Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Camargo Documents:

An Inventory of Camargo Documents at the Texas State Archives, 1798-1941, bulk 1806-1810, 1830-1835



Overview

Title: Camargo documents
Dates: 1798-1941
Dates: bulk 1806-1810, 1830-1835
Abstract: Materials are copies of records from the municipal archives in Camargo, Mexico and copies of land title documents from Hidalgo County, Texas deed records, dating 1798-1941. The bulk of these documents date from 1806 to 1810 and 1830 to 1835 and are concerned with land transactions on both sides of the Rio Grande. Also of note is an 1807 muster roll and an 1828 census of Camargo.
Quantity: 0.24 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written in Spanish a few documents in English.
Repository: Texas State Archives

History

Camargo, Mexico, on the Rio Grande, was founded in March 1749 by José de Escandon, who had been appointed by the King of Spain to colonize the province of Nueva Santander, now the state of Tamaulipas. After Mexico gained independence in 1821, a number of land laws were enacted by the federal congress to support the colonization of the area, including a general colonization law passed on August 18, 1824. The state of Tamaulipas controlled its vacant lands and after adoption of a state constitution in 1825, colonization of the vacant lands on the Rio Grande was encouraged in order to strengthen frontier towns.

Under Decree 24 of October 13, 1833, constitutional governor Francisco Vital Fernández offered inhabitants of Camargo, Reynosa, Mier, Guerrero, and Laredo who had livestock but no land as much as five sitios each for a payment of ten pesos for each sitio. [Sitio: a Spanish unit of measurement equal to 25 million square varas (4,428.4 acres). Americans came to use the term "league" as synonymous with a sitio.] The settler had to have lived in the village during the last Indian war and have emigrated since 1821.

According to Florence Johnson Scott's Historical Heritage of the Lower Rio Grande, the title to land consisted of proceedings recorded in the alcalde's (mayor's) office, with a duplicate ( expediente) given to the applicant. The expediente was forwarded by the grantee to the Governor along with the payment for the land with the title being granted under the seal of state. The alcalde was then authorized to put the individual in possession of the land.


Scope and Contents of the Records

Materials are copies of records from the municipal archives in Camargo, Mexico and from Hidalgo County, Texas deed records, dating 1798-1941. The bulk of these documents date from 1806 to 1810 and 1830 to 1835 and are concerned with land titles and transactions on both sides of the Rio Grande. Also of note is an 1807 muster roll and an 1828 census of Camargo. Physical descriptions, including number of pages, are for the originals which were returned to Mexico, not these photocopies.


 

Organization of the Records

These records are organized into six series as received in the State Archives:
Benadito grant, copy and translation, probably 1849, 1927, 1941, fractional
Benadito file, 1807, 1825, 1828, 1835-1836, bulk 1835-1836, fractional
Salinas v. Trevino file, 1798, 1803, 1806-1810, 1812-1813, bulk 1806-1810, 0.1 cubic ft.
Land grant file, 1834-1837, 1870, bulk 1835, fractional
San Rafael file, 1828, 1830-1831, fractional
Miscellaneous file, 1830, fractional

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

None.

Restrictions on Use

None.

Technical Requirements

None.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Subjects:
Land grants--Mexico.
Land grants--Texas.
Colonization.
Places:
Camargo, Mexico
Mexican-American Border Region.
Mexico--Colonization.
Texas--Colonization.
Document Types:
Deeds--Texas--Colonization--1798-1941.
Legal documents--Texas--Colonization--1798-1941.
Deeds--Mexico--Colonization--1798-1941.
Legal documents--Mexico--Colonization--1798-1941.
Muster rolls--Mexico--Colonization--1807.
Census records--Mexico--Colonization--1828.
Functions:
Documenting Mexican land grants.
Documenting Texas land grants.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Archivo General de Mexico typescripts
Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
Camargo Archives, 1764-1909 [Municipal archives. These include photostat copies of birth, baptismal, marriage, and death certificates.]
General Land Office, Austin, Texas
The General Land Office also has copies of the documents described in this finding aid.
Spanish Land Records, Province of Nuevo Santander, Auto de la General Visita (Acts of the Visit of the Royal Commissioners) [Transcribed from archives in Mexico, these volumes record the distribution of land by the Spanish royal commissioners in 1767 to the Rio Grande settlements of Laredo, Mier, Camargo, Revilla (later Guerrero), and Reynosa established by José de Escandon.]
Publications
Texas. General Land Office. Guide to Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in South Texas.
Scott, Florence Johnson. Historical Heritage of the Lower Rio Grande.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 1980/183

These documents were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Attorney General on April 20, 1978. The originals were presented to Governor Cardenas Gonzalez of Tamaulipas on March 26, 1980 to be returned to the municipal archives of Camargo. Photocopies are on file in the Archives and the General Land Office. For further details on the provenance of these documents, see the accession file.

Processing Information

José Juárez, May 1978 [English summaries of Spanish-language documents]

Tonia J. Wood, April 2002

Other Formats for the Records

The originals were given to the Governor of Tamaulipas to be returned to the municipal archives in Camargo, Mexico.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Benadito grant, copy and translation, probably 1849, 1927, 1941,
fractional

This is a copy of a certified typescript copy and translation, made in 1927 for Hidalgo County, Texas deed records from real estate records in Starr County, Texas (recorded 1849), of a grant of five sitios to Jose Antonio Morales de Villareal given on October 15, 1835, which is not included in the papers of the Benadito file. Also included is a copy of a cover letter, dating 1941, providing information on the provenance of the certified typescript copy and translation and a copy of a handwritten page containing a portion of the Spanish text, possibly from the real estate records, probably in 1849, in Starr County. The Benadito file has all of the papers which were filed to obtain this title. Page one of Part II of the Benadito file has a description of five sitios in the Benadito grant which were given to Antonio Morales García and Apolinario García. The boundaries for these five sitios are different, however. The only boundary which that land and this land share in common is the ranch of San Ramón.
Arrangement
These records are arranged chronologically as received in the State Archives.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Benadito grant, copy and translation, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box Folder
1980/183 1. Copy and translation of grant of five sitios in Benadito to Antonio Morales, probably 1849, 1927, 1941



 

