Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Commission for the Blind:

An Inventory of Commission for the Blind Records at the Texas State Archives, 1932-2003, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas Commission for the Blind.
Title: Commission for the Blind records
Dates: 1932-2003, undated
Abstract: The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. These records consist of agenda, minutes, attachments or discussion materials for meetings, reports, correspondence, memoranda, publications, printed materials, press releases, distribution lists, a scrapbook and a videotape of the Texas Commission for the Blind, dating 1932-2003 and undated.
Quantity: 19.75 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The State Commission for the Blind was created in 1931 (House Bill 844, 42nd Texas Legislature, Regular Session) to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. Since the legislature assumed that the program would be funded by donations from civic groups across the state, the founding bill did not carry an appropriation. The 43rd Texas Legislature, in 1933, however, found that the donations were insufficient and appropriated $8,250 for the Commission. The Commission then went to work with a staff of 15, only one of whom was a full-time regular employee, to serve the entire state. The Vocational Rehabilitation Division was created by House Bill 347, 49th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 1945, in order to administer newly available federal funds available through the 1943 federal Public Law 113, which broadened the scope of rehabilitative services for the physically impaired. The Commission's authority was further expanded in 1965 (Senate Bill 34, 59th Texas Legislature, Regular Session) through its designation as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. Provisions of the federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and subsequent amendments set the Commission's first priority to serve the most severely disabled blind with emphasis on client participation in planning individualized programs and thorough evaluation and diagnostic studies to determine the client's potential.

The name of the agency was changed to the Texas Commission for the Blind (TCB) in 1985 (Senate Bill 195, 69th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 1985). In 1991, TCB was one of 11 agencies placed under the oversight of the new Health and Human Services Commission with the intention that the umbrella organization would result in an integrated system of health and human services delivery and in a more efficient use of funds. The Commission was authorized to negotiate interagency agreements with other state agencies and may enter into agreements with the federal government to implement federal legislation concerning services to the visually handicapped. The Commission was governed by V.T.C.A., Human Resources Code, Chapter 91.

The Commission was originally composed of three members, one of whom had to be legally blind, appointed by the governor with senate approval for overlapping six year terms. The number of members was increased to six in 1943 (House Bill 352, 48th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 1943) and then again to nine in 1979 (Senate Bill 1243, 66th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 1979). The 1943 legislation also raised the number of members who had to be legally blind to two. Until 1957 (House Bill 400, 55th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 1957), the blind commissioner(s) had to be graduates of the Texas School for the Blind. The governor appointed the chair of the Commission and the positions were non-salaried. The Commission appointed an executive director to administer and supervise its activities. Although not required by statute, the Commission voted in 1996 to meet at least each quarter, and did so in fiscal years 1996 and 1997. The Commission also had five subcommittees for functions relating to administration, auditing, budgeting, legislative matters, and planning.

The agency's primary focus was to provide services to persons with visual impairments to ensure they could actively and independently participate in society. It served as an information center and referral resource for visually impaired Texans and developed mechanisms and procedures to help the visually impaired bridge gaps among services (educational, institutional, rehabilitative, vocational, etc.) operated by public and private non-profit organizations. TCB provided a variety of services, including counseling and guidance, independent living skills, vocational training, physical restoration and adaptive technology devices. The Commission was the designated state licensing agency under the federal Randolph-Sheppard Act of 1936 to provide opportunities for qualified blind persons to manage food service vending facilities.

TCB programs used the following stages to assist clients -- intake, application, assessment, eligibility determination, individual plan development, service delivery, case closure, and follow-up services. Depending on agency funding levels and clients resources, TCB provided or paid for all or part of medical services, skills training, adaptive technologies, and other services. Clients entered the TCB system by referral from many sources including self-referral, family members, physicians, employers, and other state agencies.

Limited agency resources during the 1980s prompted a move toward prioritizing the populations served by TCB. As a result, TCB established an order of selection for persons wishing to access agency programs, placing an emphasis on serving more legally blind clients. The federal 1992 Rehabilitation Act amendments, however, emphasized both serving a greater percentage of Texans with the most severe disabilities and having employment as the preferred outcome whenever possible. As a result, the agency revised its order of selection by eliminating the high priority given to persons in imminent danger of becoming totally or legally blind in order to work with more blind clients.

TCB operated district offices throughout Texas to serve both as local points of contact for individuals seeking the services of the agency and as bases of operation for the agency's programs. The agency also operated the Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center, a 24-hour a day residential program in Austin that provided a comprehensive array of services and training in vocational and independent living skills to blind clients. TCB counselors worked one-on-one with clients to assess their needs and abilities, develop goals, and devise a plan of services to achieve successful outcomes.

The Commission provided citizen involvement through several advisory committees, namely: the Consumer Advisory Committee, providing the blind/visually impaired a way to comment on the Commission's service delivery system and policies; the Medical Advisory Council, comprised of ophthalmologists who advised the Commission on medical services, and promoted dialogue regarding prevention of blindness and eye-care standards (discontinued after 1996?); the Optometric Advisory Council, composed of optometrists who advise on vision care standards and optometric issues (discontinued after 1996?); and the State Independent Living Council, appointed by the governor, which helped develop the agency's state independent living program. At the local level, by 1999, the Regional Advisory Committee involved clients and the public in planning and service innovation. An Elected Committee of Operators/Managers for the Business Enterprises Program (ECO/BEP) also existed to advise the Executive Director on policy decisions affecting the Business Enterprises Program.

TCB was funded by several sources of revenue including Federal Title I Basic Support (95 percent of federal funds), State General Revenue, fees and commissions from the Business Enterprise Program, and smaller sources of revenue such as an endowment fund.

In fiscal year 1997, TCB had 628 employees, served about 21,500 individuals in its programs, and received $8.6 million of General Revenue and $31.1 million in federal funds.

House Bill 2292 (78th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, 2003) merged twelve state health and human services agencies into five, officially abolishing the Texas Commission for the Blind and creating the new Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS). This new agency combined the duties of the Commission for the Blind, Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Texas Rehabilitation Commission and the Interagency Council on Early Childhood Intervention. It began its new functions on March 1, 2004. The Texas Assistive and Rehabilitative Services Council assists the agency in developing rules and policies. The council is made up of nine members appointed by the governor with the consent of the Texas Senate. To be eligible for appointment to the council, a person must have knowledge in programs and issues related to early childhood intervention services, services for people with disabilities or services for people who are blind, deaf or hard of hearing. Functions of the former Texas Commission for the Blind are now conducted by DARS, Division for Blind Services (DBS).

(Sources include: Guide to Texas State Agencies, 11th edition (2001); the article on Texas Commission for the Blind by John G. Johnson, in The Handbook of Texas Online; the DARS agency web site (http://www.dars.state.tx.us/dbs/index.shtml), both accessed October 2006; and the enabling legislation, 1931, 1943, 1945, 1957, 1965, 1979, 1985, and 2003.)

Major Divisions/Offices:

Home Teachers/Lighthouses for the Blind, 1934-about 1947

These closely intertwined programs began functioning in 1934, and were the first programs administered by the Commission. The purpose of the program was to train the blind to become self-sufficient, self-reliant, independent, and capable of fulfilling their duties as citizens of their communities. Home Teachers, themselves either totally blind or with impaired vision, taught Braille reading and writing and handicrafts in classes and to individuals at the "Lighthouses," workshops for the blind, and in private homes. Handicrafts made by the blind individuals, (mats, rugs, baskets, toys, brooms, mops, sewing, knitting, reed furniture, etc.), were sold by sighted volunteers with the profit going to the blind worker. Other blind individuals were placed in vending stands, or given other vocational assistance. The Home Teachers and Lighthouses were also involved in coordinating donations of medical services, eye-glasses, and clothing. Due to lack of staff and funds, the Commission was forced to rely upon the generosity of local communities and organizations in order to operate the programs. Wherever a lighthouse teacher or a home teacher was placed, the Commission either sought an already-existing organization to sponsor it, or it created a new sponsoring organization. Funding and materials were wholly supplied by donations from the communities; only the salaries of the Home Teachers, tools, and some equipment were supplied by the State.

By 1944-1946, this program was known as Industries and Home Teachers, with the sections: Lighthouses, seen as sheltered places for vocational training of the newly blind, the blind of limited employability, and the blind with other handicaps, with the goal of eventual outside employment; and Home Teachers, some of whom worked in the Lighthouses, who focused on training the newly blind to carry out daily activities and teaching them communication skills. By 1946-1948, the program was referred to as Home Industries, with the same functions and elements as before, though with a new Pre-Vocational Training Center, in Austin. Officially opened in May 1948, the Center was set up in conjunction with the Austin Workshop for the Blind as a live-in residence for trainees, for a minimum of three months, to teach personal hygiene, etiquette, handicrafts, and simple industrial skills to enable the home-bound to eventually work in one of the Lighthouses, and to ultimately compete with sighted workers in industry. By 1948-50 the program seems to have been split into three separate programs: Home Teacher Service, Home Industry, and Sheltered Workshops.

