Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Legislature:

An Inventory of the Texas Constitutional Conventions Records at the Texas State Archives, 1845-1846, 1860-1861, 1866-1871, 1875, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas. Legislature.
Title: Constitutional conventions records
Dates: 1845, 1860-1861, 1866-1871, 1875, undated
Abstract: Collection consists of the records of the Texas constitutional conventions of 1845, 1860, 1866, 1868-1869 and 1875 and include accounts, bids, a constitution, contracts, correspondence, declarations, a directory, drafts, journals, lists, memorials, messages, an oath, ordinances, petitions, proceedings, proclamations, protests, reports, resolutions, ledgers and vouchers, dated 1845, 1860-1861, 1866-1871, 1875 and undated.
Quantity: 5.02 cubic ft., 6 volume
Language: These materials are written predominately in English.
Repository: Texas State Archives
Sponsor: This EAD finding aid was created in cooperation with Texas Archival Resources Online.

History of the Texas Constitutional Conventions of 1845, 1860, 1866, 1868-1869 and 1875

Annexation by the United States was strongly approved by Texas voters in September 1836 at the first general election following independence. Opposition to slavery, constitutional questions and fear of war with Mexico caused U.S. President Martin Van Buren to reject the idea. Fearful of British overtures to Texas, U.S. President John Tyler secured passage of a joint resolution on March 1, 1845, offering Texas statehood under certain conditions. Tyler's successor, James K. Polk, was elected on a platform that included the annexation of Texas as the twenty-eighth state in the Union. Polk dispatched special agents to Texas to stir public opinion in favor of the merger. Bowing to American pressures and to quell rumors that he was opposed to annexation, Republic of Texas's president Anson Jones directed that a convention of popularly elected delegates assemble at Austin on July 4, 1845 to frame a state constitution. Twenty-one delegates assembled in Austin and unanimously elected Thomas Jefferson Rusk as president of the convention. James Hervey Raymond was selected as secretary. From July 4 until August 28, 1845, the delegates labored to frame a constitution acceptable to the United States. According to Andrew Jackson Donelson, the American charge d'affaires, the convention was determined to introduce "nothing questionable or novel" and the new constitution was a very conservative document. The constitution and the question of annexation were submitted to the voters on October 13, 1845. Participation was sparse, but both measures passed by an overwhelming margin. There were later complaints that voting viva voce had discouraged opposition to the measure. The U.S. Congress approved the Texas Constitution on December 29, 1845, the legal date of annexation. The transfer of authority from Republic to State ocurred on February 16, 1846.

Following the presidential election of 1860, numerous petitions were forwarded to Governor Sam Houston requesting a special session of the Texas legislature to consider secession from the rest of the nation. When Houston refused, a group of secessionist leaders including Oran M. Roberts, John S. Ford and George Flournoy called on the people of Texas to elect delegates to a convention to meet in the capital on January 28, 1861. Most of the counties responded, and 177 members assembled in Austin to consider that course. The first session of the Secession Convention extended from January 28 to February 4. The delegates passed an ordinance of secession, which was submitted to the voters on February 23 and elected representatives to a convention of Southern states in Montgomery, Alabama. During the interval from February 4 to March 2, a body of fifteen known as the Committee of Public Safety acted for the Convention. A second session assembled on March 2 and canvassed the returns of the referendum, which overwhelmingly favored separation from the United States. On March 5 an ordinance was adopted uniting Texas with the Confederate states. When Governor Houston refused to take an oath of allegiance to the new government, the Convention declared the office vacant and administered the oath of office to Lieutenant Governor Edmund Clark. Delegates ratified the Constitution of the Confederate States of America on March 23, and the Convention adjourned sine die three days later.

The Constitutional Convention of 1866 was called to meet the requirements set forth by the United States for Texas's reentry into the Union. Responding to a call of Provisional Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton, elected delegates assembled in Austin on February 7 to revise the Texas Constitution. The minimum requirements of Presidential Reconstruction Act were outlined by the governor in his executive message of February 10, that is the right of secession must be abrogated; freedmen should be protected in their rights of person and property; and the war debt should be repudiated. James Webb Throckmorton, a former Confederate soldier who had initially opposed secession, was elected president of the Convention. The question of the right of a state to secede sparked an extended debate. African-American suffrage was opposed by most delegates, although acquiescence to the Thirteenth Amendment (abolition of slavery) was unanimous. The war debt was repudiated, but counties were authorized to extend loans to war ravaged businesses to expedite economic recovery. Public education for Anglo-Americans and African-Americans, endowment of a university and support of eleemosynary institutions were also approved by the delegates. The Constitution of 1866 was a modification of earlier constitutions. It increased the governor's term and his salary. Representation and per diem of legislators also increased, and, for the first time in Texas's history, five years' residency was requisite for holding legislative office. Voter participation for ratification was sparse, and the constitution was approved by a small margin. This was later attributed to aversion to reunion with the North and the dissatisfaction of many citizens over the large increases in the salaries of public officials.

The Constitutional Convention of 1868-1869 was called by the commander of the U.S. Fifth Military District in compliance with the Congressional Reconstruction Acts. Delegates were popularly elected, but the majority of registered voters refused to participate. The Convention assembled in Austin on June 1, 1868. Delegates included Edmund J. Davis, Lemuel D. Evans, Andrew Jackson Hamilton, R.K. Smith, G.T. Ruby, Colbert Caldwell and 83 others. Although a few were jurists and legislators, most of the members had no political or legal experience. Progress toward framing a constitution was delayed because of factionalism and involvement in many matters over which they had no jurisdiction - chartering railroads and businesses, debating a division of Texas, commitment of lunatics and a suppression of lawlessness. On August 31, the Convention was forced to adjourn for want of funds. A special tax was passed, and a second session convened on December 7, 1868. This secession adjourned on February 8, 1869 after devoting only ten days to the task for which it had convened. The partially assembled constitution was signed by half of the original ninety delegates, although it was approved by a substantial majority at the general election held from November 30 to December 3, 1869. It is estimated that half of the Anglo-American voters stayed away from the polls, while a large percentage of African-Americans participated.

The Constitutional Convention of 1875 was a consequence of the resumption of Democratic control of the state in 1872 and the resulting demand for a new constitution. The legislature called for an election to be held the first Monday in August 1875, at which the voters approved a constitutional convention and elected three delegates from each senatorial district to address the task. The Convention assembled in Austin on September 6, 1875 and met for eleven weeks, adjourning on November 11. The resulting document provided for shorter terms of office and lower salaries, and generally limited the powers of elected officials. The judiciary system was reorganized. County courts returned, and the legislature was empowered to establish criminal district courts. Supreme and district court judges were to be elected and their terms reduced. On February 15, 1876, the new constitution was ratified by the voters and remains the fundamental law of the land. As of October 27, 2015, the Constitution of 1876 had been modified by 484 amendments.

(Sources include: The original survey guide files created by TSLAC staff archivist Michael Green.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

Constitutional conventions held in Texas were formed to develop state constitutions. Records are the Texas constitutional conventions of 1845, 1860, 1866, 1868-1869 and 1875 and include accounts, bids, a constitution, contracts, correspondence, declarations, a directory, drafts, journals, lists, memorials, messages, an oath, ordinances, petitions, proceedings, proclamations, protests, reports, resolutions, ledgers and vouchers, dated 1845, 1860-1861, 1866-1871, 1875 and undated.

