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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Biographical Sketch

Scope and Contents of the Records

Arrangement of the Records

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Bill files, 1997-1999, 2003-2005,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Legislature, House of Representatives:

An Inventory of Representative Toby Goodman Bill Files at the Texas State Archives, 1997-1999, 2003-2005



Overview

Creator: Texas. Legislature. House of Representatives.
Title: Representative Toby Goodman bill files
Dates: 1997-1999, 2003-2005
Abstract: The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the Legislature of the State of Texas (the other being the Texas Senate), which the Texas Constitution (Article III, Section I) vests with all legislative power of the state. Representative Toby Goodman's bill files document his representation of Texas House District 93 (portions of Tarrant County) during the 75th and 76th Texas Legislatures (1997-1999) and during the 78th and 79th Legislatures (2003-2005). Types of records include bill analyses, bill drafts, bill summaries, fiscal notes, correspondence, clippings, reports, memorandums and other legislative records dating from 1997 to 1999 and from 2003 to 2005.
Quantity: 5 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the Legislature of the State of Texas (the other being the Texas Senate), which the Texas Constitution (Article III, Section 1) vests with all legislative power of the state. The primary legislative power is enacting laws, and the most visible function of the legislature is to make public policy through drafting, considering, and passing bills and resolutions. Biennially, the House of Representatives elects a speaker from its membership to serve as its presiding officer. The House of Representatives consists of 150 representatives elected in even-numbered years for two-year terms. A representative must be at least 21 years old, a qualified voter, and a resident of Texas for at least two years and of the district represented for at least one year immediately preceding election.

In addition to legislative powers, the legislature exercises other types of authority. Constituent powers include the ability to alter the state constitution, and the members’ authority to exercise powers of attorney in behalf of their constituents. Directory and supervisory powers allow the legislature to regulate the state’s administrative machinery, made up of boards, commissions, and departments that conduct the affairs of state. The legislature establishes and funds these bodies and defines their functions. Executive powers of each house include selection of legislative officers, employees, and chairs and members of committees. Investigative powers are exercised through the formation of standing, special, interim, and joint committees to study an issue. House committees are usually charged with a particular purpose by the speaker, although this may also be accomplished by a resolution adopted by the house. Each legislative house holds judicial powers over its members, including punishing or expelling members for cause.

The legislature meets in regular session on the second Tuesday in January of odd-numbered years and in special sessions when convened by the governor. The length of the regular session is limited to 140 days. Special sessions are limited to 30 days, but the number of special sessions that may be called is not limited. Only legislative matters submitted by the governor may be considered in special session. All legislative sessions, except for the senate's executive session, are open. Neither house may, without the consent of the other, adjourn for more than three days or move to a place other than where the legislature is sitting. Two-thirds of each house constitutes a quorum, the number of members required to conduct business. If a quorum is not present, a smaller number may vote to adjourn and compel absent members to attend. The house is required to keep and publish a journal of its proceedings and to record the vote on any question on which three members who are present demand an actual count of yeas and nays.

The House of Representatives functions through committees set up under its own rules. The house maintains more standing committees than the senate. By custom the speaker appoints standing, special, and conference committees, although the house is free to designate its own method of selection. Under the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1961, the committee system was expanded, and provisions were made whereby standing, special, and general investigating committees created by each body could function whether or not the legislature was in session. As of 2014, the house has 38 standing committees: Agriculture and Livestock; Appropriations; Business and Industry; Calendars; Corrections; County Affairs; Criminal Jurisprudence; Culture, Recreation, and Tourism; Defense and Veterans' Affairs; Economic and Small Business Development; Elections; Energy Resources; Environmental Regulation; General Investigating and Ethics; Government Efficiency and Reform; Higher Education; Homeland Security and Public Safety; House Administration; Human Services; Insurance; International Trade and Intergovernmental Affairs; Investments and Financial Services; Judiciary and Civil Jurisprudence; Land and Resource Management; Licensing and Administrative Procedures; Local and Consent Calendars; Natural Resources; Pensions; Public Education; Public Health; Redistricting; Rules and Resolutions; Special Purpose Districts; State Affairs; Technology; Transportation; Urban Affairs; and Ways and Means.