Sheltered Workshops, 1947-ongoing

(For predecessor functions see Home Teachers/Lighthouses for the Blind.) By August 31, 1950, 300 people were employed in nine workshops. The shops were still products of local organizations, with the Commission paying only for supervisor's salaries, tools, and equipment, in addition to advising in the production and sale of Lighthouse merchandise. Mention of these facilities becomes less frequent with the 1954-1956 Biennial Report, though the number of facilities had increased to 12 by 1972-1974. TCB contracted with the Lighthouses, which were administered as community cooperative programs.

Home Industry Division (or Home Industries), 1947-about 1965

(For predecessor functions see Home Teachers/Lighthouses for the Blind.) This Division was meant to aid the home-bound blind scattered throughout rural areas and small towns with assistance in obtaining employment. Individuals were trained and taught at the Pre-Vocational Training Center in Austin, provided equipment, given assistance in obtaining raw materials, given immediate receipt of payment for all manufactured materials, and occasionally supervised. The Hexter Memorial Lighthouse for the Blind in Dallas was dedicated in April 1952 to provide personal adjustment and vocational training facilities for adult African-Americans, expanding facilities already in operation in Houston. Rural operations appear to have been phased out of this program beginning in 1955. Mention of this division ceases after the 1962-1964 Biennial Report, probably due to the 1965 reorganization, and elements of its services appear to have been combined with Home Teacher Service.

Home Teacher Service/Program, about 1947-about 1965

(For predecessor functions see Home Teachers/Lighthouses for the Blind.) This service specialized in meeting the individual social, psychological, and economic needs of the home-bound, newly blind in the larger cities, including instruction in Braille, basic crafts, and home-making skills. The Home Teachers were all either blind or partially sighted. By 1954-1955, the program was serving 1,000 people a year. Following the Commission's 1965 reorganization, surviving elements of Home Industries seem to have been incorporated into this division. During the 1966-1968 biennium the service was renamed the Rehabilitation Teacher Program (see below).

Rehabilitation Teacher Program, about 1966-about 1975

Formerly the Home Teacher Program, the new rehabilitation teachers were to be "walking adjustment centers" bringing a condensed version of the programs offered at formal adjustment centers into an individual's home. Teachers assisted the newly blind to develop special skills in communication, homemaking activities, personal grooming, and the use of leisure time. Teachers were stationed in 15 cities around Texas, but were unable to meet many rural needs. By 1974-1976, these services seem to have been incorporated into the Vocational Rehabilitation Program.

Talking Book Machines, 1932-ongoing

The Commission began distributing Talking Book Machines about 1932. The machines were received through the Library of Congress and then lent to the blind throughout the state. Program costs were funded entirely by private and civic donations and repair services were provided by the American Foundation for the Blind. In early 1963, the Telephone Pioneers of America volunteered their services in the repair of the machines. The talking books themselves are distributed through the Texas State Library and Archives Commission's Talking Book Program.

Eye Medical Social Work, 1944-1965

The 48th Texas Legislature, in 1944, made an appropriation of $1,800 for Eye Medical Social Work in a program to prevent blindness and conserve sight by providing medical and hospital care for children and other individuals not provided for by the Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The initial appropriation was too low to have much effect, but the program rapidly expanded. By 1946-1948, the division had become exclusively devoted to the prevention of blindness and the restoration of sight among children--the only service administered by the commission for this age group of the visually handicapped. Eligible recipients had to be no more than 16 years of age, a resident of Texas, of normal mentality, have some sort of visual impairment, and have a family who otherwise would be unable to pay for treatment. By 1952-1954, the division had become known as Eye Medical Social Service. Following a major reorganization in 1965, this program was placed in Services for Visually Impaired Children (see the Blind and Visually Impaired Children's Program).

Pre School Counseling, 1953-1965

Officially instituted on September 1, 1953, the program made available to parents counseling and guidance to help them determine and meet the needs of the pre-school blind child and to help them promote the development of the child's capacities. The service was also available to groups or schools. Initial funding came from funds appropriated for the Home Teacher Services. The counselors also met with voluntary agencies regarding training programs for blind pre-schoolers and initiated new activities/coordinated existing activities to meet local needs. Following a major reorganization in 1965, this program was placed in Services for Visually Impaired Children (see the Blind and Visually Impaired Children's Program).

Blind and Visually Impaired Children's Program (later called Children's Program; then called as of January 2007), 1965-ongoing

This program began by taking over the Pre-School Counseling program and the Eye Medical Social Work program following a 1965 reorganization. The new division, through these two programs, offered services to help prevent blindness in children, restore sight where possible, reduce dependency, and prepare children for vocational success as adults to ensure that blind and visually impaired children could develop their individual potential for independent living and financial self-sufficiency. Counseling was and is available through home visits and correspondence. Receipt of its services was contingent upon Texas residency and the written recommendation of an examining ophthalmologist. By 1968-1970, the program was called the Visually Handicapped Children's Program and was financed entirely by state funds. The Program's stated purpose, at that time, was to diminish future needs by providing preventative medical service and counseling to children. During the 1974-1976 biennium, the Commission initiated a pilot program for visually screening Texas public school children. Information derived from the project was given to the 65th Texas Legislature to provide it with definitive information on the potential options for diagnosing and treating visual impairments among children. Through the Cooperative School Program, a mainstreaming project first experimented with during the 1972-1974 biennium, the Commission worked with the educational system to provide services to blind and visually disabled school aged students, ages 1-21, through counseling and liaison assistance between school and student, and vocational rehabilitation services. In 1990, the Visually Handicapped Children's Program's name was changed to the Children's Program. As of January 2007, it is called the Blind Children’s Vocational Discovery and Development Program. Currently, program caseworker duties include ensuring that parents understand their child's eye condition, and how vision loss impacts the child's ability to function. Caseworkers also educate the family on routine eye care, sight conservation, facilitate independent living skills and career awareness, and provide referral to other services. Effective September 1998, the Children's Program implemented a four-stage service delivery process including assessment, services, outcome, and post-outcome. The Program is funded by state dollars and is not subject to federal policy requirements. The program served approximately 1000 children in FY 1966, 8,780 in FY 1993, and 7,265 children in FY 1997.

Business Enterprises Program (current title), 1936-ongoing

The federal Randolph-Sheppard Act was passed in 1936, giving preference to blind persons to operate vending stands in federal buildings. In December of that year, the Commission was appointed the licensing agency for the Business Enterprises Program in Texas. Though no federal funds were allocated to implement the program, the first stand was set up in the lobby of the Amarillo Post Office in the summer of 1938. The first state plan for the program was adopted in 1946. The program made it possible for blind individuals to operate small businesses under the supervision of the agency. The program trains and licenses vendors, selects business locations, and provides equipment and initial stock; for a monthly fee the operator can receive continued supervision, guidance, and managerial assistance. In 1970, the division became known as the Small Business Enterprise Program. As of 1972-1974, the agency was assisted in administering the program by an operators advisory committee, which blind operators themselves elect. The committee assisted staff in formulating policies and providing assistance on narrower and more specific matters, such as the adjustment of individual grievances, establishment of pricing systems, evaluation of blind licensees. and agency staff, and evaluation of training activities. The committee later became known as the Elected Committee of Operators. TCB clients interested in BEP can be referred by their counselor in the Vocational Rehabilitation program. To be eligible for BEP a client must be 18 years of age, legally blind, a high-school graduate (or possess a GED), and be a U.S. citizen. The clients are assessed on their ability to work in BEP, undergo a math and skills test, and must complete evaluation, application, and training processes. Currently, most businesses are concession stands, vending facilities, and vending machines in rest areas along the interstate highways in Texas, though they have included grocery stores, wash-a-terias, and mop shops. By 1946 there were 20 vending stands in operation, by June 1969 there were 125 coffee shops and vending stands, and by May 1976 there were 181 shops and vending facilities. For fiscal year 1997, BEP managers operated 111 facilities on 48 federal, 51 state, and 12 private sites. The different types of operations include 10 convenience stores, 41 snack bars, 36 cafeterias, and 24 vending machine sites.

Vocational Rehabilitation Program (current title), 1945-ongoing

Vocational rehabilitation had been available to the blind in Texas since 1929, when legislation was passed enabling the Texas State Department of Education to establish a Vocational Rehabilitation Division. Following the enactment of 1943 federal legislation known as Public Law 113 (broadening the scope of rehabilitative services for the physically impaired), on February 7, 1944 the State Board for Vocational Education delegated to the State Commission for the Blind the authority to administer Federal Vocational Rehabilitation Services, giving it the right to administer federal funds for vocational and educational training, physical restoration, and the purchase of prosthetic appliances. The Commission began administering these funds on March 1, 1944, in advance of House Bill 347, 49th Legislature, Regular Session, 1945, which officially authorized the new Vocational Rehabilitation Division. The new division provided individualized, specialized vocational rehabilitative services to eligible visually impaired Texans. Vocational rehabilitation services were and are tailored to each person by developing an Individualized Written Rehabilitation Plan, as required by federal law. Services included diagnosis and evaluation, counseling and medical services, vocational training, employment assistance, and post-employment services. The program's purpose was to enable each individual to live as independently and productively as possible and help each individual secure/maintain employment in careers consistent with their skills, abilities, and interests.

