Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Galveston County (Tex.) County Clerk's Office:

An Inventory of Galveston County Clerk's Office Records at the Texas State Archives, 1838-1858, 1867-1978, undated



Overview

Creator: Galveston County (Tex.) County Clerk's Office.
Title: Galveston County Clerk's Office records
Dates: 1838-1858, 1867-1978, undated
Abstract: The Congress of the Republic of Texas established Galveston County in 1838. The state Constitutions of 1846 and 1876 established various county offices for all Texas counties, including the office of county clerk. Historically, the Galveston County Clerk has performed two primary administrative roles: recorder for Galveston County and administrative clerk of the Galveston County Commissioners Court. These records include registers of claims against the county, convict labor bonds and records, county officer ledgers, occupational licenses and bonds, liquor dealer bonds, assignment registers, censuses, marriage records, registers of acknowledgments by county clerks and notaries public, automobile registers, indexes to chattel mortgages, file indexes, and registers of voters and poll lists dating 1838-1858, 1867-1978, and undated.
Quantity: 65.74 cubic ft. (258 volumes)
Language: These materials are written in English.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

All Texas counties derive their county officers and responsibilities from the Texas constitution and statutes enacted by the legislature. From the beginning of the Republic, Texas has required each county to elect a county clerk. The Congress of the Republic of Texas created Galveston County in 1838, and the county was organized the following year. The county clerk was among the first officials elected in Galveston County, and the office of the county clerk was among the first offices established by county officials.

Historically, the county clerk has performed two primary administrative functions: recorder for the county and administrative clerk for the commissioners court. The performance of these functions resulted in the creation of different types of records. As county recorder, the clerk recorded, filed, and indexed various documents and written information, such as deeds and other property instruments, lists of voters, vital records, business and professional licenses, occupational bonds and licenses, and automobile registrations. As clerk of the commissioners court, the clerk performed administrative duties for the court, including recording and filing minutes, recording and filing bonds and oaths, and maintaining dockets of claims against the county. The records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office in this group reflect the Galveston County Clerk's functions as county recorder and as administrative clerk of the commissioners court.

The county clerk also functioned as clerk of the judicial county court. In this role, the clerk provided support for the county court's judicial functions, such as recording all proceedings and maintaining court dockets. Because the records maintained by the Galveston County Clerk as clerk of the judicial county court are judicial in nature and were created and maintained as a part of the court's records, they are included in the Galveston County Court group of records. [These records are part of accession 2011/438; see reference staff for access.]

Since the Republic, county administration has been performed by various official bodies. The first Congress of the Republic of Texas divided county administrative functions between a board of commissioners of roads and revenues and a county court. In 1845, the legislature combined the functions into one administrative body – the county court – which was comprised of a chief justice, who was the presiding officer, and four county commissioners. This court peroformed administrative functions for the county. The Constitution of 1866 changed the administrative body to the police court, comprised of the judge of the county court as presiding officer and four commissioners.

Between 1836 and 1869, the county clerk's duties as recorder for the county included recording all deeds, mortgages, conveyances, other liens, judgments and abstracts of judgments, and all other written instruments concerning goods and movable property required by law to be recorded. In addition, the clerk issued marriage and occupational licenses. During that time, regardless of the configuration of the county's administrative body, the county clerk's duties as administrative clerk of that body included creating and maintaining a record of all proceedings.

The Reconstruction Constitution of 1869 significantly reconfigured county government. It renamed the counties' administrative body the county court and changed its membership to five justices of the peace. The justice of the peace residing in the county seat was designated as the presiding officer. The 1869 Constitution eliminated the offices of county judge, county commissioner, and county clerk. Their duties were re-distributed among the remaining offices. The district clerk assumed the administrative responsibilities and recording functions previously performed by the county clerk.

The Constitution of 1876 established Texas' current form of county government. It created the county commissioners court as the administrative body of the county, with no judicial function. The county judge was designated as its presiding officer. The Constitution re-established the elected offices of county clerk, county tax assessor, county tax collector, and county treasurer, among others. The county clerk, once again, became the recorder for the county and the clerk of the commissioners court. Following the re-establishment of the county clerk's office, the records maintained briefly during Reconstruction by the Galveston County District Clerk were transferred back to the County Clerk and became part of the County Clerk's Office records.

Laws adopted in 1876 defined the county clerk's administrative duties for the commissioners court. As clerk of the commissioners court, the county clerk was required to attend each meeting of the court; keep the records, books, papers, and proceedings of the commissioners court; and ensure that the court's records were properly indexed, arranged, and maintained.

The 1876 laws restored recording responsibilities the clerk had performed since the days of the Republic, including taking acknowledgments of deeds and other written instruments; recording all deeds, mortgages, and other instruments required or permitted by law to be recorded; keeping the record books; indexing, arranging and preserving these books; and issuing marriage licenses. These functions have not changed since 1876; however, subsequent legislatures have assigned additional responsibilities to the county clerk.

(Sources include: Inventory of the County Archives of Texas No. 94, Guadalupe County (Seguin) prepared by the Texas Historical Records Survey through the Works Progress Administration (San Antonio: The Survey, 1939), particularly the chapters "County Clerk as Recorder,""Commissioners Court," and "Governmental Organization and Records System." Several articles from the Handbook of Texas Online: "Galveston County" (Diana J. Kleiner), "Government" (Janice C. May), "Clerk of the County Court" (Dick Smith), and "County Organization" (Dick Smith) (Texas State Historical Association; accessed May 14-15, 2013). Inventory of County Records-Galveston County Courthouse, Volumes I and III, compiled by Diane Hill, et al (Austin: Texas State Library, 1980). The Laws of Texas, 1822-1897, compiled by H.P.N. Gammel (Austin: Gammel, 1898; reprinted University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History; accessed June 18-19, 2013). The Constitution of the State of Texas: An Annotated Comparative Analysis by George D. Braden, et al. (Austin: Texas Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations, 1977; accessed May 14-15, 2013).


Scope and Contents of the Records

Records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office reflect its various recording, indexing, and filing responsibilities as recorder for the county and administrative clerk of the commissioners court, including registers of claims allowed by the commissioners court, convict labor bonds and records, county officer ledgers, county commissioners' oaths, registers of assignments of accounts receivable, butchers' livestock slaughter records, occupation and business bonds and licenses, registers of factors' liens, liquor dealer bond records, volumes of census abstracts, notices of intention to marry, registers of acknowledgments by county clerks and notaries public, automobile registrations, indexes to chattel mortgages, transcriptions of deed records, file indexes and dockets, and registers of voters and poll lists. These records are in the form of handwritten entries into journals and registers and compiled typewritten lists organized into six series: administrative records, business and professional records, census registers, marriage records, real and personal property records, and voter registration and poll lists. Dates covered are 1838-1858, 1867-1978, and undated.

The records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office reflecting its function as clerk of the judicial county court are included in the judicial records of the Galveston County Court.

Each of Texas' constitutions has delegated to a county official the responsibility for administering county government and each constitution has designated an official in county government as the official recorder. Legislative statutes have defined the duties and responsibilities for the administrators and recording clerks.

The administrative records maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office as clerk of the commissioners court relate to the administration of the county and actions taken by the court. As clerk of the commissioners court, the Galveston County Clerk maintained the records of claims authorized by the court to be paid. In addition, the clerk maintained registers of convict labor bonds and records, which employers filed with the county judge. As the administrative clerk for the county, the Galveston County Clerk's Office received and recorded the oaths and bonds required of county officials, including the county commissioners. The Galveston County Clerk also maintained a ledger of monthly receipts by each county office.

The records maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office as county recorder reflect the variety of recording responsibilities assigned to the county clerk. Beginning during the Republic, Texas law directed the county clerk to record all deeds of trust, bonds, covenants, mortgages, defeasances, and other written instruments related to real property and to maintain an index and file register of all land records. The clerk recorded acknowledgments of deeds and other written instruments and received the acknowledgment records of notaries public when their terms of office expired. Other laws directed the county clerk to record documents relating to goods and chattel (moveable property), including chattel mortgages. Early in the twentieth century, the Galveston County Clerk's Office registered automobiles until the legislature transferred that responsibility to the county tax assessor-collector.

Recording vital statistics has always been an important role for the Galveston County Clerk's Office. The first Congress of the Republic of Texas assigned to the county clerk the responsibility of issuing marriage licenses, determining the eligibility of the parties to marry, and recording the license return after the marriage ceremony was performed by an authorized person. By 1930, the Texas legislature required parties to file their intention to marry.

The Galveston County Clerk's Office recorded a variety of business and professional records, including occupational licenses, bonds required of certain occupations and businesses, and records of actions by certain professions, such as butchers. In addition, the county clerk recorded business-related transactions, including assignments of accounts receivable and factors' liens, to protect the financial interests of lenders.

During those times when the legislature required the registration of voters or authorized the maintenance of voter, or poll, lists, the county clerk, as administrator of elections, has been responsible for maintaining those lists.

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.


 

Organization of the Records

The records are organized into six topical series. Four series are further organized into topical subseries related to the purposes for which the volumes were created.
Administrative records, 1870-1905, 1911-1955, undated, 19 volumes
  • Registers of claims allowed by county commissioners, 1870-1905, 12 volumes
  • Convict labor bonds and records, 1877-1901, 2 volumes
  • Oaths of county judges and commissioners, 1878-1886, 1 volume
  • County officer ledgers, 1911-1955, undated, 4 volumes
Business and professional records, 1867-1874, 1893-1935, 1945-1967, undated, 38 volumes
  • Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, 1867-1870, 1 volume
  • Register of occupation licenses, 1870-1874, 1 volume
  • Liquor dealer records, 1893-1918, undated, 32 volumes
  • Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, 1913-1935, 1 volume
  • Register of assignments of accounts receivable, 1945-1967, undated, 2 volumes
  • Factors' lien records, after 1947, 1 volume
Census registers, 1880, 2 volumes
Marriage records, 1932-1933, 1 volume
Real and personal property records, 1838-1858, 1869-1870, 1876-1966, undated, 95 volumes
  • File indexes, 1838-1858, 1884-1887, 1899-1948, 1950-1956, 1965, 31 volumes
  • Deed book transcriptions, 1869-1870, 2 volumes
  • Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, 1876-1945, 4 volumes
  • Acknowledgment records of notaries public, 1877-1938, 21 volumes
  • Chattel mortgages, 1896-1966, undated, 36 volumes
  • Automobile registrations, 1907-1917, 1 volume
Voter registration and poll lists, 1867-1873, 1892, 1894, 1905-1978, undated, 103 volumes
  • Register of voters for Galveston County, 1867-1873, undated, 2 volumes
  • Registers of voters for city of Galveston, 1892, 1894, 3 volumes
  • Poll lists, 1905-1978, 98 volumes