Benadito file, 1807, 1825, 1828, 1835-1836, bulk 1835-1836,
fractional

Documents are a legal file relating to a land purchase, descriptions of ceremonies granting possession of land, a petition for land, a muster roll, and census, all from the municipal archives in Camargo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Materials date from 1807, 1825, 1828, 1835-1836, bulk 1835-1836.
Arrangement
These records are arranged somewhat chronologically as received in the State Archives.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Benadito file, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Part I
Box Folder
1980/183 2. Muster Roll With Expressions Of Rank, Names, Years, Months And Days Of Service, Quality (Race), Value Or Bravery, And Conduct. Signed by Pedro Lopez Prieto on December 31, 1807.
1 page.
2. General Census That In This Town Of Camargo Is Made As Per The Law Of Finance For The Tax On Articles Contained Within It: Made By The Second Citizen Garcia And Begun On April 10, 1828.
2 pages.
[Categories include: Names, Rented Houses, Age, Summer Pasture, Capital, Cattle of All Ages, Ready Mules, Horses of All Ages, Sheep of All Ages, Rented Ewes, Owned Goats, Rented Goats, Donkeys.]
2. Photostat Copy Of Request For Lands By Francisco Ygnacio Farias On Behalf Of His Three Sons, 1825.
2 pages, stapled together.
[Note: Original is found at the end of Part III of this file.]
Part II
Box Folder
1980/183 3. Copies Of Some Possessions Given Some Citizens Of This Town In The Years Of 1835 And 1836. The Mayor Being Matias Ramires.
1 cardboard cover.
3. Copies Of The Possessions Given To Some Citizens Of This Village In This Year Of 1835 And 1836. N-8.
2 title pages, Spanish and English.
3. Expediente (Legal File) Of The Summer Pasture Of Benadito, Five Sitios Of Summer Pasture For Cattle In The Jurisdiction Of The Town Of Camargo Measured For Antonio Morales De Villarreal. Number 456.
1 title page.
[Note: This page is numbered "1" in pencil. There are pages numbered through 17 in pencil, with pages 4,5,6,7 and 12 missing. Pages were numbered by a previous possessor of the documents.]
3. Page 2: Petition From Jose Antonio Morales De Villarreal To The Municipality Of Camargo Asking To Have His Claim To Five Sitios Known As "El Benadito" Denounced (Affirmed), August 14, 1835.
3. Page 3: Jose Matias Ramirez, Speaking For The City Council Of Camargo, Affirms That Morales De Villarreal Has Livestock But Not Land For It, And That He Has Never Emigrated Elsewhere, August 14, 1835.
3. Page 8: Vista De Ojo (Inspection Report) Of El Benadito Conducted By Ramirez, The State Surveyor And Witnesses, [date is likely on a missing page].
[The lakes on this ranch will not hold water for even fifteen days.]
3. Pages 8-9: Report Of The Measurement Of El Benadito Conducted By The State Surveyor, Ramirez, Overseers, Accountants, And Expert (Perito), August 18, 1835.
[Includes a description of the actual measurement of the land, together with a listing of the boundaries and the surrounding ranches.]
3. Pages 9-10: The Appraisers Set The Value Of The Land At Ten Pesos Per Sitio, September 13, 1835.
3. Pages 10-11: Ramirez Orders The State Surveyor To Make A Map Of The Land. The State Surveyor Returns The File On The Same Day, With The Map Attached. Antonio Morales De Villarreal Paid Fifty Pesos For His Land, Which Is Sent To The Governor Together With This File, September 15, 1835.
3. Page 13: Attorney Canales Rules That Trinidad Valverde Has No Reason To Withhold The Salary Of His Servant Jose Maria Rivera, undated.
3. Page 14: Governor Fernandez Sends The Money To The Treasury Minister on October 8, 1835.
3. Page 14: Jose Nunez De Caceres Accepts Fifty Pesos From Blas Morales On Behalf Of Antonio Morales De Villarreal, October 9, 1835.
3. Page 15: Governor Fernandez Sends The File On To The Fiscal De Hacienda (Minister Of Finance Or Attorney General. Hereafter translated as attorney general) on October 9, 1835.
3. Pages 15-16: Attorney General Nunez De Caceres Certifies That All Of The Legal Requirements Have Been Met And A Deed Can Be Issued To Morales, October 12, 1835.
3. Pages 16-17: Governor Fernandez Issues A Title To Morales on October 14, 1835.
[He sends the file to the Mayor of Camargo so that he can make a copy for the municipal archives. The original is to be returned to the state archives. Morales is ordered to construct boundary markers so that the boundaries of his property will be known.]
Part III
[Note: Numbered (in the original ink) in the upper right-hand corner, from pages 1 through 17. All of the documents from page 2 to page 12 are certified copies of the originals and were certified on December 20, 1835 by Jose Matias Ramirez. The certified copies on pages 13 through 16 were dated May 10, 1836. In addition, an unnumbered page at the end consists of a petition from Francisco Ygnacio Farias.]
Box Folder
1980/183 4. Page 1: Description Of Ceremony Granting Possession Of Five Sitios To Antonio Morales Garcia And Apolinario Garcia. The document is dated August 17, 1835.
[They received this land from Antonio Morales de Villarreal. The certified copy was made on September 19, 1835.]
4. Page 2: Mayor Matias Ramirez Granted Possession Of Four And A Half Sitios To Antonio Gonzalez, November 29, 1835.
[He is required to build boundaries of rough stone and mortar within four months or he will lose his title. Description of ceremony is similar to above.]
4. Page 3: Description Of Ceremony Granting Possession Of One Sitio in the Paraje Of San Juan To Juan Moreno, December 2, 1835.
[Moreno petitioned Ramirez for this land on November 29, 1835. On December 2 Ramirez went with Moreno to the ranch to give him possession. The document then describes what is apparently a standard ceremony: Mayor Ramírez took Mr. Moreno's hand and told him in a loud voice that, having paid the State Treasury, he gave him this land in the name of the sovereign state of Tamaulipas. He is required to build boundaries of rough stone and mortar on his grant within four months or he will lose the title. Mr. Moreno then gave thanks to the state, sprinkled water on the land, cut some grass and pulled some weeds, which he then threw to the four winds. At the same time he asked the witnesses to note that he had been given possession of this land by the Mayor, and that no one there had contradicted his claim and right to this land.]
4. Page 4: Description Of Ceremony Granting Possession Of One And One Half Sitios in the Paraje Of Señor De La Carrera To Dionisio Elizondo. Elizondo petitioned for the land on November 29, 1835 and the ceremony took place on December 1, 1835.
4. Page 5: Description Of Ceremony Granting Possession Of Five Sitios In Los Jaboncillos To Jose Antonio Ramirez. Ramírez petitioned José Antonio Falcón for the land on November 29, 1835. The ceremony took place on December 2, 1835.
4. Page 5b: Description Of Ceremony Granting Possession Of Four Sitios In Las Norias De Tio Ayala To Estevan Martines. On November 29, 1835 Martínes petitioned Matías Ramírez for the land. The ceremony took place on December 3, 1835.
4. Page 6: Description Of Ceremony Granting Antonio Morales De Villarreal Possession Of Five Sitios In Los Benaditos. Morales petitioned Ramírez for the land on November 29, 1835. The ceremony took place on December 4, 1835.
4. Page 7: Description Of Ceremony Granting Guadalupe Sanches Possession Of Five Sitios In La Rucia. Sánches petitioned José Antonio Falcón for the land on December 14, 1835. The ceremony took place with José Manuel de Chapa standing in for Sánches on December 15, 1835.
4. Page 8: Description Of Ceremony Granting Jose Andres Elizondo Possession Of Three Sitios In El Lecero. Elizondo petitioned Antonio Falcón on December 14, 1835. The ceremony took place on December 15, 1835.
4. Page 8b: Description Of Ceremony Granting Gil Ballarena Possession Of Five Sitios In La Blanca. Ballarena petitioned Falcón on December 14, 1835. The ceremony took place on December 15, 1835.
4. Page 9b: Description Of Ceremony Granting Pilar Ballarena Possession Of Three Sitios In La Alameda. Ballarena petitioned Falcón on December 14, 1835. Gil Ballarena accepted the land on behalf of his daughter on December 15, 1835.
4. Page 10b: Description Of Ceremony Granting Antonio Gutierres One Sitio And Josefa Gutierres Two Sitios In El Pasadiso. Antonio Gutiérres petitioned Falcón on December 14, 1835 for the lands. The ceremony giving one sitio to Antonio Gutiérres and 2 sitios to his mother, Josefa Gutiérres took place on December 17, 1835.
4. Page 11b: Description Of Ceremony Granting Miguel Gutierres Possession Of Two Sitios In Santa Gertrudis. Gutiérres petitioned Falcón for possession on December 14, 1835. The ceremony took place on December 17, 1835.
4. Page 12: Statement Of Pilar Ballarena, December 22, 1835.
[Pilar Ballarena appeared to say that the land granted to her also belongs to her two brothers, Manuel Ballarena and Francisco Elizondo because they also paid equal parts for the land. Although the land was granted to one, each sibling owns one sitio of the three sitio site. Manuel de Chapa is a witness to this. The certified copy was made on December 22, 1835.]
4. Page 12b: Statement Of Antonio Elizondo.
[In the same manner, Antonio Elizondo states that his son Andrés owns one-half of his land in El Licero. Each owns equal parts of 1 1/2 sitios of the 3 sitio grant. The witnesses are Antonio Morales, Lazaro Elizondo and Bruno Garcia. The certified copy was made on December 22, 1835.]
4. Page 13: Description Of Ceremony Granting Luciano Rivas Possession Of Two And One-Half Sitios In Paso Ancho De Abajo. Rivas petitioned Cayetano López for possession of the land on April 15, 1836. The ceremony took place on April 21, 1836.
4. Page 14: Description Of Ceremony Granting Manuel Farias Possession Of Two And One-Half Sitios In Paso Ancho. Farías petitioned López for possession on April 15, 1836. The ceremony took place on April 22, 1836.
4. Page 15: Description Of Ceremony Granting Gregorio Vela Possession Of Two Sitios In Santa Teresa. Vela petitioned López for possession on April 15, 1836. The ceremony took place on April 28, 1836.
4. Page 16: Description Of Ceremony Granting Ramon Garza Possession Of Two And One-Half Sitios In El Paisano. Garza petitioned López for possession on April 16, 1836. The ceremony took place on April 21, 1836.
4. Page 17: Description Of Ceremony Granting Juan Garza Dias Possession Of Four Sitios In Vargas. Garza Días petitioned López for possession on April 17, 1836. The ceremony took place on April 22, 1836.
[The document is incomplete; it is only about 1/2 of the standard description of the ceremony, and the last sentence is incomplete.]
4. Unnumbered page: Petition Of Francisco Ygnacio Farias For Two Sitios in each of the Parajes Of El Benadito, La Montandad And Tampacitos, 1825.
2 pages, plus one cardboard back cover
[In 1825 Farías found that his land, Santa Cruz on the other side of the Río Grande, was not enough to support the cattle that he and his sons hold in common. He therefore claims for his three sons (José Maximo, José Manuel and José Lasaro) (the first two being emancipated and the last about to be emancipated), two sitios in each of the above parajes. These lands are not occupied and are right next to Santa Cruz. He therefore asks that this be certified and that the file be returned to him so that he can send it to the State Government. He does not know how to sign his name, and the paper is signed by Donaciano García.]



 

Salinas v. Treviño file, 1798, 1803, 1806-1810, 1812-1813, bulk 1806-1810,
0.1 cubic ft.