Initially the division had four sections: the Physical Restoration Section, providing medical or surgical care for those otherwise unable to pay for care which renders the individual more employable; the Professional and Clerical Section to select, train, and place persons qualified for professional and clerical employment; the Rural Rehabilitation Section, to train and place blind persons in agricultural work; and the Industrial Section to industrial training and placement. Currently the division still administers activities in all of the original sections, but only the physical restoration section still seems to stand out as a separate area. The division, financed through state and federal funds, makes no monetary payments to clients but provides most services free of charge. Eligible individuals must have a visual impairment which constitutes a vocational handicap and there must be an expectation that they would benefit from the services (legal or total blindness has never been required). By 1974-1976, the services offered by the Rehabilitation Teacher Program had been incorporated into this division.

The Commission, possibly through this division, cooperated with other state agencies/departments to assist visually impaired Texans, such as the Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation's visually impaired residents and outpatients. One of its projects with the University of Texas at Austin resulted in the establishment of a facility for blind students at the University and in working relationships with the University's medical schools. In 1972, in addition to the Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, the agency also worked with the Texas Education Agency, the Department of Corrections, the Industrial Accident Board, the Department of Public Welfare, and a variety of private, non-profit organizations. Sometime before 1978, however, many of these cooperative functions may have been transferred to the Mental Health/Mental Retardation Cooperative Services Program. The division did continue to cooperate with federal agencies such as the Veterans Administration, the Department of Health, Education and Welfare, and the Civil Service Commission.

By 1978 the division's name had changed to the Vocational Rehabilitation Program. Under the provisions of the 1975 Act for the Blind, during 1976 contractual arrangements with educational service centers and independent school districts, the Commission was able to initiate four cooperative school projects to provide services for youth requiring special education, habilitation, or rehabilitation to enhance their development. This project is now the Transition Program which provides services to young persons between the ages of 13 and 22 years of age. Transition services focus on vocational awareness, career planning, and coordination with education. The program helps younger clients make the transition from high school to adult life. When transition services are completed, clients are transferred to the vocational rehabilitation caseload. The Transition Program served 1,167 clients in fiscal year 1997. The Vocational Rehabilitation Program served 12,415 people in FY 1993, and 11,978 people in FY 1997.

Mental Health/Mental Retardation Cooperative Services Program, about 1977-unknown date

The Commission had been engaged in a contractual cooperative program with the Texas State Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation since the 1968-1970 biennium, though it is somewhat unclear whether the program occurred under the administration of the Vocational Rehabilitation Division, or as a part of a separate unit. The Program had three major objectives: to serve multiply handicapped people more effectively to try and avoid the need for institutionalization; to generally intensify services to the residents and patients of the state's special schools and hospitals to promote greater independence; and to assist residents and patients to return to their communities and to provide some necessary services locally. Included in this program was a pilot project (Project Sunrise), with the Austin State School to determine the rehabilitation potential of blind retarded children who have previously been determined to be hopeless cases. Students are taught basic communication skills, personal grooming and care, and given some exposure to the outside world. By 1972-1974, outreach activities had been initiated and the Sunrise Project had proven so effective, it was being duplicated around the state. (During these years cooperative projects also occurred between the Commission and the Texas School for the Blind, the Model Cities Program, local universities and state medical schools, the Texas Department of Corrections, the Hermann Low Vision Aid Rehabilitation Clinic, and assorted non-profit organizations, though the hierarchical structure/administration of these programs within the Commission is unclear.)

During the next biennium the institutional program at the Austin State School was also being carried out at the Richmond State School (Cole Manor?), and the program became large enough to require a complete overhaul, once finance issues had been resolved. At the same time a community-based pilot project had been started to work with multiply handicapped individuals with the purpose of: identifying visually and mentally handicapped individuals; training and placing those who have vocational potential; heightening community awareness; working with their families; helping them develop a greater degree of independence; and developing necessary community resources. By the 1976-1978 biennium, the cooperative program with the Texas State Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation became formalized in the Mental Health/Mental Retardation Cooperative Services Program. The Program had a diagnostic and evaluation unit, an assessment-placement-training system, community facilities, and independent living rehabilitation. The community based pilot-project grew, and services were initiated for 1,869 individuals. An appropriation by the 66th Texas Legislature, 1979, ensured the survival of the project. By 1980-1982, the program had been renamed Special Rehabilitation Services.

Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center (current title), 1971-ongoing

The Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center (CCRC) was built, staffed, and opened in two stages during the 1970-1972 and 1973-1974 bienniums as the first residential rehabilitation program owned by the State Commission for the Blind. The Center was developed to assist individuals who lose their sight after completing educational programs offered by the state's public schools. The Center offers intensive vocational and independent living training to adult Texans who are blind, the majority newly blinded. Located in Austin, the center provides intensive, comprehensive training in areas such as orientation and mobility, Braille, communication skills, home and personal management, technology and career guidance. Other services include medical, social, psychological, and vocational evaluations. The average trainee completes the program in 3 to 4 months. To participate in Center activities, clients must be eligible for VR or IL programs, legally blind, able to move independently, willing to attend classes, and be able to demonstrate progress in training activities. Approximately 60 percent of the Center's clients have secondary disabilities in addition to being blind. By the 1973-1974 biennium, a special training program to prepare clients for post-secondary academic or vocational training began to be offered each summer. Each year 500 to 600 clients participate in CCRC activities.

The Center supports all aspects of the Blind Commission's programs by delivering services, training clients for the Business Enterprises Program, and training agency staff. The Center and the School for the Blind have a close working relationship, sharing certain resources and working jointly with the multiply handicapped. Through grant money from the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youths and Adults, a deaf-blind project has also been established at the Center. In fiscal year 1997, CCRC had a staff of 108 and budget of $4.3 million, of which $580,000 was General Revenue.

Career Development Unit, 1980-unknown date

The Career Development Unit was established in 1980 to further assist the agencies employment placement efforts and expand upon the number of fields in which the blind could be employed. The program's goal is to increase employment opportunities and enhance the quality of that employment.

Older Blind American Project, about 1975-unknown date

The Older Blind American Project was started in 1974-1976, as a demonstration program to serve blind Texans over the age of 60. Individuals were provided with orientation and mobility skills, homemaking and personal management skills, social activities, resource utilization training, evaluations and counseling in order to help them maintain their self-sufficiency and independence. The original funds were scheduled to run out on June 30, 1977, but an interagency contract allowed the use of Title XX funds, continuing the program and serving 1,584 people in 1976-1978. This program may eventually have merged with others to become incorporated into Independent Living (IL) Services.

Independent Living (IL) Services, unknown date-ongoing

Services included in the Independent Living Services program were first allowed in the 1978 amendments to the federal 1973 Rehabilitation Act. The program provides services for the elderly and for those with disabilities so severe that they do not have employment potential, teaching them to live as independently as possible within their families and communities, eliminating or reducing their need for alternative and dependent care (such as nursing homes, in-home chore services, etc.), and preventing accidents and hospitalizations. Counselors and caseworkers in local district offices consult with potential clients and determine the appropriate programs. Independent Living clients average approximately one year in the program to achieve a successful outcome. The program was called Independent Living Rehabilitation in 1990, and then Independent Living (IL) Services in ca. 1996. The program served 2,253 people in FY 1997.

Administrative Divisions (have included, among others):

Staff Services Division

Handled accounting, reproduction, and records management functions.

Program Evaluation and Program Development Division

Supervised child guidance counselors working with visually handicapped children in several school districts.

Technical and Consultative Services Division

Provided consultants for caseworkers and field service personnel in the client-contact divisions, and managed staff development for the commission generally.

General Client Services Division

Responsible for the major programs carried out by district offices throughout the state.

TCB Contracted Services

In 1957, the Texas Lions League for Crippled Children, Inc., and the Texas Commission for the Blind established a cooperative agreement to have the commission purchase diagnostic evaluation and adjustment training services offered by a Lion's League owned center at Kerrville, Texas. In the 1960's, the Commission had to send individuals out of state to receive adjustment training.

TCB expanded its contracts for specialized services for clients. The agency contracted with local Lighthouse facilities and other providers for rehabilitation services. For fiscal year 1997, the agency had 63 contracts totaling $2.1 million. Most TCB contractors were paid fees for service that are bid each year using a Request for Proposal process.


Scope and Contents of the Records

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. The records consist of agenda, minutes, attachments or discussion materials for meetings, reports, correspondence, memoranda, publications, printed materials, press releases, distribution lists, a scrapbook, and a videotape of the Texas Commission for the Blind, dating 1932-2003 and undated.

