Agency History
Established in the fall of 1901 as Substation No. 2 of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, the Troup Experiment Station was located one mile northeast of Troup (known as Troupe until 1909), Texas in Smith County. The Hatch Act (passed by the U.S. Congress in 1887) called for agricultural experiment stations to be established by land grant colleges in each state, funded with federal grants. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station was conducting research projects in College Station by March 1888, and field tests began at several state prison farms, the state reform school in Gatesville, and Prairie View Normal College. Temporary stations were started at McKinney and Wichita Falls in 1893. The first permanent regional station opened in 1894 as Substation No. 1 in Beeville, Bee County. The state of Texas began to fund additional regional stations in 1909 (Senate Bill 52, 31st Texas Legislature). Sixteen substations were established by 1930. The Troup Experiment Station consisted of 150 acres, 80 of which are used for cultivation. Beginning in 1902, a barn, a seven-room two-story dwelling, and a nine-room office and laboratory building were constructed. Later a four-room tenant house was added. Early work consisted of horticultural tests, but the focus eventually shifted to agronomic work. The station closed after its land was conveyed to the Troup Consolidated School District in 1933 (Senate Bill 388, 43rd Legislature). The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, known as Texas A&M Agrilife Research since 2008, continues to operate 13 research centers and associated research stations.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the Troup Experiment Station prepared by an unknown architect and by J.H. Bothwell, Architect, for the station and the superintendent's residence show elevations, floor plans, framing sections, and the foundations. Materials are dated July 3, 1902 and undated. Associated papers consist of undated specifications.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, which may be by building or by architect.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Troup Experiment Station, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, undated
Box
821-92 Specifications Troup Experiment Station
Linen print, section of office building
Blueprints and drawings, 1902, undated
Box
821-84 Superintendent's residence, J.H. Bothwell, Architect, July 3, 1902:
Elevation A
Elevation B
Elevation C
Elevation D
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Framing section
Foundation plan
Troup Experiment Station, unknown architect, filed December 11, 1902:
Elevation A
Elevation B
Elevation C
Elevation D
Foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Foundation plan
Troup Experiment Station, unknown architect, undated:
North elevation
South elevation
End elevation
Floor plan
Loft plan
Longitudinal section
Transverse section
Foundation and sill plan



 

University of North Texas school building, 1903,
0.32 cubic ft.

Agency History
The University of North Texas was founded as Texas Normal College and Teachers' Training Institute by Joshua C. Chilton, as a private college in 1890. It is located in Denton, Texas and its first building was financed and constructed by the city government before receiving a state charter in June 1891. In 1893, the college was permitted to confer state teaching certificates and its name was changed to North Texas Normal College. It was granted a state charter by the Texas Legislature on March 31, 1899 (Senate Bill 145, 26th Legislature, Regular Session) and granted its first baccalaureate degree in 1917. The college joined intercollegiate athletic conferences in 1913 and was admitted to the Association of Texas Colleges and Universities in 1919, the American Association of Teachers Colleges and Universities in 1921, the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of the Southern States in 1925, and the Association of American Universities in 1940. The school's name was changed to North Texas State Teachers College in 1949 (House Bill 691, 51st Legislature, Regular Session), to North Texas State College (House Bill 645, 57th Legislature, Regular Session) in 1961, and to the University of North Texas in 1987 (Senate Bill 784, 70th Legislature, Regular Session). In 1992, the university was elected to full membership in the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications of an unidentified building at North Texas Normal College (later the University of North Texas) prepared by C.H. Page Jr. show plans for the basement, first and second floors, and roof, along with elevations, sections, and details. Of particular interest are details of a Victorian-style cornice. Materials are dated September 23, 1903 and undated. Associated papers consist of specifications for the school building and general work, September 23, 1903.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), University of North Texas school building, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1903
Box
821-91 Specifications for school building
Specifications for general work
Blueprints and drawings, September 23, 1903
Box
821-52 Plan of foundation
Plan of basement
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
West side elevation
East side elevation
Rear elevation
Plan of section
Full size detail of cornice
Detail of window frames
Plan of basement
Detail of front elevation
Full size detail of newel and detail of stairs
Detail of stage opening, full size baseboard, and full size chalk rail
Detail of high truss
Detail of low truss and roof plan showing bracing



 

University of Texas, 1902, 1904,
1.1 cubic ft.