The title of this file is actually misleading since it contains copies of legal records, 1798, 1803, 1806-1810, 1812-1813, bulk 1806-1810, relating to three different suits concerning land or money owed, which had been filed in the municipal archives in Camargo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. The three suits are Juan José Salinas v. José Ygnacio de Treviño, Juan Bautista Chacón v. Estate of José Ygnacio Ramírez, and José Antonio Cisneros v. Juan de la Garza y Montemayor. There are 92 pages in the entire file, all of them numbered in black ink by a previous possessor of the documents. There are no missing pages. The entire file of original records was housed in a blue folder with the following title: "Folder in which is found the suit brought between Juan José Salinas and Don Ygnacio de Treviño.- 1808 and 1809. Arranged by the municipal government from 1941 to 1942."
Organization
These records are organized into three suits as received in the State Archives:
Juan José Salinas v. José Ygnacio de Treviño, 1809-1810, fractional
Juan Bautista Chacón v. Estate of José Ygnacio Ramírez, 1798, 1803, 1806-1807, 1809, fractional
José Antonio Cisneros v. Juan de la Garza y Montemayor, 1806, 1808-1809, 1812-1813, fractional
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Salinas v. Treviño file, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Juan José Salinas v. José Ygnacio de Treviño, 1809-1810,
fractional
These are legal records of a suit between Juan José Salinas v. José Ygnacio de Treviño, dating 1809-1810 (pages 1 through 43). Juan José Salinas laid claim to land belonging to Pedro López Prieto. Since López Prieto was on the Texas-Louisiana frontier as a soldier, he appointed José Ygnacio de Treviño (who was also his brother-in-law) as his attorney and representative.
Box Folder
1980/183 5. Page 1: Order Of Judge Goseascoechea Allowing Juan José Salinas To Settle On Land In Las Cuevas, May 3, 1809.
[This land was granted to Juan Gerónimo Básquez (deceased), who never settled it. It therefore reverted to His Majesty, and in his name Goseascoechea gives it to Salinas, who will pay His Majesty an appropriate amount.]
5. Page 2: Petition Of Juan José Salinas Supporting His Claim As The Rightful Owner.
[Most of his arguments are illegible, but they include the fact that the land was never settled and therefore has reverted to His Majesty. He also claims to have presented the order granting him possession of the land to de Treviño, who has refused to accept it or to let Salinas settle on the land. He presents this petition so that justice may be done.]
5. Page 7: An Illegible Letter.
5. Page 8: José Ygnacio Treviño Is Ordered By José De Jesus Garcia To Appear Before The Court, August 16, 1809.
[He is to bring any documents that would support his claim to the disputed land. The proceedings are suspended until that time.]
5. Page 8: Appearance Of José Ygnacio Treviño In Court.
[Treviño appeared before Judge José de Jesús García, who did not accept the evidence Treviño presented and therefore ordered???---this part is illegible.]
5. Page 10: Letter From Pedro López Prieto To The Governor Explaining Why This Land Belongs To Him.
[He claims that Ygnacio de Ayala bought the land from his servant, Juan Gerónimo Vásquez, who received it when Fernando Palacios was giving out grants. After Ayala died, Prieto married his widow and so has been in possession of the land since 1787. María Josefa de Treviño, his wife, rented out the land to Pedro José Villarreal and therefore Salinas has not been allowed on the land. His neighbors can confirm this story. He cannot present original title since he is in Texas defending the Texas-Louisiana frontier and he does not have his personal papers with him. This land, however, is right next to his own land which he was granted. He has more right to it since he is not a stranger like Salinas is. Furthermore, the land is useless without the larger piece of land which he owns. He therefore petitions the governor to refuse the claim of Salinas. José Ygnacio de Treviño is his attorney and will represent him since he is away.]
5. Page 12: "Blanca" [Blank Page]
5. Page 14: Judge Goceascoechea Orders Salinas Not To Put Anything On The Ranch Since Treviño Has Presented Evidence That He Does Indeed Own The Land. If he does put anything on the ranch, he could lose it, May 14, 1809.
5. Page 15: Letter From Treviño Asking That Salinas Be Thrown Off The Land.
[Ygnacio Anastacio Ayala received the land from Gerónimo Vásquez in payment of a debt. Juan José Salinas asked Captain Goceascoechea for the land, falsely claiming that it was not populated and unused. Captain Goceascoechea then issued an order giving the land to Salinas. Treviño then went to complain to Goceascoechea, who then issued another order telling him to get out, but he refused to obey the order. Treviño therefore asks that he be thrown off the land.]
5. Page 17: José De Jesus Garcia Orders That Treviño's Letter Be Added To The File.
5. Page 17: José De Jesus Garcia Sends The File On To The Higher Court Of The Governor.
5. Page 17: José De Jesus Garcia Orders That Goceascoechea's Last Order To Salinas Be Added To The File.
5. Page 17: The Last Letter Is Illegible.
5. Page 19: Letter From Juan José Salinas.
[He claims that he did not know that a countervailing order had been issued negating his claim to the land and he requests a hearing so that justice may be done.]
5. Page 21: Letter From Governor Joaquin Vidal Ordering That The Government's Decree Of Last September Be Enforced, November 22, 1809.
5. Page 22: The Governor's Order Is Given To Salinas So That It Can Be Enforced.
5. Page 22: Letter From José De Jesus Garcia Acknowledging Receipt Of The Governor's Order And Ordering That Salinas Be Given Possession Of The Land, November 29, 1809.
5. Page 22: Garcia Gives The File To Salinas. Salinas left a receipt for 11 pages.
5. Page 23: Letter From Juan José Salinas To José De Jesus Garcia.
[Salinas states that a tailor named Lorenzo wrote up his deposition and used certain ignoble expressions in describing Miguel Margain and Sergeant Manuel Nogaro. Although Salinas signed, he did not mean to do this. He now revokes this testimony and asks that he be excused since he does not know how to read and write well. He does not want to be dispossessed of his land because of this. He refutes Treviño's argument that he is illegally in possession of the land because he was given possession by the government. Furthermore, he claims that Prieto did not start renting the land to Pedro José Villarreal until May 1809, a month after he started living there. He claims that they did this because of envy. He then claims that Prieto is unable to find his title to the land because there is no title. He also refutes Prieto's argument that the land must be his since it is next to his land, saying that in that case, Nacogdoches belongs to the U.S.A. If Ayala received the land in payment of a debt, he should have paid a tax (derecho de alcabala), but no royal receipt has been produced. He therefore asks that the land be given to him, as it was on May 3, 1809, especially since the legal costs have been a heavy burden on his family.]
5. Pages 29-30: José De Jesus Garcia Orders The Above Letter Added To The File And Given To Treviño So That He Can Examine It.
5. Page 25: File In The Government Of This Province Created By José Antonio Cisneros Against Juan José De La Garza Montemayor, Over A Certain Amount Of Pesos, On September 7, 1812 And Concluded On February 26, 1813. Consists Of Six Pages. Number 37.
5. Page 27: Expediente Number 25. Most of it is illegible.
5. Page 31: Treviño Responds To Salinas By Summarizing His Arguments.
[He claims that although Anastacio de Ayala and Prieto never populated the ranch, their brothers-in-law and other individuals did, as did their wife, María Josefa de Treviño. He claims that the heirs of José Antonio Flores have the title to the land.]
5. Page 33: Garcia Orders Salinas To Come To Court To Listen To The Testimony Of The Flores Heirs.
5. Page 34: Salinas Came To Court And Was Told To Appear For The Testimony Of The Flores Heirs, January 12, 1810.
5. Page 34: Testimony Of Witness Jose Leonardo Treviño.
[He knows Juan José Salinas, who is a native of Serralbo (Cerralvo) and came to this area when he married. He also knows José Ygnacio Treviño, who is from this town and is the son of an original settler. He also knows that both are Spaniards. He then confirms Treviño's account of the ownership of the land. He also claims that he and María de Josefa Treviño's brothers used the land. The lower boundary of the disputed land was known as the Charco de los Holmos (Pond of the Elm-Trees). Salinas came to him and showed him a small kitchen and a goat corral that he had built on the land and asked him to help build a house on it, but J.L. Treviño refused since he could not do that on land that did not belong to Salinas. He urged instead that Salinas build on his own Rancho del Salado.]
5. Page 36: Testimony Of Witness Joaquin Gonzalez.
[He said Salinas had lived in the area about 9 years. He supported Treviño's account of the ownership of the land. He said that the land was rented to Manuel de la Garza and Pedro José Villarreal, among others. He claims that everyone knew that the land belonged to Anastacio de Ayala, who paid Vásquez 40 pesos for the land. The first installment of this payment was in the form of a broken horse. The witness is a Spaniard, widower of 70 years of age and originally from Cerralvo. He did not sign since he does not know how to write.]
5. Page 38: Testimony Of Witness Pedro José Villarreal.