The records of the Annexation Convention include correspondence, presidential messages and proclamations, resolutions, petitions, lists of delegates and committees, committee reports, ordinances, protests, journals of proceedings, drafts of constitutional amendments and accounts, all dating 1845. Topics include conditions preliminary to peace with Mexico, annexation, the framing of a state constitution, the death of Kenneth L. Anderson (the last vice president of the Republic of Texas), courts, marriage, bill of rights, the formation of four new states from Texas, congressional appointment, education, women's rights, land ownership and colonization contracts. Prominent personalities appearing in these records include Anson Jones, Thomas J. Rusk, John Tyler, Hardin Runnels, Sam Houston, Thomas W. Ward, Andrew Jackson Donelson, Abner S. Lipscomb, Jose Antonio Navarro, George Fisher (Ribar), Isaac Van Zandt, John Hemphill, James S. Mayfield, Joseph Hogg, William Cazneau and others.

Secession Convention, dating 1860-1861 and undated, records include many ordinances and working papers. However, most of the material relates to military and diplomatic activities. These records are ordinances, journals, petitions, recommendations and requests for military appointments, committee reports and reports of military forces in the field, muster rolls and lists of delegates and ordinances and communications from other Southern states. Events referenced in the record are the surrender of General David E. Twiggs; the capture of the schooner Henry Dodge; the abandonment of Fort Clark; the surrender of Camp Cooper; the Montgomery (Alabama) Convention; the return of the revolutionary cannon the "Twin Sisters"; the design of the Confederate flag and history of the Lone Star banner; and the secession of Alabama and Louisiana. Prominent persons associated with the records are Sam Houston, Oran Milo Roberts, J.C. Robertson, Joel D. Sayers, John Salmon "Rip" Ford, Edward Clark, Benjamin and Henry Eustace McCulloch, David Emanuel Twiggs, Joseph L. Hogg, Samuel A. Maverick, Pryor Lea, William Polk "Gotch" Hardeman, George M. Flournoy, John A. Wharton, John Ireland, Isham Chisum, Santos Benavides, John Henry Brown, Horace Randall, Howell Cobb, William Beck Ochiltree, William R. "Dirty Shirt" Scurry, Thomas N. Waul, Sackfield Maclin, John H. Reagan, Tandy Walker, W.P. Rogers and others.

The records of the Convention of 1866 consist of constitutional amendments, ordinances, committee reports, resolutions, and appropriations, dating 1866. Record forms are both printed and handwritten with the latter predominating. Subjects include: Congressional districting, Native American depredations, abolition of slavery, African-American franchise, judiciary reform, war debts, county loans to business and industry, elections, back pay for Texas State Troops, the validity of secession and acts of the legislature from 1861-1865 and an appropriation for the relief of Margaret Moffette Lea Houston, widow of Sam Houston. Prominent individuals associated with the records are James Webb Throckmorton, Albert Hamilton Latimer, Hinche Parham Mabry, John Hancock, John Ireland, Hardin R. Runnels, James Wilson Henderson, Daniel Murchison, Isaiah Addison Paschal and Edmund J. Davis.

The records of the Convention of 1868-1869 contain declarations, resolutions, constitutional amendments, petitions, committee reports (majority and minority), State Treasurer's reports, oaths, executive messages, correspondence and a schedule of mileage, dating 1867-1871 and undated. Subjects include the judiciary, railroads, ferries and bridges, creation of new counties and relocation of county boundaries or seats, bankruptcy and imprisonment for debt, internal improvements, incorporations and charters, loyalty ("ironclad") oaths, lawlessness and crime, franchise, lease of the penitentiary, homesteading, the division of Texas, education, bounties for Union soldiers, mineral rights and constitutional revision.

Finally, a small number of the records of the Convention of 1875 are present, documenting most of the activities of that body during that year. Types of materials represented are ordinances, resolutions, articles, correspondence, committee reports and working papers, bids for printing, vouchers for postage, a contract and a petition. Subjects associated with the records are public schools, railroads, impeachment, homesteading, public lands and the General Land Office, the judiciary, suffrage, taxation and revenue, corporations and public printing of Convention proceedings. Persons associated with the records are Edward Bradford Pickett, John Henry Brown, John H. Reagan, John Salmon "Rip" Ford, E.S.C. Robertson, Joel W. Robertson, G.A. Sessions, Lawrence Sullivan Ross, John Wilkins Whitfield, William Pitt Ballinger and others.


 

Arrangement of the Records

These records are arranged into five series:
Annexation Convention records, 1845-1846, 0.58 cubic ft.
Secession Convention records, 1860-1861, undated, 1.72 cubic ft., 1 volume
Convention of 1866 records, 1866, 0.5 cubic feet
Convention of 1868-1869 records, 1867-1871, undated, 1.72 cubic ft., 4 volumes
Convention of 1875 records, 1875, 0.5 cubic ft., 1 volume

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Volume 2-7L/66 is too fragile for use. Please contact Archives staff for microfilm copy.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Some of the records may be too large and/or fragile to photocopy. Please see Archives staff for assistance.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Runnels, Hardin Richard--1820-1873.
Rusk, Thomas Jefferson--1803-1857.
Houston, Sam--1793-1863.
Van Zandt, Isaac--1813-1847.
Caldwell, Colbert--1822-1892.
Reynolds, Joseph Jones--1822-1899.
Ruby, George Thompson--1841–1882.
Flournoy, George M.--1832-1889.
Ford, John Salmon.
Roberts, Oran Milo--1815-1898.
Twiggs, David Emanuel--1790-1862.
Ballinger, William Pitt--1825-1888.
Brown, John Henry--1820-1895.
Pickett, Edward Bradford--1823-1882.
Ross, Lawrence Sullivan--1838–1898.
Hancock, John--1824-1893.
Houston, Margaret Moffette Lea--1819-1867.
Davis, Edmund Jackson--1827-1883.
Throckmorton, J.W. (James Webb)--1825-1894.
Corporate Names:
Texas Constitutional Convention (1845).
Texas Constitutional Convention (1860-1861).
Texas Constitutional Convention (1866).
Texas Constitutional Convention (1868-1869).
Texas Constitutional Convention (1875).
Subjects:
Constitional conventions--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Constitutional conventions.
Document Types:
Accounts--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845.
Reports--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1860-1861, 1866, 1868-1869, 1875.
Journals--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1868.
Ordinances--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1860-1861, 1866, 1868-1869, 1875.
Petitions--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1860.
Proceedings--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845.
Correspondence--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1860, 1871.
Protests--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845.
Resolutions--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1868-1869, 1845, 1860-1861, 1866.
Declarations--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1868-1869.
Messages--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1868.
Proclamations--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845.
Lists (document genre)--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1861.
Drafts--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845.
Memorials--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1845, 1860.
Oath--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1870.
Constitution--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1869.
Directory--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1875.
Bids--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1875.
Vouchers--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1875.
Contracts--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1875.
Ledgers--Texas--Constitutional conventions--1868-1869.
Functions:
Developing Texas constitutions.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Legislative Council records concerning the Constitutional Convention of 1974, 1973-1976, 8 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Edmund Jackson Davis records, 1869-1874, 15.5 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records, 1865-1866, 3.5 cubic ft.
Texas Governor John Ireland records, 1879-1887, bulk 1883-1887, 0.47 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Richard Coke records, 1873-1877, 2.5 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Edward Clark records, 1861, 2 cubic ft.
James W. Throckmorton papers, 1857-1940, bulk 1857-1897, 0.24 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Oran Milo Roberts records at the Texas State Archives, 1861-1883, bulk 1878-1883, 8.46 cubic ft.
Texas Governor James Pinckney Henderson records, 1846-1847, 0.47 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Hardin Richard Runnels records, 1857-1859, 1.41 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Elisha Marshall Pease records of his third term, 1865-1869, undated, bulk 1867-1869, 3.25 cubic ft.
Texas Constitutional Convention of 1836 records, 1836, 7.5 inches
Texas Constitutional Convention of 1974 records, 1974-1975, 177 cubic ft.
Texas Governor Sam Houston records at the Texas State Archives, 1824-1862, bulk 1859-1861, 2.5 cubic ft.
Texas Legation (U.S.) correspondence, 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, undated, bulk 1836-1839, 4.75 cubic ft.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas Constitutional Convention records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1932/002, unknown, 1932/003, probably 1932/004, 1935/001