The minutes document the work discussed at Commission meetings and at meetings of the Elected Committee of Operators (ECO) under the Business Enterprises Program (BEP). Policy and procedure manuals and manual updates, published from 1990 to 1998 for the Vocational Rehabilitation, Independent Living Rehabilitation, Business Enterprises, and Blind and Visually Impaired Children's programs, document the functions of these programs. Press releases and a few pamphlets, from 1970 to 1993 and undated, provide notice of events planned for anniversary receptions, announcements of grants and awards, list the services of the Cooperative School Program, announce a moratorium on Title XX expenditures; and mention the election of board members. Reports and audits, and Administrative files and public relations files, record the development of the agency and its functions at a considerable degree of detail. Finally, a scrapbook records the earliest decades of the Commission's existence, and a videotape commemorates its 60th anniversary.

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.


 

Organization of the Records

These records have been organized by State Archives staff into seven series:
Minutes and agenda, 1932-2003, 4.75 cubic ft.
Procedure manuals, 1984-1998, 3 cubic ft.
Press releases and pamphlets, 1970, 1976, 1979-1981, 1986, 1991, 1993, undated, fractional
Reports and audits, 1933-1982, 3.6 cubic ft.
Administrative files and public relations files, 1937-1982, 8 cubic ft.
Scrapbook, 1934-1942, 0.4 cubic ft.
Videotape, 1991, fractional

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Because of the possibility that portions of these records (specifically, the series Reports and audits) fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, names of persons receiving state assistance (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.101: V.T.C.A., Human Resources Code, Section 12.003), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail (Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P. O. Box 12927, Austin, TX 78711), fax (512-463-5436), email (Dir_Lib@tsl.state.tx.us), or see our web page (http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/agency/customer/pia.html). Include enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.

Researchers wishing to access the videotape must contact the Archives' Preservation Officer to obtain the necessary equipment.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Subjects:
Blind--Services for--Texas.
Blind--Rehabilitation--Texas.
Document Types:
Minutes--Texas--Blind--1932-2003.
Agendas--Texas--Blind--1968, 1974-2003.
Reports--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Budgets--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Lists--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Bills (legislative records)--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Resolutions--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Statistics--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Guidelines--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Correspondence--Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Forms (documents) --Texas--Blind--1932-1999.
Manuals--Texas--Blind--1984-1998.
Memorandums--Texas--Blind--1990-1998.
Press releases--Texas--Blind--1970-1991.
Functions:
Assisting blind.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Prints and Photographs Collection, 12 World War II era black and white prints, 1983/123

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: unassigned, 1983/123, 1984/011, 1986/093, 1987/026, 1991/050, 1991/167, 1992/025, 1993/012, 1994/024, 1995/021, 1996/005, 1997/024, 1998/002, 1998/004, 1999/038, 1999/112, 2000/015, 2001/033, 2002/061, 2002/152, 2003/013, 2004/004, 2005/161, 2006/143, 2006/345

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on January 1, 1943; March 21, 1983; May 2, 1983; September 2, 1983; February 16, 1986; October 26, 1986; January 2, 1991; May 15, 1991; October 30, 1991; September 28, 1992; October 26, 1993; October 27, 1994; September 24, 1995; October 23, 1996; September 3, 8, and 22, 1997; September 30, 1998; October 30, 1998; September 16, 1999; October 16, 2000; November 5, 2001; July 26, 2002; September 23, 2002; and September 3, 2003; by the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services on June 9, 2005; and by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on January 26, 2006.

Processing Information

Tony Black, September 1991

Tonia Carlisle, May 1992

Paul Beck, October 1994

Lisa M. Hendricks, October 1995, October 1996, September 1997

Tony Black, September 1997, October 1998

Nancy Enneking, April 1999, September 1999, October 2000, August 2001, July 2002

Tony Black, December 2006

Location of Originals

The record copies of minutes and agenda of the former Texas Commission for the Blind are maintained by the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Minutes and agenda, 1932-2003,
4.75 cubic ft.

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans.
These records consist of minutes, agenda, and attachments or discussion materials for meetings of the Texas Commission for the Blind, 1932-2003. Agenda are only occasionally present in earlier files, but are routinely included from 1974 to 1978 and since 1994. The minutes document the work discussed at each commission meeting, including reports on legislation, approval of budget requests and records of expenditures, discussions of personnel matters (including approval of new employees hired), adoption of changes to the State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation of the Blind and to the State Plan for the Business Enterprises Program, passage of resolutions, and other policy matters. Attachments or discussion materials are provided from time to time, and include the following: copies of state plans, lists of employees and other personnel statistics, budgets and reports of expenditures, copies of legislation, resolutions, placement reports, vending stand reports, vocational rehabilitation statistics, talking books project reports, staff development guidelines, program evaluations, Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center reports, field service activities, forms, correspondence, etc. Agenda and discussion materials for the period 1974-1978 are filed separately from the minutes.
There is some overlap between 1963 and 1993: one set--bound volumes--was transferred from the Legislative Reference Library. Two sets of minutes are included because of possible minor changes between the sets, including original signatures.
Also included are the agenda and minutes of the meetings of the Elected Committee of Operators (ECO) under the Business Enterprises Program (BEP), October 1989-November 1990. These minutes include district reports, consultant reports, training specialist reports, BEP Director reports, ECO Chairman reports, resolutions, etc.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by State Archives staff in chronological order. Elected Committee of Operators minutes and agenda are at the end.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Minutes and agenda, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession Numbers: 1983/123, 1984/011, 1998/002, 1999/038, 2000/059, 2001/033, 2002/061, 2002/152, 2003/013, 2004/004, 2005/161
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Commission for the Blind on May 2, 1983; September 2, 1983; September 3 and 22, 1997; October 30, 1998; October 16, 2001; November 5, 2001; September 23, 2002; and September 3, 2003; by the Legislative Reference Library on July 26, 2002; and by the Texas Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services on June 9, 2005.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Tony Black, September 1997, October 1998
Nancy Enneking, October 2000, August 2001, July 2002
Tony Black, December 2006
Box
1984/011-1 Minutes, 1932-1973
April 1932
February, September 1933
January, May, June, December 1934
January 1935
March 1935
June, November 1935
June 1936
August, September 1937
January 1938
February, May 1938
August 1938
February 1939
June 1939
August 1939
November 1939
February 1940
May 1940
June 1940
July, August 1940
October, November 1940
April, July, August 1941
November 1941
January 1942
April 1942
August 1942
September 1942
October 1942
November 1942
February 1943
April 1943
May 1943
July 1943
November 1943
February 1944
June 1944
August 1944
November 1944
February 1945
June 1945
October 1945
Box
1984/011-2 April 1946
August 1946
March 1947
June 1947
Meeting materials, November 1947
December 1947
May 1948
June 1948
August 1948
March 1949
State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation, July 1949
Policies and Principles of the Business Enterprises for the Blind
Memo regarding historical records, 1979
Box
1983/123-1 August 1949
January 1950
July 1950
April 1951
July 1951
February, July 1952
March, April, August 1953
March 1954
August 1954
January 1955
May 1955
August 1955
January, May, August 1956
January, April 1957
May, September 1957
January, March 1958
June, October 1958
January 1959
April, July, November 1959
March, August, December 1960
March, May 1961
July 1961
September, December 1961
March, July 1962
December 1962
March, July 1963
Box
2002/152-1 September 1963-October 1977
[bound volume]
Box
1983/123-1 September, December 1963
January, March, April 1964
August, October 1964
Box
1983/123-2 January 1965
April 1965
July 1965
March 1966
September 1966
November 1966
February 1967
June 1967
November 1967
February 1968
Agenda and meeting materials, February 1968
July 1968
October 1968
March 1969
September 1969
December 1969
April 1970
June 1970
September 1970
April 1971
October 1971
February 1972
June 1972
September 1972
July 1973
December 1973
Box
1983/123-3 Agenda and discussion materials, 1974-1978
March 1974
August 1974
January 1975
May 1975
October 1975
May 1976
August 1976
Box
1983/123-4 December 1976
April 1977
May 1977
June 1977
October 1977
Box
1983/123-5 January 1978
May 1978
Box
2002/152-1 November 1978
Box
1983/123-2 Minutes, 1974-1978
March 1974
August 1974
January 1975
May 1975
October 1975
February 1976
May 1976
December 1976
April 1977
May 1977
Minutes and agenda, June 1977
October 1977
January 1978
Minutes and agenda, June 1978
November 1978
Box
2002/152-1 Minutes, 1978-1994
January 1978-October 1983
[bound volume]
Box
1983/123-2 June 1979
September 1979
December 1979
March 1980
April 1980
Minutes and agenda, June 1980
Minutes and agenda, September 1980
Minutes and agenda, December 1980
April 1981
September 4, 1981
September 11, 1981
December 1981
July 1982
December 1982
Box
1998/002-1 February 1983
July 1983
October 1983
Box
2002/152-1 February-October 1984
[bound volume]
Box
1998/002-1 February 1984
May 1984
June 1984
September 1984
October 1984
Box
2002/152-2 January 1985-November 1991
[bound volume]
Box
1998/002-1 January 1985
February 1985
May 1985
July 1985
September 1985
October 1985
January 1986
May 1986
August 1986
September 1986
October 1986
December 1986
February 1987
May 1987
September 1987
November 1987
February 1988
May 1988
November 1988
February 1989
May 1989
August 1989
November 1989
February 1990
May 1990
Consumer Advisory Committee, July 1990
September 1990
Consumer Advisory Committee, October 1990
November 1990
February and March 1991
May 1991
September 1991
November 1991
Box
2002/152-2 February 1992-December 1993
[bound volume]
Box
1998/002-1 February 1992
March 1992
May 1992
August 1992
September 1992
December 1992
February 1993
May 1993
August 1993
October 1993
December 1993
February 1994
Minutes and agenda, 1994-2003
Minutes and agenda, May 1994
Minutes and agenda, July 1994
Box
1998/002-2 Minutes and agenda, August 1994
Minutes and agenda, June 1995
Minutes and agenda, August 1995
Minutes and agenda, December 1995
Minutes and agenda, May 1995
Minutes and agenda, February 1996
Minutes and agenda, May 1996
Minutes and agenda, August 1996
Minutes and agenda, November 1996
Minutes and agenda, February 1997
Minutes and agenda, May 1997
Agenda, August 1997
Agenda, December 1997
Minutes and agenda, February 1998
Agenda, May 1998
Agenda, August 1998
Minutes and agenda, November 1998
Agenda, February 1999
Agenda, May 1999
Minutes and agenda, August 1999
Minutes, October 1999
Minutes and agenda, November 1999
Minutes and agenda, February 2000
Minutes and agenda, May 2000
Minutes, August 2000
Minutes and agenda, November 2000
Minutes and agenda, February 2001
Box
1998/002-3 Minutes and agenda, March 2001
Agenda, May 2001
Minutes and agenda, August 2001
Minutes and agenda, November 2001
Minutes and agenda, February 2002
Minutes and agenda, May 2002
Agenda, July 2002
Minutes and agenda, August 2002
Minutes and agenda, November 2002
Minutes, February 2003
Minutes and agenda, May 2003
Agenda, August 2003
Minutes and agenda, November 2003
Elected Committee of Operators (E.C.O.), agenda and minutes, 1989-1990
October 1989
January 1990
February 1990
May 1990
September 1990
November 1990