[He testified that for four or five years he had used the land rent-free with the permission of Captain Pedro López Prieto and for the last two years he had rented it from Josefa de Treviño for five pesos per year. Villarreal is a 30 year old Spaniard from this town and is married. Although he and Salinas “tocan las Grles. de la Ley”, he has told the truth.]
5. Page 39: Testimony Of Witness José Manuel De La Garza, January 16, 1810.
[He said that he is a Spaniard from Cerralvo and the town of Reynosa and is married. He has lived for 17 years on the Rancho de las Cuevas which is on the boundary of the jurisdiction of Reynosa and for all of that time has known Prieto as the owner of the disputed land. He presents as further evidence the title to Rancho de las Cuevas which Juan Vega sold to de la Garza's father-in-law. This title mentions one of the boundaries of the land as being the land belonging to the heirs of Anastacio de Ayala. Judge García has seen this title. De la Garza is about 40 years old and did not sign because he does not know how to write.]
5. Page 41: Salinas Abdicates All Claims To The Land.
[He does not really have the resources to fully utilize the land anyway, so in the interests of peace with his Christian brothers, he gives up his right to the land. He will rent part of the land for three years at a rate of four pesos per year. Treviño accepts this agreement. Salinas does this of his own free will and not because he was afraid Justice would rule against him. Judge García therefore certifies this agreement.]
5. Page 43: Governor Joaquin Vidal De Lorca Returns The File To Judge Garcia With His Decree Of The Same Date Putting The Agreement Into Effect, September 30, 1809.
Juan Bautista Chacón v. Estate of José Ygnacio Ramírez, 1798, 1803, 1806-1807, 1809,
fractional
These are copies of legal records, dating 1798, 1803, 1806-1807, 1809, (pages 44-82) of a suit filed by Juan Bautista Chacón against the estate of José Ygnacio Ramírez from the municipal archives in Camargo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Juan Bautista Chacón, represented by attorney José Perez Rey, claimed that José Ygnacio Ramírez owed him money. Ramírez specifically stated in his will that he did not owe the money and it was not to be paid. The suit was against Ramírez' estate.
Box Folder
1980/183 6. Page 44: Title Page of File Formed By José Perez Rey, Attorney For Juan Bautista Chacón Against The Estate Of The Deceased José Ygnacio Ramírez, By Captain José De Goseascoechea And José De Jesus Garcia. Number 13. Consists Of 20 Pages. Years 1807, 1808, 1809 and 1810.
6. Page 45: José Ygnacio Ramírez Acknowledges That He Owes Juan Bautista Chacón The Sum Of 2,801 Pesos. Letter, August 1, 1798.
6. Page 47: Receipt Acknowledging Payment Of A Part Of The Debt, February 3, 1803.
[Witnessed by Juan José de la Garza Montemayor, in which Chacón says there has been a total payment of 822 pesos.]
6. Page 49: Letter From José Perez Rey, Attorney For Juan Bautista Chacón To The Judge.
[José Ygnacio Ramírez owed Chacón 979 pesos, but Ramírez has left a will instructing that this debt is not to be paid. Perez Rey therefore asks that the property of Eugenio Ramírez be impounded to pay off the debt.]
6. Page 52: Letter From José De Goseascoechea Ordering José Eugenio Ramírez To Respond To The Charges Of José Perez Rey, December 15, 1807.
6. Page 53: Letter From José Eugenio Ramírez, March 14, 1809.
[He requests that Pedro Ygnacio García, the secondary executor of the estate of José Ygnacio Ramírez will be allowed to represent the estate in this affair since he lives near Revilla, far from Camargo.]
6. Page 53: Pedro Ygnacio García Accepts The Responsibility Of Standing For The Ramírez Estate. He asks Judge Goseascoechea to allow him to become familiar with the documents in the case.
6. Page 54: Judge Goseascoechea Orders The File Be Turned Over To Pedro Ygnacio García.
6. Page 54: The File Of Five Pages Was Turned Over To García.
6. Pages 55-66: Certified Copy Of The Last Will Of José Ygnacio Ramírez, May 9, 1806.
[He lists all of his assets and debts. On page 59, he indicates he left 3 burros on land belonging to Pedro Prieto. This certified copy was made on March 16, 1809.]
6. Pages 67-72: Supplement To José Ygnacio Ramírez' Will.
[He states that he does not owe any money to Juan Chacón and directs that his estate should not pay this unjustified claim. This certified copy was made on March 17, 1809.]
6. Pages 73-76: Letter From Pedro Ygnacio García.
[García, the son-in-law of José Ygnacio Ramírez, writes regarding the refusal of the Ramírez estate to pay debts claimed by Juan Bautista Chacón.]
6. Page 76: Letter From Judge Goseascoechea, March 18, 1809.
[He ordered the two wills to be added to the file and the entire file given to José Perez Rey, the attorney for Juan Bautista Chacón.]
6. Pages 76-77: Judge Goseascoechea Has Been Sent To The Texas-Louisiana Frontier, And So Passes This Case On To Municipal Judge José Jesus García.
6. Page 77: José Jesus García Orders The File Turned Over To José Perez Rey, Attorney For Juan Bautista Chacón.
6. Page 78: Letter From José Perez Rey Explaining Chacón's Side Of The Dispute And Returning The File.
6. Page 79: Orders Of José Jesus García.
[He orders page 78 added to the file and orders a lawyer be consulted to decide the case. In the bottom paragraph he orders the appointment of lawyer José María Letona of Monterrey, and orders the papers handed over to him.]
6. Page 80: Letter From Attorney José María De Letona.
[He informs José de Jesús García that he has been sick and has therefore moved to Saltillo. Papers should be sent to him there.]
6. Pages 81-82: Letter From Attorney José María De Letona Concerning The Case Between José Ygnacio Ramírez And Juan Bautista Chacón. Most of it is illegible.
José Antonio Cisneros v. Juan de la Garza y Montemayor, 1806, 1808-1809, 1812-1813,
fractional
Legal records (pages 83-92), dating 1806, 1808-1809, 1812-1813, of a suit filed by José Antonio Cisneros against Juan de la Garza y Montemayor from the municipal archives of Camargo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Antonia de Villarreal rented two sitios of land to Juan de la Garza y Montemayor. After she died, de la Garza y Montemayor claimed to have settled the account with her son Nepomuceno Cisneros. Her other son, José Antonio Cisneros, however, said this was not true and demanded that the account be settled. Letters 1 through 7 appear to be the copies of letters mentioned on page 83. See also page 25 in the Juan José Salinas v. José Ygnacio de Treviño file.
Box Folder
1980/183 7. Pages 83-84: Letter From José Antonio Cisneros To The Judge, September 7, 1812
[He states that two sitios of land owned by his mother, Antonia de Villarreal, had been rented since 1797 to Juan de la Garza y Montemayor. His mother died in 1807 and they have been unable to settle rent accounts since then. De la Garza y Montemayor claims that he settled accounts with Cisneros' brother, Juan Nepomuceno Cisneros, but José Antonio claims this is not true, and submits a letter written by Juan Nepomuceno to Mayor José Gregorio Chapa stating that de la Garza y Montemayor also refuses to allow Cisneros to sell the improvements he made upon the land, which include four huts, one corral and two bull pens. He therefore asks the judge to decide the case.]
7. Pages 85-86: Letter From Juan Fermin De Juanicotena Acknowledging That He Shall Judge The Case, September 12, 1812.
7. Pages 86-87: Letter From José Antonio Cisneros, February 26, 1813.
[He admits that he wrote the letter to Provisional Governor Juanicotena only to influence him. He really has no claim against Juan de la Garza y Montemayor.]
7. Page 88: Letter Number 1, May 28, 1812.
[A letter from Juan José Montemayor to Mayor José Gregorio Chapa in which he affirms that in 1808 he settled his accounts with Nepomuceno Cisneros and that now José Antonio Cisneros is trying to say that the account is not settled.]
7. Page 88: Letter Number 2, January 23, 1808.
[Letter from Juan José de la Garza Montemayor to José Antonio Cisneros in which he says that he has settled accounts with Nepomuceno Cisneros and that José Antonio is entitled to one-half of the proceeds.]
7. Page 90: Letter Number 3, March 8, 1812.
[A letter from José Vicente López de Aterrera to José Antonio Cisneros discussing the produce of Rancho de las Burras.]
7. Page 90: Letter Number 4, March 24, 1806.
[Letter from María Antonia de Villarreal to Juan José de la Garza Montemayor informing him that she had given this land to her two sons in January. She asks that he settle accounts with her sons, giving them time to pay back the rent he has already paid. He is to be allowed to keep his personal belongings on the ranch until the rent is paid back.]
7. Page 90: Letter Number 5, February 12, 1809.
[Letter from Juan José de la Garza Montemayor to José Antonio Cisneros, asking him to come and settle accounts in person. He wishes to do this since they are good friends and he is sure they can do this without using judges, courts, etc. He urges doing this in person, however, since misunderstandings can arise when using the mails.]
7. Page 91: Letter Number 6, February 18, 1809.
[Letter from José Antonio Cisneros to Juan José de la Garza Montemayor, telling him that he will go to the ranch to settle accounts, along with his brother Nepomuceno. He also informs him that he may stay on the ranch as long as he likes since he still cannot pay him back. He may continue under his mother's lease, or he may draw up a new lease.]
7. Page 91: Letter Number 7, June 11, 1812.
[Letter from Juan José de la Garza Montemayor to José Antonio Cisneros in which he demands full payment of all the money owed to him.]