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas county agencies are not copyrighted. County records also include materials received by, not created by, county agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Many of the large bound volumes are in fragile condition; bindings are either broken or ready to break, and pages may be loose. Therefore, most of the volumes may not be photocopied and must be treated with care. Check with State Archives staff to determine if a volume can be copied or scanned.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Galveston County (Tex.) Commissioners Court.
Subjects:
Business records--Galveston County (Tex.)
Business tax--Galveston County (Tex.)
Cattle--Galveston County (Tex.)
Census--Galveston County (Tex.)
Chattel mortgages--Galveston County (Tex.)
Claims--Galveston County (Tex.)
Convict labor--Galveston County (Tex.)
County government--Galveston County (Tex.)
County officials and employees--Galveston County (Tex.)
Deeds--Galveston County (Tex.)
Elections--Galveston County (Tex.)
License system--Texas.
Liquor laws--Texas.
Livestock--Galveston County (Tex.)
Local government--Galveston County (Tex.)
Marriage records--Galveston County (Tex.)
Motor vehicle--Galveston County (Tex.)
Notaries public--Galveston County (Tex.)
Voting registers--Galveston County (Tex.)
Poll tax--Galveston County (Tex.)
Voter registration--Galveston County (Tex.)
Voters lists--Galveston County (Tex.)
Places:
Galveston (Tex.)
Galveston County (Tex.)--History.
Galveston County (Tex.)--Officials and employees.
Galveston County (Tex.)--Politics and government.
Document Types:
Administrative records--County government--Galveston County (Tex.)--1870-1905, 1911-1955, undated.
Bonds (legal records)--Galveston County (Tex.)--1878-1886, 1913-1935..
Contracts--Galveston County (Tex.)--Convict labor--1877-1901.
Indexes (reference sources)--Galveston County (Tex.)--Deeds--1838-1856, 1884-1887, 1899-1948, 1950-1956, 1965.
Oaths--Galveston County (Tex.)--Officials and employees--1878-1886.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Business records--1945-1967, undated.
Registers (lists)--Galveston County (Tex.)--Census--1880.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Claims--1870-1905.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Deeds--1869-1870, 1876-1966, undated.
Registers (lists)--Galveston County (Tex.)--Elections--1867-1873, 1892, 1894, 1905-1978, undated.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--License system--1870-1874, 1893-1918, undated.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Marriages--1932-1933.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Motor vehicles--1907-1917.
Registers--Galveston County (Tex.)--Public expenditures--1911-1955, undated.
Functions:
Administering claims.
Administering county government.
Administering elections.
Administering expenditures.
Administering licensing system.
Administering liquor laws.
Administering voter registration.
Licensing businesses.
Licensing occupations.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Comptroller's Office Tax Volumes (Other Than Ad Valorem), 1870-1873, 1879-1921, undated, 19.35 cubic ft. [See the series "Occupation tax records, 1870-1873, 1879-1912, bulk 1879-1892, 2.54 cubic ft., 21 volumes"; "Records of liquor tax (Bell Punch Law), 1879-1881, 0.61 cubic ft., 5 volumes"; and "Records of liquor permits, 1907-1921, 3.91 cubic ft., 13 volumes"]
Galveston County (Tex.) Tax Assessor-Collector's Office records, 1865-1871, 1877-1879, 1884-1950, 1958, 1961, 1963, 126 volumes [See the series "Occupation license and tax records, 1865-1870, 1890-1904, 1913-1932, 5 volumes"; and "Poll tax records, 1908-1916, 2 volumes"]
Texas Secretary of State Notary Public records, 1849-2002, undated, bulk 1870-2002, 92.94 cubic ft.
Galveston County (Tex.) records available on microfilm, 151 reels [See: "County court civil minutes, 1867-1908, 13 reels"; "Deed record, 1836-1886, 49 reels"; "Marriage record, 1838-1907, 9 reels"; "Voter registration lists, 1853-1873, 1 reel"; and "Voter registration list (Galveston City), 1894, 1 reel"]
1867 Texas Voters' Registration Lists, 1867-1869, 12 reels of microfilm, including Galveston County [microfilm of the federally mandated voter registration lists]
Galveston County (Tex.) Justice of the Peace Records. Marriage records, 1889-1910, 1912-1950, and undated, 15 volumes [Part of accession 2011/438; see reference staff for access]
Galveston County (Tex.) Treasurer's Office. Registry of Claims against Galveston County, 1874, 1879-1881, 2 volumes [Part of accession 2011/438; see reference staff for access]
National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, DC
1880 United States Dicennial Census, Galveston County, Texas

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2011/438

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by Galveston County in 1980 and were initially housed at the Houston Metropolitan Research Center. They were transferred to the Sam Houston Regional Library & Research Center in Liberty, Texas, on December 19-20, 2003. On July 20 and August 18, 2011, the records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission in Austin.

Processing Information

Collection processed and DACs-compliant EAD finding aid created by Teri E. Flack, volunteer, February-May 2013

Appraisal Information

These records were appraised and determined to be archival in October-December 2012.

Other Formats for the Records

Galveston County records available on microfilm, 151 reels [See: "Census, 1880, 1 reel"; "County court civil minutes, 1867-1908, 13 reels"; "Deed record, Books 1 and 2, 1869-1870, 1 reel"; "Voter registration lists, 1853-1873, 1 reel"; and "Voter registration list (Galveston City), 1894, 1 reel"]


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Administrative records, 1870-1905, 1911-1955, undated,
19 volumes

Administrative records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office were recorded and maintained by the county clerk pursuant to specific statutes and for different purposes. They consist of registers of claims allowed by Galveston County commissioners, convict labor bonds and records, oaths of Galveston County judges and commissioners, and Galveston County officers ledgers dating overall 1870-1905, 1911-1955, and undated.
Under the Reconstruction Constitution of 1869, the county court administered county government, and the district clerk assumed the administrative responsibilities and recording functions previously performed by the county clerk (Art. V, Secs. 7 and 20, Texas Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). The Constitution of 1876 created the county commissioners court as the chief administrative body of the county, and the county clerk, once again, became the clerk of the court (Art. V, Secs. 18 and 20, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876). Following the re-establishment of the county clerk's office, the records maintained by the Galveston County District Clerk during Reconstruction were transferred back to the County Clerk and became part of the County Clerk's Office records.
Laws adopted in 1876 defined the clerk's duties. As clerk of the commissioners court, the county clerk was required to attend each meeting of the court; keep the records, books, papers, and proceedings of the commissioners court and county judge; and ensure that the court's records were properly indexed, arranged, and maintained. The clerk also was required to file and record the oaths of office of all elected county officials and to maintain a ledger of accounts of all county officials. (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 60)
Organization
The records are organized into four subseries:
Registers of claims allowed by county commissioners, 1870-1905, 12 volumes
Convict labor bonds and records, 1877-1901, 2 volumes
Oaths of county judges and commissioners, 1878-1886, 1 volume
County officer ledgers, 1911-1955, undated, 4 volumes
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records, Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Registers of claims allowed by county commissioners, 1870-1905,
12 volumes
Registers of claims against Galveston County allowed by the county commissioners reflect the county's payment for services performed, such as conducting inquests, burying paupers, digging graves, or keeping prisoners; for providing goods, such as ice and spittoons for the courthouse; and for relief for the poor. Dates covered are 1870-1905. Information includes the date of filing, the county-assigned number for the claim, the name of the claimant, the nature and character of the claim, and the amount of the claim. Beginning in 1879, the registers included the amount of the claim allowed by the county and the date of county action. The volumes are not indexed.
The registers for the years 1870-1873 were created by the Galveston District Clerk's Office on behalf of the Galveston County Court. They were subsequently transferred to the Galveston County Clerk's Office. The registers for the years 1874-1905 were created by the Galveston County Clerk's Office on behalf of the Galveston County Commissioners Court. One volume for 1900-1901 is a supplement to the commissioners court minutes reflecting additional claims acted on by the court.
Beginning in 1870, the Texas legislature directed each county to create a register of outstanding claims (Acts 1870, 12th Legislature, Called Session, Chapter 20, Section 4). The legislature further directed the county court to register each claim and reflect its approval in the minutes (Acts 1874, 14th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 140, Section 3). Following adoption of the Constitution of 1876, the legislature directed each county commissioners court to file all reports and vouchers in the office of the clerk of the county court (Art. 977 et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 867 et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895). At the same time, the county treasurer was directed to "keep a well-bound book in which he shall register all claims against his county" (Art. 961, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879), which duplicates some opf the information contained in the registers of claims maintained by the county clerk.
Arrangement
The volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, each volume is arranged numerically by county-assigned claim number.
Texas State Archives
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Registers of claims allowed by county commissioners, Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-127 Court docket-claims, September 1870-December 1873
Volume
2011/438-128 Court docket-claims, January 1874-August 1879
Volume
2011/438-129 No. 2, Commissioners Court Claim docket, September 1879-December 1883
Volume
2011/438-130 No. 3, Commissioners Court Claim docket, January 1884-September 1887
Volume
2011/438-131 No. 4, Commissioners Court Claim docket, October 1887-January 1890
Volume
2011/438-132 No. 5, Commissioners Court Claim docket, February 1890-June 1892
Volume
2011/438-133 No. 6, Commissioners Court Claim docket, July 1892-November 1894
Volume
2011/438-134 No. 7, Commissioners Court Claim docket, November 1894-February 1897
Volume
2011/438-135 No. 8, Commissioners Court Claim docket, February 1897-August 1899
Volume
2011/438-136 No. 9, Commissioners Court Claim docket, September 1899-April 1903
Volume
2011/438-137 No. 10, Commissioners Court Claim docket, April 1903-October 1905
Volume
2011/438-138 Supplement to Commissioners Court minutes, 1900-1901
Convict labor bonds and records, 1877-1901,
2 volumes
Convict labor bonds and convict labor records date 1877-1901. The volume of convict labor bonds covers the dates 1877-1880 and includes information on the principal and surety of the bond, the amount of the bond, a description of the adjudication of the convict, amounts of the fine and court costs, the duration of the hire, and the amount the principal agreed to pay the county. The volume of convict labor records covers the dates 1881-1901 and includes information describing the physical attributes of the convict, how the convict was employed, name of the party hiring the convict, date of the hire, price at which the convict was hired, the amount credited for employment, amount of fine and costs due by the convict, and the amount collected by the county. Neither volume is indexed.
In 1876, the Texas legislature enacted a law allowing the county to hire out to a private individual or company anyone convicted of a misdemeanor or petty offense who was subsequently jailed for failure to pay his or her fine and court costs. The work could continue until the money generated covered all amounts owed. Anyone hiring a convict had to execute a bond payable to the county judge ensuring the prompt payment of all amounts due to the county. The hirer also had to guarantee he would treat the convict humanely, he would provide the convict with "a sufficient quantity of good and wholesome food, comfortable clothing, and medicine when sick," and he would not require the convict to work unreasonable hours or for a longer time during the day than other laborers doing the same kind of work. The county judge was required to record all of the transactions in books maintained by the county clerk. Convict labor bonds were approved by the county judge and filed in the office of the county clerk. (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 138; codified at Art. 3602, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 3744, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895)
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, the volume of convict labor bonds is arranged numerically by bond number; the volume of convict labor records is arranged chronologically by date of hiring.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Convict labor bonds and records, Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-139 No. 1, Convict labor bonds, 1877-1880
Volume
2011/438-140 No. 1, Convict labor record, 1881-1901
Oaths of county judges and commissioners, 1878-1886,
1 volume
Before taking office, the county judge and county commissioners were required to swear an oath. The oath and certificate of the officer administering the oath were then filed and recorded with the clerk of the county court. (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 55, Section 16) The register of oaths required to be maintained by the county clerk dating 1878-1886 includes the name of the county official, the date the oath was administered, the name of the individual administering the oath, and a transcription of the oath of office. The volume is not indexed.
Arrangement
Data in the volume are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Oaths of county judges and commissioners, Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-141 No. 1, Record of oaths of county judges and commissioners, 1878-1886
County officer ledgers, 1911-1955, undated,
4 volumes
County officer ledgers maintained by the county clerk include accounts for each office holder or fund and reflect total amounts in each account or fund each month. The dates covered are 1911-1955 and undated. The information for each office holder or fund varies by the source of the money collected. The county clerk's account includes fees and jury fees; the district clerk's account includes jury fees and stenographer fees. For the tax assessor-collector, the information includes delinquent taxes, interest on daily deposits, occupation taxes, poll taxes, ad valorem taxes, penalties, special taxes, and commissions on auto licenses. All of the amounts reflect monthly totals; no information on amounts collected from individuals is recorded. For volume 1, only the entries for the year 1940 are indexed. The undated index to volume 2 of the county officer ledgers includes the type of account and page numbers. Volume 3 is indexed within the volume.
The county clerk was required to keep a ledger of accounts for every officer of the county, district, or state who was authorized to collect or receive any money for the use of or belonging to the county (Acts 1893, 23rd Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 105, Section 1; recodified at Art. 824, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895; recodified at Art. 1402, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911; recodified at Art. 1607, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925). Each county officer was required to report the amounts collected to the county clerk.
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, the ledger volumes are arranged by office holder or fund and within each account the information is arranged chronologically by month. Internally, the index volume is arranged alphabetically by type of account.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), County officer ledgers, Administrative records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-142 Volume 1, Ledger – county officers, 1911-1940
Volume
2011/438-143 Volume 2, Ledger – county officers, 1941-1954
Volume
2011/438-144 Index to Volume 2, Ledger - county officers
Volume
2011/438-145 Volume 3, Ledger – county officers, 1955