 

Procedure manuals, 1984-1998,
3 cubic ft.

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans.
These records consist of manuals, updates of manuals, memoranda, and distribution lists published by the Commission for the Blind from 1984 to 1998 for the following manuals: Administrative Procedures, Business Enterprises program, Blind and Visually Impaired Children's program, Human Resource Management, Independent Living Rehabilitation, Older Blind Services/Independent Living Rehabilitation, Maximum Affordable Payment Schedule, and Vocational Rehabilitation. Several manuals were reprinted when the number of changes to the previous version were unusually numerous.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by State Archives staff (as they probably were by the creating agency) in alphabetical order by program, and then in chronological order within each program.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Procedure manuals, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1991/050, 1992/025, 1993/012, 1994/024, 1995/021, 1996/005, 1997/024, 1998/004, 1999/112, 2000/015
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on January 2, 1991, October 30, 1991; September 28, 1992; October 26, 1993; October 27, 1994; September 24, 1995; October 23, 1996; September 8, 1997; September 30, 1998; and September 16, 1999.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Tony Black, September, 1991
Tonia Carlisle, May 1992
Paul Beck, October 1994
Lisa M. Hendricks, October 1995, October 1996, September 1997
Nancy Enneking, April 1999
Tony Black, January 2007
Box
1991/050-1 Administrative Procedure, 1984-1996, undated
Administrative Procedure Manual updates, 1984-1990:
Updates, February 1984
Updates, August 1984
Updates, January, December 1986
Updates, April, September 1987
Updates, February, October, December 1988
Updates, October 1989
Updates, January, August 1990
Administrative Procedures, regular change #23, April 1991
APM interim transmittals, March-August 1993
APM, interim transmittal #8, September 1993
A-1 Handbook, October 1993
Administrative Procedures Manual, undated
[2 folders]
APM, transmittal #1, July 1996
Box
1991/050-2 Business Enterprises Program, 1989
Business Enterprises Program, January 1989:
Volume I, Rules and Regulations
Volume II, Manual of Operations
Volume III, Manual of Operations
Children's Program, 1989-1994
Children's Program Manual (CPM), 1st edition, updates, 1989-1990:
Transmittal #1, July 1989
Transmittal #2, August 1990
BVICP (Blind and Visually Impaired Children's Program) Interim transmittal, January 1991
Children's Program Manual (CPM), 2nd edition, October 1991
CPM, 2nd edition, transmittal #1, September 1992
BVICP (Blind and Visually Impaired Children's Program), transmittal #2, October 1992 and March 1993
BVICP interim transmittal, February 1994
Human Resource Management, 1996-1998
Human Resource Management (HRM) manual, revised November 1, 1996
[2 folders]
HRM manual updates, transmittal #2, September 1997
Box
1991/050-3 HRM manual (complete reprint, with transmittals #1-3), November 1998
Independent Living Rehabilitation (ILR), 1991-1998
ILR manual updates, transmittal #3, April 1991
ILR manual interim transmittals, September 1992 and March 1993
ILM (Independent Living Manual), transmittals #5 and #6, September and October 1995
ILM transmittal #7, February 1996
ILM transmittal #8, April 1997
ILM transmittal #9, June 1998
Older Blind Services/Independent Living Rehabilitation, 1987
Older Blind Services/Independent Living Rehabilitation Manual, March 1987
Box
1991/050-4 Maximum Affordable Payment Schedule (MAPS), 1990-1998
Maximum Affordable Payment Schedule, 6th edition, March 1990
MAPS interim transmittal #1, August 1991
MAPS, 7th edition, July 1992
MAPS, interim transmittals, December 1991 and August 1992
MAPS interim transmittal, March 1993
MAPS interim transmittals, September 1993 and July 1994
MAPS, 8th edition, April-May 1996
MAPS update e-mail, July 1998
Vocational Rehabilitation (VR), 1989-1998
Box
1991/050-5 VR Manual, 2nd edition, January 1989
Transmittal #1, April 1989
Transmittal #2, July 1989
Transmittal #3, November 1989
Transmittal #4, March 1990
Transmittal #5, December 1990
Interim transmittal, February 1991
Transmittal #6, April 1991
Interim transmittal, September 1991
VR manual, transmittal #7, February and March 1992
VR manual, transmittal #8, July 1992
VR manual, interim transmittals, September 1992-June 1993
Box
1991/050-6 VR manual, 3rd edition, April 1993
VR manual, interim transmittals, October 1993 and July 1994
VR manual, transmittal #4, November 1995
VR manual, transmittal #5, February 1996
Box
1991/050-7 VR manual, transmittal #6, November 1996
VR manual, transmittal #7, April 1997
VR manual, transmittal #8, September 1997
VR manual, transmittal #9, July 1998



 

Press releases and pamphlets, 1970, 1976, 1979-1981, 1986, 1991, 1993, undated,
fractional

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. These records comprise press releases and a few pamphlets of the Texas Commission for the Blind from 1970, 1976, 1979-1981, 1986, 1991, 1993, and undated. Topics covered in the materials include notice of events planned for anniversary receptions; notice of new mailing addresses; announcements of financial grants and service awards; the recovery of public monies; the ability of state employees to make their own coffee at work; the services of the Cooperative School Program; the announcement of a moratorium on Title XX expenditures; the election of board members; and staff appointments. The degree to which these press releases are representative, in either numbers or content, of all Texas Commission for the Blind press releases is unknown.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by State Archives staff by type of record, and then in chronological order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Press releases and pamphlets, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 2006/143, 2006/345
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on March 27, 2002; and January 26, 2006. Press releases were assigned a new accession number by State Archives staff (for purposes of control) on January 26, 2006.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Nancy Enneking, July 2002
Tony Black, December 2006
Box
1998/002-3 Press releases, 1970, 1976, 1979-1981, 1986, 1991, undated
Pamphlets, 1993



 

Reports and audits, 1933-1982,
3.6 cubic ft.