 

Land grant file, 1834-1837, 1870, bulk 1835,
fractional

This file consists of copies of records, dating 1834-1837, 1870, bulk 1835, accumulated in the process of establishing claims to five different land grants for summer pastures for Antonio Elizondo, Leonardo Bargas, Ramon de la Garza, Guadalupe Sanchez, and Pilar Ballarena y Sarate. Each of the five has basically the same documents, with only the dates and names changed. The records had been filed in the municipal archives in Camargo, Tamaulipas, Mexico.
Organization
These records are organized into five subseries as received in the State Archives:
File of the summer pasture of the Lucero measured for Antonio Elizondo, 1835, fractional
File of the summer pasture of Guadalupe measured for Leonardo Bargas, 1834-1837, 1870, fractional
File of the summer pasture of the Paysano measured for Ramon de la Garza, 1835-1836, fractional
File of the summer pasture of Rucia measured for Guadalupe Sanchez, 1835, fractional
File of the summer pasture of the Alameda measured for Pilar Ballarena y Sarate, 1835, fractional
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Land grant file, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
File of the summer pasture of the Lucero measured for Antonio Elizondo, 1835,
fractional
Records are copies of land transaction documents in the file of the summer pasture of the Lucero, three sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the jurisdiction of the town of Camargo measured for Antonio Elizondo, Number 448, dating 1835.
Box Folder
1980/183 8. Page 1: Certification Petition From Jose Antonio Elizondo, August 5, 1835.
[He asks the City Council to certify that he has no summer pasture and that he does have livestock to put on a summer pasture that he would receive under Decree Number 24 of October 13, 1833. He has laid claim to three sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the paraje of the Lucero.]
8. Page 1: City Council Certification, August 5, 1835.
[Jose Matías Ramírez of the City Council and Juan José Villarreal, Secretary of the City Council certify that Elizondo does not have a summer pasture, but that he does have livestock to put on a pasture. Elizondo is a native of Camargo, born there without having emigrated from it at any time for any reason.]
8. Pages 3-4: Blank.
8. Page 5: Petition To The Mayor From Elizondo.
[He states that he has 130 head of cattle and a relay of horses without any land to graze them on. He therefore lays claim to three sitios of vacant national lands. He agrees to pay whatever price the land is valued at, and he petitions the mayor to have the land measured and claimed for him.]
8. Page 5: Mayor Ramirez Orders General State Land Surveyor Antonio Canales To Measure The Elizondo Claim, August 5, 1835.
8. Page 6: Orders Of Mayor Ramirez, August 14, 1835.
[He orders that the owners of the lands around the Elizondo claim be notified that a claim has been laid on the land. Surveyor Canales, together with the town clerk, is to appraise the land.]
8. Page 6: The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
8. Page 6: Mayor Ramirez Informs Elizondo Of The Above. Elizondo then appoints Juan Manuel Ramíres as his appraiser.
8. Page 7: Appraisers Sworn In.
[Juan José de la Garza (appraiser for the government) and Juan Manuel Ramíres (appraiser for Elizondo) appeared before Mayor Ramírez and accepted their appointments and swore they would carry out their duties to the best of their abilities.]
8. Page 7: Appointments Of Mayor Ramirez.
[He appoints Joaquin Canales and Juan José Villareal as accountants, Leonardo Bargas and Blas Morales as overseers, and Pedro García as summer pasture expert (perito). All of them swore to do their best.]
8. Page 8: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, August 22, 1835.
[Mayor Ramírez, the Surveyor and witnesses walked around the land to make a reconnaissance and discovered that the land was level with oak trees and a few small lakes which will not hold water longer than 15 days.]
8. Page 9: Measurement Of The Claim.
[Mayor Ramírez, the Surveyor, the Accountants, Overseers and Summer Pasture Expert all measured the parcel of land. The exact measurement of the parcel is then described. The exact measurements are listed.]
8. Page 10: Appraisal Of The Land. The appraisers set a price of ten pesos on each sitio of land, September 13, 1835.
8. Page 11: Mayor Ramirez Orders The File Turned Over To The Surveyor So That He Can Make The Map, September 15, 1835.
8. Page 11: The Surveyor Returns The File, With The Map Attached. September 15, 1835.
8. Page 11: Elizondo Pays For The Claim.
[He gives thirty pesos to Ramírez, who is sending the money, together with the file, to the Governor so that he can settle the matter.]
8. Page 13: Summer Pasture Of The Lucero, Measured For Antonio Elizondo.
[This is a map, with a description of the boundaries of the land and the names of the surrounding pastures. It is signed by Surveyor Attorney Antonio Canales.]
8. Page 14: Blank.
8. Page 15: Governor Fernandez And Secretary Manuel Villasenor Instruct The State Treasurer To Deposit The Thirty Pesos in Ciudad Victoria, November 16, 1835.
8. Page 15: Minister Of The Treasury José Nunez De Caceres Certifies That The Thirty Pesos Have Been Deposited In The General Treasury.
8. Page 17: Attorney General Nunez De Caceres Certifies That The Money Has Been Deposited And Therefore Grants The Three Sitios To Elizondo Since All Legal Requirements Have Been Met And None Of His Neighbors Object. He therefore sends him the title to the property, and instructs the mayor to put Elizondo in possession of the land, November 20, 1835.
8. Page 18: Governor Fernandez Orders That The Title Be Issued.
[The mayor is to give Elizondo possession of the land. He therefore sends the file to the mayor, and orders it be returned to the archives of the State Government after Elizondo is given possession of the land.]
File of the summer pasture of Guadalupe measured for Leonardo Bargas, 1834-1837, 1870,
fractional
Records are copies of land transaction documents in the file of the summer pasture of Guadalupe of three sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the jurisdiction of the town of Camargo, measured for Leonardo Bargas, Number 447, dating 1834-1837, 1870.
Box Folder
1980/183 9. Page 1: Certification Petition From Leonardo Vargas, September 9, 1834
[He petitioned the City Council to certify that he has no pasture, but does have sufficient livestock to utilize a pasture. He states that he is a native of Camargo and has never emigrated elsewhere, even when the town was repeatedly attacked by barbaric Indians. He does not know how to sign his name.]
9. Page 2: City Council Certification.
[José Manuel de Chapa and Juan José Villarreal (the Secretary) of the City Council certify that Vargas has sufficient livestock to utilize a pasture, but does not have one. They also certify that he has lived continuously in Camargo for 18 years. The paper is returned to Vargas so that he can continue his efforts.]
9. Pages 3-4: Blank.
9. Page 5: Petition from Vargas, September 9, 1834.
[Vargas states that he wants the land in the paraje of Guadalupe because he has cattle but has been unable to increase his herd for the good of the State because he has no land and has been forced to bother with rented lands. The boundaries of the land are: to the south, national lands, to the north measured lands of Ygnacio Peña, to the west measured lands of Juan Guerra and to the east, public lands. He petitions the City Council to survey the land so that he can obtain title to it.]
9. Page 6: Mayor Chapa Orders State Survey or Attorney Antonio Canales to Survey the Land, September 9, 1834.
9. Page 6: Mayor Jose Matias Ramirez Orders That the Neighbors of the Claim Be Given Judicial Notice. The town clerk, as appraiser for the government, is to join with Vargas' appraiser in appraising the land. August 5, 1835.
9. Page 7: Ramirez Notes That The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
9. Page 7: Ramirez Notified Vargas Of The Above And Vargas Appointed Juan Manuel Ramires As His Appraiser.
9. Page 7: Appraisers Sworn In.
[Appraisers Juan José de la Garza and Juan Manuel Ramírez (the first for the government and the second for Vargas) were notified of their appointment, and both swore that they would do the best they could.]
9. Page 8: Appointments By Ramirez.
[He appointed Juan Villarreal and Joaquín Canales as Accountants, Blas Morales and Clemente Treviño as Overseers, and Pedro García as Expert of the Summer Pasture (Perito). All of them accepted their appointments and swore they would perform their duties faithfully.]
9. Page 9: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, August 26, 1835.
[Ramirez went out to Guadalupe with the Surveyor and witnesses and looked around the land and noted that it is flat, with a hillock of oak trees, and a few lakes which will not hold water for even 15 days.]
9. Page 10: Measurement Of The Claim, August 27, 1835
[Ramirez, together with the Surveyor, Accountants, Overseers and Expert of Summer Pasture measured out the land. There follows an exact description of the measurements of the land and the names of the surrounding parcels of land.]
9. Page 11: Rafael Gomez Acknowledges Receipt Of The Title Belonging To Leonardo Bargas. It was delivered to his brother-in-law, Antonio Martínez, for whom he is attorney, November 21, 1837.
9. Page 12: Appraisal Of The Claim, September 13, 1835.
[The appraisers, being notified of all of the above, agreed that a reasonable price for the land is ten pesos per sitio since the land has no running waters and no folds for cattle.]
9. Page 12: Mayor Ramirez Orders The State Surveyor To Take The File And Draw Up A Map, September 14, 1835.
9. Page 13: On The Same Date The Surveyor Returned The File, With A Map Attached.
9. Page 13: Mayor Ramirez Received The Thirty Pesos. He sends them, together with the file, on to the State Government so that they may dispose of the case as they see fit.
9. Page 14: Summer Pasture Of Guadalupe, Measured For Leonardo Vargas. September 15, 1835.
[Map drawn up by State Surveyor Antonio Canales includes a description of the boundaries and of the surrounding parcels of land.]
9. Page 15: Blank.
9. Page 16: Governor Fernandez And Secretary Manuel Villaseñor Instruct The Treasurer To Deposit The Thirty Pesos. He is to then return the file with a receipt, March 18, 1836.
9. Page 16: Treasury Minister José Nuñez De Caceres Certifies That José Antonio Velasquez Deposited Thirty Pesos For Leandro Vargas For The Purchase Of Guadalupe, March 18, 1836.
9. Page 18: Attorney General Nuñez De Caceres Certifies That All Of The Requirements Of The Colonization Law Have Been Met, March 22, 1836.
[He therefore orders that title to Guadalup be issued to Leandro (note Leandro, not Leonardo) Vargas. He orders the Mayor of Camargo to put Vargas in possession of the land.]
9. Page 19: Governor Fernandez Orders The Title Be Sent To Vargas. The Mayor of Camargo is to put him in possession of the land. A copy of this file is to be made and kept in Camargo and the original is to be sent back to the State Archives, March 23, 1836.
9. Page 19: Judge Nieves Villarreal Gave A Certified Copy Of This File To Vargas' Son-in-Law, Juan Rodriguez, June 23, 1870.
File of the summer pasture of the Paysano measured for Ramon de la Garza, 1835-1836,
fractional
Records are copies of land transaction documents in the file of the summer pasture of the Paysano of two and one-half sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the jurisdiction of the town of Camargo measured for Ramon de la Garza, Number 451, dating 1835-1836.
Box Folder
1980/183 10. Page 1: Certification Petition From Ramon Garza, July 10, 1835.
[He petitioned the City Council to certify that he does not own land but does have livestock so that he can secure title to 2 1/2 sitios in El Paisano.]
10. Page 1: Mayor Jose Matias Ramirez Certifies That Garza Has Livestock But Does Not Own Any Land.
[He certifies that Garza was born in this town and orders that the file be returned to Garza.]
10. Pages 2-4: Blank.
10. Page 5: Statement Of Ramon Garza, July 10, 1835.
[He states that he has cattle and horses, but no land to graze them on. He has found vacant national land which he wishes to claim and will pay a fair price for it. We will also pay all legal costs.]
10. Page 5: Orders Of Mayor Ramirez.
[He orders that the neighbors of the claim be given judicial notice. The State Surveyor, Attorney Antonio Canales is to be notified that the land is to be claimed and measured.]
