Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Samuel Hamilton Walker:

An Inventory of Papers at the Texas State Archives, 1836-1905, [ca. 1982], undated



Overview

Creator: Walker, Samuel Hamilton, 1817-1847.
Title: Papers
Dates: 1836-1905, [ca. 1982], undated
Abstract: Types of papers include correspondence, military orders, quartermaster invoices and receipts, social invitations, pamphlets, and newspaper clippings of Samuel Hamilton Walker and his family, dating 1836-1905, [ca. 1982], and undated. The correspondence is from family, social, business, and military sources. The papers begin in 1836 with correspondence between Walker and members of his family when he was in Florida. Walker's correspondence with his family continues through his activities in Texas until his death in 1847. The bulk of the papers are from the last few years of Walker's life and focus on his military activities in Texas, beginning with several letters in 1843 when Walker was in Mexican prisons after the Mier expedition. Afterwards, most of the papers are from Walker's service in the Mexican War, 1846-1847. Also during this period, there is important correspondence with Samuel Colt on the development of the Walker-Colt revolver. After Walker's death there is some third party correspondence reflecting on Walker's military career. The papers also contain more Walker family correspondence that continues up to 1905 and a biographical sketch of Walker from about 1982.
Quantity: 0.71 cubic ft., 2 photographs
Language English.

Biographical Sketch

Samuel Hamilton Walker was born at Toaping Castle, Prince Georges County, Maryland, on February 24, 1817. In May 1836 he joined the Washington City Volunteers and served in the Florida and Seminole wars. Following the war he and his brother Charles started a business in Iola, Florida. In 1840 Walker returned to Washington where he published a pamphlet critical of the conduct of the Army and certain officers during the Seminole wars.

Walker then left Washington and came to Texas in January 1842. He fought against the Mexican invasion of Texas in 1842 and joined the Somervell expedition. He was captured at Mier in December 1842, imprisoned in Mexico, and was a participant in the black bean episode. After his release, he served as a Texas Ranger with John Coffee Hays, becoming a captain of a company in the First Texas Mounted Rifles.

When the Mexican War began, Walker was lieutenant colonel of the First Texas Mounted Rifles. He joined General Zachary Taylor's army on the Rio Grande in April 1846 and participated in the battles of Resaca de la Palma and Palo Alto. Walker performed valuable scouting duty during the summer and fought in the battle of Monterrey in September 1846. He was offered a commission as a captain of Company C, First United States Mounted Rifles, Regular United States Army. He traveled to Washington to accept his commission in late 1846.

He became involved at this time with Samuel Colt, the famous gunsmith, who was designing a new revolver. Colt sought Walker's opinion since the Texas Rangers had been using an early model Colt revolver. Colt also wanted Walker's aid in getting a contract for the new revolvers with the War Department. A contract was signed on January 4, 1847, calling for 1,000 pistols to arm the First United States Mounted Rifles. Walker continued his correspondence with Samuel Colt and made several suggestions for changes in the design. This weapon became known as the Walker-Colt revolver.

Walker returned to the war in Mexico and commanded a company of the First United States Mounted Rifles. He was killed leading a charge at the battle of Huamantla, on October 9, 1847. His body was returned to Texas and buried in San Antonio.


Scope and Contents of the Papers

The Samuel Hamilton Walker Papers cover the years 1836-1905, [ca. 1982], and undated. Types of papers include correspondence, military orders, quartermaster invoices and receipts, social invitations, pamphlets, and newspaper clippings. The correspondence is from family, social, business, and military sources.

The papers begin in 1836 with correspondence between Walker and members of his family when he was in Florida. Walker's correspondence with his family continues through his activities in Texas until his death.

The bulk of the papers are from the last few years of Walker's life and focus on his military activities in Texas, beginning with several letters in 1843 when Walker was in Mexican prisons after the Mier expedition. Afterwards, most of the papers are from Walker's service in the Mexican War, 1846-1847. Also during this period, there is important correspondence with Samuel Colt on the development of the Walker-Colt revolver.

After Walker's death there is some third party correspondence reflecting on Walker's military career. The papers also contain more Walker family correspondence that continues up to 1905 and a biographical sketch of Walker from about 1982.


 

Arrangement of the Papers

The papers were left in their original order. There is an item listing for each accession. The folders and item descriptions were prepared by the donors.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

None.