 

Business and professional records, 1867-1874, 1893-1935, 1945-1967, undated,
38 volumes

The Texas legislature has assigned to the county clerk the responsibility for recording and maintaining records related to business and professional activity in the county. The records of the Galveston County Clerk's Office related to business and professional activity were recorded and maintained by the county clerk pursuant to different statutes and for different purposes. They consist of butchers livestock slaughter records, a register of occupation licenses, liquor dealer records, a register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, a register of assignment of accounts receivable, and an index to factors' lien records dating overall 1867-1874, 1893-1935, 1945-1967, and undated.
The legislature required certain businesses, such as liquor dealers, to register with the county, pay a business tax, and post a bond. Other occupations required the county clerk to issue a license upon the payment of a tax. Because Galveston was a busy cotton port, the legislature passed laws requiring commission merchants and contracting stevedores to file bonds with the county clerk before they could conduct business. To protect the health and safety of residents, butchers were required to provide records of the livestock they slaughtered. The legislature also recognized the importance of protecting business interests by requiring the recording of assignments of accounts receivables and factors' liens.
Organization of the Records
The records are organized into six subseries:
Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, 1867-1870, 1 volume
Register of occupation licenses, 1870-1874, 1 volume
Liquor dealer records, 1893-1918, undated, 32 volumes
Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, 1913-1935, 1 volume
Register of assignments of accounts receivable, 1945-1967, undated, 2 volumes
Factors' lien records, after 1947, 1 volume
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's Office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, 1867-1870,
1 volume
The record of the reports of butchers in Galveston County of animals sold or slaughtered dating 1867-1870 includes a description of the animal, including any brands, the name of the butcher, and the date. The volume is not indexed.
In 1866, the Texas legislature enacted a statute regulating the "sale, alienation, removal, or transfer of animals" and requiring anyone engaged in the slaughter of animals for market to report to the police court a description of every animal slaughtered and to exhibit to the sheriff or clerk of the county court the hides of the slaughtered beef. A report was required to be made at a regular meeting of the court. The county clerk was required to record the report and make it available for inspection upon request. (Acts 1866, 11th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 179, Section 3)
Arrangement
Data in the volume are arranged by the name of the butcher and then chronologically by date of the record.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Butchers livestock sale and slaughter record, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-146 Records of bills of sale and the reports of butchers of Galveston County of animals slaughtered by them, 1867-1870
Register of occupation licenses, 1870-1874,
1 volume
The register of occupation licenses, entitled State and County Licenses Issued by the District Clerk of Galveston County, includes the date of the license, name of the parties to whom the license was issued, license number, sheriff's receipt number, period for which the license was issued, character of the license, amount due the state, and amount due the county. The dates covered are 1870-1874. The types of occupations for which licenses were issued included selling liquor by the glass, one-horse peddler, keeping one billiard table, selling liquor by the quart, keeping a first-class hotel, exhibiting a panorama, operating a Daguerrean gallery, commission merchant, and cotton broker. Because licenses were issued for a fixed period of time, several of the persons listed in the volume obtained licenses quarterly or annually and appear multiple times in the volume. The volume was maintained by the Galveston County District Clerk who transferred it to the Galveston County Clerk after that office was restored in 1876. The volume is not indexed.
The Congress of Texas first authorized the collection of occupational taxes during the Republic as one means of raising public revenue. The first occupations taxed were wholesale and retail dealers in wares, goods or merchandise; retailers of wines or spirituous liquors; and operators of nine-pin (bowling) alleys (Acts, First Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 12, 1837). In 1846, the 1st Texas Legislature created a state tax on certain occupations, and subsequent legislatures added and deleted the occupations subject to licensure taxes. By the end of the Civil War, retailers of wines and spirituous liquors and operators of billiard tables and nine- or ten-pin alleys, whether used for pleasure or profit, continued to be taxed, but the legislature had added peddlers, theaters, circuses, menageries, waxworks, shows of any kind, concerts, and lectures, among others (Acts 1866, 11th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 903).
During Reconstruction, the named occupations for which taxes were required included selling spirituous, vinous, malt or other intoxicating liquors; selling beer; operators of billiard, bagatelle, pigeon hole, and Jenny Lind tables; nine- and ten-pin bowling alleys; foot peddlers; horse peddlers; transient theatres; circuses; menageries, waxworks, or other exhibitions; concerts; cook shops and eating houses; livery stables; distilleries and breweries; traveling agents; dealers in stocks or bills of exchange; physicians, surgeons, and dentists; attorneys; operators of Daguerrean galleries; and land agents (Acts 1870, 12th Legislature, Called Session, Chapter 82; Acts 1873, 13th Regular Session, Chapter 83).
To obtain a license, a person applied to the designated tax collector and paid the appropriate taxes. The person was issued a receipt which was then taken to the district clerk who issued the license. For the 1870 law, the sheriff collected all occupation taxes. The 1873 law designated that some occupation taxes were collected on behalf of the state by the county sheriff, and some occupation taxes were collected on behalf of the county by the county treasurer.
Arrangement
Data in the volume are arranged chronologically.
Texas State Archives
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Register of occupation licenses, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-147 State and county licenses issued, 1870-1874
Liquor dealer records, 1893-1918, undated,
32 volumes
Liquor dealer records were kept by the Galveston County Clerk's Office in accordance with laws regulating the sale of liquor. They consist of records of retail malt liquor dealer bonds filed by applicants, records of retail (spiritous) liquor dealer bonds filed by applicants, and records of liquor license approvals and denials reflecting the changes in the law requiring the county judge to grant or deny liquor licenses dating overall 1893-1918 and undated.
Retailers of wines and spirituous liquors were among the first occupations taxed by the Congress of the Republic of Texas (Acts, First Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 12, 1837). Liquor dealers were taxed continuously in every occupation tax law adopted by the legislature throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
In 1893, the Texas legislature enacted a new law regulating the sale of liquor (Acts 1893, 23rd Regular Session, Chapter 121; codified at Art. 5060a, et seq., Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895). Before engaging in the sale of liquor, the law required persons or firms to file a license application with the county clerk and to post a bond – $5,000 for a retail liquor dealer and $1,000 for a retail malt dealer.
In 1907, the Texas legislature further regulated the sale of liquor (Acts 1907, 30th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 138; codified at Art. 7427, et seq., Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911). This act required persons or firms desiring a license as a retail liquor or retail malt dealer to apply to the state Comptroller of Public Accounts for a permit to apply for a license. The Comptroller investigated the application and acted upon it, after which the county judge of the county in which the applicant wished to operate his business, granted or refused the license and recorded his judgment in a book preserved by the county clerk. If approved, the applicant paid the appropriate tax, the tax collector issued a receipt, and the county clerk issued the license.
In 1918, the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors or medicated bitters within Texas, except for medicinal, scientific, mechanical, or sacramental purposes (Acts 1918, 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24). For these excepted purposes only, the state continued to issue licenses through the Comptroller of Public Accounts. This act of the legislature, passed partly as an emergency wartime measure, preceded the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which was ratified in 1919, became effective in 1920, and was not repealed until 1933.
Organization of the Records
These records are organized into three subseries:
Retail malt dealer bonds, 1893-1918, undated, 16 volumes
Retail liquor dealer bonds, 1894-1918, undated, 11 volumes
Liquor license application approvals, 1907-1918, undated, 5 volumes
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Retail malt dealer bonds, 1893-1918, undated
16 volumes
Registers of bonds posted by retail malt liquor dealers include the bond posted by retail malt liquor dealer applicants, date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number. Dates covered are 1893-1918 and undated. Separate indexes to volumes 13 and 14 include the names of licensees and the corresponding page numbers from the register volumes. Volumes 1 through 12 are indexed within the volumes.
In 1893, the Texas legislature enacted a law requiring persons or firms desiring to engage in the sale of malt liquor to file a license application with the county clerk and to post a bond in the amount of $1,000 (Acts 1893, 23rd Regular Session, Chapter 121; codified at Art. 5060a, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895). In 1918, the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of malt liquor within Texas (Acts 1918, 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24), and the responsibility of the county clerk to receive liquor dealer bonds ended.
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, each register volume is arranged numerically by license number. Internally, the index volumes are arranged alphabetically by licensee surname.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Retail malt dealer bonds, Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-148 Volume 1, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, December 1893-January 1897
Volume
2011/438-149 Volume 2, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, January 1897-November 1897
Volume
2011/438-150 Volume 3, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, November 1897-April 1899
Volume
2011/438-151 Volume 4, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, April 1899-May 1901
Volume
2011/438-152 Volume 5, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, May 1901-March 1903
Volume
2011/438-153 Volume 6, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, March 1903-June 1904
Volume
2011/438-154 Volume 7, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, June 1904-April 1906
Volume
2011/438-155 Volume 8, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, April 1906-July 1907
Volume
2011/438-156 Volume 9, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, July 1907-February 1909
Volume
2011/438-157 Volume 10, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, January 1909-June 1909
Volume
2011/438-158 Volume 11, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, August 1909-October 1912
Volume
2011/438-159 Volume 12, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, October 1912-June 1913
Volume
2011/438-160 Volume 13, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, July 1913-November 1913 and May 1914-March 1915
Volume
2011/438-161 Index to Volume 13, Liquor dealers bond record-malt
Volume
2011/438-162 Volume 14, Liquor dealers bond record-malt, December 1913-May 1914 and April 1915-May 1918
Volume
2011/438-163 Index to Volume 14, Liquor dealers bond record-malt
Retail liquor dealer bonds, 1894-1918, undated,
11 volumes
Registers of bonds posted by retail dealers of spiritous liquor include the bond posted by retail liquor dealer applicants, date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number. Dates covered are 1894-1918 and undated. Separate indexes to volumes 6 and 10 include the names of the licensees and corresponding page numbers from the register volumes. Volumes 1 through 5 are indexed within the volumes. Volumes 7 and 9 are not indexed.
In 1893, the Texas legislature enacted a law requiring persons or firms desiring to engage in the sale of spirituous liquor to file a license application with the county clerk and to post a bond in the amount of $5,000 (Acts 1893, 23rd Regular Session, Chapter 121; codified at Art. 5060a, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895). In 1918, the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous liquors within Texas (Acts 1918, 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24), and the responsibility of the county clerk to receive these bonds ended.
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, each register volume is arranged numerically by license number. Internally, the index volumes are arranged alphabetically by licensee surname.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Retail liquor dealer bonds, Liquor dealer records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-164 Volume 1, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, January 1894-March 1899
Volume
2011/438-165 Volume 2, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, March 1899-September 1904
Volume
2011/438-166 Volume 3, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, October 1904-July 1907
Volume
2011/438-167 Volume 4, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, July 1907-June 1909
Volume
2011/438-168 Volume 5, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, July 1909-July 1912
Volume
2011/438-169 Volume 6, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, June 1912-June 1913
Volume
2011/438-170 Index to Volume 6, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous
Volume
2011/438-171 Volume 7, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, June 1913-November 1913 and May 1914-March 1915
Volume
2011/438-172 Volume 9, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, November 1913-July 1915
Volume
2011/438-173 Volume 10, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous, July 1915-December 1918
Volume
2011/438-174 Index to Volume 10, Liquor dealers bond record-spiritous
Liquor license application approvals, 1907-1918, undated,
5 volumes
Registers of liquor license approvals, granted by the Galveston County Judge and maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office, include the name of the petitioner, date, case number, application number, type of license, and fees collected. Dates covered are 1907-1918 and undated. Because licenses were renewable, a licensee may appear several times within a volume. A separate index to volumes 8 and 9 includes the names of the licensees and corresponding page numbers from the register volumes. Volume 7 is not indexed. Volume 10 is indexed within the volume.
In 1907, the Texas legislature further regulated the sale of liquor by requiring persons or firms desiring a license as a retail liquor dealer or retail malt dealer first to apply for a permit from the state Comptroller of Public Accounts. Once the Comptroller investigated the application and acted on it, the county judge of the county in which the applicant wished to operate his business granted or refused the license and recorded his judgment in a book filed and maintained by the county clerk. If approved, the applicant paid the appropriate tax, the tax collector issued a receipt, and the county clerk issued the license. (Acts 1907, 30th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 138; codified at Art. 7427, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911). In 1918, the Texas legislature prohibited the manufacture, sale, or transportation of spirituous, vinous, or malt liquors within Texas (Acts 1918, 35th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 24). At that time, the role of the county judge in the approval or denial of licenses and the role of the county clerk in issuing licenses ended.
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, each register volume is arranged numerically by license number. Internally, the index volume is arranged alphabetically by licensee's surname.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Liquor license application approvals, Liquor dealer records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-175 Volume 7, Liquor docket-County Court, July 1907-September 1908
Volume
2011/438-176 Volume 8, Liquor docket-County Court, September 1908-June 1911
Volume
2011/438-177 Volume 9, Liquor docket-County Court, June 1911-June 1914
Volume
2011/438-178 Index to Volumes 8 and 9, Liquor docket-County Court
Volume
2011/438-179 Volume 10, Liquor docket-County Court, June 1914-December 1918
Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, 1913-1935,
1 volume
Several recording functions for the Galveston County Clerk resulted from Galveston's position as a shipping port. Laws passed early in the twentieth century required shipping-related businesses, such as commission merchants and contracting stevedores, to post bonds to ensure their faithful performance on their agreements
This register, titled Bonds of Commission Merchants, Contracting Stevedores, and Live-Stock Commission Merchants, includes the bond posted by the commission merchant or contracting stevedore, the date of the bond, names of principals and sureties, and license number. The dates covered for commission merchants bonds are 1913-1919; the dates covered for contracting stevedores bonds are 1913-1935. The volume is indexed. Despite the volume's title, no livestock commission merchant bonds are included.
A commission merchant was defined as a person or business that sells produce, goods, wares or merchandise on consignment for a commission. Since 1860, laws delineated the ways commission merchants could conduct their business. However, in 1907, declaring that "no adequate law for the protection of farmers and truck growers" existed, the Texas legislature added a requirement that commission merchants file a $2,000 bond payable to the county judge to ensure that merchants performed in accordance with all agreements with consignors. County clerks approved the bonds, then filed and recorded them. (Acts 1907, 30th Regular Session, Chapter 38; codified at Art. 3826, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911) In 1913, the legislature enacted additional restrictions and qualifications for commission merchants. The bond amount was increased to $3,000, and the sureties had to swear an oath that they were worth the full amount of the bond. The bond was payable to the county judge. The county judge of the county in which the merchant maintained an office had to approve the bond and then it was filed in the county clerk's office. (Acts 1913, 33rd Regular Session, Chapter 94; codified at Art. 1274, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925)
Additionally, in 1913 the Texas legislature adopted a law regulating the occupation of contracting stevedore (Acts 1913, 33rd Regular Session, Chapter 82; codified at Art. 5191, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925). A contracting stevedore was defined as a person or business that contracted to load or unload any vessel, ship, or water craft. A stevedore was defined as the laborer who worked for a contracting stevedore, and who actually loaded or unloaded a vessel, ship or water craft. The law required each contracting stevedore to post a $5,000 bond payable with the county judge of the county in which the stevedore conducted his business. The bond was conditioned on the contracting stevedore paying each laborer his wages promptly on Saturday of each week and performing all agreements. The county clerk approved the bond, then filed and recorded it.
Arrangement
Data in the volume are arranged by type of bond: commission merchant or contracting stevedore. Within each section, the bonds are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Register of commission merchants and contracting stevedores bonds, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-180 Volume 1, Bonds of commission merchants and contracting stevedores, 1913-1935
Register of assignments of accounts receivable, 1945-1967, undated,
2 volumes
In 1945, in response to new lending practices, the Texas legislature passed a law to protect the assignment of accounts receivable (Acts 1945, 49th Leg, Regular Session, Chapter 293; codified at Art. 260-1, Vernon's Ann. Tex. Civ. Stat., Supp., 1945). The register of assignments of accounts receivable includes file number, date of notice, date and time filed, name and address of assignor, name and address of assignee, period of assignment, date of release, and remarks. Dates covered are 1945-1967 and undated. The index to the register volume includes name of assignor, name of assignee, and page number of the register volume in which the notice is filed.
During the Depression of the 1930s, Texas businesses, like businesses across the country, suffered from a shortage of unsecured commercial loans. One result was the expansion of the use of accounts receivable by banks and other lenders as security for business loans. Because this type of lending was relatively new, there were few notice requirements. By the mid-1940s, banks and other creditors were demanding notice-filing legislation that would protect their interests and ensure that businesses did not pledge their accounts receivables as collateral to multiple lenders. The filed notice was intended to protect holders of these assignments from being superseded by the claims of subsequent lenders. (Source: "Notice of Filing for Assignments of Accounts Receivable," by John DeJ. Pemberton, Jr. in Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 13, No. 4, Autumn, 1948: 643-665.)
Assignments of accounts receivable could be protected by the assignor delivering a signed written instrument describing and assigning the particular accounts to the assignee and by filing for record a "Notice of Assignment" with the county clerk's office of the county in which the assignor resided. The "Notice of Assignment" was required to include the name and address of the assignor and the assignee, a statement that the assignor had or would assign one or more accounts to the assignee, and a statement of the period of time in which the notice would be effective. The county clerk was required to receive, file and index the notices of assignment.
Arrangement
Data in the register volume are arranged chronologically. The index volume entries are arranged alphabetically by names of the assignor and assignee.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Register of assignments of accounts receivable, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-181 Notice of assignment of accounts receivable register, 1945-1967
Volume
2011/438-182 Index to notice of assignment of accounts receivable register
Factors' lien records, after 1947,
1 volume
During the Depression of the 1930s, Texas businesses, like businesses across the country, suffered from a shortage of unsecured commercial loans. Like assignees of accounts receivables, factors soon determined that they also needed protection of their business interests to ensure that the claims of subsequent lenders did not supersede their claims. The index to factors' liens filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office includes filing number, name and address of borrower, and name and address of factor. The volume is undated; however, its creation antedates the statute in which factors' liens were created (1947). The location of the register of notices of the creation of factors' liens, to which this volume is an index, is unknown.
In 1947, the Texas legislature enacted a law providing for the creation of a lien by written agreement between a factor and a borrower (Acts 1947, 50th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 180; codified at Art. 5506c, Vernon's Ann. Tex. Civ. Stat., Supp. 1947). A factor was defined as a person or business that advances money on the security of merchandise, whether or not they are employed to sell the merchandise. The borrower was the owner of the merchandise who created a lien in favor of a factor. By written agreement with the borrower, a factor created a lien on the borrower's merchandise which secured the factor for any and all loans and advances to the borrower. A notice of the lien was required to be filed with the county clerk in each county in which merchandise subject to the lien was located. The clerk was required to mark the lien with a file number, the date and hour of filing, and to note and index the lien in a "suitable index" arranged by name of the borrower.
Arrangement
Entries in the volume are arranged alphabetically by name of borrower.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Factors' lien records, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-183 Index to factors' liens, after 1947



 