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. These records consist of biennial reports, other reports, and audits of the Texas Commission for the Blind, dating 1933-1982.
Biennial reports (dating 1933-1936 and 1941-1982) give the broadest view of the work of the agency for those years. Reports to the federal government on the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program (dating 1944-1982) include monthly, quarterly, semi-annual and annual reports of referrals, caseloads, and finances for that program, plus some more specific studies. Audits and reports (dating 1969-1978) include other specific reports, most notably a series of follow-up studies of general caseload VR clients and also mental health/mental retardation VR clients (both employed and unemployed), as well as Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center exit interviews from the 1970s.
Arrangement
The records are arranged by the creating agency in the order that they were transferred to the State Archives, by type of report. Some types of reports are then arranged chonologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Reports and audits, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, Texas Government Code Sections 552.101 (Texas Human Resources Code, Section 12.003, names of persons receiving state assistance), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail, fax, or email including enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information requested. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1984/011, 1987/026
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on September 2, 1983 and October 26, 1986.
Box
1984/011-3 Biennial reports, 1933-1935, 1942-1982
1933-1935
1942-1944
[Note: also duplicated in Box 2-10/854, folder 4.]
1944-1946
1946-1948
1948-1950
1950-1952
1952-1954
1954-1956
1956-1958
1958-1960
1960-1962
1962-1964
1964-1966
1966-1968
1968-1970
1970-1972
1972-1974
1974-1976
1976-1978
Box
1984/011-4 1978-1980
(50th Anniversary Edition) 1980-1982
Box
1984/011-5 State reports, 1933-1965
Annual report, September 1, 1935-August 31, 1936
Report of personnel and expenditures (filed with Senate Investigating Committee), September 1, 1933-August 31, 1937
Biennial report, 1941-1942
Financial reports, FY 1953, 1957, 1958, 1962-1965
Reports to federal government, Vocational Rehabilitation Program, 1944-1982
Financial report for Vocational Rehabilitation, July 1955-June 1956
Report of state and local funds available for matching purposes, FFY 1957-1959
Financial reports for Vocational Rehabilitation, FFY 1956-1966
1956-1959
1961-1963
Partial report, FFY 1960
Partial report, FFY 1964-1966
Report of state and local funds available for matching purposes, FFY 1957-1967
Annual report for Vocational Rehabilitation, FFY 1976-1980
Annual Vocational Rehabilitation program/cost report (work copy), FFY 1981
Vocational Rehabilitation Program progress report, FFY 1975-1981
Quarterly cumulative caseload/expenditure report, FFY 1982, first quarter FFY 1983
War-disabled civilians or civil employees of the U.S., 1944
Report of services, FFY 1947-1948
Sources of new cases, FFY 1945-1949
Annual report on post-employment services, FFY 1976-1982
Quarterly cumulative report: Manpower Development and Training Act Program for minor medical services, FFY 1969-1971
Semi-annual cumulative report: Manpower Development and Training Act Program for minor medical services, FFY 1972-1974
Consolidated case load flow sheets (3 quarterly reports), 1944-1946
Case load summary report (quarterly), FFY 1947-1949
Referral and case load reports, 1949-1965:
Quarterly, FFY 1950-1953
Semi-annual, FFY 1954-1955
Quarterly, FFY 1956-1958
Monthly, FFY 1959-1965
Monthly report of cases closed, rehabilitated, FFY 1966-1974
Monthly cumulative reports of rehabilitations, FFY 1974-1979:
FFY 1975-1976
July 1-September 30, 1976
FFY 1977-1979
Monthly workload reports (supported by SCB district reports), FFY 1956-1958
Quarterly cumulative caseload reports, FFY 1967-1981
Quarterly cumulative reports of rehabilitations of clients in special target groups, FFY 1974-1981
Monthly report on OASI inquiries for Vocational Rehabilitation, FFY 1956-1961
Quarterly report on OASI disability applicant transmittals for Vocational Rehabilitation consideration, FFY 1961-1963
Report on OASI disability applicant transmittals for Vocational Rehabilitation consideration, FFY 1964-1965
Semi-annual case load report, FFY 1966
Quarterly report on Social Security disability insurance beneficiaries, June 30, 1967
Report on selected SSDI beneficiaries, FFY 1967
Quarterly status reports of Social Security disability insurance beneficiaries, FFY 1968-1974
Quarterly status reports of Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income program (SSI), FFY 1975
Characteristics of rehabilitants, FFY 1961-1966
Summary of Case Service reports for clients closed rehabiliatated (status 26), FFY 1967-1968
Earnings and dependency data, FFY 1964
Quarterly manpower report, FFY 1968
Report on activities of industrial rehabilitation specialist trainee since completing industrial rehabilitation specialist training course, 1945
Individual case report of blind persons placed by industrial rehabilitation specialist since completing industrial rehabilitation specialist training course, 1945
Special data on public assistance cases, critical occupations, and essential activities, FFY 1952
Special study of public assistance and institutionalized cases rehabilitated during FY 1953
Status of number of cases in referral status, September 30, 1965
Box
1987/026-1 Audits and reports, 1969-1978
Third party agreement reviews (medical facilities), 1977
MHMR program report and evaluation, FY 1975, September 1974-August 13, 1975
[2 folders]
MHMR and other cooperative programs evaluation summaries, 1974-1976
Third party evaluation of agreement between TCB and TLC for cooperative studies relating to program planning and evaluation of rehabilitation services for the visually disabled (three publications), 1969-1975
Follow-up study of TCB MH/MR VR clients closed, employed FY 1975, February 1978
Follow-up study of TCB general caseload VR clients, closed employed FY 1975, February 1978
Follow-up study of TCB general caseload VR clients closed unemployed, statuses 28 and 30 FY 1975, February 1978
Follow-up study of TCB summaries for 1972-1974, general client and MH/MR services, 1975
Follow-up study of TCB MH/MR clients closed employed FY 1974, February 1975
Follow-up study of TCB general caseload VR clients, closed employed FY 1974, December 1976
Follow-up study of TCB general caseload VR clients, closed employed FY 1972 and 1973, January 1976
Follow-up study of TCB VR clients closed employed, FY 1970 and 1971, April 1974
Follow-up study of TCB general caseload VR clients, closed FY 1970-1976--summary, August 1979
Closure follow-up survey summaries, 1970-1974
Box
1987/026-2 Extended employment annual review, final reports, 1976-1978
MH/MR in-house audits and evaluations, FY 1978
Third-party agreement, TCB questionnaire
Third-party contracts--general client services program; TCB evaluation report, MH/MR facilities, FY 1977
Evaluation standards, reports for 1974-1978
[5 folders]
Current and anticipated utilization of Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center for the Blind, January 1978
CCRC exit interviews and evaluation, to June 30, 1975
[Contains possibly excepted information: names of clients of social services]
CCRC exit interviews, September 1977, May 1978, June 1978, September 1978
Criss Cole Rehabilitation Center exit interviews, 1973-1978:
September 1973-August 1974
September 1977-May 1978
June-September 1978
Coding of "severely handicapped" cases, November 1977
Intensification of services to the visually disabled (Model Cities Programs), February 1, 1970-January 1, 1971
Older Blind Americans Grant proposal, FY 1976
Older Blind Americans Project, development of a pattern of services to older blind individuals, 1977
Review of ineligibility decisions, FY 1978 closures
Study of homemaker closures, FY 1978
Tuition and fees exemption at state-supported colleges and universities, March 1976
Vision screening survey, 1976
Low vision service functions and costs (services to low vision clinics), 1977
Vision screening project, preliminary report, 1977



 

Administrative files and public relations files, 1937-1982,
8 cubic ft.