Restrictions on Use

None.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the papers. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Colt, Samuel, 1814-1862.
Corporate Names:
Texas Rangers.
Texan Mier Expedition, (1842-1844)
Subjects:
Colt revolver.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Military--1836-1847.
Orders (military records)--Texas--1836-1847.
Pamphlets--Texas.
Invitations--Texas.
Financial records--Texas--Military--1836-1847.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the papers in this finding aid. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Army papers, Army correspondence, 1835-1846, 5.95 cubic ft. [Particularly, ALS, May 4, 1843, from Walker to Texas Adjutant General A. Sidney Johnson [sic], written from Mexican prison. Possibly other documents in other series in the Army Papers.]
Texas Comptroller's Office, Republic of Texas claims, 1835-[ca. 1900], 259 reels of 35mm microfilm. [Index available at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/index.html]
Southern Historical Collection, Manuscripts Department, Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A finding aid for this collection is available at the Southern Historical Collection. Contact staff at: (919)962-1345 (telephone); (919)962-4452 (FAX); mss@email.unc.edu.
Samuel Hamilton Walker Diary, 1842-1843, 1 item.
Publications
Colt, Samuel, 1814-1862. Sam Colt's own record : Samuel Colt's own record of transactions with Captain Walker and Eli Whitney, Jr., in 1847. Hartford : Connecticut Historical Society, 1949.
Walker, Samuel Hamilton, 1817-1847. Samuel H. Walker's account of the Mier expedition / edited with an introd. by Marilyn McAdams Sibley. (Austin) : Texas State Historical Association, 1978.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Samuel Hamilton Walker Papers. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1982/047, 1989/080

These papers were donated to the Texas State Archives in two separate accessions: first, by Warren O. Simonds on October 30, 1981; second, by Mrs. Jane Zielinski on December 28, 1988.

Processing Information

Paul B. Beck, February 1989


Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Simonds accession, 1836-1905, [ca. 1982], undated (bulk 1846-1847),
0.47 cubic ft., 2 photographs