10. Page 6: Orders Of Mayor Ramirez, August 4, 1835.
[He orders that the neighbors be given judicial notice and that the State Surveyor should be notified. The town clerk is to serve as an appraiser, together with one for Garza.]
10. Page 6: The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
10. Page 6: Mayor Ramirez Notified Garza Of The Above, And Garza Then Appointed Juan Manuel Ramires As His Appraiser.
10. Page 7: Appraisers Sworn In.
[Before Ramírez appeared the appraisers Juan José de la Garza (for the government) and Juan Manuel Ramirez (for Garza), who were notified of their appointment. Both swore to perform their duties faithfully.]
10. Page 7: Appointments Of Mayor Ramirez.
[He appointed Juan José Villarreal and Clemente Treviño as Accountants, Blas Morales and Joaquín Canales as Overseers, and Pedro García as Expert of the Summer Pasture. All accepted their appointments and promised to perform their duties faithfully.]
10. Page 8: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, August 27, 1835.
[Ramírez found that the land is flat with a few small lakes that will not hold water for more than 15 days. The Surveyor and witnesses were with him.]
10. Page 8: Measurement Of The Claim, August 28, 1835
[Ramírez, the State Surveyor, Accountants and Overseers measured the land. There follows a description of the measurement, together with a listing of the boundaries of the claim and a listing of the owners of the surrounding parcels of land.]
10. Page 10: Appraisal Of Claim, September 13, 1835.
[The appraisers were notified of the above and arrived at the price of 10 pesos, since there is no running water and no folds for cattle.]
10. Page 10: Ramirez Ordered The File Be Turned Over To The State Surveyor So That He Could Make The Map Of The Claim, September 15, 1835.
10. Page 11: The Surveyor Returned The File, Together With A Map Of The Land, September 15, 1835.
10. Page 11: Ramirez Receives 25 Pesos From Garza. He sends them on, together with the file, to the State Government so that they can settle the case.
10. Page 12: Blank.
10. Page 13: Summer Pasture Of The Paisano, Measured For Ramon Garza.
[Map includes a description of the boundaries of the land and the surrounding parcels. Signed by Surveyor Antonio Canales.]
10. Page 14: Blank (except for "Ciu-"="City")
10. Page 15: Governor Fernandez Orders The Minister Of The Treasury To Deposit The Twenty-Five Pesos. He is to return the file with a receipt, March 18, 1836.
10. Page 15: Minister Of The Treasury José Nuñez De Caceres Certifies That José Antonio Velasquez Deposited 25 Pesos For Ramon Garza In The Purchase Of The Paisano Grant.
10. Page 16: Attorney General Nuñez De Caceres Certifies That All Of The Legal Requirements Of The Colonization Law Have Been Met. Title to the property should therefore be issued. The Mayor of Camargo should put Garza in possession of the land, March 24, 1835.
10. Page 17: Governor Fernandez Orders That Title Be Issued To Ramon De La Garza. The Mayor of Camargo is to put him in possession of the land. The Mayor is to make a copy of the file for the Municipal Archives and is to return the original to the State Archives.
File of the summer pasture of Rucia measured for Guadalupe Sanchez, 1835,
fractional
Records are copies of land transaction documents in the file of summer pasture of Rucia of five sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the jurisdiction of the town of Camargo measured for Guadalupe Sanchez, Number 446, dating 1835.
Box Folder
1980/183 11. Page 1: Certification Petition From Guadalupe Sanchez, August 2, 1835.
[He petitioned the City Council to certify that he has livestock, but no land, so that he can buy four sitios in the paraje of Santa Gertrudis. He does not know how to sign his name.]
11. Page 1: City Council Certification.
[Mayor Ramírez certifies that Sanchez has livestock, but no land and that he was born in Camargo and has never emigrated anywhere else.]
11. Pages 3-4: Blank.
11. Page 5: Petition From José Guadalupe Sanchez, August 2, 1835.
[He petitioned to have the land measured since he owns 150 head of cattle and 70 horses and mules. but has no land. There being no other industries in the area, he is forced to ranch and claims five sitios to the north of town on the coast of Santa Gertrudis in a place commonly known as la Rucia. He lists the owners of the lands surrounding the claim.]
11. Page 5: Mayor Ramirez Orders The Neighbors And The Surveyor To Be Notified.
11. Page 6: Orders Of Mayor Ramirez, August 3 1835.
[He orders the neighbors and the Surveyor to be notified that four sitios (not five, as on page 5) have been claimed. The town clerk is to serve as the government appraiser.]
11. Page 6: The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
11. Page 7: Ramirez Notified Sanchez Of The Above, And Sanchez Then Appointed Juan Manuel Ramires As His Appraiser.
11. Page 7: Appraisers Sworn In.
[Juan José de la Garza (for the government) and Juan Manuel Ramíres (for Sanchez) appeared before Ramírez and accepted their appointments as appraisers. They swore to perform their duties faithfully.]
11. Page 7: Appointments Of Ramírez.
[Ramírez appointed Juan José Villarreal and José Lázaro Elizondo as Accountants, Blas Morales and Leonardo Bargas as Overseers, and Pedro García as Expert of the Summer Pasture. All of them accepted their appointments and swore to perform their duties faithfully.]
11. Page 8: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, August 18, 1835.
[In the presence of the Surveyor and witnesses, Ramírez inspected the land and found it to be flat, with a few good pastures and a few small lakes that will not hold water for even fifteen days since they have no way of collecting rain runoffs.]
11. Page 9: Measurement Of The Claim, August 19, 1835.
[Ramírez, the Accountants, Overseers, Expert and Surveyor measured the five sitios. There follows an exact description of the boundaries and of the surrounding neighbors.]
11. Page 10: Appraisal Of The Claim, September 13, 1835.
[The appraisers valued the land at ten pesos per sitio since it does not have running water or folds for cattle.]
11. Page 11: Ramirez Orders The File To Be Turned Over To The Surveyor So That He Can Draw Up The Map, September 15, 1835.
11. Page 12: The Surveyor Returned The File, With A Map Attached To It.
11. Page 12: Guadalupe Sanchez Gives Ramirez 50 Pesos. Ramírez is sending it, together with the file, to the State Government so that they can dispose of the case.
11. Page 13: Summer Pasture Of The Rucia Measured For Guadalupe Sanchez, September 15, 1835.
[The map includes a description of the boundaries and neighbors of the five sitios. It is signed by Surveyor Antonio Canales.]
11. Page 14: Blank.
11. Page 15: Governor Fernandez Orders The Treasury Minister To Deposit The 50 Pesos. He is to return the file with a receipt, November 16, 1835.
11. Page 15: Treasury Minister Jose Nunez De Caceres Certifies That Sanchez Deposited The Fifty Pesos For The Purchase Of La Rusia.
11. Page 16: Governor Fernandez Sends The File On To The Attorney General, November 17, 1835.
11. Page 16: Attorney General Nunez De Caceres Certifies That Sanchez Has Met All The Requirements Of The Colonization Law, November 18, 1835.
[He reminds the mayor of Camargo that he should put Sanchez in possession of the land, and he reminds Sánchez that he should construct durable boundary markers so that future disputes can be avoided.]
11. Page 17: Governor Fernandez Orders The Title Be Sent To Sanchez, November 23, 1835.
[The Mayor of Camargo is to put him in possession of the land. A copy of this file is to be made for the Municipal Archives and the original is to be returned to the State Archives. Sánchez is not to forget to set up landmarks so that boundaries will not be confused.]
File of the summer pasture of the Alameda measured for Pilar Ballarena y Sarate, 1835,
fractional
Records are copies of land transaction documents in the file of the summer pasture of the Alameda of three sitios of summer pasture for cattle in the jurisdiction of the town of Camargo measured for Pilar Ballarena y Sarate, Number 453, dating 1835. A note on page one in blue ink in the left margin states a certified copy of the document was made on April 8, 1924 for Demetrio Elizondo.
Box Folder
1980/183 12. Page 1: Certification Petition From Pilar Ballarena, August 1, 1835.
[He petitions the City Council to certify that he has no land and that he deserves land under Decree Number 24 of October 13, 1833 so that he can claim three sitios in La Alameda. He does not know how to sign his name.]
12. Page 1: City Council Certification.
[Mayor Ramírez certifies that Ballarena has livestock but no land for them and that he is a native-born citizen of Camargo who has never emigrated.]
12. Pages 3-4: Blank.
12. Page 5: Petition To Ramirez.
[Ballarena states that he has 100 head of cattle and 60 horses without pasture lands for them. He then describes the lands surrounding his claim and asks that measurements be taken of the land.]
12. Page 5: Ramirez Orders That The Neighbors And State Surveyor Antonio Canales Be Given Judicial Notice.
12. Page 6: Orders Of Ramirez, August 7, 1835.
[He orders that the neighbors and Surveyor be notified and that the town clerk be appointed as an appraiser for the government. The land is to be measured.]
12. Page 7: The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
12. Page 7: Ballarena Was Notified Of The Above And In Response He Appointed Juan Manuel Ramirez As His Appraiser.
12. Page 7: Appraisers Sworn In.
[Juan José de la Garza (government appraiser) and Juan Manuel Ramírez (appraiser for Ballarena) were notified of their appointments, which they accepted. They swore to perform their duties faithfully.]
12. Page 8: Appointments By Ramirez.
[He appointed Juan José Villareal and José Lázaro Elizondo as Accountants, Blas Morales and Leonardo Bargas as Overseers, and Pedro García as Expert. They accepted their appointments and swore to perform their duties faithfully.]
12. Page 8: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, August 21, 1835.
[Ramírez, with the Surveyor and witnesses, investigated the land and found it to be flat with a few hillocks of oak and a few small lakes which would not hold water for even 15 days.]
12. Page 9: Measurement Of The Claim, August 22, 1835.
[Ramírez, together with the Surveyor, Overseers Accountants and Expert measured the land. There follows an account of the measurement with an exact description of the boundaries of the land and the surrounding lands.]
12. Page 10: Appraisal Of The Claim, September 13, 1835.
[The Appraisers were notified of the above. They then set the value of the land at ten pesos per sitio since the land does not have running water or folds for cattle.]
12. Page 11: Ramirez Gave The File To The Surveyor And Asked Him To Make A Map, September 14, 1835.
12. Page 11: The Surveyor Returned The File, With The Map Attached, September 14, 1835.
12. Page 12: Ramirez Received 30 Pesos From Ballarena. He sent them, together with the file to the State Government so that it may decide the case.
12. Page 13: Summer Pasture Of The Alameda, Measured For Pilar Sar. Y Ballarena, September 15, 1835.
[Underneath the map is a description of the boundaries of the grant and a description of the surrounding grants, signed by Attorney Antonio Canales.]
12. Page 14: Blank.
12. Page 15: Governor Fernandez Orders The Treasury Minister To Deposit The Money. He is to return the file to him with a receipt, November 16 1835.
12. Page 15: Treasury Minister Jose Nunez De Caceres Certifies That Pilar Sarate Y Bayarena Has Paid 30 Pesos For 3 Sitios In La Alameda.
12. Page 16: Governor Fernandez Sends The File On To The Attorney General, November 17, 1835.
12. Page 16: Attorney General Nunez De Caceres States That Pilar Sarate Has Fulfilled All The Obligations Of The Law, November 18, 1835.
[He is therefore entitled to the title. The Mayor of Camargo is to put him in possession of the land and Sarate is to erect boundary markers so that there will be no complicated litigation later over boundaries.]
12. Page 16: Governor Fernandez Orders The Title Be Delivered To Pilar Zarate Y Bayarena Since He Has Fulfilled All Requirements, November 23, 1835.
[The Mayor is to give him possession of the land, make a copy of the file for the Municipal Archives, and send the original file back to the State Archives. Zarate y bayarena is not to forget to build boundary markers.]