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans.
The full range of functions of this agency are documented by these records, which include correspondence, memoranda, pamphlets and other publications, copies of legislation, press releases, attorney general opinions, interagency legal agreements, training materials, conference materials, newspaper and magazine clippings, and photographs, dating 1937-1982.
Arrangement
The records are arranged as they were received by the State Archives, in no easily discernible order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Administrative files and public relations files, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1983/123, 1986/093
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on March 21, 1983; and February 16, 1986.
Box
318-1 Texas School for the Blind
Texas Committee for Children and Youth; Texas Committee for Handicapped Children
Internal Revenue Office: TCB salary records, 1940-1941
Department of Public Welfare, miscellaneous cities and states
Texas Legislation Service
National Industries for the Blind, 1945-1954
Texas State Library
Opinion request procedure, June 5, 1963
Correspondence with Attorney General re: out-of-state trips
Attorney General ruling, out of state travel #2
Opinion #C-556, re: construction of Senate Bill 527 relating to financing services to crippled children with blindness
Opinion #C-644, re: whether contracts between Governor's Committee on Aging and enumerated entities can be legally entered into for purposes stated
Attorney General Opinions
[30 folders]
Opinions re: services for aliens #V-1447, #V-19, WW-1274
Attorney General Opinion #WW-766, Braille printer
Article 4399: Texas Braille Press transcription
American Foundation for the Blind: Braille watches
Braille Services, miscellaneous
Braille, sampler from Clovernook Home
Sample of braille reproduced on multigraph duplicator
Braille printer project: State Commission for the Blind
Braille printing houses and libraries
Moon system
Braille Institute of America, Inc.
Braille course, Orlando, Florida
Braille, general
House Resolution 4034: Talking Book Machine statistical data, to provide books and sound reproduction record for certain physically incapacitated
Texas Committee for the Employment of the Physically Handicapped
Texas Federation of the Blind
Texas School for the Deaf
Department of Public Welfare
Legislation
Legislation--State
Job classification study
Box
318-2 Texas Commission for the Blind historical items
State Medical Association
Proposed child labor law, February 27, 1937
Directory of activities for the blind in Illinois, North Carolina, and Canada
Prevention of blindness, general information
Statistics regarding services of the State Commission for the Blind, 1940-1942
Pension vs. prevention of blindness
Sightsaving class, Dallas Public School, special education
State Board for Vocation Education, J.J. Brown, Director
Rehabilitation Clinic for the Visually Handicapped, Houston
Agreement between Texas Education Agency (Vocational Rehabilitation Division) and the State Commission for the Blind: designation as agency to license BEP Operators, 1943
Auditor's Department
Vocational Rehabilitation: Basic definitions and principles
State Exchange Service
Texas statutes re: exemption from fees in state education institutions of collegiate rank
The Blind and Rehabilitation Commission Newsletter, April 1948
State Department of Vocation Education, correspondence
Texas State Commission for the Blind, August 31, 1943
Agreement between Vocational Rehabilitation Division of the State Board for Vocation Education and the VR Division of State Commission for the Blind, July 15, 1946
Agreement between the Texas Unemployment Compensation Commission and the State Commission for the Blind, 1943
State Commission for the Blind, June 30, 1946
Audit reports, 1943-1946
Occupations, list of
Statistical comparison by districts case loan data
Community Program for the Rehabilitation of the Severely Disabled
Texas Welfare Association
Ways and Weans for the Blind Service Bond: letter from the Walter G. Homes Foundation
Vocational Rehabilitation legislation
Questions and answers relating to vocational rehabilitation services, July 1948
Wechsler-Bellevue Intelligence Scale
Pinter Ability Tests
State Board for Vocational Rehabilitation Distributive Education Division
Texas Rehabilitation News
Radio documentaries
Rehabilitation abstracts
Bill--House Resolution 5563--to amend the Vocational Rehabilitation Act by providing for federal grants to states for vocational rehabilitation centers and sheltered workshops
Planning a comprehensive distributive education program in larger cities of Texas
National Rehabilitation Association, 1946-1955
[4 folders]
National Society for the Blind, Washington, D.C.
National Society for the Prevention of Blindness, New York
Box
318-3 Rehabilitation report for fiscal year ending June 30, 1950
Legislative Council
Negro Employment Report, etc., report of visit to Texas by Mr. John R. Smith, consultant for the placing of blind Negroes in employment
Agreement between the lighthouses and the State Commission for the Blind, re: statewide sales program
Readers fees
Placements, professional and semi-professional, March 1944 thru December 1952
Rehabilitation services for persons attending high schools, 1953
Professional literature
Agreement, Harris County Lighthouse
Hexter Memorial Lighthouse for the Blind, Dallas Training Center
Survey of blind population of Texas
Eye medical social workers, general file
Vocation rehabilitation amendments, 1954
Plant surveys
Survey of blind population of Texas, by county, as of July 1, 1954
Memoranda from Mr. Alsup, 1954-1955
National Employ the Physically Handicapped Week, Washington, D.C., 1949
Recruitment for State Vocational Rehabilitation programs
Memorandum--miscellaneous
Texas industries for the blind, Ft. Worth training facility
Memoranda from Lon Alsup, 1956
Rehabilitation center
Tarrant County Association for the Blind--Ft. Worth training facility
Dallas County Association for the Blind--Capital Avenue, Dallas training facility
Federations for blind
[2 folders]
National Federation for the Blind
Memoranda, Lon Alsup, 1957
Memoranda, Alsup, 1958
Revised regulations under the Vocational Rehabilitation Act, September 12, 1958
Health, Education and Welfare
Lon Alsup, fact sheet (copy and clippings)
Statistics on number of placements, up to June 30, 1958
Registry of blind pupils listed with Texas Education Agency
Appropriation for the State Commission for the Blind, 1950-1951
Board information, 1958-1959
Agreement between State Commission for the Blind and San Antonio Association for the Blind
Memoranda, Alsup, 1959
Survey of blind population of Texas to percentage in rural and urban areas, April 16, 1959
Agreement, Travis County Juvenile Court, 1959-1960
Estimated prevalence of blindness in the U.S. and individual states (National Society for the Prevention of Blindness), 1960
Agreement between Department of Public Welfare: distribution of radio and Commission for the Blind
Board meeting information, 1960-1962
Memoranda, Alsup, 1960-1961
Doyle Best, Dallas Regional Office, HEW
Memoranda, Alsup, 1962
Board meeting information, 1963-1964
Memoranda, Alsup, 1963
Aubrey B. Tipps--memoranda--extracted from Lon Alsup files, 1955-1963
Health, Education, and Welfare, VRA (Vocational Rehabilitation Administration)
VR (Vocational Rehabilitation) training
VR (Vocational Rehabilitation)--general
OVR (Office of Vocational Rehabilitation) director's letters
Health, Education, and Welfare, OVR (Office of Vocational Rehabilitation)
OVR--Rehabilitation service series (2)
OVR, rehabilitation memo
Box
318-4 Services Unlimited, Beaumont's community workshop for the handicapped
Beaumont Association for the Blind and Beaumont Lighthouse, G.A. McLaughlin
Negro Lighthouse for the Blind, Houston
San Antonio Association for the Blind
South Texas Lighthouse for the Blind and Otherwise Handicapped Persons, Lubbock
Harris County Lighthouse for the Blind, Houston
Lighthouse for the Blind, Dallas
Hexter Memorial Lighthouse for the Blind, Dallas
El Paso County Association for the Blind
Travis Association for the Blind and Austin Lighthouse
Willie Fay Lewis, Home Teacher Lighthouse for the Blind, Ft. Worth
Sammie Rankin, home teacher, Waco Lighthouse for the Blind
Richard Riley, Corpus Christi
Sara Suwal, home teacher, Lighthouse for the blind, Dallas
Marianna Webb, home teacher San Antonio Lighthouse
Alabama
Arkansas Enterprises for the Blind, Inc.
California
Colorado
Delaware Commission for the Blind
Florida
Georgia
Walter G. Holmes Foundation, Inc., Atlanta, Georgia
Illinois
Hadley School for the Blind, Winnetka, Illinois
Iowa Commission for the Blind
Kansas
Kansas Rehabilitation Center for the Adult Blind, Topeka, Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
[2 folders]
Maryland
Massachusetts
Massachusetts Division of the Blind, Annual Report, and general correspondence, 1958
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Nebraska
Nevada
New Jersey
New Mexico
[2 folders]
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio, miscellaneous
Ohio Association for the Blind, Ohio Clocernook Home for the Blind
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
South Dakota
West Virginia
Wisconsin
India
Texas Association for the Blind
Congressional Directory of Texas Senators and Representatives
State cars, general
Chevrolet truck #4800
Chevrolet Tudor #2142, 1953-1954
Chevrolet station wagon #XS 2566, 1953-1954
Chevrolet sedan #3950, 1953-1954
Preliminary list of heads of state departments and agencies as of September 1955
Attorney General, Austin, Texas
Board of Control, office space
Comptroller of Public Accounts re: executive director's salary
County judge, correspondence
Department of Education
Executive Department, Governor of Texas
Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Vocational Rehabilitation Administration, Washington, D.C.
Texas State Teachers Association, re: home teacher participation in retirement fund, 1943
Box
318-5 Medical Advisory Board
Fee schedule
Tests for the clients and the results
Organization and functions of State Commission for the Blind
Notice of change of address, State Commission for the Blind
Legislation, AAWB
AFB, general
Texas Research League, Study of the Commission for the Blind
AFB publication:
Vocational Rehabilitation
Scholarships
Radio and TV releases
Braille
Home teacher
Deaf blind
Consultant in vocational planning
Legislation
Legislation:
Vending stand memorandum, 1969
Pending legislation
Legislation--federal
Congressional Record, 1950
Amendment to appropriation bill, State Commission for the Blind
Budgets and appropriation
Budget and appropriation information, Commission for the Blind, 1941-1945 and 1951
Mimeographed legislative matter
Political aid and loyalty oath, signed by employees
Political aid and legislative influence prohibited
Legislation--federal: State Commission for the Blind, correspondence, 1941-1943
Legislation, Rehabilitation, a pleas for our maimed
National Society for the Blind: legislation, Barden-LaFollett Act, 1942-1943
Representatives, 1951
Legislation, State Commission for the Blind
Senate, State of Texas
Legislature, House of Representatives, State of Texas
Legislation affecting blind
House of Representatives, Washington, D.C., 1943-1949
House Bill 10, injury of employees, amending sections 7, 8, 10, 11, 12 of Article 8306
House Bill 21, no funds of the state to be used as salary for employees until oath is filed
Senate Joint Resolution 33, state participation in programs financed with funds from private or federal sources
House Bill 465, previous injuries, amending article 8306, section 12c
Senate Bill 40, workman's compensation, occupational diseases
Sick leave
Social Security card
Standard for measuring the financial need of clients of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Talking Book Machine information, PR files
10 rules of courtesy to the blind
Travel code for the Commission for the Blind, 1955, 1957, 1959
Workload data for legislative budget
Zenith Radio Corporation, letter
Allocation of state and local funds for certain employees, September 1, 1953 thru August 31, 1954
Appropriations bill, general provisions, August 31, 1961
College scholarships, AFB, April 5, 1957
Conservation Club, Mail. A. Voice
Counseling handbook
Excerpts from "The Blind and the Professions"
Farming for the blind
Fee schedule for physical restoration services
Handbook of industrial jobs
Increment provisions, August 1, 1956
Maintenance, October 15, 1963
Medical examination authorization, VR
Memo to all rehabilitation personnel
Opportunities for men in Texas radio
Psychological testing of rehabilitation clients
Procedures on temporary certifications authorizing employment/training of vocational rehabilitation clients at sub-minimum wage rates, May 290, 1956
Procedure to be followed in recording cases in which "long term" training is being provided
Program administration review narrative appraisal, Texas Agency for the Blind
Reader fees
Rehabilitation clients attending college, May 10, 1957 and August 15, 1958
[2 folders]
Rehabilitation clients with hospitalization and medical/surgical insurance, November 19, 1959
Reopening of cases closed "employed"
Request for authority to dispose of public records
Retirement policies for Commission personnel and vending stand operators, July 30, 1965
Sears, Roebuck, and Co. program for employment of physically handicapped
Donations
Health, Education and Welfare programs, senior citizens, 1962
Box
318-6 Training facilities approved by the State Commission for the Blind: Texas masseur training, Jewish Community Center, Houston
Training facilities and occupational information:
Job opportunities in the hotel industry
East Texas Steel Casting Co., Longview Job Placement
Elkins Radio Institute, Dallas
Employment conditions at Corpus Christi Naval Air Station
Employment of blind workers in industry
Blind lawyers
Employment opportunities for persons in T.V.
Employment possibilities for the blind at U.S. Air Force bases
Employment opportunities for qualified blind persons wishing to tutor University of Texas students (in Spanish)
Estimated increase in tuition cost for rehabilitation students attending college for the school year 1957-1958
Farm school
Federal Security Agency unschooled deaf person
Garden therapy and the blind
Handbook of job descriptions in rural activities suitable for the employment of blind persons
Industries, general
Industrial and related occupations, July 1, 1954-June 30, 1955
Industrial Home for the Blind
Interstate Readers Service, Dallas
Jobs held by rehabilitants of the Texas Commission for the Blind
Possibility of employment for the blind, Sol Frank Co., San Antonio
Professional and technical
Prospective industrial position
Qualifications for positions in State hospitals and special schools, October 22, 1959
Radio Engineering Institute, Nebraska
Rural rehabilitation
Rural development
TV station personnel and opportunities for men in Texas radio, February 20, 1958
United States Blind Industries, San Diego, California
Work performance of physically impaired workers
Conference--meetings:
Vocational Rehabilitation Conference, March 15, 1946
Executive Committee Meeting of the States, September 1946
Area Conference on Program for Crippled Children, November 21, 1946
State Directors of Divisions of Vocational Rehabilitation and Agencies for the Blind, December 1946
Conference of Executives of State Agencies for the Blind, April 1948
Regional Conference of State Directors, October 1947
State's Vocational Rehabilitation Council annual meeting, December 1948
NRA Conference, New Orleans, 1968
NRA Conference, Region VII, May 4-6, 1956
NRA Conference, Milwaukee
TRA annual meeting, Dallas, July 29-31, 1964
Southwest Regional Conference, NRA, Santa Fe, New Mexico, June 1-2, 1964
Southwest Regional Conference, NRA, Santa Fe, New Mexico, April 7-10, 1963
NRA conference, Miami Beach, Florida, 1963
NRA annual conference, San Francisco, October 2-4, 1961
NRA meeting, March 1957, October 1956, October
[3 folders]
NRA conference, November 1949
In-service training conference, September 1956
In-service training program for employees, September 1957
Aids for sub-normal vision speech given by Barney K. Williams at the 1958 Conference of the National Rehabilitation Association, Dallas, March 9-12, 1958
Regional workshop on staff development for vocational rehabilitative personnel, Fayetteville, Arkansas, September 22-26, 1958
In-service training program for employees, October 1958
Training Institute for Rehabilitative Council for the Blind, November 17-20, 1958
Texas Association for Mental Health, January 19, 1961
Texas Welfare Association, San Antonio, November 14, 1961
The Church's Ministry to the Exceptional Child and His Family, November 29-December 1, 1961
Institute on the Development of Occupational Information, St. Louis, Missouri, April 8-10, 1963
Project reports, Advanced Counseling Institute, summer 1963
Occupational Information meeting, St. Louis, Missouri, April 8-10, 1963
Rehabilitation Symposium, Dallas, May 7-8, 1964
In-service training for new staff, November 1-11, 1966
National Commission on Architecture, Washington, D.C., summary minutes, March 2-4, 1967
Association of Rehabilitation Centers, Phoenix, Arizona, November 29-December 3, 1964
Directors Conference, September 1965
Agencies for the blind:
New Eyes for the Needy, Inc.
Our Lady of the Lake College--Harry Jersig Speech and Hearing Center, San Antonio
Pilot School for the Blind Children, Washington, D.C.
General
Seeing Eye Dogs:
Canine College, Inc., Waveland, Mississippi
Companion Collie Program--Guide Dogs for the Junior Blind, Quitman, Texas
Elizabeth Hutchinson--Seeing Eye
Employing a blind person who uses a seeing eye dog (pamphlet)
Eye Dog Foundation
Facts about the Seeing Eye, Inc.
Guide Dogs for the Blind, Inc.
Guiding Eyes for the Blind, Inc., New York, NY
Pilot Guide Dog Foundation
Information about dog guides-- "A Dog Guide User Speaks on Mobility,""Dog Guides and Blind Children"
International Guides Eyes
Leader Dogs for the Blind
Magazines and pamphlets on seeing eye dogs
Pre-school:
Diseases of the eye
Penrickton Nursery School, Taylor, Michigan
Talking Book Machines and Talking Book Records: 25th anniversary of TBM
Box
318-7 Biennial reports to the Governor, State Commission for the Blind, 1952-1966
Newspaper/magazine articles on visually handicapped, organizations of or for the blind
Legal basis for the Rehabilitation Program for the Blind
Historical materials gathered for preparation of 50th anniversary edition, Biennial Report, 1980-1982
Photographs of blind workers, probably early 1940s
Drafts of 50th anniversary section of Biennial Report, 1980-1982
Draft materials of Biennial Report, 1980-1982
Publications of organizations of and for the blind, including Commission for the Blind newsletters
International Year of Disabled Persons, proclamation by President Jimmy Carter, 1981
Box
1986/093 Charles W. Hoehne files, 1972-1978:
Correspondence (memos), 1972-1974
Memos: program evaluation, 1975
Memos: general, 1975
Memos: general, 1976
Memos: general, 1977-1978
Client Assistance Program, 1980-1981
Client Assistance Project:
Budget, 1980
Grants, 1979-1980
Grant, prep backup
[empty folder]
Miscellaneous, 1978-1980
Annual review, October 1978-September 1979
WATS Line call records, 1980-1981
September-December 1980
January-March 1981
April-June 1981