Agency History
The University of Texas originated in 1839 when the Congress of the Republic of Texas set aside a site near the Capitol for a university. On March 30, 1881, an election for location of the university was ordered, governance was vested in a board of eight (later nine) regents, and provisions were made for admission fees, coeducation, and nonsectarian teaching. On September 6 of that year, Austin was chosen for the main university site and Galveston for the medical department. On November 17, 1882 the cornerstone for the west wing of the first Main Building was laid, and the university formally opened on September 15, 1883. The Main Building was completed in 1899 to serve all university purposes of the time. The original main campus consisted of the forty-acre tract on College Hill, which had been set aside in 1839. In 1897 the university acquired land for an athletic field. San Antonio architects Charles A. Coughlin and Atlee B. Ayres designed the Woman's Building and the Engineering Building, completed in 1903 and 1904, respectively. The Woman's Building was the first dormitory for women on the campus and served that purpose through 1940, after which it was used as a classroom until a fire destroyed the structure in 1959. The Engineering Building housed that department until 1933, when a new Engineering Building (later named Taylor Hall) designed by Paul Phillipe Cret was completed. The original Engineering Building eventually became the Journalism Building (1933-1952), the Speech Building (1953-1977; also occupied by the Geography Department), and the Student Services Building (1977-1984), and was then named the Dorothy L. Gebauer Building, to honor the dean of women from 1936 to 1959, and has been used by the College of Liberal Arts since 2000. It is the oldest academic building still standing on the original 40 acres. In 1910, 500 acres were acquired for life-science research, along with northern tracts consisting of the grounds of the former Blind Institute in 1925, the Cavanaugh homestead on Waller Creek in 1930, and the grounds of the Texas Wesleyan College and property on Whitis Avenue in 1931. The university has continued to expand since its opening.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the University of Texas prepared by architectural firm Coughlin and Ayres show floor plans, elevations, and section details for the Engineering Building (which later became the Dorothy L. Gebauer Building) and the Woman's Building (destroyed by fire in 1959), along with heating and plumbing plans by Kinnison Bros. and William G. Schuwirth and Co., contractors, and lighting and power plans by W.A. Burke, contractor. Materials are dated May 1, 1902, and February 10 and May 2, 1904. Associated papers consist of specifications for the buildings, dating 1902-1904. See the series Fireproofing and fire protection for blueprints of the underground layout for proposed inside vertical pipes for the university's Medical Department, and of the fire protection system for the university.
Organization
Materials are organized into two groups: Associated papers and Blueprints and drawings. Materials are arranged as received in each group, by building.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), University of Texas, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Associated papers, 1902-1904
Box
821-92 Engineering Building, 1904:
Specifications for electricity in the Engineering Building, April 6, 1904
Contract, April 14, 1904
Specifications for plumbing, drainage, gas, and compressed air fittings for Engineering Building, April 6, 1904
Contract, April 6, 1904
Specification for steam heating in the Engineering Building, April 6, 1904
Woman's Building, April 22, 1902:
Specifications for building
Specifications of electric wiring
Specifications of plumbing and gas fitting
Blueprints and drawings, 1902, 1904
Box
821-85 Engineering Building, Coughlin and Ayres, Architects, February 10, 1904:
Foundation plan
Basement plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Box
821-85 Third floor plan
Front elevation (south)
Side elevation (west)
Rear elevation (north)
Side elevation (east)
Cross section
Longitudinal section
Details
Details
Basement plan - first tier of steel plans
First floor plan - second tier steel plans
Second floor plan - third tier steel plans
Third floor plan - fourth tier steel plans
Heating and plumbing plans, Kinnison Bros. and William G. Schuwirth and Co., contractors, May 2, 1904:
Basement floor plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Riser diagram
Lighting and power plans, W.A. Burke, contractor, May 2, 1904:
Basement floor plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Box
821-86 Woman's Building, Coughlin and Ayres, Architects, May 1, 1902:
Basement and foundation plan
First floor plan
Second floor plan
Third floor plan
Fourth floor plan
Roof plan
Front elevation
South elevation
North elevation
Rear elevation
Longitudinal section
Cross section
Details
Details



 

Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site, 1936,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site is on Farm Road 1155, seven miles southwest of Navasota in Washington County. The 293-acre park, owned by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, occupies most of the site of the old town of Washington, commonly called Washington-on-the-Brazos, which served as the last capital of the Republic of Texas. The Texas Declaration of Independence was signed at the site on March 2, 1836. The legislature appropriated funds to purchase about fifty acres of the old townsite in 1916 and subsequently erected a replica of the hall where the Declaration of Independence was signed. In 1936 the state acquired additional land, built an amphitheater, and moved the home Anson Jones built at his Barrington plantation to the site. In 1949 the Texas Legislature transferred the land from the Texas State Board of Control to the Texas State Parks Board. In 1955 a number of local people formed the Washington-on-the-Brazos State Park Association, which has raised money for numerous improvements, including a better replica of the Independence Hall. Additional land was purchased from private owners in 1976 and 1996. Facilities at the park include picnicking areas, two pavilions, restrooms, a visitor center, and the Star of the Republic Museum, staffed by Blinn College of Brenham. The Barrington Living History Farm, also at the site, includes the restored Anson Jones home and features farming demonstrations by interpreters in period costume.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site prepared by architect A. Lyman Egan show plans for the layout of an amphitheatre, arrangement and location of the buildings, picnic areas, restrooms, and electrical details. Materials are dated May and June of 1936.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Washington-on-the-Brazos State Historic Site, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-87 A. Lyman Egan, Architect, May 1936:
Plan of arrangement and location of units
General layout of amphitheatre
Details for amphitheatre building, plumbing for amphitheatre
Details for amphitheatre seating, mortar, rubble, masonry
Grading plan for amphitheatre
Grading plan for amphitheatre
Picnic area details, restroom, barbecue pit, table bench
Septic tank layout and details, pump house details
Water system layout and details
Fencing layout and details
Picnic area layout, general grading
A. Lyman Egan, Architect, June 23, 1936:
Amphitheatre grading plans
Revised plans for amphitheatre stage or bandstand
Details for rest rooms and pump house and roof framing
Electric service in amphitheatre
Proposed plan for electrical wiring
Proposed plan for electrical wiring
Amphitheatre grading
A. Lyman Egan, Architect, June 1936:
Water system, June 27, 1936
Details for rest rooms and pump house, June 29, 1936
Revised plans for amphitheatre stage or bandstand, June 29, 1936
Travis Broesche, Architect, undated:
Entrance gate of Old Washington-on-the-Brazos - front and side
Elevations