Most records of the Annexation Convention were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on September 28, 1932. Other records of the Annexation Convention were received from the same agency at an unknown date. Other Constitutional Convention records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on October 20, 1932; December 21, 1932; and June 11, 1936.

Processing Information

Individual folder contents descriptions created by Texas Secretary of State staff, unknown date

Processed and initial finding aid created by Michael Green, June 1983

Description and DACS compliance by Jessica Tucker, October 2015


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Annexation Convention records, 1845-1846,
0.58 cubic ft.

At the direction of Republic of Texas's president Anson Jones, the Annexation Convention was formed to frame a Texas constitution state constitution. Bowing to American pressures and to quell rumors that he was opposed to annexation, directed that a convention of popularly elected delegates assemble at Austin on July 4, 1845 to frame a state constitutionRecords of the Annexation Convention date 1845-1846 and include correspondence, presidential messages and proclamations, resolutions, petitions, lists of delegates and committees, committee reports, ordinances, protests, journals of proceedings, drafts of constitutional amendments, and accounts. Topics include conditions preliminary to peace with Mexico, annexation, the framing of a state constitution, the death of Kenneth L. Anderson (last vice president of the Republic of Texas), courts, marriage, bill of rights, the formation of four new states from Texas, congressional appointment, education, women's rights, land ownership and colonization contracts. Prominent personalities appearing in these records include Anson Jones, Thomas J. Rusk, John Tyler, Hardin Runnels, Sam Houston, Thomas W. Ward, Andrew Jackson Donelson, Abner S. Lipscomb, Jose Antonio Navarro, George Fisher (Ribar), Isaac Van Zandt, John Hemphill, James S. Mayfield, Joseph Hogg, William Cazneau and others. The scope of these records reaches beyond the events of the convention and includes materials relative to U.S. and Texan diplomatic and legislative activities prior to the convention.
Arrangement
The records are arranged roughly in chronological order.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Annexation Convention records, Texas Constitutional Convention records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1932/002, unknown
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on September 28, 1932. Other records of the Annexation Convention were received from the same agency at an unknown date.
Technical Requirements
Some of the records may be too large and/or fragile to photocopy. Please see Archives staff for assistance.
Box
2-8/911 Journals of the Committee of the Whole, July-August 1845
President's message with documents, June 28, 1845
Memorial of the citizens of Galveston with enclosure, July 7, 1845
List of committees of the Convention, July 7, 1845
Resolution in introduction of U.S. troops into Texas, July 7, 1845
Resolution of regrets on the death of K.L. Anderson, vice president of Texas, July 10, 1845
Report on the Committee of the Judiciary Department, July 12, 1845
Report of the Committee on the Legislative Department, July 14, 1845
An ordinance creating an election precinct in Fannin County for representatives, July 14, 1845
Report of Committee on General Provisions and Bill of Rights, July 15, 1845
Committee report and resolutions in reference to the General Land Office, July 9, 1845
Communications from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, August 5, 1845
Report of the Judiciary Committee in relation to the establishment of a Chancery Court, August 8, 1845
Report of the Judiciary Committee on Marriage, August 9, 1845
Report of the Judiciary Committee in reference to the judiciary article, August 9, 1845
Report of the Judiciary Committee on the formation of four new states out of Texas, August 12, 1845
Report of the Committee on the Legislative Department on seventh section of the same, August 12, 1845
Report of the Committee on Senatorial Appointments, August 14, 1845
Substitute for the first section, Legislative Department, August 14, 1845
An ordinance apportioning the state into two congressional districts, August 15, 1845
Report of the Judiciary recommending a substitute for the 18th section, General Provisions, August 16, 1845
Report of the Select Committee on the 18th Section, General Provisions, rights of women, 1845
Protest of J.L. Mayfield and John D. Anderson against the first section of the Legislative Article, August 19, 1845
Communications from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, August 20, 1845
Report of the Committee on Education, August 20, 1845
An ordinance in relation to colonization contracts and committee report, August 21, 1845
Report of the Committee on Education and articles on education, August 23, 1845
Report of George Fisher and distribution of certain documents, August 30, 1845
Box
2-8/912 Proposals for printing and reports, July-August 1845
(Reports of the Committee on) Privileges and Elections - petitions to the Convention, July-August 1845
Assorted resolutions and committee reports, July-August 1845
[2 folders]
Expenditures of the Annexation Convention, August 1845, February 1846



 