 

Scrapbook, 1934-1942,
0.4 cubic ft.

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans.
These records include a photocopy and the original of a scrapbook of newspaper clippings documenting the activities of the Texas Commission for the Blind and others engaged in work for the blind, as well as blind individuals themselves, dating 1934-1942. The original scrapbook was presented to Hazel Beckham Benedict when she resigned as Executive Secretary-Director of the Commission on August 31, 1942. The photocopy was made in 1981.
Arrangement
The scrapbook is arranged in the order it was received from the creating agency.
Preferred Citation
Scrapbook, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Accession Information
Accession number: 1984/011
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on September 2, 1983.
Box
1984/011-4 Scrapbook, 1934-1942
[original and photocopy]



 

Videotape, 1991,
fractional

The Texas Commission for the Blind was created to provide vocational rehabilitation and other services to blind Texas residents not receiving such services from other sources, to help prevent blindness, and to maintain a registry of the blind. In 1965, it was designated as the state agency with primary responsibility to provide all services, except those related to the education of school-aged children or those purely welfare in nature, to all visually impaired Texans. These records consist of one copy of the videotape "Partners in Independence," 1991, commemorating the 60th anniversary of the Texas Commission for the Blind.
Preferred Citation
Videotape, Texas Commission for the Blind records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Technical Requirements
Researchers wishing to access the videotape must contact the Archives' Preservation Officer to obtain the necessary equipment.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1991/167
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Commission for the Blind on May 15, 1991.
Box
AC 1991/167 "Partners in Independence," 1991