Samuel Hamilton Walker is listed below as SHW. Jonathan Thomas Walker, his brother, is listed as JTW.
box folder
1982/47 1 Letter SHW to JTW, from Castle of Perote, August 4, 1847.
12 pages.
2 Letter SHW to JTW, no address, no date.
2 Invoice of Quartermaster stores issued to Walker's Company of Rangers, and Walker's certification of loss of same by capture by Mexicans. April 28, 1846
3 Letter SHW to James Gridley, December 29, 1846.
3 Printed invitation to SHW for the Third Annual Ball of the Young Men's Henry Clay Association, N. Y., N. Y., December 14, 1846.
3 Printed invitation to Tammany Hall Annual Ball, December 11, 1846.
4 Invoices of Quartermaster stores issued to Walker's Company on April 22, 1846; April 29, 1846; May 6, 1846; May 13, 1846; and May 14, 1846.
4 Letter to SHW from Captain Libby transmitting above invoices, June 29, 1846.
5 List of Arms charged to SHW, July 22, 1846.
6 Receipt of supplies turned in by SHW, no date.
6 Letter from Quartermaster to SHW, August 2, 1846.
6 Regimental Orders, First Regiment Texas Mounted Riflemen, ALS by SHW. August 27, 1846,
6 Invoice of Quartermaster stores issued to Walker's Company of Rangers and Walker's certification that stores were expended in service.
7 Certificate of membership in Independent Order of Odd Fellows, issued August 7, 1840, November 27, 1846.
8 Letter SHW to JTW, Castle of Perote, October 5, 1847.
9 Invoice of Public Arms issued to Walker's Company and Walker's statement that they were lost due to enemy action, April 28, 1846.
9 Receipt for arms issued, April 20, 1846 and May 8, 1846.
10 Letter to Colonel John Mason, signed Samuel Colt, December 1, 1846.
10 Receipt of mule and saddle turned in by SHW, October 19, 1846.
11 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, January 10, 1846 [1847?].
12 Letter to SHW from Mary H. Bordley, November 6, 1846.
13 Letter of introduction of SHW to Captain Charles Casey, United States Army, from Henry P. Casey, October 20, 1846.
13 Letter to SHW from John G. Chalmers, La Grange, May 4, 1847.
13 Letter to SHW from John C. Pritt, Washington, January 26, 1847.
14 Letter to SHW from William B. Iaques, San Antonio, July 15, 1846.
15 Petition to the Senators and Representatives of the United States Congress by regular Army officers on duty in Texas and Mexico protesting promotion of SHW ahead of them.
16 Letter to SHW from Melchoir Hoffer, requesting information on a fellow Mier prisoner. August 14, 1846
17 Invitation to the fifth Annual Ball of Junior Artillerists, December 5, 1846.
17 Letter to SHW from M.S. Branch, New York, December 3, 1846.
18 Letter to SHW from R.T. Street, Richmond, November 24, 1846.
18 Letter to SHW from Chris L. Onderliesy, Baltimore, November 28, 1846.
19 Letter to SHW from John Llewelyn, Harpers Ferry, Virginia, November 26, 1846.
19 Letter to SHW from Thomas J. Green, Ridgeway, North Carolina, December 29, 1846.
20 Letter to SHW from Elijah Stanton, Baltimore, January 20, 1847.
20 Letter to SHW from Jho. B. Brooke and B.B. Holt, Upper Marlboro, Maryland, January 27, 1847.
21 Letter to SHW from Wm. D. Bowie, Annapolis, Maryland, January 28, 1847.
21 Letter to SHW from Thomas Stockdale, Port Clinton, Pennsylvania, February 4, 1847.
22 Letter to SHW from Ellen A. Catlett, Prince Georges County, Maryland, February 1, 1847.
22 Letter to SHW from Wm. H. Worthington, Fredericksburg, Virginia, January 26, 1847.
23 Letter to SHW from Wm. L. Schley, Frederick, Maryland, January 18, 1847.
24 Letter to SHW from N.C. Lyons, Academy, no date.
24 Letter to SHW from Wm. Bentz, Carlisle, November 24, 1847.
25 Treasury Department requisition for $150.00, January 16, 1847.
25 Letter to SHW recommending four recruits, no date.
25 Letter to SHW from Wm. H. Tuer (?), Upper Marlboro, January 31, 1847.
26 Letter to SHW from Adjutant General's Office, signed E.D. Townsend. January 30, 1847,
26 Letter to SHW from Wm. D. Bowie, Senate Chamber, Annapolis, January 28, 1847.
27 Letter to Colonel T.S. Andrews from Thomas Claiborne, First United State Mounted Rangers, in re Walker and his arrest, November 18, 1847.
28 Invoice to SHW for board and lodging, August 5, 1846.
28 Letter to SHW from N.C. Lyons, Reisterstown, Maryland, December 1, no year.
28 Invitation to SHW from Captain H.L. Thistle, November 27, 1846.
28 Requisition to SHW from United State Army Quartermaster for $45.00, January 12, 1847.
29 Letter to SHW from G.H. Penfield, New York, January 18, 1847.
29 Invitation to SHW from Mr. and Mrs. Brooke, February 1847.
29 Letter to SHW from Nathaniel Cox, House of Delegates, Annapolis, Maryland, January 22, 1847.
29 Letter of introduction of SHW to Thomas Carron, United States Senate, from J.N. Reynolds, January 4, 1846.
29 Letter to SHW from Samuel G. David, November 25, 1846.
30 Letter to SHW from W.F. Wallach, January 21, 1847.
30 Letter to JTW from Henry T. Hays stating that he had shipped SHW's horse, Toranado, from New Orleans, May 25, 1849.
30 Letter of introduction to David Ratcliff, Esq., from Wm. H. Trine (?), October 15, 1846.
30 Letter to SHW from Lacey Phillips, January 1847.
31 Letter to SHW from Wm. H. Perrie, June 24, no year.
31 Letter to SHW from Martha Bell, Washington, January 29, 1847.
31 Letter to John Sanders from A.C. Bartlett, New Orleans, offer of horse Toranado to be presented to SHW by citizens of New Orleans. May 15, 1846,
31 Letter to SHW from N.C. Lyons, June 22, 1847.
31 Invitation to SHW, January 4, 1846.
32 Letter to SHW from C. Parker, Baltimore, January 17, 1847.
32 Letter to SHW from Jonathan Robey, Washington, January 15, 1847.
32 Letter to SHW from Harry Stevens, New York, January 15, 1847.
32 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New York, January 5, 1847.
32 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New York, December 16, 1846.
32 Telegram to SHW from Samuel Colt, no date.