Secession Convention records, 1860-1861, undated,
1.72 cubic ft. and 1 volume

The Secession Convention was formed in response to the numerous petitions forwarded to Governor Sam Houston requesting a special session of the Texas legislature to consider secession from the rest of the United States. The Secession Convention records include many ordinances and working papers. The preponderance of the material relates to military and diplomatic activities coincident with the time period. These records fall into the following types: ordinances, journals, petitions, recommendations and requests for military appointments, committee reports and reports of military forces in the field, muster rolls and lists of delegates and ordinances and communications from other Southern states. Events referenced in the record are the surrender of General David E. Twiggs; the capture of the schooner Henry Dodge; the abandonment of Fort Clark; the surrender of Camp Cooper; the Montgomery (Alabama) Convention; the return of the revolutionary cannon, the "Twin Sisters"; the design of the Confederate flag and history of the Lone Star banner; and the secession of Alabama and Louisiana. Prominent persons associated with the records are Sam Houston, Oran Milo Roberts, J.C. Robertson, Joel D. Sayers, John Salmon "Rip" Ford, Edward Clark, Benjamin and Henry Eustace McCulloch, David Emanuel Twiggs, Joseph L. Hogg, Samuel A. Maverick, Pryor Lea, William Polk "Gotch" Hardeman, George M. Flournoy, John A. Wharton, John Ireland, Isham Chisum, Santos Benavides, John Henry Brown, Horace Randall, Howell Cobb, William Beck Ochiltree, William R. "Dirty Shirt" Scurry, Thomas N. Waul, Sackfield Maclin, John H. Reagan, Tandy Walker, W.P. Rogers and others.
Arrangement
Records are arranged in a numerical filing system created by the Texas Secretary of State.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Secession Convention, Texas Constitutional Convention records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1935/001, probably 1932/004
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on June 11, 1936. A copy of the ordinance of secession of the State of Louisiana was transferred on December 21, 1932 from the same agency.
Technical Requirements
Some of the records may be too large and/or fragile to photocopy. Please see Archives staff for assistance.
Box
2-8/912 Memorials and petitions to Governor Sam Houston for convening a special session of the legislature, 1860:
Austin County
Bosque County
Bexar County
Bell County
Brazoria County
Brown County
Burleson County
Calhoun County
Coryell County
Dallas County
Freestone County
Galveston County
Gonzales County
Grimes County
Guadalupe County
Harris County
[2 folders]
Box
2-8/913 Hays County
Henderson County
Hill County
Hopkins County
Karnes County
Lavaca County
Leon County
Limestone County
Llano County
Live Oak County
Madison County
Matagorda County
McLennan County
Montgomery County
Navarro County
Robertson County
Rusk County
Rusk, Cherokee County
Tarrant County
Walker County
Wharton County
County unknown (the portion of the document containing the name of the county has been torn)
An Ordinance to dissolve the union of the state of Texas and the other States, united under the compact styled "The Constitution of the United States of America," February 1861
Report of the committee on credentials, undated
Various ordinances, adopted March 19, 1861
Various ordinances adopted on March 12, 1861
An ordinance in relation to a union of the state of Texas with the Confederate States of America, March 1861
Ordinances pertaining to the oath to be taken by members of the legislature and all officers of the state government, March 1861
Letter recommending James Walker as a suitable person to raise a company, March 1861
An ordinance that the President of the Convention be instructed to correspond with the proper authorities in Arkansas and Mississippi to appoint commissioners to cooperate with the Texas commissioners in their mission to the Indian nations (specifying Creek, Chickasaw, Cherokee, and Choctaw), February 1861
Recommendation for the appointment of a local commissary, April 24, 1861
Muster roll of Bayou City guards (and related correspondence), March 3, 1861
Ordinances to provide for the continuance of the state government, March 1861
Box
2-8/914 Various ordinances, March 23, 1861, undated
Request for the Commission to raise a company of Rangers, March 4, 1861
Ordinance providing for the continuance of customs officers and customs revenue, March 1861
Letter from Robert Crawford requesting the appointment of colonel of a Texas regiment, March 15, 1861
Letter from G.W. Campbell to the Long Point Company, February 4, 1861
Letter from E. Cushing recommending Captain J.C. Stafford to the Honorable John Henry Brown, March 20, 1861
Recommendations of William Jackson as enrolling officer, March 12, 1861
Letter from Andrew Daly applying for position of field officer in one of the regiments, March 19, 1861
Letter from B.H. Davis recommending J.D. Sayers for the position of captain in the service, March 8, 1861
Letter from Captain John Donelson wishing to be retained in the service, April 17, 1861
Substitute ordinance to provide for the enrollment, publication and preservation of the ordinances of the Convention, March 9, 1861
An ordinance to confer jurisdiction over the forts, Navy yards, Arsenals and Light Houses in the State upon the Confederate States, March 20, 1861
An ordinance relative to the debts and liabilities of the Convention, March 19, 1861
An ordinance concerning arms, quartermaster's and commissary's stores recently surrendered to the State of Texas, March 12, 1861
An ordinance to amend section 1, article 7 of the General Provisions of the State Constitution, March 14, 1861
An ordinance to amend the first and second sections of article 3 of the Constitution of the State of Texas, March 22, 1861
An ordinance relating to the removal of U.S. troops from the limits of the State of Texas, about March 1861
Edward Conway reports the Red Star Guard Rifles ready for service, March 29, 1861
Recommending Major Henry King to raise a company of Rangers, March 19, 1861
James H. Fry tenders services to the Convention, February 4, 1861
Respecting public property, March 5, 1861
To ratify the Constitution of the Confederate States of America, March 23, 1861
Concerning certain Commissioners appointed by this Convention to the Indian Nations, 1861
Specifying the ordinances of the Convention which shall be subject to Legislative action, March 18, 1861
Concerning the suits, records, and papers which pertained to the Federal Courts in Texas, March 2, 1861
J.H. Griffin reports 85 men ready for service, February 18, 1861
E. F. Gray tenders his services to the Convention, March 5, 1861
That the delegates to the Congress of the Confederate States are authorized to act in paid Congress, as duly accredited Representatives of the State of Texas, 1861
To provide, in part, for the Military defence of the State, March 1861
To authorize the purchase of Arms for the use of the State, March 9, 1861
R.B. Halley reports Salado Infantry ready for service, 1861
That the Convention proceed to elect seven Delegates to represent the State of Texas in the Convention of Slave-holding States at Montgomery, Alabama, February 4, 1861
Archie Hart wants arms to equip a company, April 18, 1861
W.C. Hart wants a commission to raise a company, April 29, 1861
W.J. Herbert applies for a commission to raise a company, April 16, 1861
J.D. Holliday wants authority from Convention to raise a company, March 2, 1861
An ordinance prescribing the mode of election to be held for the rejection or ratification of the ordinance of separation of the State of Texas from the United States of America, February 1, 1861
To transfer to the Government of the Confederate States the property lately acquired by Texas from the U.S., 1861
A. Horton reports company ready for service, February 25, 1861
M.D.K. Taylor to O.M. Roberts, President of Convention, with the Secession Ordinance of the State of Alabama, January 30, 1861
To repeal in part Section 2, Article 10, of the Constitution, and other purposes, 1861
To amend Article 7 of the Constitution, March 23, 1861
Colonel N. H. Darnell wishes military appointment, 1861
J.E. Kirby recommends Captain M.K. Snell for military appointment, February 28, 1861
P.R. Kyle application for an appointment, March 21, 1861
Henry Kyle and others of Fort Bend County ask for arms, March 5, 1861