 

West Texas A&M University, about 1910,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
Established by the 31st Texas Legislature, West Texas State Normal College opened in 1910 in Canyon, Texas as a state supported teachers' university. The original Administration Building, which housed all functions of the college, burned in 1914 and was replaced in 1916, the new structure eventually becoming known as Old Main. Georgia O'Keeffe, later to become a world-renowned artist, was among the faculty at this time. The college joined the American Association of Teachers Colleges in 1922, the Association of Texas Colleges in 1923, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools in 1925. Four-year degrees were first offered in 1919, and in 1932 the college was the first institution in West Texas to provide graduate training. West Texas State Normal College was renamed West Texas State Teachers College in 1923, and renamed again in 1949 as West Texas State College. In 1963 the legislature changed the name to West Texas State University to recognize the institution's expanded curriculum. Between those two name changes, from 1950 to 1965, twenty major buildings were modified, or constructed in their entirety, as an expansion of the campus. In 1988 the Old Main Building, the oldest building on campus, was renovated. West Texas State University joined the Texas A&M University System on September 1, 1990, and then on June 1, 1993, the school's name was changed to West Texas A&M University. The university is located on 135 acres at its main campus in Canyon, and has four colleges and one school: Agriculture, Nursing and Natural Sciences; Education and Social Sciences; T. Boone Pickens College of Business; Sybil B. Harrington College of Fine Arts and Humanities; and the Graduate School.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Plans for the original Administration Building at West Texas A&M University prepared by architects Waller, Shaw, and Field include basement, roof, mechanical, floor and plot plans, elevation and section details, and truss diagrams. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in about 1910.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), West Texas A&M University, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-88 Plans and drawings, about 1910
[all torn and fragile]:
Truss "A"
Section
Details
Foundation plan
Ground floor plan and schedules
First floor plan and schedules
Second floor plan and schedule
Roof plan
Front and rear elevation
Side elevations and transverse section
Longitudinal section and details
Trusses



 

West Texas Museum, 1930s-1940s,
0.35 cubic ft.

Agency History
The West Texas Museum was established by the Plains Museum Society (later the West Texas Museum Association) on March 27, 1929 in Lubbock, Texas. Through the Centennial Commission of Control, partial construction on a three-story building was begun in the summer of 1935. The basement was completed on March 5, 1937. The remaining money needed was allocated by the Texas Technological College regents in 1948. The formal opening of the museum occurred in 1950 to coincide with Texas Tech's silver anniversary. Renamed the Museum of Texas Tech University in 1969, the following year the museum holdings were moved to a new facility on a seventy-six acre tract to the northwest. The original museum building was converted to classroom and office spaces and renamed Holden Hall. Its rotunda retains the South Plains mural completed by artist Peter Hurd in 1954.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Blueprints and specifications for the West Texas Museum prepared by F.A. Kleinschmidt, Architect show floor plans, elevations, lighting system specifications, and heating ventilation system details. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in the 1930s and 1940s.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), West Texas Museum, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-81 Plans and details, 1930s-1940s:
Footing and first floor framing plan and schedules
Second floor and roof framing plans and schedules
Plans, details, elevations, and schedule
Ground floor and roof plans and details
First and second floor plans and schedules
East and north, west and south elevations, details and sections
Section through Memorial Hall
Details and elevations
Electric lighting system - first and second floor plans
Heating and ventilation equipment - first and second floors
Heating and ventilation equipment - ground floor plan, and details
Details for heating and ventilation system



 

Western Normal and Commercial School, mid-1880s,
fractional

Agency History
The Western Normal and Commercial School opened in Merkel, Texas in 1886. Situated sixteen miles west of Abilene, the school operated for only four years, possibly due to the negative economic effects of drought that this region of Taylor County experienced at the time. Some sources refer to the institution as a college. The curriculum of a normal and commercial school included teacher-training and skills needed for business employment, such as bookkeeping and shorthand.
Scope and Contents of the Records
Sewage plans for the Western Normal and Commercial School were prepared by T.H. Langdon, Civil Engineer. Materials are undated but date from the building's design in the mid-1880s.
Arrangement
Materials are arranged as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Western Normal and Commercial School, Blueprints and drawings collection. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
821-88 Sewage plans, mid-1880s:
Sewage disposal plan
Septic field
Sections AA, BB, and CC