33 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New Haven, January 30, 1847.
33 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New Haven, January 23, 1847.
33 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New Haven, January 18, 1847.
34 Letter to SHW from John A. Chevallie, Richmond, January 24, 1847.
35 Letter to SHW from Lacey Phillips, Philadelphia, January 14, 1847.
35 Letter to J.E. Merriker from Nathaniel Cox, Annapolis, January 17, 1847.
35 Letter to SHW from Thomas F. Bowie, Upper Marlboro, Maryland, January 30, 1847.
36 Testimonial to Nathan Walker, Iola, Florida, November 18, 1839.
36 Letter transmitting the above to Nathan Walker, Sr., November 18, 1839.
36 Letter to John Homes Offley, office of the Secretary of War, from Samuel Colt, New York, December 1, 1846.
36 Testimonial, February 1847.
37 Letter to JTW from Artence West, October 7, 1848.
37 Letter to SHW from Samuel Colt, New Haven, February 3, 1847.
38 Roll of enlistment of Unites States Mounted Riflemen, January 22, 1847.
39 Letter to SHW from James I. Tarleton, New Orleans, December 19, 1846.
40 Letter to Harry T. Hays from JTW, December 24, 1847.
40 Letter to Mrs. Thomas Walker from George W. Meyers, Baltimore, January 10, 1849.
40 Letter to JTW from Harry T. Hays, New Orleans, January 29, 1847.
40 Invoices of items issued to Walker's Company, Point Isabel, May 2, 1846.
41 List of locations of gunsmiths in New York City, no date.
41 Note to SHW from I.D. Boyce, no date.
41 Letter to Mrs. Jane A. Walker from John M.L. Collins, Baltimore, January 19, 1849.
42 Invitation from D.C. Bradley, Commercial Exchange, St. Charles Street, November 11, 1846.
42 Invoice of R.E. Pays and John Lane, April 29, 1846.
42 Inventory of arms of Walker's Company of Rangers, May to July, 1846.
43 Pamphlet "Florida and Seminole Wars" written by SHW, printed in Washington, D.C., July 1, 1840.
44 War Department General Orders No. 57, Washington, December 22, 1846.
44 War Department General Orders No. 2, Washington, January 8, 1847.
45 Program of the Young Men's Henry Clay Association, New York, December 29, 1846.
45 General Orders No. 18, headquarters of the Army, assignment of the officers of the regiment of Mounted Riflemen and uniform specifications. June 4, 1846,
46 Cover of address on the occasion of removing the remains of Captains Walker and Gillespie, San Antonio. See Folder 47 for a copy of the address. April 21, 1856,
46 Request of Hedding B. Leech that the above be returned to him, April 15, 1905.
47 Copy of a request from April 22, 1846 [1856?]for the address in Folder 46 and a typed copy of the address, no date.
47 Typed extract from Thrall's History of Texas on Captain Walker, no date.
47 Newspaper clipping, "San Antonio in 1849", May 2, 1900.
48 Letter to JTW from SHW, headquarters Army of the South, Tampa Bay, Florida, May 10, 1837.
49 Letter to JTW from SHW, Fort Mitchell, Alabama, October 2, 1836.
50 Letter to JTW from SHW, Fort Dade, Florida, March 5, 1837.
51 Letter to JTW from Nathan Walker, New Orleans, March 20, 1837.
52 Letter to JTW from SHW, New Orleans, July 7, 1837.
53 Letter to JTW from SHW, New Orleans, July 13, 1837.
54 Letter to Charles Walker from SHW, Iola, Florida, July 22, 1838.
55 Letter to Charles Walker from SHW, Iola, Florida, October 21, 1838.
56 Letter to Charles Walker from SHW, Iola, Florida, January 16, 1839.
57 Letter to Charles Walker from SHW, Iola, Florida, February 16, 1837.
58 Letter to Mother and Father from SHW, Iola, Florida, April 20, 1839.
59 Letter to JTW from SHW, Iola, Florida, December 29, 1839.
60 Letter to JTW from SHW, Iola, Florida, January 17, 1840.
61 Letter to JTW from SHW, Charleston, South Carolina, February 24, 1840.
62 Letter from F.C. Taylor to M. Nevarro and SHW, Iola, Florida, March 5, 1840.
63 Letter to SHW from John C. Taylor, Iola, Florida, March 17, 1840.
64 Letter to SHW from Ann M. Walker, Iola, Florida, May 24, 1840.
65 Letter to JTW from Ann W. Walker, Iola, Florida, July 11, 1840.
66 Letter to JTW from Ann W. Walker, Iola, Florida, September 31, 1840.
67 Letter to JTW from SHW, Iola, Florida, October 20, 1840.
68 Letter to JTW from SHW near Tallahassee, March 7, 1841.
69 Letter to JTW from SHW near Tallahassee, April 20, 1841.
70 Letter to JTW from SHW, Tallahassee, Florida, June 16, 1841.
71 Letter to Zafoc Mehnew from SHW, New Town, Florida, August 8, 1841.
72 Letter to Samuel H. Bass from SHW, August 22, 1841.
73 Letter to JTW from SHW, in prison near the City of Mexico, May 29, 1843.
74 Letter to JTW from SHW, Matamoros, Headquarters, Army of the Invasion, July 1, 1846.
74 Letter to JTW from SHW, Baltimore, February 10, 1847.
74 Letter to JTW from SHW, Baltimore, February 15, 1847.
74 Letter to JTW from SHW, Baltimore, February 20, 1847.
75 Letter to JTW from SHW, Newport, Kentucky, March 6, 1847.
75 Letter to JTW from SHW, New Orleans Barracks, April 18, 1847.
76 Letter to JTW from SHW, Perota, Mexico, June 6, 1847.
77 Letter to JTW from T.P. Andrews, December 13, 1847.
77 Letter to SHW II from Wyoming Historical Society, Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, July 27, 1882.
77 Letter to SHW II from Thomas Claiborne, Nashville, Tennessee, April 4, 1886.
77 Letter to Thomas Claiborne from Jas. L. Barton, McMinnville, April 3, 1886.
77 Letter to SHW II from Thomas Claiborne, Nashville, July 13, 1892.
78 Copy of The Vedette, Washington, D.C., containing Colonel Thomas Claiborne's memoirs of SHW, April 1886
79 Silver print copy photo of a daguerreotype (?) portrait of SHW. Removed to Prints and Photographs Collection, 1982/ 47-1.
79 Silver print photo view of SHW's tombstone in San Antonio. Removed to Prints and Photographs Collection, 1982/ 47-2.
79 Biographical sketch of SHW, [ca. 1982].
79 The Walker's of Toaping Castle, Md., Reprint of an 1883 family history, no date.