(Sources include: Guide to Texas State Agencies, 11th edition (2001); and Legislative Reference Library of Texas (http://www.lrl.state.tx.us/index.cfm), accessed October 9, 2014.)

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Biographical Sketch

Texas Representative Toby Goodman, a Republican from Arlington, served eight terms in the Texas House of Representatives (1991-2007). During this time, he represented House District 93 (portions of Tarrant County). He was interested in child support and custody issues, juvenile justice system and protocol, court administration, and animal welfare issues. Much of his legislation involved amending, changing, and clarifying the Juvenile Justice Code and the Family Code. He served on the Juvenile Justice and Family Issues Committee as its chair (1995-2003) and its vice-chair (2003-2007) as well as on the Judicial Affairs Committee (1991-1997). In 2006, Goodman lost his reelection campaign.

Goodman was born in Wichita Falls in 1948. He earned a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas Christian University in 1971 and a Juris Doctor from Baylor University School of Law in 1974. After graduation, he entered the law field with a focus on family law and general civil practice. He and his wife, Gloria, have three children.

(Sources include: Texas Legislature Online (http://www.lrl.state.tx.us/legeLeaders/index.cfm), and Goodman's law office website (http://www.goodmanclark.com/), both accessed October 9, 2014; and the records themselves.)

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Scope and Contents of the Records

The Texas House of Representatives is one arm of the Legislature of the State of Texas (the other being the Texas Senate), which the Texas Constitution (Article III, Section I) vests with all legislative power of the state. Representative Toby Goodman's bill files document his efforts to represent Texas House District 93 (portions of Tarrant County) during the 75th and 76th Texas Legislatures (1997-1999) and during the 78th and 79th Legislature (2003-2005). Types of records include bill analyses, bill drafts, bill summaries, fiscal notes, correspondence, clippings, reports, memorandums and other legislative records dating from 1997 to 1999 and from 2003 to 2005. Major topics include court administration, especially in Tarrant County; community improvement programs and services in Tarrant County; amending, changing, and clarifying the Juvenile Justice and the Family Codes; disbursement of community property and debts following a divorce; child support and custody issues; juvenile justice system and protocol; animal welfare; public safety issues, especially in regard to motor vehicle accidents; local tax revenue collection for special events; and regulation of public utilities. Additionally, Goodman served on the Juvenile Justice and Family Issues Committee as its chair (1995-2003) and its vice-chair (2003-2005).

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.

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Arrangement of the Records

Records are arranged by legislative session and then by bill number as received from the representative's office.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to: home addresses, phone numbers and personal family information of government employees and officials (Texas Government Code, Section 552.117), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (Texas Government Code, Chapter 552).

The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail (Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P. O. Box 12927, Austin, TX 78711), fax (512-463-5436), email (director.librarian@tsl.texas.gov), or see our web page (https://www.tsl.texas.gov/agency/customer/pia.html). Include enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.

In accordance with Texas Government Code, Chapter 306, Toby Goodman allowed public access to the communications between himself and citizens/representatives of the state of Texas and with the Texas Legislative Council as of November 29, 2006.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

None.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Goodman, Toby, 1948-
Corporate Names:
Texas. Legislature. House of Representatives. Committee on Juvenile Justice and Family Issues.
Subjects:
Animal welfare--Law and legislation--Texas.
Court administration--Law and legislation--Texas.
Custody of children--Law and legislation--Texas.
Juvenile justice, Administration of--Law and legislation--Texas.
Tax collection--Law and legislation--Texas.
Document Types:
Bills (legislative records)--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Clippings (information artifacts)--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Correspondence--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Legislative records--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Memorandums--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Notes--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Reports--Texas--Legislators--1997-1999, 2003-2005.
Functions:
Representing state.