 

San Rafael file, 1828, 1830-1831,
fractional

This file consists of copies of the legal records of the San Rafael grant, dating 1828, 1830-1831. Maximo Villarreal and Jose Ygnacio Rivas applied for this land. After Villarreal died, his widow continued the claim.
Arrangement
These records are arranged somewhat chronologically as received in the State Archives.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), San Rafael file, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box Folder
1980/183 13. Page 1: Certification Petition From Maximo Villarreal.
[He states that agriculture is the only industry in the area. Although there are droughts and hostile barbaric Indians the people continue at it because they love the land they were born in. They also stay because they are proud of the help they give to their country. Villarreal has participated in several of the battles against the Indians. and has even shed his blood. He is unable to not defend his fellow citizens. For the last five years he has ranched at San Rafael with a view towards buying the land. He even had a power of attorney of the owners on file in the municipal archives. He would like, however, to take advantage of Article Number 26 of the law of December 15, 1826 which declares this land to be vacant public land. He has already built a well, a corral and put his animals on the land. He owns 150 head of cattle, 60 horses and mules and 500 head of goat and sheep. He makes his living off of these. For all of the above reasons he lays claim to four sitios of land stretching from San Rafael to the banks of the Nueses. This is between the parajes of Las Animas and Santa Cruz.]
13. Page 3: Certification By Mayor Jose Lorenzo Longoria, February 19, 1828.
[He certifies that all of the above is true. San Rafael is on the other side of the Río Grande.]
13. Page 3: Longoria Sends The File On To The Governor So That Action May Be Taken.
13. Page 4: Longoria Sent The File On To The Governor On That Same Date.
13. Page 4: Governor Fernandez Orders That The Land Be Measured, Claimed And The Neighbors Be Given Judicial Notice. José Antonio Gutiérres de Lara will see to it that the law is carried out.
13. Page 5: Certification Petition From Ygnacio Rivas.
[He states that six years ago he and Villarreal ranched at San Rafael and built a well and corral. He gave these up to Villarreal. Although this land was recognized as belonging to José Ygnacio Guerra under the old government. he lost possession because he never put any animals on the land. This was because he could not afford to put any animals on the land. Guerra is from Gualeguas or Agualeguas (See page 1). Under the 1826 law he claims 2 sitios of land beginning with where the land of the Garcías ends. He doesn't have anywhere to put 38 head of cattle and 108 mares. He therefore petitions the mayor to certify that the above is true and then to send the case on to the governor. He signs José Ygnaso Rybas.]
13. Page 5: Certification By Lorenzo, February 20, 1828.
13. Page 5: Lorenzo Orders That The File Be Sent To The Governor.
13. Page 6: The File Was Sent To The Governor On The Same Date.
13. Page 6: Governor Fernandez Orders The Mayor To Measure, Claim And Give The Neighbors Judicial Notice. José Antonio Gutiérrez de Lara will see to it that the law is carried out, March 18, 1828.
13. Page 7: Blank.
13. Page 8: Rivas Petitions The Mayor.
[He asks that the Mayor do as the Governor ordered on March 18. He also asks that all of the papers be kept in an archives so that they will be preserved for later use.]
13. Page 9: Lorenzo Orders That Gutierrez De Lara Carry Out The Governor's Orders, April 24, 1828.
[A message was sent to the interior notifying Surveyor Gutiérrez de Lara that he has been given this position and that he should come carry it out.]
13. Page 9: Claim Restated, April 5, 1830.
[Pedro de la Garza (standing for the widow of Meximo Villarreal) and Ygnacio Rivas came before Mayor Bruno García and restated their claim to San Rafael. Widow Villarreal is to retain possession of the well and corrals, while Rivas is to have the right to draw water from the lake.]
13. Page 11: Appointments By Mayor Garcia, April 10, 1830.
[He states that on January 14 he appointed Domingo de la Fuente as Surveyor for all claims. De la Garza and Rivas are to appoint an appraiser, and de la Fuente will serve as appraiser for the government.]
13. Page 11: De La Garza And Rivas Gave Their Neighbors Judicial Notice.
[Their neighbors did not oppose them and they therefore appointed José Antonio Longoria as their appraiser (continues on page 14).]
13. Page 12: Certified Copy Of Letter From Mayor Of Camargo To Mayor Of Mier, April 5, 1830.
[Claims have been laid on lands in Aguanueva, Sal Colorada, las Animas and San Rafael. He asks the Mayor of Mier to give this publicity so that those of his citizens who own land next to the above ranches can be at their ranches on the 20th when they will be given judicial notice about the claims.]
13. Page 12: Letter From Mayor Pablo Victoriano De Ynojosa, April 13, 1830.
[He acknowledges receipt of the letter of the 5th and says he gave the notice as much publicity as possible. The certified copies were made April 21, 1830.]
13. Page 13: Blank.
13. Page 14: Appraiser Sworn In.
[Mayor García notified José Antonio Longoria that he has been appointed an appraiser. He accepted the position and swore he would fulfill his duties to the best of his knowledge.]
13. Page 15: Appointments By Garcia.
[He names Pedro García as Expert, Narciso López and Alejandro Farías as Accountants, and Joaquín Canales and Rafael López as Overseers. They accepted their appointments and swore to fulfill their duties to the best of their knowledge.]
13. Page 15: Reconnaissance Of The Claim, May 10, 1830.
[Having finished the measurement of the Animas Ranch, Mayor García, Surveyor de la Fuente and the Appraisers and various witnesses made an inspection of the land at San Rafael. It is flat with normal pastures without any running or standing waters since the lakes here will not hold water for even 8 days. Upon discovering that there are not 6 sitios in the site, it was decided that widow Villarreal would receive three and Rivas would receive two. There is a well, a corral and a hut on the ranch. Both ranches will have to use the water from the well because without it the ranch would be useless, although it does enjoy many other advantages.]
13. Page 16: Measurement Of The Claim.
[Mayor García, together with the Surveyor, Accountants and Overseers measured the land. The five sitios are then described with their boundaries. The five sitios are to remain undivided so that water from the lake can be drawn away. There follows a listing of the surrounding ranches (continued on page 21).]
13. Page 17: Domingo De La Fuente Drew A Map Of The Five Sitios.
[It was taken from the general map of lands he measured in Camargo. There follows a listing of the measurements of the ranch, and a listing of the surrounding ranches.]
13. Pages 19-20: Blank.
13. Page 21: Appraisal Of The Claim, May 11, 1830.
[The Appraisers appraised each of the five sitios at 35 pesos.]
13. Page 22: Blank.
13. Page 23: Garcia Received 175 Pesos. He sends them, together with the file, to the State Government so that the case can be settled.
13. Page 24: Governor Zozasa Sent The Money And File On To The Treasury Minister, June 30, 1830.
13. Page 24: Treasury Minister Jose Felisano Ortiz Received 175 Pesos From Manuel Garza Sosa On Behalf Of Maximo Villarreal, July 2, 1830.
13. Page 26: Governor Zozasa Sends The File On To The Attorney General, July 2, 1830.
[He is to examine it and finalize the case so that the land will no longer be abused by whoever wants to use it.]
13. Page 26: Letter Of Attorney General Gil, July 7, 1830.
[He notes that all of the requirements of the law have been fulfilled, except that the file does not include the appointment of de la Fuente as Government Surveyor. The file mentions a government decree of January 14th, but it does not include the decree itself. This is also true of 3 other files sent from Camargo. All of them must include the decree or a certified copy of the decree. Nor did the Municipal Treasury of Camargo receive its share of the 175 pesos for having taken care of the measurement. He requests the Governor to send this money to them and to be sure to receive a receipt for it. When Rivas and Villarreal are put in possession of the land, they are to be told exactly which section of the grant they are receiving, and boundary markers are to be set up. They are also to be told that they are to share the waters of the San Rafael Pond.]
13. Page 29: Governor Guerra Orders That The File Be Returned To Camargo So That The Attorney General's Orders Can Be Implemented, July 10, 1830.
[The file is to be put in the Municipal Archives there, and an extract copied from it will serve as the title to the property.]
13. Page 29: Orders Of Mayor Garcia, July 18, 1830.
[He orders that the neighbors be given judicial notice that on the 21st Rivas and the Villarreal heirs are to be put in possession of the land.]
13. Page 30: Garcia States That The Neighbors Were Given Judicial Notice.
13. Page 30: Garcia Puts Matias Ramirez, Standing In For Ygnacio Rivas, In Possession Of The Land, July 22, 1830.
[A description of the standard ceremony follows. If he does not build boundary markers within four months, Rivas will lose possession of his two sitios.]
13. Page 33: Mayor Jose Lazar Elizondo Put Juan Villareal, Legitimate Son Of Maximo Villarreal, In Possession Of 3 Sitios For Himself And The Other Heirs Of Maximo Villarreal, June 21, 1831.
[A description of the standard ceremony follows. They will lose possession if they do not build stone boundary markers within four months.]
13. Page 35: Governor Suares Appointed Domingo De La Fuente As State Surveyor And Appraiser. The decree is dated January 14, 1830.
[Ramón Guerra was his Secretary. The certified copy of this decree was made on July 10, 1830 by Manuel Garza de Porras, Secretary to the Governor. (This certified copy was made in compliance with the Attorney General's orders on page 26).]
13. Pages 36-38: Blank.