 

Zielinski accession, 1839-1903,
0.24 cubic ft.

box folder
1989/080 1. A group including:
To Mrs. Ann Walker (at her Father's). From James Hudson and James Roach, Iola, Florida. Nov. 18, 1839.
A. D. S. 12-11/16 in. x 8-1/2 in.
Conveys to Ann Walker resolutions passed by neighbors about Nathan Walker's death. The resolutions are in a very elaborate style of handwriting.
To Mrs. Ann Walker. From James Hudson, Iola, Florida with, on the same sheet, notice of the committee appointments and the officers of the meeting. Nov. 18, 1839.
A. L. S. 20 in. x 13 in.
2. To Mssrs. Jas. Hudson or James Roach, Iola, Florida. From J. T. Walker, Washington City. Dec. 5, 1839.
A. L. S. 9-15/16 in. x 8-1/2 in.
Thanks given to Hudson and Roach for news about Nathan Walker's death and for what was likely a copy of the above resolutions. J. T. was brother of Nathan and Samuel Hamilton Walker. J. T. goes on to ask for any late news of Samuel H. Walker and inquires of the men about Miss Anna Stone, who Samuel Walker had told them was married to Nathan.
3. To Ann M. Walker, Iola, West Florida. From S. H. Walker, Washington City. May 18, 1840.
A. L. S. 10 in. x 8-1/2 in.
He complains that people who should have written to him have not. He tells her (his sister-in-law) some family news such as the severe illness of his father (also named Nathan as was Ann's deceased husband) and the concern that all of the family feel for her and the child. Samuel asks that she see that some building is finished and he will pay up when he comes. He will not be able to return to Florida before the next fall. He and Manuel (perhaps a slave) enjoy good health.
4. To Mrs. Ann M. Walker, Iola, Calhoun County, Florida. From S. H. Walker, Washington City, D. C. June 6, 1840.
A. L. S. 10-1/2 in. x 8-1/2 in.
His father has recovered somewhat but he (SHW) cannot come out before fall. He says that because of the continuing threat of Indians, she and other citizens should petition Congress for help. He says that he himself would like to be commissioned to raise a company of horsemen to protect the citizens from Quincy to St. Joseph.
5. To Ann Walker, Iola, Florida. From S. H. Walker, Leon City, Florida. May 24, 1841.
A. L. S. 10-1/16 in. x 8-1/2 in.
He says that he and Manuel are working for the Tallahassee Rail Road Company where they will continue to work if their health continues. People in the area are sickly; however, he intends to visit her in July or August. He has found acquaintances among the men but not many among the ladies. He says that he likes the society of the ladies. He often goes to church in Tallahassee. By now he has heard from friends and relatives in Maryland. If his health continues to hold out, he thinks he will stay in Florida and still considers Calhoun City as his home.
6. To Mrs. Ann M. Walker, Calhoun County, Iola, Florida. From Hanah D. Stone, St. Joseph. June 27, 1841.
A. L. S. 10 in. x 8 in.
Ann's aunt, Hanah Stone, is glad that she is coming for a visit. "Elizabeth" is anxious for her company. Cousin Henry will meet her at the cove when she comes.
7. To Mrs. A. M. Walker, Iola, Florida. From S. H. Walker, Tallahassee, Florida. Jan. 22, 1842.
A. L. S. 9-15/16 in. x 8-1/4 in.
An important letter in which Samuel Walker tells of some of the motivating factors in his character. He speaks, for instance, of "that unextinguishable love of chivalric immortal fame...The love of fame stil urges me on." Not surprisingly he says that he may go to Texas. His father (her father-in-law) is still alive but his faculties are reduced to those of "a newborn infant." His brother Thomas sends greetings and is afflicted with some form of asthma. A child has died and Charles and sister, Jane, are married. Samuel says that he and Manuel are well. He calls little Florida by name.
8. To Ann M. Walker (she was apparently in Iola). From S. H. Walker, Galveston, Texas. March 10, 1842.
A. L. S. 10in. x 8 in.
He has been for three weeks in Texas and is well pleased. He assures her that the causes of temperance and religion flourish with one hundred and eighty persons taking the total abstinence pledge. He is preparing to meet the Mexicans on the frontier. A hasty note dated later tells her that definitely an invasion of Mexico will take place. The whole tone of the letter is jubilant and hopeful.
9. To Mrs. Ann M. Walker, Blount Town, Calhoun County, Florida. From A. M. McAlpine (a brother-in-law), Iola. Sept. 6, 1842.
A. L. S. 13-1/2 in. x 8-1/4 in.
He informs her of Robert's severe illness (probably a nephew). He (A. M. McAlpine) did not receive her letter about shoes until after the boat was gone and the cars had left. Perhaps he will come to get her and bring the shoes himself. She has received a letter from Pearlington which he has sent by the boat. The family are well except for James and Robert. Jane (his wife) is sick from sitting up with Robert.
39. To Ann M. Walker. From J. T. Walker, Washington City. February 15, 1843.
A. L. S. 10 in. x 8-1/2 in.