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Related Material

None.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Representative Toby Goodman bill files, Texas House of Representatives. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2012/198

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the House of Representatives on March 6, 2012.

Processing Information

Processed by Anna M. Reznik, October 2014

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Detailed Description of the Records

 

Bill files, 1997-1999, 2003-2005,
5 cubic ft.

Box
2012/198-1 75th Legislature, Regular Session, 1997
SB (Senate Bill) 1726
HB (House Bill) 1826
[Includes folder labeled HCR (House Concurrent Resolution) 270.]
HB 3286/SB 29
HB 1825
HB 1550
[2 folders]
SB 1098
SB 1154
HB 1352/HJR (House Joint Resolution) 75
SB 1235 - Dangerous Animal
HB 2885
SB 133: Chapter 37 Education Code
HB 1090/HB 2885
SB 607
SB 711: Dalworthington Gardens
SB 797
SB 798
HB 863
SB 937
SB 34
HB 1091
HB 1091: Putative Fathers Registry
CSHB (Committee Substitute House Bill) 92
SB 334: Recodification Title I
HB 308
SB 349
SB 381
[Includes 1 folder labeled HB 309 – Sex offenses against child and 1 folder labeled SB 381 Amendment.]
HB 399
SB 426: UIFSA (Uniform Interstate Family Support Act)
SB 625
SB 310
Box
2012/198-2 HB 1828
HB 1917
CSSB (Committee Substitute Senate Bill) 712
HB 3285
HB 3281
HB 2873
76th Legislature, Regular Session, 1999
HB 1712
HB 2948/SB 1035
SB 1814
SB 1816
HB 2142
HB 2143
HB 2243
HB 2355
[2 folders]
HB 2440
HB 2742
78th Legislature, Regular Session, 2003
HB 263
HB 276
HB 233
HB 234
HB 296
HB 297
SB 351
SB 354
SB 602
HB 648
HB 729
HB 821
HB 822
HB 858
HB 980
HB 823
SB 922
[2 folders]
HB 913
SB 1000
SB 1047
HB 1119
HB 1834
HB 1815: Ad Litem
HB 1066
Box
2012/198-3 HB 1324
HB 1658: Telecommunications Bill
HB 1659: TABC (Texas Alcoholic Beverage Code) Bill
HB 1719
HB 1833
HB 2088
HB 2087/SB 358
HB 2319
CSHB 2393
HB 2588
HB 3418
HB 3583
SB 1000
HB 3336
HB 3418
HJR 82
HR 181
[Resolution from the 3rd Called Session.]
79th Legislature, Regular Session, 2005
HB 61
[Bill numbers in folder correspond with the 2nd Called Session.]
HB 201
HB 202
HB 203
HB 204
HB 205
HB 207
HB 208
HB 209
HB 247
HB 248
HB 252
HB 260
HB 261
HB 305
HB 306
HB 307
HB 326
HB 352
HB 409
Box
2012/198-4 HB 410
HB 545
HB 678
HB 1056
HB 1142
HB 1157
HB 1158
HB 1256/SB 393
HB 1449
HB 1952
[Includes folder labeled HB 2191.]
HB 2149: UTA (University of Texas – Arlington) Bill
HB 2485
HB 2486
HB 2637
HB 2638/SB 1253
HB 3071: Tax Bill
HB 3382: Franchise fees
[2 folders]
HR 475: Children's Advocacy Resolution
[2 folders]
SB 321
SB 1151
SB 1305
SB 1582
HB 200
HB 201
HB 202
HB 203
HB 204
HB 205
HB 206
HB 207
HB 208
HB 209
HB 247
HB 248
HB 252
Box
2012/198-5 HB 260
HB 305
HB 306
HB 307
HB 352
HB 409
HB 1142
HB 1157
HB 1158
HB 1256
HB 1952
HB 2149
HB 2308: University of Texas – Arlington Bill
HB 2485
HB 2637
HB 2638
HB 3071: Tax Bill
HB 3382

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