Pryor Lea recommending that a Company in Goliad County be received and armed, February 7, 1861
Ordinance making appropriations demanded by the extraordinary condition of the country and defray the expenses of the Convention, March 19, 1861
J.W. Morgan tenders a company for Rio Grande service, April 1, 1861
W.T. Mechling, special order 7, requiring Lieutenant Benton to repair with his command to the post assigned him, March 1, 1861
W.T. Mechling authority to B.E. Benton to raise and command 20 men, February 21, 1861
Letter stating the muster roll of a Mexican company is enclosed, March 6, 1861
William M. Meyrout relative to arms for a company of volunteers, March 18, 1861
C.L. McCarty recommending Aaron Burns for a company, March 7, 1861
James Wilcox wishes military appointment, March 14, 1861
Box
2-8/915 C.L. McCarty reports the schooner Henry Dodge captured, March 3, 1861
Report of Captain James Oaks, U.S.A., concerning troubles with the Indians, February 26, 1861
Levy C. Harly tenders his services as naval officer, February 25, 1861
A.B. McDonald and others wish to know if the state is able to arm companies called into service, March 6, 1861
A.L. McNeill, U.S.A., tenders his services to the State of Texas, March 2, 1861
H.W. Allen in reference to the cannons known as the "Twin Sisters", March 7, 1861
Jas. L. Hogg reports a company of 100 men ready for service, February 3, 1861
Copy of a letter addressed to Captain T.T. Teel of the Texas State Troops from Don Luis Moisquez in Piedras Negras, Mexico, March 27, 1861
A. Neill offers a company, 1861
A.J. Nicholson wants W.E. Daily appointed surgeon, April 23, 1861
S.C. Olive wants authority to enroll a company, April 20, 1861
Henry Pendarvis reports muster roll of Port Sullivan Grays, March 5, 1861
W.R. Beadfute tenders his services, March 8, 1861
Dr. James Walker wishes position in the Texas Army, 1861
Captain James Paul wishes to raise a company, 1861
E.B. Nichols to President of the Convention regarding the departure of U.S. troops from Texas, March 15, 1861
Petition recommending Peter Hardeman as enrolling officer, 1861
Petition recommending P.M. Walling of Henderson County as enrolling officer, 1861
Petition recommending Isaac C. Stafford of Harris County as enrolling officer, 1861
Petition recommending H.A. Hamner as enrolling officer, March 21, 1861
J.A. DeCourey to enroll company, 1861
C.L. Pyron asks appointment as enrolling officer, 1861
Petition recommending Santos Benavides for Captaincy, March 19, 1861
Horace Randall of the U.S.A. offers his services to the State, December 30, 1861
Resolution of the Convention accepting the services of Lieutenant James P. Flewellen, 1861
Ben McCulloch to President of the Convention telling him that he is going on to Montgomery and explains to Congress the necessity of more troops for protection of Texas frontier, March 12, 1861
Cornelius Rich wants captaincy, April 17, 1861
Charles M. Martin wants a captaincy, 1861
Howell Cobb transmits copy of the Constitution of the Confederate States to the President of the Texas Convention, March 1861
O.M. Roberts transmits letters relative to an officer in the Army (Randall), February 4, 1861
O.M. Roberts encloses muster rolls, etc. relative to frontier defense, 1861
O.M. Roberts encloses application of Captain Redwood, May 9, 1861
W.F. Rogers regarding the schooner Henry Dodge, 1861
Thomas Rock tenders a company from Tyler County, February 25, 1861
H.R. Runnels and others recommending Jonathan Russell as enrolling officer, March 19, 1861
E.B. Scarborough et al. recommending James W. Bennett of Limestone County as enrolling officer, 1861
C.F. Forshey of the Texas Military Institute, Fayette County, regarding the Texas flag, 1861
John Gregg and W.B. Ochiltree (delegates to the Congress of the Confederate States), their report of the reception, etc., 1861
W.R. Scurry has command of a Company, 1861
H. Wickland wants the Turner Rifles received, April 20, 1861
Mo. A. Wilcox wants permission to raise a Regiment in Western Texas, April 19, 1861
C.W. Winn applies for Lieutenancy in the Texas Army, March 5, 1861
Thomas Rock tenders a company from Tyler County, February 25, 1861
Jonathan Russell asks to be an enrolling officer, March 19, 1861
James W. Bennett asks appointment as an enrolling officer, March 19, 1861
C.F. Forshey of Texas Military Institute, Fayette County, regarding Texas flag, March 1, 1861
John Gregg and W.B. Ochiltree, delegates to Congress of Confederate States, their report of reception, etc. February 23, March 16, 1861
W.R. Scurry relative to his command of a company, 1861
H. Wickland wants the Turner Rifles received, April 20, 1861
J.A. Wilcox asks permission to raise a regiment in Western Texas, April 19, 1861
C.W. Winn applies for Lieutenancy in Texas Army, March 5, 1861
O.G. Welch asks for arms, March 13, 1861
Letter to Fort Martin Scott, March 19, 1861
Relative to the U.S. mail contractors in the state of Texas, March 14, 1861
Relative to Nacodoches Rifle men, March 2, 1861
B.F. Terry to Thomas S. Lubbock relative to the Fort Bend rifles, February 3, 1861
John Mullen tenders services of Island City Rifles, February 4, 1861
W.A. Wallace reports a company in Bexar County ready for service, March 10, 1861
J.M. Branaugh tenders his services, 1861
O.M. Roberts to G.W. Chilton requesting him to present certain ordinances to Governor Houston, March 14, 1861
G.W. Chilton to O.M. Roberts telling of his interview with Governor Houston when he delivered certain ordinances of the Convention to him, March 13, 1861
Reply of Governor Houston regarding the ordinance of secession, March 5 and 6, 1861
O.M. Roberts to Sam Houston appointing a day when Governor Houston shall take the oath prescribed by the Convention, March 14, 1861
Captain W.T. Mechling tenders his services, March 4, 1861
Box
2-8/916 F.S. Bass, muster roll of the Marshall Guards, 1861
T.T. Teel asks that his company may be mustered into service, March 29, 1861
Captain T.T. Teel on the surrender of Fort Clark, March 27, 1861
Andrew Daly tenders his services as a field officer, March 19, 1861
Adjutant General, declining to give information to the Convention, March 12, 1861
Colonel John S. Ford reports the U.S. troops leaving the State, public property being turned over to the Commissioners, Indian and Mexican affairs, March 13, 1861
Howell Cobb says the Confederate constitution has been completed and will forward a copy soon, March 9, 1861
T.N. Ward transmitting a letter from L.P. Walkin (secretary of war) relating to military affairs in Texas, February 23, 1861
J.H. Murray recommends Jas. T. Hunter for a position in the Texas Army and advises the deposition of "Old Sam," March 16, 1861
Captain Henry E. McCulloch and Captain E.W. Roberts, surrender of Camp Cooper, March 7-12, 1861
George Williamson relative to arms for State Troops and the "Twin Sisters, " March 13, 1861
Sackfield Maclin (Adjutant General of Texas) relative to Indian depredations, March 16, 1861
Index of letters to the Convention, 1861
Copy of the resolution for the Confederate Congress providing for incorporating the officers who may have resigned from the U.S. Army and Navy into the Confederate Army and Navy, February 13, 1861
Ordinance providing for receiving into state service all non-commissioned officers and soldiers who are residents of Texas on March 2, 1861 who may desire to enter the same, 1861
Ordinance to raise money to defray the extraordinary expenses arising from the condition of affairs and to pay the expenses of the Convention with amendments, 1861
List of the members of the Committee on Public Safety, 1861
S.P. Hollingsworth, commissioner to Montgomery, report with enclosures, letter to Postmaster General Reagan relative to mail matters and his reply, March 16-23, 1861
Ordinance to declare the sense of this Convention on slavery, March 7, 1861
Committee on Federal Relations, resolutions, oaths, and flag, 1861
An ordinance to punish treason and report to the Committee thereon, 1861
O.M. Roberts on the situation, expects a long war, transmits documents from Tandy Walker, chief of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, relative to the situation, April 10, 1861
Ordinance of Secession - Louisiana, 1861
Ordinance to provide for the appointment of delegates to a convention to form a Southern Confederacy (Louisiana), January 29, 1861
Item
Broadside 522 Ordinance of Secession
Box
2-7/379 Record of the Journal of the Convention of the People of Texas at Austin, withdrawing from the Union and joining the Confederacy, January 28, 1861