Census registers, 1880,
2 volumes

Census registers are lists of names for each of the enumeration districts created by the census enumerator in 1880 which were to be posted with the Galveston County Clerk's Office in accordance with the enumeration instructions. Information includes names, color ("white, black, mulatto, Chinese, Indian"), sex, and age at last birthday prior to June 1, 1880. The date covered is 1880. Although not indexed, the volumes are arranged alphabetically within each enumeration district. Volume 1 includes the mainland, Bolivar Peninsula, Galveston Island, and Wards 1 through 5. Volume 2 includes Wards 6 through 12.
The United States began conducting a decennial census in 1790. For each census, the US Congress would establish the requirements for conducting the census, including the requirements to be followed by each enumerator. The initial requirements for the 1880 census were adopted by Congress on March 3, 1879. The 1880 census, for the first time, included the relationship of each person enumerated to the head of the household; whether the person was single, married, widowed, or divorced; and the place of birth of the person's parents. An amendment to the 1880 requirements, passed on April 20, 1880, required enumerators, before forwarding the completed census schedules to the district supervisor, to make and file in the office of the county clerk, a list of names, ages, sex, and color, of all persons enumerated. He was required to advertise at three or more public places that he would be at the courthouse on the fifth and sixth days after filing the list (excluding Sunday) for the purpose of correcting his enumeration. Anyone who was improperly enumerated or omitted from the enumeration could appear and make a case for correcting the information or being included. (Source: Carroll D. Wright, The History and Growth of the United States Census Prepared for the Senate Committee on the Census, Document No. 194 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1900), 61-62.)
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged by enumeration district. Within each enumeration district, the information is arranged alphabetically by surname.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Census registers, Business and professional records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-184 Volume 1, Census of 1880
Volume
2011/438-185 Volume 2, Census of 1880



 

Marriage records, 1932-1933,
1 volume

Marriage records consist of notices of intention to marry recorded by the Galveston County Clerk's Office dating 1932-1933. Information includes application number, name, age, and residence of applicant, the name of the applicant's intended spouse, and an acknowledgment by the county clerk. Each applicant (groom and bride) completed a separate form. The volume is not indexed.
Recording vital statistics has always been an important role for the Galveston County Clerk's Office. The first Congress of the Republic of Texas assigned to the county clerk the responsibility of issuing marriage licenses, determining the eligibility of the parties to marry, and recording the license return after the marriage ceremony was performed by an authorized person (Acts 1837, 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, June 5, 1837). After statehood, Texas authorized county clerks to record all marriage contracts (Acts 1846, 1st Legislature, Regular Session, 12 May 1846). In 1911, the legislature required the consent of a parent or guardian before a woman under the age of 18 or a man under the age of 21 could marry (Acts 1911, 32nd Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 42).
In 1929, the legislature further regulated the issuance of marriage licenses by county clerks (Acts 1929, 41st Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 114; codified at Art. 4604, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., Supp. 1929). The clerk was required to examine applicants under oath as to age and residence and could not issue a license until three days after the application was filed. County clerks were required to record the applications in a book titled, Notice of Intention to Marry. Before a license could be issued, the man was required to provide to the clerk a doctor's certificate showing that he was free from all venereal disease.
Arrangement
Entries in the volume are arranged by application number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Marriage records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-186 Volume 2, Notice of intention to marry, 1932-1933



 

Real and personal property records, 1838-1858, 1869-1870, 1876-1966, undated,
95 volumes