Writing to his sister-in-law, J. T. Walker reports that he hasn't received any letters from his brother Sam, but has heard of him through a friend. The friend "states that Sam has done some of the greatest exploits he ever heard of. In one instance he crawled near three miles passed all the mexican sentinels ( ) into their camp and returned ( ). ... states that he has covered himself with honor his friends and his country. I have written to Sam several times but have had no answer and I fear if he performs many such acts as above I shall never enjoy that pleasure again." J. T. Walker goes on to report on the death of his father, on December 27, 1842, and that he is settling the estate, part of which will go to Ann's daughter.
[This item came in with the other documents in this accession but was not listed in the inventory. It has been given the next number in the inventory, #39.]
10. To Mrs. Ann M. Walker (Iola). From S. H. Walker, In Prison, Santiago, City of Mexico. May 6, 1843.
A. L. S. 10-1/16 in. x 8-1/16 in.
This letter is, of course, the most significant and valuable of all of the letters in this collection since it is an account by a participant in the unfortunate Mier Expedition, culminating in the drawing of the black and white beans whereby the survivors were decimated, seventeen of their number being shot in cold blood in the presence of the others. This threepage letter gives Walker's account of the entire expedition, the battle, the surrender, the escape, the second surrender under the terrible impetus of no water, the execution of one-tenth of the prisoners, and the horrible march in irons to Mexico City. Walker is not in the slightest cowed but is determined to revenge the deaths of his comrades. Walker, himself, escaped again in the late summer and made his way to the coast. Probably he mailed this letter at that time. A particularly important aspect of this letter is that Walker was at Santiago, not Perote where the other well-known participant in the Expedition, General Thomas Green was imprisoned. Green's account does not give the fates of some of the men not known to him, but known to Samuel Walker. Since the letter is transcribed in the Appendix, it is not necessary to summarize more of its contents, but that he intended to leave a record of this unhappy chapter in the history of Texas is indubitable.
11. To Isaac Jackson, Ochesee P. O., Jackson Co., Florida. From D. Levy, Washington. Oct. 15, 1844.
10-1/4 in. x 8-1/2 in.
This communication from a lawyer in Washington is written to Isaac Jackson, who was Ann Walker's second husband, and concerns the settlement of Nathan Walker's estate. This Nathan appears to be Ann's previous father-in-law, the father of Samuel H. Walker and Nathan Walker, who had married her. The gist of the letter is that Thomas Walker has been appointed by the Orphan's Court of Prince George's County, Md., to attend to the estate of Nathan Walker deceased. The child of Mrs. Walker (now Mrs. Jackson) is recognized as one of the legal heirs. The letter says that Thomas has previously written her to obtain an appointment as Guardian to the child so that he can pay about $300.00 which is due the child. To date, no reply has been received. Levy needs this evidence of legal appointment as Guardian and a power of attorney made out to him so that he can act in this matter.
12. To Isaac Jackson, Marianna, Jackson Co., Florida. From D. Levy, Washington. March 8, 1845.
A. L. S. 10-1/4 in. x 8-1/2 in.
Refers to a letter of 15 February. He has collected for Florida $275.00, which he is sending by draft. He requests a receipt and encloses a form to use. He explains why the division of the real property would not produce much money.
13. To Mrs. Ann M. Walker, near Ochesee, Florida. From S. H. Walker, San Antonio de Bexar (Texas). Aug. 16, 1845.
A. L. S. 10-1/16 in. x 8-1/16 in.
He is sending her a few lines by Mr. Smith, who has told him of the little girl (Florida Walker), her mother's family, and her prospect of future happiness (an apparent reference to her second marriage to Isaac Jackson). He mentions a letter about his escape from prison but has not heard from her until he saw Mr. Smith. Samuel goes on to say that he has been on active service (as a Texas Ranger) nearly all of his time in Texas, has been twice wounded, and has been a prisoner, but that his health is good. He intends to stay in Texas until the settling of the difficulties with Mexico. He has heard that the frontier-Rangers are about to be reorganized and increased to nearly 400 men under "our Gallant leader John C. Hays" with whom he has served ever since coming to Texas. After sending his regards to her family, he says in a postscript that he has not heard from his relatives in Maryland for some time but that about fourteen months previously he had received a letter from Samuel Hamilton who had written a disapproving letter about his activities and advising him to quit seeking fame and glory in a foreign country. Samuel H. Walker replied to this advice that he intended to stay in Texas until its independence should be guaranteed. He says that he will not write anyone except his aged mother until he receives something in the nature of an apology. Most of them probably think that he is dead. He sounds bitter at the lack of understanding and sympathy for his position on the Texas question.