 

Convention of 1866 records, 1866,
0.5 cubic ft.

The Constitutional Convention of 1866 was formed to develop a Texas constitution to meet the requirements set forth by the United States for Texas's reentry into the Union. The records of the Convention of 1866 consist of constitutional amendments, ordinances, committee reports, resolutions, and appropriations. Record forms are both printed and handwritten with the latter predominating. Subjects include Congressional districting, Native American depredations, abolition of slavery, African-American franchise, judiciary reform, war debts, county loans to business and industry, elections, back pay for Texas State Troops, the validity of secession and acts of the legislature from 1861-1865, and an appropriation for the relief of Margaret Moffette Lea Houston. Prominent individuals associated with the records are: James Webb Throckmorton, Albert Hamilton Latimer, Hinche Parham Mabry, John Hancock, John Ireland, Hardin R. Runnels, James Wilson Henderson, Daniel Murchison, Isaiah Addison Paschal, and Edmund J. Davis.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by topic.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Convention of 1866 records, Texas Constitutional Convention records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1935/001
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on June 11, 1936.
Box
2-8/916 An ordinance making an appropriation for the per diem pay of members and per diem pay of the officers of the Convention, 1866
Amend Article 3 of the State Constitution, February 15, 1866
To amend the Constitution relating to Supreme and District judges and their salaries, February 17, 1866
Papers pertaining to reports and ordinances restricting actions of the Convention, February 17, 1866
To divide the state into Congressional districts, February 19, 1866
Preamble and resolutions relating to Indians, March 21, 1866
Ordinance-per diem and mileage, March 23, 1866
Resolution - printing and contingent expenses, March 7, 1866
Article 8 of the Constitution regarding slavery, March 13, 1866
Amending Article 6 of the Constitution, creating criminal court, March 22, 1866
Declaring the Ordinance of Secession null and void, 1866
Amending Section 33 of the Constitution, March 8, 1866
Article 10 - education, March 26, 1866
Committee reports, March 3, 1866
Article 6, judicial department, March 21, 1866
Box
2-8/917 Ordinance declaring war debt void, March 2, 1866
Substitute for Article 3 of the Constitution, March 16, 1866
Appropriating $3,158.56, amount shown by Comptroller's report to be still due troops and for which warrants have not been issued, March 21, 1866
Executive department, March 23, 1866
Resolution relating to the salary of Governor Sam Houston, March 27, 1866
Defining the Constitution of the State of Texas, March 27, 1866
Relating to the election of State and other officers, meeting of the Legislature, March 22, 1866
Requiring assessment and collection of taxes for the year 1866, March 29, 1866
Making additional appropriations for additional expenses, March 29, 1866
Appropriating money to defray the expenses of delegates at Washington City, March 29, 1866
Authorizing counties, etc., to lend their credit to companies, corporations, etc., March 29, 1866
For the certification of the amendments to the Constitution, March 29, 1866
Making valid the laws and acts of officers therein mentioned and for other purposes, March 30, 1866
Striking out certain articles of the Constitution of 1845, March 31, 1866
Relative to the election of State, District and County officers, March 31, 1866
Prescribing mode of calling a Convention, March 31, 1866
Amending Section 10, Article 7, General Provisions, March 31, 1866
To equalize labor and make uniform terms of judicial districts, March 31, 1866
For the relief of the people of Orange County, March 31, 1866
Validating certain warrants issued for Frontier Service, March 31, 1866
Substitute for Section 37, General Provisions, Internal Improvements, March 31, 1866
Appropriating $5000 for contingent expenses, April 2, 1866
Securing school and university funds, April 2, 1866
Substitution for Section 34, Article 7 of the Constitution, March 26, 1866
Amending Section 9 of the Bill of Rights, March 23, 1866
Amending Section 8 of the Bill of Rights, March 26, 1866
Defining caption for the new Constitution, March 31, 1866
Relating to mines, minerals, etc., General Provisions, Section 39, March 17, 1866
Providing for a division of the state, April 2, 1866
Ordinance in relation to debt contracted by counties in support of the late Civil War and report of the Committee thereon, March 1866
Ordinance to prevent suits (civil or criminal) for official acts performed since February 2, 1861, March 12, 1866
Confederate money, rule of evidence in relation to suits and report of Committee, February 28, 1866
Ordinance to annul the proceedings of the Secession Convention, 1866
Ordinance relative to the Blind Asylum, March 27, 1866



 

Convention of 1868-1869 records, 1867-1871, undated,
1.72 cubic ft. and 4 volumes