One of the earliest statutory responsibilities assigned to county clerks was the recording of real property and related documents. Real and personal property records were created and maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office pursuant to specific statutes and for different, but related, purposes. They consist of file indexes, deed book transcriptions, acknowledgment statements by county clerks, acknowledgment records of notaries public, chattel mortgages, and automobile registrations dating overall 1838-1858, 1869-1870, 1876-1966, and undated.
The first Congress of the Republic of Texas directed the clerks of the county courts to "be the recorders for their respective counties, and it shall be their duty to record all deeds, conveyances, mortgages and other liens, and all other instruments of writing required by law to be recorded in their offices." Property owners were required to present their property instruments to the county court in which the property was located to prove their rightful ownership, and the clerk was directed to note the date and time of recording. (Acts 1836, 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, December 20, 1836)
Over time, the legislature added new records related to real and personal property for the county clerk to file and record. After Texas became a state, the first legislature directed the county clerk to record "all deeds, mortgages, conveyances, deeds of trust, bonds, covenants, defeasances, or other instruments of writing, of or concerning lands, tenements, goods and chattels, or moveable property of any description in his county" (Acts 1846, 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 12, 1846). Following adoption of the Constitution of 1876 and restoration of the office of county clerk, the legislature enacted statutes giving the county clerk the duty to record any written instrument relating to real or personal property required to be filed (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art. 1142 et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 1133, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895; recodified at Art. 1743, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911; recodifed at Art. 1935, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925).
In addition to recording deeds and other written instruments, the legislature assigned the county clerk other duties related to real and personal property, including maintaining indexes to the recorded instruments. The clerk also recorded acknowledgments of deeds and received the acknowledgment books of notaries public when their terms of office expired. The clerk recorded and indexed chattel mortgages and, early in the twentieth century, recorded automobile registrations.
Organization of the Records
The records are organized into six subseries:
File indexes, 1838-1858, 1884-1887, 1899-1948, 1950-1956, 1965, 31 volumes
Deed book transcriptions, 1869-1870, 2 volumes
Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, 1876-1945, 4 volumes
Acknowledgment records of notaries public, 1877-1938, 21 volumes
Chattel mortgages, 1896-1966, undated, 36 volumes
Automobile registrations, 1907-1917, 1 volume
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
File indexes, 1838-1858, 1884-1887, 1899-1948, 1950-1956, 1965,
31 volumes
The First Congress of the Republic of Texas directed the clerks of the county courts to "be the recorders for their respective counties, and it shall be their duty to record all deeds, conveyances, mortgages and other liens, and all other instruments of writing required by law to be recorded in their offices" (Acts 1836, 1st Congress of the Republic of Texas, December 20, 1836). File indexes maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office relate to real and personal property and date 1838-1858, 1884-1887, 1899-1948, 1950-1956, and 1965. The volumes are titled with various names, including index, filing index, reference index, clerk's file index, and clerk's file docket.
Information varies slightly among the volumes; however, it generally includes the date of the instrument, names of the parties, date filed, nature of the instrument, and the book and page number where the instrument is recorded. Later volumes include a reference number for each entry. The volume dated 1838-1856 is an 1880 transcription copy of the original Volume 1. It was completed in accordance with an 1876 law, which allowed a county clerk to transcribe a true and correct copy of a record or index when the original became "defaced, worn, or in any condition endangering its preservation in a safe and legible form" (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 78). The volumes dated 1838-1856, 1846-1850, and 1855-1858 include both direct (grantor) and indirect (grantee) indexes. The types of instruments indexed in these volumes include deeds, bills of sale, mortgages on "Negroes," powers of attorney, copies of wills, and deeds of trust. Volumes dated after 1899 also include abstracts of judgments, writs of attachment, bonds, agreements, transfers of liens, and releases.
The first Texas legislature assigned to the county clerk the responsibility for creating and maintaining an alphabetical index to "all books of records wherein deeds, mortgages or other instruments of writing concerning lands and tenements are recorded." The legislature also required the clerk to keep an index to all books of record containing written instruments relating to goods and chattels, moveable property, marriage contracts, powers of attorney, and any other instrument that the law required him to file. (Acts 1846, 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 12, 1846) Following restoration of the office of county clerk in 1876, the legislature enacted statutes directing the county clerk to properly index the real and personal property records filed in his office (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art. 1142 et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 1133, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895; recodified at Art. 1743, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911; recodifed at Art. 1935, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925).
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, the volumes dated 1838-1858 and 1884-1887 are arranged chronologically by the date the instrument was filed. Internally, the volumes dated 1899 and after are arranged chronologically by filing number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), File indexes, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-187 No. 1, Filing index, June 1838-December 1856
Volume
2011/438-188 Index, August 1846-October 1850
Volume
2011/438-189 Reference or filing index, August 1855-February 1858
Volume
2011/438-190 No. 1, Filing index, April 1884-January 1887
Volume
2011/438-191 No. 1, Clerk's file index, August 1899-March 1903
Volume
2011/438-192 No. 2, Clerk's file index, March 1903-June 1906
Volume
2011/438-193 No. 3, Clerk's file index, July 1906-March 1909
Volume
2011/438-194 No. 4, Clerk's file index, April 1909-July 1911
Volume
2011/438-195 No. 5, Clerk's file index, August 1911-July 1913
Volume
2011/438-196 No. 6, Clerk's file index, July 1913-April 1915
Volume
2011/438-197 No. 7, Clerk's file index, April 1915-December 1919
Volume
2011/438-198 No. 8, Clerk's file index, December 1919-August 1923
Volume
2011/438-199 No. 9, Clerk's file docket, August 1923-November 1926
Volume
2011/438-200 No 10, Clerk's file index, November 1926-June 1929
Volume
2011/438-201 No. 11, Clerk's file index, June 1929-June 1932
Volume
2011/438-202 No. 12, Clerk's file docket, June 1932-July 1935
Volume
2011/438-203 No. 13, Clerk's file docket, July 1935-December 1937
Volume
2011/438-204 No. 14, Clerk's file docket, December 1937-November 1939
Volume
2011/438-205 No. 15, Clerk's file docket, November 1939-January 1941
Volume
2011/438-206 No. 16, Clerk's file docket, January 1941-March 1942
Volume
2011/438-207 No. 17, Clerk's file docket, March 1942-September 1943
Volume
2011/438-208 No. 18, Clerk's file docket, September 1943-May 1945
Volume
2011/438-209 No. 20, Clerk's file docket, August 1946-November 1947
Volume
2011/438-210 No. 21, Clerk's file docket, November 1947-December 1948
Volume
2011/438-211 No. 23, Clerk's filing index, January 1950-January 1951
Volume
2011/438-212 No. 24, Clerk's filing index, January 1951-March 1952
Volume
2011/438-213 No. 25, Clerk's filing index, March 1952-March 1953
Volume
2011/438-214 No. 26, Clerk's file docket, March 1953-April 1954
Volume
2011/438-215 No. 27, Clerk's file docket, April 1954-February 1955
Volume
2011/438-216 No. 28, Clerk's file docket, February 1955-January 1956
Volume
2011/438-217 No. 42, Clerk's file index, November 1965-December 1965
Deed book transcriptions, 1869-1870,
2 volumes
Transcription copies of two original deed volumes recorded and filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office date January 1869-May 1870. The transcription of Book 1 was completed in 1884; the transcription of Book 2 was completed in 1886. The transcriptions include the deed or other written instrument recorded, which reflects the names of parties, land description, terms of transfer or sale, and date of transfer; and date filed and recorded. Both volumes include a certification signed by the clerk attesting that the record was "truly and correctly transcribed" from the original volume. Volume 1 includes indentures on deeds of trust, reflecting land pledged as collateral on loans. Volume 2 includes deeds and other related written instruments. The volumes are not indexed.
The Galveston County Clerk's Office maintained deed books, which recorded deeds, mortgages, conveyances, deeds of trust, bonds, covenants, defeasances, or other instruments of writing relating to real and personal property, dating back to the formation of the county. Because these books were in continuous use, sometimes a clerk needed to replace the book with a transcription copy. An 1876 law allowed a county clerk to transcribe a true and correct copy of a record when the original became "defaced, worn, or in any condition endangering its preservation in a safe and legible form" (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 78).
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Deed book transcriptions, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-218 Book 1, Record of deeds, January 1869-1870
Volume
2011/438-219 Book 2, Record of deeds, June 1869-May 1870
Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, 1876-1945,
4 volumes
In Texas, for written instruments relating to real property to be recorded, the grantor or person executing the document is required to appear before an authorized individual and acknowledge that he or she executed the instrument for the purpose and consideration represented. Various individuals were authorized to take the acknowledgments, including the chief justices of the county courts during the Republic, commissioners appointed by the governor following statehood, appointed notaries public, judges, and county clerks.
Record books of acknowledgments and proofs of written instruments taken by various Galveston County clerks date 1876-1945 and include date of acknowledgment; date of instrument; kind of instrument; if acknowledgment of real property instrument, description and location of property, names of grantor and grantee, name and residence of grantee, and names and residences of witnesses; amount of fees collected; and name of officer taking acknowledgment. The volumes are not indexed.
After adoption of the Constitution of 1876, the Texas Legislature assigned to county clerks the duty to acknowledge the execution of any deed or other instrument in writing, to take the separate acknowledgement of married women when the law required such an acknowledgment, and to take proofs by witnesses to deeds, written instruments, or conveyances (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 15; codified at Art. 1148, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 1141, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895; recodified at Art. 1751, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911). In 1925, the legislature consolidated into one statute the requirements for taking acknowledgments and proofs for all who were authorized to do so, including county clerks and notaries public (Art. 6602, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925). An 1874 law required anyone authorized to take acknowledgments and proofs to keep a record in a "well-bound book" in which he was to enter a brief description of the instrument (Acts 1874, 14th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 60).
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically and by county clerk.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Acknowledgment statements by county clerks, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-220 C. T. McMahan, Record of acknowledgments, December 1876-January 1879
Volume
2011/438-221 C. T. McMahan and P. S. Wren, Record of acknowledgments, January 1879-January 1885