14. To Florida M. Walker (Iola). From "Aunt" Amy Walker, Washington, D. C. Feb. 27, 1850.
A. L. S. 6-1/2 in. x 8-1/4 in.
Although the letter begins "Dear Neice" (sic), the first paragraph is obviously from and is signed by Florida's grandmother, Elizabeth Walker. This letter completed by Amy Walker, wife of Jonathan T. Walker, urges Florida to visit her grandmother and without fail to write. Elizabeth Walker's address is given as Beltville, Prince George's County, Maryland, where Elizabeth is living with a daughter and son-in-law, John Bell (really Beall). Many cousins, aunts, and uncles are named and the directions to Amy's house in Washington are given as at the corner of K and 8th North. This letter has misspellings and awkward constructions which bear out the writer's statement that she writes but little; however, her love and concern certainly are evident.
15. To Florida F. Walker (Iola). From Jonathan T. Walker, Washington. Aug. 16, 1854.
A. L. S. 13-1/4 in. x 8 in.
This is a warm, avuncular letter in which J. T. Walker regrets that his correspondence with Florida's "Ma" (Ann M. Walker) was broken off when she married Mr. Jackson. J. T. Walker regrets that Florida's opportunity for "schooling" is limited and tells her to have her Ma draw on him for fifty dollars to assist her. He quickly goes on to say that a little more money is coming to her from the estate--that he has sent her Guardian what she is due from the estate except for $40.15. He says that part of the estate is still unsettled because his mother is still living in good health on the old "homestead." He urges her to visit her grandmother and the rest of the family. Makes a joke about three of his sisters having married "Bealls" (pronounced "bells") and produced sixteen little Bealls who are not noisy but quiet. He, himself, has seven living children and has "burried" four. His brother, Charles, has four pretty little girls. All send love to her.
16. To Miss Florida Walker (somewhere in Texas). From James B. Stone, Aspin Grove. Sept. 6, 1857.
A. L. S. 13-1/2 in. x 8 in.
This uncle, probably Ann's brother, writes a funny if imaginatively spelled letter in which he says that old Mrs. Carawan is about to die but "you no that Redhead People is hard to die they are like a Mule have to be killed, Doll." Florida's nickname of "Doll" or "Dolly" shows up several times in this letter. He says that he cannot come to Texas to see her because it would take at least $300.00 for the mules to pull Jiney (Jennie?) and the "ballance would have to stay at home which would not doe." He tells Doll to get married (she would be no more than 18) for "blast a old maid." He urges her to tell Em that Nin is "speling" in three syllables and that all of his little ones send love to her and the others. He wishes that Luck may hold to her like "grim death to a dead Negro."
17. To Florida (Walker). From Elizabeth Walker (her grandmother), Topin Castle, Prince George's County, Md. July 19, 1858.
A. L. S. 10 in. x 8 in.
This is an affectionate letter from the grandmother of 76 who wishes that Florida would come to visit her. Someone else is acting as amanuensis, for the hand is completely unlike the one of the earlier letter. She gives news of the family and says that she has enjoyed raising chickens and gardening all her life. She has given up the homestead to Thomas who has taken the old house down and replaced it. His wife has planted a lot of flowers and the place is very beautiful. Cousin Lizzie and her husband, Mr. Lester, are staying there now. Uncle Charles lives in Washington with his second wife and six children. The cousin, or whoever is writing, interjects that the grandmother has said about enough for now but urges Florida to write. She goes on to ask if Florida goes to church and Sunday School? Most of the family are Methodists.
18. To Florida Walker, Livingston, Polk Co., Texas. From Mrs. Elizabeth Walker, Prince George's County, Md. Feb. 28, 1859.
A. L. S. 8 in. x 5 in.
She apologizes for not writing sooner. Florida's November letter has been received and all are pleased that she is doing so well. She is disappointed that Florida has not come for a visit. Now soon the spring will come and traveling will be pleasanter. They have had a mild winter and she fears that the fruit may be killed in March. She comments on her relatively good health for 77 and again urges Florida to visit.
19. To "Cousin" Florida (Livingston, Texas). From "Cousin" Lizzie Beall, Beltsville, Prince George's Co., Md. Sept. 21, 1859.
A. L. S. 8-1/4 in. x 5-1/4 in.
This letter is liberally underlined and "elegantly" written. She says of their disappointment that Florida did not come to Maryland in the spring. She hopes that Florida can come soon for all of them are anxious to see her. The grandmother's health is much as usual, but she may be feebler and a visit would cheer her up. Florida has asked for a daguerrotype of her grandmother, but it is unlikely that she can go to sit for one. However, all of them would be glad to see one of her (Florida). Cousin Lizzie says that she and her sister, Jennie, have written to Florida for the grandmother but have decided to sign their own names.