The Constitutional Convention of 1868-1869 was called by the commander of the U.S. Fifth Military District to comply with the Congressional Reconstruction Acts. The records of the Convention of 1868-1869 contain declarations, resolutions, constitutional amendments, petitions, committee reports (majority and minority), State Treasurer's reports, oaths, executive messages, correspondence, and a schedule of mileage, dating 1867-1871 and undated.
Subjects include: the judiciary, railroads, ferries and bridges, creation of new counties and relocation of county boundaries or seats, bankruptcy and imprisonment for debt, internal improvements, incorporations and charters, loyalty ("ironclad") oaths, lawlessness and crime, franchise, lease of the penitentiary, homesteading, the division of Texas, education, bounties for Union soldiers, mineral rights, and constitutional revision.
Persons associated with the records are Edmund Jackson Davis, J.J. Reynolds, J.H. Lippard, G.T. Ruby, Andrew Jackson Hamilton, Lemuel Dale Evans, R.K. Smith, Colbert Caldwell, Edward R.S. Canby, Martin D. Hart, Julius Schutze, James Armstrong, F.W. Sumner, C.H. Bryant, Elisha M. Pease and others.
Arrangement
These records are arranged chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Records of the Convention of 1868-1869, Texas Constitutional Convention. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1932/003, 1935/001
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on October 20, 1932 and June 11, 1936.
Box
2-8/917 Reports, petitions and miscellaneous records, September 1867
Resolution requesting mileage, January 5, 1868
Report from the Committee on State Affairs, June 12, 1868
Resolution of Grimes County pertaining to Richard Fortie, June 18, 1868
Resolution on the taxation of imported machinery for manufacturing, June 22, 1868
Evans of McLennan County, Memorial, July 17, 1868
Patton resolution referring report of the Committee on the Penitentiary to Governor E.M. Pease, August 3, 1868
Declaration changing the boundary of Comal County and committee report thereon, August 8, 1868
Resolution requiring the reported to report on all debates, August 6, 1868
Communication from Post No. 1 Grand Army of the Republic with accompanying resolution, 1868
Resolutions and declarations of the Committee on Engrossed Provisions, August 20, 1868
Declaration to lease the penitentiary, August 25, 1868
Report from the Special Committee on the Condition of the State, December 26, 1868
Report of the Committee on Education and resolution on the Committee on General Provisions, December 23, 1868
Minority report of the Committee on the Condition of the State, December 28, 1868
Judiciary report, 1868
Minority report of the Committee on Contingent Expenses respecting payment to Flakes bulletin, January 4, 1869
Report of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries regarding San Jacinto County, January 5, 1869
Declaration for the New Orleans, Mobile and Chattanooga Company, January 8, 1869
Report of the Special Committee on Back Pay due Convention members, January 7, 1869
Report of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries regarding Bexar County, January 13, 1869
Report of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries regarding Wilson and Guadalupe Counties, January 13, 1869
Box
2-8/918 Report of the Special Committee on Mileage with accompanying resolution, January 19, 1869
Declaration incorporating the Rock Bridge and Turnpike Company, January 23, 1869
Declaration incorporating the Ship Channel and Bolivar Point Company, January 28, 1869
Report of the majority of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries, January 29, 1869
Reports of the Committees on Public Lands, December 17, 1868, January 7, 1869
Report of the Committee on Education - provisions respecting education, January 7, 1869
A Declaration regarding the Austin Bridge Company, January 22, 1869
Thomas resolution rejecting potential division of the state of Texas, January 16, 1869
Report of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries, January 18, 1869
Report of the Special Committee appointed to revise the Engrossed Constitution, January 26, 1869
Report of the Committee on Counties and County Boundaries regarding Peebles County, January 22, 1869
Report of the Special Committee on Mr. Sumner's Case, January 27, 1869
Report of the Special Committee on Printing Journals, January 30, 1869
McCormick substitute to report to the Special Committee on Printing Journals, January 30, 1869
Document of the Special Committee on the Expulsion of McSumner, February 6, 1868
Declaration Incorporating the Brenham Mutual Life Insurance Company, February 2, 1869
Oath of Peter Johnson as Clerk of the District Court of Presidio County, October 28, 1870
Letter of Moses E. Kelly of Presidio County, May 8, 1871
Report of the Committee on Style Adopted, undated
Assorted drafts, undated
[2 folders]
Message of Governor Pease to the Convention, June 3, 1868
Enquiring into the condition of the General Land Office, June 8, 1868
To prevent the collection of debts accruing before the first day of June, June 11, 1868
Regarding the collection of the fees of the officers of the court, June 12, 1868
Committee on Lawlessness and Crime authorized to employ a clerk, June 13, 1868
To suspend sheriffs and constables sales, temporarily, in the state, June 13, 1868
That the Legislature may establish new counties for the convenience of the inhabitants, June 13, 1868
Tendering Major General Reynolds a sufficient number of loyal men for the suppression of lawless and crime, June 13, 1868
Box
2-8/919 Authorizing 90 copies of the map of Texas to be furnished for the use of the Convention, June 13, 1868
Ask that the Commanding General of the Fifth Military District order the appropriation of $125 from the State Treasury, June 13, 1868
Regarding forced sales of land, June 15, 1868
Declaring null and void the Ordinance of Secession, prohibiting the payment of debts incurred in aid of the Rebellion, and repealing laws against persons of color, June 15, 1868
Regarding taxation, June 15, 1868
Sections to be included in the judicial department of the Constitution, June 15, 1868
Disenfranchising certain classes herein named, June 16, 1868
All male persons of 21 years of age of foreign birth shall, on taking the oath of allegiance to the U.S., be allowed suffrage, June 16, 1868
Requesting Governor Pease to procure a frame to contain the portrait of Sam Houston, June 16, 1868
Appropriating $25,000 to be used by the Governor in the apprehension of lawless and desperate persons, June 17, 1868
Disenfranchising all editors and publishers of newspapers advocating secession and 'rebellion' prior to and during the war, June 17, 1868
All males arriving at the age of maturity after July 4, 1876 who are unable to read and write the Constitution of the U.S. shall be debarred from suffrage, June 17, 1868
Appropriating $15,000 to pay the civil officers appointed by Governor A.J. Hamilton, June 17, 1868
Regarding the change of names of counties or towns by the Legislature, June 18, 1868
That no loyal minister of the Gospel shall be held ineligible to hold any office of honor or profit in the State, June 18, 1868
That the jurisdiction over the county of El Paso, the right of Public Domain be relinquished to the U.S. . . , June 22, 1868
That the President shall appoint a Committee whose duty it shall be to report to the Convention such citizens lobbying under political disabilities, June 23, 1868
Prescribing the penalty for conveying deadly weapons, June 23, 1868
Requiring the Legislature to establish in county a workhouse for the punishment and safekeeping of such offenders. . . , June 23, 1868
That no property qualifications shall ever be required in order to vote or hold office within this State, June 24, 1868
That all rights which the State may have to mineral substances. . . , June 24, 1868
That the County Courts shall be authorized to pledge the faith of their counties to aid in the construction of the railroads. . . , June 24, 1868
That every foreign born male who shall have resided 19 months in this state. . . , June 24, 1868
That it shall be the duty of the Legislature at its first resolution after the adoption of this Constitution. . . , June 24, 1868
That no individual will ever be debarred from the rights common to all citizens. . . , June 25, 1868
That it shall be a penal offense to disturb any religious or political meeting. . . , June 25, 1868
That no laws shall ever be enacted by the authority of Constitution of the state of Texas. . . , June 25, 1868
That burying grounds, schools, houses used exclusively for public worship, any institution of charitable or public purpose shall never be taxed, June 26, 1868
Whenever the State under the law shall be a party, plaintiff or defendant in any suit. . . , June 26, 1868
The social status of a citizen shall never be a legislation of this state, June 26, 1868
That one fourth of the annual tax. . . shall be dedicated to the education of the children of the state of Texas, June 27, 1868
That the Commission on General Provisions be requested to enquire into the propriety of engrafting. . . laws for the observance of the Christian Sabbath, June 27, 1868
Giving land to actual settlers, June 28, 1868
That no person shall ever be imprisoned for debt except in cases of fraud. . . , June 29, 1868
Appropriating a bounty of $100 to each enlisted man who was honorably discharged from the 1st and 2nd cavalry, June 29, 1868
That no person shall be deprived, by law, of the right to indulge in public or private recreation or pleasure any day of the week, June 1868
That all railroads holding charters that may be affected in their rights by a failure of the Biannual session. . . , June 29, 1868
That the Constitution as it existed in 1860 be committed to the Judiciary Committee, June 1868
That the Government be instructed to contract with G.W. Paschal for the delivery of 500 copies of Paschal's Annotated Copy of the Laws of Texas, July 2, 1868
Providing that no member of the Convention shall speak for more than 30 minutes at one time, July 3, 1868
Requesting Brevet Major General Reynolds to authorize the payment of the Convention up to date, 1868
Appropriating (illegible) dollars to the proprietor of Flake's Bulletin, August 26, 1868
Repealing an Act to organize the County Courts. . . , August 27, 1868
Appointing T.H. Waldron enrolling clerk pro tem, August 28, 1868
Respecting the Central and Washington County Railroad Company, August 28, 1868
Requiring a notice of one month before the sale of the Memphis - El Paso Railroad. . . , August 29, 1868
Consenting to the formation of a new state in Texas, August 29, 1868
Instructions to the Governor to sell the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado, August 31, 1868
Ordinance and act in relation to the New Orleans, Mobile and Chattanooga Railroad Company, 1868
Authorizing Eleanor Oaks, widow of N.E. (or possibly W.E.) Oakes, to receive all pay and mileage due the latter, August 26, 1868
Jordan declaration requesting the relinquishment of state taxes to Goliad County, August 25, 1868
Resolution respecting county sites, August 24, 1868
Resolution on the on the death of the Honorable W.E. (or possibly N.E.) Oakes, August 24, 1868
Asking that the Commanding General relinquish the state tax of San Augustine County, August 22, 1868
Declaration for a new county to be called Richland, August 3, 1868
Regarding the making of Surveyors Districts the same as Judicial Districts, August 3, 1868
Authorizing L.E. Hughes to establish a ferry across Powder Horse Bayou, August 4, 1868
Box
2-8/920 That this Convention take recess from August 20 to December 3, August 4, 1868
Respecting trial of criminals, August 5, 1868
Deducting pay from absent members, August 5, 1868
Regarding the estate of J.H. Leaver, August 31, 1868
Respecting special tax in Gillespie County, August 5, 1868
Report of the Committee on County and County Boundaries, creating the county of Union, January 22, 1869
That the General Land Office be required to deliver to G. Yarbough two land patents, August 5, 1868
That any debtor whose property may be sold by writ of execution. . . , August 5, 1868
Creating the county of San Jacinto, August 5, 1868
Regarding the leasing out of the Penitentiary, August 6, 1868
To investigate the murder of Captain Martin D. Hart during the Rebellion, August 8, 1868
Relinquishing the state tax of 1868 of Jefferson County, August 13, 1868
Defining the lines between Burleson and Brazos counties, August 13, 1868
Requesting General Reynolds to abolish county courts, July 17, 1868
Regarding county tax of Guadalupe County, August 14, 1868
For the relief of M.K. Reon, August 15, 1868
That all persons engaged in any professions or trade, are heads of families, and own no homesteads. . . , August 15, 1868
Respecting the relinquishment of state tax of Erath County, August 19, 1868
To stop unlawful cohabitation, vagrancy, etc., August 19, 1868
Providing the expulsion of M. Coles from the Convention, July 16, 1868
Requiring the Committee on Political Disabilities to have a list printed, July 17, 1868
For the appointment of a commission to inquire into the cause of families, now in the vicinity of Austin, fleeing from their homes, July 21, 1868
Incorporating the Hebrew Charitable Society of the City of Houston, 1868
To inquire into the facts of one member of the Convention challenging another to fight a duel, July 29, 1868
Asking information of the Governor, respecting U.S. bonds, July 24, 1868
Statements of funds on hand in the State Treasury on the 31st of July 1868
To authorize J.M. Floyd to erect a bridge across the Navasota River, January 3, 1869
Resolutions on the death of G.W. Smith, a delegate to the Convention, December 8, 1868
Appropriating $3200 for printing the Constitution, December 9, 1868
Resolution on the death on the death of W.H. Mullins, December 9, 1868
Rescinding the rules of the Convention as to the order of business and night sessions, December 8, 1868
Asking information from the provisional Governor respecting railroads, December 14, 1868
Providing for morning and evening sessions, December 14, 1868
To appoint a special Committee on the condition of the State, December 16, 1868
Substitute to Caldwell's resolution respecting newspapers and employees, December 10, 1868
Respecting the expulsion of Bryant of Harris, January 30, 1869
Providing for the election of an additional delegate to Washington, January 26, 1869
Creating the county of Peebles, December 8, 1868
Respecting compensation to members, December 11, 1868
Requiring a commanding general to order an election to fill vacancies, December 11, 1868
Declaring officers of the provisional Government, December 17, 1868
Tendering the Senate Hall to Episcopal Church, December 18, 1868
Repealing Thomas's resolution respecting the Division of the State of Texas 1868
To suppress and prevent the extortion of the Houston and Texas Central Rail Road Company upon the people of Texas, 1868
Respecting the framing of a Constitution by the Convention, January 8, 1869
Respecting Division of the State, June 23, 1868
Constitution of 1869
Regarding qualification of members, December 21, 1868
Granting mileage to G.W. Slaughter, December 19, 1868
Inviting Major General Canby and staff to seats on the floor, December 12, 1868
Respecting the "Austin Republican," January 9, 1869
Recordings of the convention, President not being present, Mr. Armstrong of Lamar was elected as President pro tem, February 6, 1869
Inviting a seat to R. Talbot to a seat on the floor, February 3, 1869
Appropriating $100.00 to defray expenses for publishing Constitution, February 3,1869
Box
2-8/921 To incorporate the Brenham and Waco Railroad Company, January 11, 1869
Amending rules of the Convention, January 11, 1869
Authorizing the building of a bridge across the Brazos river, December 12, 1868
Respecting the printing of the Constitution, January 26, 1869
In relation to the Corpus Christi Ship Channel, January 26, 1869
Fixing mileage and per diem to be paid to members and employees of the Convention, January 1869
Incorporating the town of Lancaster, January 1869
Incorporating the Brenham Mutual Life Insurance Company, January 19, 1869
For relief of heirs of W.A. Smith, January 20, 1869
Lending the Hall to Reverend Bishop Simpson, January 11, 1868
For the relief of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, January 11, 1869
Incorporating the Jefferson Navigation Company, January 16, 1869
Respecting the absence of members of the Convention, January 16, 1869
Respecting the official reporter of the Convention, January 12, 1869
Concerning the postmaster of the Convention, January 11, 1869
Appropriating a committee to revise the Constitution so far as engrossed, January 12, 1869
From the president to General Canby, regarding vacancies in the Convention, January 22, 1869
Providing that no adjournment shall until a constitution is adopted, January 25, 1869
Respecting business before the Convention and hours of meeting, January 25, 1869
Providing for the sale of certain railroads, July 11, 1868
Regarding the consolidation of certain railroad companies, July 7, 1868
Respecting the carrying of arms in the Convention, July 8, 1868
Committee reports, 1868-1869
[4 folders]
Ledger
2-7/380 Journal of the Reconstruction Convention (handwritten), first session, June 1-August 3, 1868
Ledger
2-7/384 Convention Journal 1869 (handwritten), second session, January 26-February 6, 1869
Ledger
2-7/391 Votes of the Reconstruction Convention (printed forms with handwritten entries), June-about August 1868
Ledger
2-7/392 Journal of the Reconstruction Convention (handwritten), first session, August 1868-January 1869