 

Miscellaneous file, 1830,
fractional

This file consists of copies of various legal documents, dating 1830, which apparently belonged in the municipal archives in Camargo, Mexico. Various subjects are covered, including a divorce case of Antonio Canales; powers of attorney; litigation over Ranch of Los Portales; boat leasing; and land sale. This file is numbered in the original ink from page 5 through page 16. Antonio Canales is mentioned in most of these documents, either as party to a divorce, attorney, or witness.
Arrangement
These records are arranged numerically by page number assigned by a previous possessor of the documents, which is somewhat chronological.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Miscellaneous file, Camargo documents. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box Folder
1980/183 14. Page 5: Order Of Mayor Bruno Garcia.
[He orders that the divorce petition be sent to the State Government since they are more knowledgeable in these matters, and he orders that her requests be granted.]
14. Page 6: Letter From Garcia To The Mayor Of Bejar, February 12, 1830.
[He asks the Mayor of Bejar to notify Attorney Antonio Canales Rosillo that he is to appear in Camargo within 30 days of this notice so that he can be present at the divorce hearings sought by his wife, Mariana Rodríguez. He asks that this file be returned.]
14. Page 7: Very Faded And Illegible.
14. Page 8: Power Of Attorney.
[Nicolás Matías, Bruno García Matías, Rafael and Juan Manuel Ramíres, and José Vicente appeared before Second Alderman Francisco López Días (because of the absence of the President and the First Alderman). They gave their power of attorney to Attorney José Antonio Canales Rosillo. He has authority to represent them in all Mexican courts and legal proceedings.]
14. Page 8: Power Of Attorney.
[Canales has the power to bring suits in their name and to confer the power of attorney on someone else. He is asked to pursue the suit until it is concluded.]
14. Page 9: Certified Copy.
[Francisco López Días certifies that this is a correct copy of the original.]
14. Page 9: Power Of Attorney, August 28, 1830.
[José Antonio Canales confers his power of attorney on Antonio Morales, as the above power of attorney authorizes him to do.]
14. Page 10: Petition From Pedro Rodriguez To The Mayor, July 10, 1830.
[He petitions on behalf of his wife, María Josefa Casas and her sisters, Leonarda, Gertrudis, Francisca and the heirs of Juana. He describes how his father-in-law, Juan-Eligio Casas, ended up in 1786 with sole control of the Ranch of Los Portales. This document has been mislaid or lost, and now Alejandro Salinas has appeared to deny that the sale ever took place. Most of the second half is illegible, but in the last paragraph he asks the Mayor to certify that he knows that they have been on that land for almost 50 years and also to certify that the original document is in the Municipal Archives.]
14. Page 11: Mayor Bruno Garcia Orders The Requested Certification To Proceed. July 10, 1830.
[He certifies that Narciso López and Antonio Morales de Villarreal were witnesses on the document in which Andrés, Manuel and Juan José Casas sold their rights to Los Portales to their brother Juan Eligio Casas, which he in turn bought from Juan José Salinas. Although this document is supposed to be in the Municipal Archives, it cannot be found. Juan José Casas lived for more than forty years there with his heirs and with his livestock. The Judge, Bruno García, therefore certifies that he is 50 years old and that since he has had use of his reason he has known that the Casas family lived at Los Portales. He further certifies that he knows that Alexandro Salinas has never lived at Los Portales and has brought this difficulty now out of envy.]
14. Page 12: On The Same Date, This Instrument Was Placed In The Municipal Archives.
14. Page 13: Power Of Attorney.
[This is the original power of attorney that was copied on pages 8 and 9.]
14. Page 14: Boat Rental, November 4, 1830.
[Attorney Antonio Canales appeared before Mayor Francisco López Díaz and obligated himself to deposit 130 pesos every year for the rent of the canoe and small boat in the river which belong to the town. His neighbors will cross their persons and their belongings without charge unless there is so much that another boat is required for safety. Canales will pay all repair costs above one peso. No one else is to put a boat near his, and if they do Canales will not be responsible for the rents they charge nor for any smuggling on that boat. This contract is backdated to August 3 of this year when the boats were turned over to José Angel de la Garza and will end next August 3. Narciso López, Pedro de la Garza and Ygnacio Ribas signed the document as witnesses.]
14. Page 15: Land Sold, December 15, 1830.
[Before Bruno García appeared Francisco Guerra y Chapa (for his wife María Antonia de Ynojosa and his brothers-in-law), José Eusebio de Trebiño, Bartolo Trebiño and Antonio María Guerra (for himself and for his brother and cousins, Rafael de Ynojosa and Francisco Guerra Trebiño) and said: that they sell to Ygnacio de Trebiño 2 porciones (parcels) of land, bounded on the east by the jurisdiction of Reinosa, on the west by the land of the Deceased Lorenzo Trebiño, by the south by the Río Grande, and on the North by national lands. This is in payment of 173 pesos and four reales that the deceased Josefa de Trebiño owed. Her heirs therefore pay this debt off. The buyer should further pay 70 pesos to María Edubije Olibares, Josefa Olibares for Pablo Prieto and María Justa de la Garza in payment of the inheritance that Josefa de Trebiño left them. All claims on the two porciones are abandoned, and José Ygnacio de Trebiño may take possession whenever he likes. Antonio Canales, Antonio Morales and Pedro de la Garza were witnesses to this.]