Volume
2011/438-222 A. Wakelee, Record of acknowledgments, December 1886-November 1910
Volume
2011/438-223 George F. Burgess, Record of acknowledgments, November 1910-May 1945
Acknowledgment records of notaries public, 1877-1938,
21 volumes
The notary public in Texas is a constitutionally created office. The first state constitution (Art. V, Sec. 19, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1845), and an 1846 law, authorized the governor, with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint a "convenient number" of notaries public, but no fewer than six per county. Notaries were authorized by law to administer oaths and acknowledge written instruments. (Acts 1846, 1st Legislature, Regular Session, May 13, 1846) An 1874 law required anyone authorized to take acknowledgments and proofs to keep a record in a well-bound book in which he was to enter a brief description of the instrument (Acts 1874, 14th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 60).
Record books and public papers of various notaries publics commissioned for Galveston County date 1877-1938 and include date of acknowledgment; date of instrument; kind of instrument; if acknowledgment of real property instrument, description and location of property, names of grantor and grantee, name and residence of grantee, and names and residences of witnesses; amount of fees collected; and name of officer taking acknowledgment. The volumes were filed with the Galveston County Clerk's Office when the notaries' terms of office expired. The volumes are not indexed.
Following adoption of the 1876 Constitution (Art. IV, Sec. 26, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876), the legislature revoked all previous notary public commissions and re-wrote the statute authorizing the appointment of notaries for each county; however, the "convenient number" of notaries consisted of no fewer than 5 nor more than 20. Their appointments were for two-year terms. Their particular duties included taking acknowledgments or proofs of all written instruments entitling the instruments to be filed with the county clerk, taking the examination and acknowledgment of a married woman conveying or charging her separate property or the homestead she shared with her husband, the administration of oaths, and the taking of proofs and acknowledgments of instruments of commerce and navigation. Each notary was required to keep a book of all official acts. The law further stipulated that when a notary vacated his office, all of his record books and public papers were to be deposited with the county clerk (Acts 1876, 15th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 36; codified at Art. 3362, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 5949, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925).
In 1925, the legislature consolidated into one statute the requirements for taking acknowledgments and proofs for all who were authorized to do so, including notaries and county clerks (Art. 6602, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat. 1925). Notaries continued to be appointed by the governor until 1939 when the legislature transferred the responsibility to the secretary of state (Acts 1939, 40th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 1; codified at Art. 5949, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., Supp., 1939).
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged by notary in chronological order by date of commission. Internally, each volume is arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Acknowledgment records of notaries public, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-224 J. Stewart Cleveland, Acknowledgment record, June 1877-October 1879
Volume
2011/438-225 J. M. Claiborne, Acknowledgment record, April 1879-December 1886
Volume
2011/438-226 Davis A. Spencer, Record of acknowledgments, June 1881-September 1882
Volume
2011/438-227 J. P. Kindred, Acknowledgment record, June 1885-March 1890
Volume
2011/438-228 J. P. Kindred, Record of acknowledgments, March 1890-May 1891
Volume
2011/438-229 Rodney Gary, Acknowledgment record, June 1891-October 1893
Volume
2011/438-230 B. R. A. Scott, No. 2, Acknowledgment record, June 1891-October 1901
Volume
2011/438-231 R. W. Luttrell, Record of acknowledgments, June 1893-May 1895
Volume
2011/438-232 J. A.Whitaker, Acknowledgment record, June 1897-June 1900
Volume
2011/438-233 J. W. Messenger, Notary public record, July 1897-June 1898
Volume
2011/438-234 Thomas J. Goree, Acknowledgment record, June 1899-April 1900 and December 1901-February 1905
Volume
2011/438-235 Sam Boyd, Acknowledgment record, June 1909-October 1910, and W. E. Grover, No. 4, Acknowledgment record, January 1916-August 1917
Volume
2011/438-236 J. S. Montgomery, Acknowledgment record, June 1911-May 1917
Volume
2011/438-237 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., No. 1, Acknowledgment record, June 1907-June 1909
Volume
2011/438-238 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., No. 2, Acknowledgments, June 1909-January 1913
Volume
2011/438-239 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., No. 3, Acknowledgments, January 1913-Feburary 1916
Volume
2011/438-240 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., No. 5, Acknowledgment record, August 1917-Feburary 1919
Volume
2011/438-241 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., Acknowledgment record, June 1919-November 1920
Volume
2011/438-242 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Jr., Acknowledgment record, November 1920-November 1922
Volume
2011/438-243 W. E. Grover and John Adriance, Record of acknowledgments, November 1922-April 1929
Volume
2011/438-244 W. E. Grover and John Adriance II, Record of acknowledgments, April 1929-June 1938
Chattel mortgages, 1896-1966, undated, 1896-1966, undated,
36 volumes
Indexes to chattel mortgages filed in the Galveston County Clerk's Office date 1897-1966 and undated and include date of instrument, when filed, name of the trustee or cestui qui trust, mortgagor, and book and page where mortgage is recorded. Two volumes, both titled Book 386, are indexes to chattel mortgage liens on machinery situated on real property. The first volume listed is undated and includes pages 2 through 39; the second volume listed is dated 1955-1966 and includes pages 40-82.
Chattel is movable personal property, such as an automobile or machinery. A chattel mortgage is a lien on movable personal property to secure a loan. Real property is not chattel. An 1879 law required "every chattel mortgage, deed of trust or other instrument of writing intended to operate as a mortgage of, or lien upon, personal property" to be filed in the office of the county clerk where the property was located. Failure to file a record of the chattel mortgage rendered it void. The county clerk was obligated to keep a record of filed chattel mortgages. Once the debt was paid, the mortgagee was required to notify the county clerk, who was to record the cancellation of the lien in the record book. (Acts 1879, 16th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 127; codified at Art. 4294, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; recodified at Art. 3327, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1895; recodified at Art. 5654, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911; recodified at Art. 5489, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925)
A 1917 law clarified the method of perfecting a lien on machinery or a manufactured article located on and attached to real property in such a manner that it could be deemed a fixture. If a lien or mortgage existed on machinery or a manufactured article located on real property, and if the chattel mortgage was registered properly with the county clerk, the lien on the machinery or article was superior to any lien on the real property. County clerks were required to identify such chattel mortgages and index them in a separate volume. (Acts 1917, 35th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 153; codified at Art. 5661, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911, Supp. 1917; recodified at Art. 5498, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925).
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged chronologically. Internally, each index volume is arranged alphabetically by the name of the mortgagee and the mortgagor.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Chattel mortgages, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-245 Volume 1, Index to chattel mortgages, 1897-1899
Volume
2011/438-246 Volume 2, Index to chattel mortgages, 1899-1902
Volume
2011/438-247 Volume 3, Index to chattel mortgages, 1903-1907
Volume
2011/438-248 Volume 4, Index to chattel mortgages, 1907-1911
Volume
2011/438-249 Volume 5, Index to chattel mortgages, 1911-1914
Volume
2011/438-250 Volume 6, Index to chattel mortgages, 1914-1917
Volume
2011/438-251 Volume 7, Index to chattel mortgages, A-F, 1917-1926
Volume
2011/438-252 Volume 8, Index to chattel mortgages, G-Mc, 1917-1926
Volume
2011/438-253 Volume 9, Index to chattel mortgages, N-Z, 1917-1926
Volume
2011/438-254 Volume 10, Index to chattel mortgages, A-Bi, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-255 Volume 11, Index to chattel mortgages, Bo-Ci, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-256 Volume 12, Index to chattel mortgages, Co-Do, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-257 Volume 13, Index to chattel mortgages, Du-Ga, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-258 Volume 14, Index to chattel mortgages, Ge-Ha, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-259 Volume 15, Index to chattel mortgages, He-Jy, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-260 Volume 16, Index to chattel mortgages, Ka, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-261 Volume 17, Index to chattel mortgages, Ke-Ly, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-262 Volume 18, Index to chattel mortgages, Me-Ne, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-263 Volume 19, Index to chattel mortgages, Ni-Q, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-264 Volume 20, Index to chattel mortgages, Ra-Sa, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-265 Volume 21, Index to chattel mortgages, Se-Ta, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-266 Volume 22, Index to chattel mortgages, Te-Ty, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-267 Volume 23, Index to chattel mortgages, U-Z, 1926-1952
Volume
2011/438-268 Volume 24, Index to chattel mortgages, A-By, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-269 Volume 25, Index to chattel mortgages, Ca-Dy, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-270 Volume 26, Index to chattel mortgages, E-Go, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-271 Volume 27, Index to chattel mortgages, Gu-Jy, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-272 Volume 28, Index to chattel mortgages, Ka-My, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-273 Volume 29, Index to chattel mortgages, Mc-Pa, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-274 Volume 30, Index to chattel mortgages, Pe-Sy, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-275 Volume 31, Index to chattel mortgages, Ta-Z, 1953-1963
Volume
2011/438-276 Volume 32, Index to chattel mortgages, Aa-Fro, 1964-1966
Volume
2011/438-277 Volume 33, Index to chattel mortgages, Ga-Mi, 1964-1966
Volume
2011/438-278 Volume 34, Index to chattel mortgages, Mo-XYZ 1964-1966
Volume
2011/438-279 Book 386, Index to chattel mortgages-liens on machinery situated on realty, undated
Volume
2011/438-280 Book 386, Index to chattel mortgages-liens on machinery situated on realty, 1955-1966
Automobile registrations, 1907-1917,
1 volume
The record of automobile owners registered with the Galveston County Clerk's Office dates 1907-1917 and includes date, registration number, owner's name and address, description of the machine, and H. P. (Horse Power) number. In 1907, Texas began to require owners of automobiles and other motor vehicles (such as motorcycles) to register their vehicles with the county clerk (Acts 1907, 30th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 96). County clerks were required to record the number of the registration, the name of the owner, and a description of the vehicle. The owner was required to display the number, in figures at least six inches high, conspicuously on the vehicle. In 1917, Texas created the Highway Department and centralized registration of motor vehicles. Owners, then, were required to pay a state registration fee to the local county tax assessor-collector who issued a state-issued license plate (Art. 6675, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925).
Arrangement
Data in the volume are arranged chronologically and by registration number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Automobile registrations, Real and personal property records, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-281 Automobile register, 1907-1917