 

Convention of 1875 records, 1875,
0.5 cubic feet and 1 volume

The Constitutional Convention of 1875 was formed as a consequence of the resumption of Democratic control of the state of Texas in 1872 and resulting demand for a new constitution. A small number of records of the Convention of 1875 exist, documenting most of the activities of that body during that year. Types of materials include ordinances, resolutions, articles, correspondence, committee reports and working papers, bids for printing, vouchers for postage, a contract and a petition. Record forms are both printed and handwritten with the latter predominating.
Subjects associated with the records include: public schools, railroads, impeachment, homesteading, public lands and the General Land Office, the judiciary, suffrage, taxation and revenue, corporations, and public printing of Convention proceedings. Persons associated with the records are Edward Bradford Pickett, John Henry Brown, John H. Reagan, John Salmon "Rip" Ford, E.S.C. Robertson, Joel W. Robertson, G.A. Sessions, Lawrence Sullivan Ross, John Wilkins Whitfield, William Pitt Ballinger and others.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by type and in numerical or chronological order within each type.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Convention of 1875 records, Texas Constitutional Convention records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Volume 2-7L/66 is too fragile for use. Please contact Archives staff for microfilm copy.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1935/001
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Secretary of State on June 11, 1936.
Box
2-8/921 Directory of Members of the Constitutional Convention (photocopy), (original record) dated 1875
For the support and maintenance of public schools, November 24, 1875
To define the effect of ordinances, November 21, 1875
Regarding railroads, October 16, 1875
Article 9, that the Legislature shall have power for the people, November 24, 1875
Regarding Spanish and Mexican land grants, November 17, 1875
Plan for the organization of the Supreme Court, August 19, 1875
Box
2-8/922 Article 13, regarding impeachments, November 24, 1875
Article II, Municipal corporations, November 24, 1875
Judicial departments, October 21, 1875
Regarding suffrage, September 30, 1875
Preserving lands for public buildings, November 24, 1875
Article 8, Taxation and revenue, November 24, 1875
Public lands and land office, October 21, 1875
Submitting the new Constitution to a vote of the people, November 23, 1875
An ordinance postponing the general election of December 1875, September 24, 1875
Bids for papers, September 18, 1875
Vouchers, sergeant at arms for postage, October-November 1875
Relating to public painting, 1875
Contracts and bonus for printing the Constitution, September 18, 1875
Spanish and Mexican land claims, September 20, 1875
Documents of the Judiciary, 1875
[3 folders]
Correspondence, September 1875
Box
2-7L/66 Ordinances of the Constitutional Convention of 1875