 

Voter registration and poll lists, 1867-1873, 1892, 1894, 1905-1978, undated,
103 volumes

Voter qualifications, generally related to sex, age, residency, and citizenship, have been included in Texas constitutions since 1836. Lists of voters maintained by the Galveston County Clerk as required by various statutes reflect the changes in voter qualifications and eligibility enacted throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Poll lists make up the majority of the series, which also includes registers for voters in Galveston County and the City of Galveston, with overall dates of 1866-1873, 1892, 1894, 1905-1978, and undated.
The 1836 Texas constitution qualified to vote "every citizen of the Republic who has attained the age of twenty-one years, and shall have resided six months within the district or county where the election is held" (Art. VI, Sec. 11, Constitution of the Republic of Texas, 1836). When Texas became a state, the constitution declared that "every free male person who shall have attained the age of twenty-one years, and who shall be a citizen of the United States, or who is [at the time the state constitution was adopted] a citizen of the Republic of Texas, and shall have resided in this State one year next preceding an election, and the last six months within the district, county, city or town in which he offers to vote (Indians not taxed, Africans, and descendants of Africans, excepted), shall be deemed a qualified elector" (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1845).
Voter qualifications fluctuated during Reconstruction because of the adoption of multiple state constitutions. The 1866 Constitution qualified all free males 21 and over who were U.S. citizens and residents of Texas for one year (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1866). The 1869 Constitution qualified every male U.S. citizen 21 and over who was a resident of Texas for one year. Non-citizen aliens, who declared their intention to become U.S. citizens and otherwise met the qualifications, were also allowed to vote (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). This Constitution also declared that male citizens were entitled to vote "without distinction of race, color, or former condition" (Art. VI, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). Both of these constitutions disqualified various groups of people.
The Constitution of 1876 defined classes of persons who were disqualified from voting, and it defined eligibility requirements for those who were not disqualified. Disqualified were males under 21, convicted felons, paupers, "idiots and lunatics," and members of the U.S. armed forces (Art. VI, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876). Males 21 years and older who were U.S. citizens or resident aliens and residents of Texas for one year were eligible to vote (Art. VI, Sec. 2, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876).
Throughout most of the nineteenth century, Texas did not require voters to register. However, for a brief period during Reconstruction, qualified voters were required to register (Art. III, Secs. 1 and 14, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). The Constitution of 1876 specifically prohibited voter registration (Art. VI, Sec. 4, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876). Although Texas collected a poll (or head) tax, there was no linkage between payment of the poll tax and the qualification to vote until voters passed a constitutional amendment in 1902 requiring any voter subject to a poll tax to pay the tax before he was eligible to vote (Acts 1901, 27th Legislature, Regular Session, S.J.R. 3, adopted November 4, 1902). This requirement remained in place until it was declared unconstitutional. During the twentieth century, several amendments to the U.S. Constitution forced Texas to change voter qualifications and eligibility. Women became eligible in 1920. The poll tax was eliminated in the 1960s. The minimum voting age was lowered to 18 in the 1970s.
Organization of the Records
The records are organized into three subseries:
Register of voters for Galveston County, 1867-1873, undated, 2 volumes
Registers of voters for city of Galveston, 1892, 1894, 3 volumes
Poll lists, 1905-1978, 98 volumes
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Voter registration and poll lists, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Register of voters for Galveston County, 1867-1873, undated,
2 volumes
The register of individuals who registered to vote in Galveston County during the years of Reconstruction dates 1867-1873 and undated and includes registration number, date, name, age, nativity, how made a citizen, original signature, and remarks. The information in this volume is recorded during two distinct periods. The first period dates approximately 1867. The second period dates January 1868-March 1873. An index volume includes the name of the registered voter and the registration number.
Following the Civil War, Texans adopted several constitutions, each with a slightly different set of voter qualifications. The 1866 Constitution qualified "every free male person," who had attained the age of 21, who was a citizen of the United States, and who had "resided in this State for one year next preceding an election and the last six months within the district, county, city, or town in which he offers to vote." As with the 1845 Constitution, "Indians not taxed, Africans and descendants of Africans" were excepted. In addition, "no soldier, seaman or marine, in the Army or Navy of the United States" was eligible to vote in a Texas election. (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1866)
The so-called Reconstruction Constitution of 1869 qualified every male 21 years or older who "shall be (or who shall have declared his intentions to become) a citizen of the United States," who was a citizen of Texas, and who had resided in the state for the year preceding an election and for "the last six months within the district or county in which he [offered] to vote" (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). It declared that male citizens were entitled to vote "without distinction of race, color, or former condition" (Art. VI, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). The 1869 constitution excepted and disqualified several groups from voting eligibility. "Indians not taxed" were excepted, and as with the Constitution of 1866, no serviceman in the US army or navy was allowed to vote in a Texas election (Art. III, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). For the first time, a Texas constitution included several other disqualifications: "no person, while kept in any asylum, or confined in prison, or who has been convicted of a felony, or who is of unsound mind, shall be allowed to vote or hold office" (Art. VI, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869).
Throughout most of the nineteenth century, Texas did not require voters to register. However, in 1867, the United States Congress enacted legislation designed to "provide for the more efficient Government of the Rebel States" (15 Stat. 2). This law called for the commanding officer of each military district to register qualified voters for each county before September 1, 1867. The intention was for the lists to be used to determine who would be eligible to vote for any proposed Constitutional Convention in the state. The registrant had to take an oath stating that he was not disqualified by law from voting. Disqualifications included Confederate veterans with a rank of major or above and any person who had previously taken an oath as a member of Congress, as an officer of the United States, as a member of any state legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any state, to support the Constitution of the United States, and who later engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or gave aid or comfort to the enemies thereof, and whose "disability" had not been removed by a two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress. Local military authorities often interpreted this prohibition to include anyone who held any type of office or who in any way benefited from either Confederate state or federal government patronage, thereby preventing a number of otherwise eligible citizens from voting. Although Texas complied with this federally mandated registration requirement, the requirement was not incorporated into the 1866 Texas Constitution.
The 1869 Reconstruction Constitution required qualified voters to be "duly registered" (Art. III, Secs. 1 and 14, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1869). To register to vote during Reconstruction, a qualified voter was required to "appear before the proper registration officer during the days of registration, and make oath that he is a citizen, or that he has declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, that he has resided one year in the State of Texas and sixty days in the county, that he is twenty-one years old, and not otherwise disqualified from registering or voting." He then registered as a voter. The registering officer was required to register each qualified elector and to provide him with a certificate of registration. Included in this statute was a declaration that "the registration of voters made under the late Provisional Government by the military commander, is hereby declared valid, and persons holding certificates of registration shall be deemed qualified electors." (Acts 1870, 12th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 16)
Arrangement
Register volume entries are arranged numerically by registration number. Index volume entries are arranged alphabetically by first letter of the last name and then numerically by registration number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Register of voters for Galveston County, Voter registration and poll lists, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-282 List of registered voters of Galveston County, Texas, 1867-1873
Volume
2011/438-283 Index to List of registered voters of Galveston County, Texas
Registers of voters in city of Galveston, 1892, 1894,
3 volumes
Three volumes of registers of voters for the city of Galveston filed with the Galveston County Clerk's Office date 1892 and 1894. Information includes certificate number, date of registration, name, precinct number, residence, nationality, color, and remarks. The two 1894 volumes are identical, except the entries in one volume have been marked to indicate the persons who voted in the election. The volumes are not indexed.
In 1876, Texas voters adopted the current state constitution. This Constitution first defines the classes of persons who are disqualified from voting, and then it defines the eligibility requirements for those who are not disqualified. At the time of its adoption, the 1876 Constitution disallowed "persons under twenty-one years of age, idiots and lunatics, all paupers supported by any county, all persons convicted of any felony (subject to any legislative exceptions), and all soldiers, marines and seamen, employed in the service of the army or navy of the United States" (Art. VI, Sec. 1, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876). Every male who was 21 years old or older, who had not been disqualified, who was a citizen of the United States and a resident of Texas (for at least one year preceding the election and for the last six months within the district or county) was qualified to vote. In addition, the 1876 constitution continued to allow aliens to vote (Art. VI, Sec. 2, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876), although an 1895 constitutional amendment required an alien to declare his intention to become a citizen at least six months before the election (Acts 1895, 24th Legislature, Regular Session, House Joint Resolution 32, adopted November 3, 1896). Alien suffrage was abolished in 1921 by constitutional amendment (Acts 1921, 37th Legislature, Regular Session, Senate Joint Resolution 1, adopted July 23, 1921).
Throughout most of the nineteenth century, Texas did not require voters to register. The Constitution adopted by voters in 1876 specifically stated "no law shall ever be enacted requiring a registration of voters of this State" (Art. VI, Sec. 4, Constitution of the State of Texas, 1876). Voters, however, modified this provision by an 1891 constitutional amendment, which allowed the registration of voters in cities with populations over 10,000 (Acts 1891, 22nd Regular Session, S.J.R. 19, adopted August 11, 1891). The enabling legislation adopted in response to this amendment directed county commissioners to appoint a registrar of voters. It was the duty of the registrar to register all qualified voters in the city. A list of registered voters was furnished to the election managers who were instructed during elections to indicate each of the registered voters who voted. At the close of the election, the list of registered voters was to be delivered to the county clerk or city secretary, depending on the nature of the election. (Acts 1892, 22nd Legislature, 1st Called Session, Chapter 13)
Arrangement
These volumes are arranged numerically by certificate number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Registers of voters in city of Galveston, Voter registration and poll lists, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
2011/438-284 Register of voters in the city of Galveston, 1892
Volume
2011/438-285 Register of voters in the city of Galveston, 1894
Volume
2011/438-286 Register of voters in the city of Galveston [list marked "voted"], 1894
Poll lists, 1905-1978, 98 volumes 1905-1978,
98 volumes
Except for a brief period during Reconstruction and following the adoption of the 1891 Constitutional amendment allowing cities with populations over 10,000 to register voters, Texas did not require voters to register during the nineteenth century. Consequently, until the twenty-first century, Texas did not consistently maintain lists of eligible voters.
Poll lists of eligible voters for Galveston and Galveston County maintained by the Galveston County Clerk's Office date 1905-1978 and include name, precinct number, age, address, length of residence (state, county, city, and/or ward), occupation, and race. The two-year date ranges for the volumes reflect the time period during which voters were eligible to vote. The volumes for the years 1926-1927, 1931-1932, and 1957-1958 are missing. Each volume dated prior to 1964-1965 contains all Galveston County precincts in existence at the time. Beginning in 1964-1965, the volumes generally contain specific precincts, and two or more volumes reflect all Galveston County precincts for a particular voting time period.
The volumes from the time period during which Texas voters were required to pay a poll tax (1905-1966) include a list of all citizens who paid the poll tax by the annual deadline and a list of voters exempt each year from payment of the tax. The volumes from the time period after the poll tax as a means of qualifying voters was declared unconstitutional and consequently, Texas required eligible voters to register (1967-1978) include a certified list of all voter registrations. The volumes are not indexed.
The volume for 1919-1920 includes a supplemental list of women newly eligible to vote. The volume entitled Federal poll list-free registration certificates includes individuals who were not required to pay the poll tax in Federal elections following enactment of the 1964 Voting Rights Act. The information in this volume includes name, address, occupation, race, and length of residence (state and county). One of the volumes for 1966-1967 is a list of conditional voter registrations for all Galveston County precincts. Volumes for 1967-1968 through 1977-1978 reflect the newly adopted statewide voter registration system, and the information includes registration certificate number, name, address, occupation, age, sex, and whether or not the registrant was a property owner. One of the volumes for 1971-1972 is a supplemental volume of newly eligible voters who registered after the voting age was lowered to 18.
Although counties collected a poll (or head) tax beginning with the Republic, there was no linkage between payment of the poll tax and the qualification to vote until Texas voters passed a constitutional amendment in 1902 requiring any voter subject to a poll tax to pay the tax before he could become eligible to vote (Acts 1901, 27th Legislature, Regular Session, Senate Joint Resolution 3, adopted November 4, 1902). The enabling statute adopted to implement this constitutional provision required "any voter who is subject to pay his poll tax under the laws of the State of Texas or ordinances of any city or town shall have paid said tax before he offers to vote at any election in this state, and hold a receipt showing the payment of his poll tax before the first day of February next preceding such election" (Acts 1905, 29th Legislature, 1st Called Session, Chapter 11; codified at Art. 2939, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911). Poll taxes were assessed on male residents of Texas between the ages of 21 and 60. The law exempted several groups of people from payment of the tax: "Indians" and "persons insane, blind, deaf and dumb, or those who [had] lost one hand or foot" (Art. 4664, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1879; as amended in Acts 1881, 17th Legislature, First Called Session, Chapter 17; recodifed at Art. 7355, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911).
Following passage of the poll tax requirement, a prospective voter, who was not otherwise exempt from the payment requirement, was required to pay the tax each year and obtain a receipt showing his payment. On or before March 10th each year, the county tax assessor-collector was required to provide to the county clerk certified lists of the citizens in each precinct who had paid the poll tax or who were otherwise exempt from payment. (Acts 1905, 29th Legislature, 1st Called Session, Chapter 11, Sections 2 and 28; codified at Art. 2939, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1911; recodified at Art. 2954, et seq, Tex. Rev. Civ. Stat., 1925)
The 24th Amendment to the US Constitution and the 1964 Voting Rights Act made it illegal to require payment of a poll tax to vote in Federal elections. In reaction, the Texas legislature amended the Texas Election Code to authorize individuals to obtain receipts entitling them to vote without paying a poll tax in Federal elections only. Election officials were required to "enter their names on a separate poll list and to furnish them with a ballot containing only the offices and candidates on which they are entitled to vote." (Acts 1965, 59th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 678)
Payment of the poll tax remained a qualification to vote in Texas state elections until a Federal appeals court declared the poll tax requirement unconstitutional under the Fourteenth Amendment. Shortly thereafter, Texas voters adopted a constitutional amendment repealing the poll tax and authorizing the legislature to provide for voter registration (Acts 1965, 59th Legislature, Regular Session, House Joint Resolution 13, adopted November 8, 1966). In 1966, the legislature instituted annual, state-wide voter registration for the first time (Acts 1966, 59th Legislature, 1st Called Session, Chapter 1). In 1975, Texas eliminated annual voter registration and instituted a system of permanent voter registration (Acts 1975, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, Chapter 296).
When the poll tax was eliminated, the county tax assessor-collector became the registrar of voters in the county responsible for registering voters and preparing a certified list of registered voters for each election precinct in the county. He was required to furnish to the county clerk one set of original lists and one set of supplemental lists prepared for each county-wide election. These lists were public records, and the county clerk was required to make them available for public inspection at all times the office was open. (Acts 1966, 59th Legislature, 1st Called Session, Chapter 1)
During the twentieth century, several other amendments to the US Constitution forced Texas to change its voter qualifications. The 19th Amendment, ratified by the Texas legislature in 1919, provided for female suffrage. In 1920, the Texas legislature amended all Texas statutes relating to voter qualifications removing the word "male" and adding females to the poll tax requirement, thus ensuring that both male and females were qualified to vote (Acts 1920, 36th Legislature, 4th Called Session, Chapter 6). A 1921 amendment to the Texas constitution removed gender qualifiers permanently (Acts 1921, 37th Legislature, Regular Session, Senate Joint Resolution 1, adopted July 23, 1921).
The 26th Amendment to the US Constitution, ratified by the Texas legislature in 1971, lowered the voting age to 18. In response, the Texas legislature adopted special voting procedures for the 1971 voting year, allowing for a supplemental registration period to enable those who had recently become eligible to register to vote (Acts 1971, 62nd Regular Session, Chapter 2).
Arrangement
The volumes are arranged by chronologically. Internally, each volume is arranged by county precinct and then alphabetically by voter name.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Poll lists, Voter registration and poll lists, Galveston County Clerk's office records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
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2011/438-287 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1906-1907
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2011/438-288 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1907-1908
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2011/438-289 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1908-1909
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2011/438-290 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1909-1910
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2011/438-291 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1910-1911
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2011/438-292 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1911-1912
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2011/438-293 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1912-1913
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2011/438-294 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1913-1914
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2011/438-295 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1914-1915
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2011/438-296 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1915-1916
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2011/438-297 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1916-1917
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2011/438-298 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1917-1918
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2011/438-299 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1918-1919
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2011/438-300 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1919-1920
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2011/438-301 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1920-1921
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2011/438-302 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1921-1922
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2011/438-303 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1922-1923
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2011/438-304 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1923-1924
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2011/438-305 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1924-1925
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2011/438-306 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1925-1926
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2011/438-307 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1927-1928
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2011/438-308 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1928-1929
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2011/438-309 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1929-1930
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2011/438-310 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1930-1931
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2011/438-311 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1932-1933
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2011/438-312 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1933-1934
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2011/439-313 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1934-1935
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2011/438-314 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1935-1936
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2011/438-315 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1936-1937
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2011/438-316 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1937-1938
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2011/438-317 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1938-1939
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2011/438-318 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1939-1940
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2011/438-319 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1940-1941
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2011/438-320 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1941-1942
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2011/438-321 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1942-1943
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2011/438-322 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1943-1944
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2011/438-323 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1944-1945
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2011/438-324 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1945-1946
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2011/438-325 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1946-1947
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2011/438-326 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1947-1948
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2011/438-327 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1948-1949
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2011/438-328 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1949-1950
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2011/438-329 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1950-1951
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2011/438-330 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1951-1952
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2011/438-331 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1952-1953
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2011/438-332 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1953-1954
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2011/438-333 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1954-1955
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2011/438-334 List of qualified voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1955-1956
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2011/438-335 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1956-1957
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2011/438-336 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1958-1959
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2011/438-337 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1959-1960
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2011/438-338 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1960-1961
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2011/438-339 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1961-1962
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2011/438-340 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, 1962-1963
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2011/438-341 Federal poll list-free registration certificates, 1964-1965
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2011/438-342 List of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 1-25, 1964-1965
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2011/438-343 List of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 26-39, 1964-1965
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2011/438-344 List of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 40-50, 1964-1965
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2011/438-345 List of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 51-68, 1964-1965
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2011/438-346 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 1-37, 1965-1966
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2011/438-347 Certified list of voters/list of poll tax receipts and exemption certificates, Precincts 38-69, 1965-1966
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2011/438-348 Certified list of voters, Precincts 1-40, 1966-1967
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2011/438-349 Certified list of voters, Precincts 41-70, 1966-1967
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2011/438-350 Certified list of conditional voter registrations, All precincts, 1966-1967
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2011/438-351 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-41, 1967-1968
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2011/438-352 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 42-70, 1967-1968
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2011/438-353 Certified list of voter registrations, All precincts, 1968-1969
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2011/438-354 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-30, 1969-1970
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2011/438-355 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 31-57, 1969-1970
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2011/438-356 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-30, 1970-1971
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2011/438-357 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 31-57, 1970-1971
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2011/438-358 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-30, 1971-1972
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2011/438-359 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 31-57, 1971-1972
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2011/438-360 List of voters who registered after time extended for 18-year-olds and others to register, Precincts 2-57, 1971-1972
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2011/438-361 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1972-1973
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2011/438-362 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1972-1973
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2011/438-363 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44, 1972-1973
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2011/438-364 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-59, 1972-1973
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2011/438-365 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1973-1974
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2011/438-366 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1973-1974
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2011/438-367 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44, 1973-1974
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2011/438-368 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-59, 1973-1974
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2011/438-369 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1974-1975
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2011/438-370 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1974-1975
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2011/438-371 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44, 1974-1975
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2011/438-372 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-59, 1974-1975
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2011/438-373 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1975-1976
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2011/438-374 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1975-1976
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2011/438-375 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44 1975-1976
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2011/438-376 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-61, 1975-1976
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2011/438-377 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1976-1977
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2011/438-378 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1976-1977
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2011/438-379 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44, 1976-1977
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2011/438-380 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-61, 1976-1977
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2011/438-381 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 1-17, 1977-1978
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2011/438-382 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 18-31, 1977-1978
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2011/438-383 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 32-44, 1977-1978
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2011/438-384 Certified list of registered voters, Precincts 45-61, 1977-1978