20. To Miss Florida F. Walker, Colita, Polk Co., Texas. From Jennie E. Beall, Beltsville, Prince George's Co., Maryland. Dec. 8, 1860.
A. L. S. 23-3/4 in. x 7-7/8 in.
Cousin Jennie says that in the absence of her sister she will answer Florida's letter of Nov. 13. The daguerrotype intended for the grandmother has arrived too late since the dear old lady died in April. Jennie has supposed that Uncle Thomas, being the eldest son and administrator of the estate would have written her. Jennie says that her grandmother had wanted very much to see Florida and had never spoken of Uncle Nathan's daughter without tears in her eyes. She had died in a sudden apoplectic fit and up to four hours before her death had been up and going about her usual domestic duties. She piously says that we should all be in readiness to meet death at any time. Probably Florida will hear from Uncle Thomas before long. The grandmother did not leave a will. She was 79. Jennie's sister has been teaching in Virginia but will get Florida's letter. Jennie will take the daguerrotype with her to Washington to show the other relatives who will be anxious to see it. Jennie then asks if the political agitation of the time is affecting people in Texas. She hopes and prays that the Union may be preserved and a bloody war avoided.
21. To Miss Dolly (Florida) Walker (Texas). From W. G. Lewis, Richmond, Va. July 29, 1861.
A. L. S. 7-3/4 in. x 5 in.
He has a chance to send a few lines by Parson Shotwell and apologizes for taking the liberty of writing her but he is far from home and wants to hear from Polk County. He has received very few letters though he has "wrote" many. He cannot able to write flowery letters with big words. He knows that they are about to go and thinks that their destination will be Manassas Junction where there was a fight July 21. He tells her to write him addressed to the Texas "volenteers."
22. To Miss Florida Walker (Polk Co., Texas). From W. G. Lewis, Camp Quantico, Prince William Co., (Va.). Feb. 3, 1862.
A. L. S. 10-1/8 in. x 7-7/8 in.
This letter is written on Confederate States lithographed stationery. Lewis writes that he has had a letter from her and that he is in fine health and spirits since finishing winter quarters in which he has a fine little log cabin. He speaks of the death of a friend and says that a mutual friend, Joe, was present so he could be given the letter she had enclosed. Joe is not in good health. Lewis has about decided to stay in Virginia until the war is over although he would like a furlough. He calls her "Miss Dollie" and says that there is little war news although they skirmish and kill "Yankeys" fairly often. There appears to be no chance of a battle before his enlistment runs out. Some of the Yankey cannon balls have come near hitting him or some of his comrades but have not.
23. To "Dear Friend" (Florida Walker). From Thomas H. McCreary, Camp near Richmond. March 3, 1863.
A. L. S. 8-1/2 in. x 7 in.
This stationery, again, is headed Confederate States of America, but is not so picturesque as the previous letter. He writes of a severe illness in which he "liked to of died" and being treated by a good doctor and his wife who was a better doctor. His survival was a surprise. There is a lady from "Rappahannock" who loves him well enough to come to Texas but whom he does not like well enough to pay her expenses. The Yankeys made a raid to try to take some of our wagons but did not. As was common in this time of short supplies of paper, he has turned the sheet and written in an opposite direction at the end. Tells news of friends.
24. Hood's Texas Brigade. 1862.
Broadside. 11-1/2in. x 8-1/2 in.
A laudatory tribute recapping the accomplishments and glories of the Brigade and naming heroes from Sam Houston at San Jacinto to A. S. Johnston at Shiloh. Parrish 4884.
25. Article of agreement between Miss F. F. Walker and the "undersigned citizens of the second part" in which Miss Walker agrees and binds herself to teach school at a common school in the neighborhood of Mr. Wm. West on Tarkington Prairie for three months. May 7, 1866.
A. D. S. 12-1/2 in. x 7-1/2 in.
She will give instructions in Orthography, Reading, "Writting," Common or "elamentary" arithmetic, English Grammar and Geography. The subscribers will pay her $2.00 each in specie or its equivalent at the end of the term. A four-page document listing patrons, students, and accounting figures. Apparently she got, or was supposed to get, $113.00. This interesting contract was folded for vertical filing with the legend "School Article/Miss F. F. Walker/and/Citizens/7th May/69."
26. Group of miscellaneous material, mostly undated:
a. Three 8-line stanzas "Old Texas." Excruciatingly bad poetry, but very much of its time.
A. M. S. 10 in. x 8 in.
b. Newspaper clipping of no apparent relevance. Both sides shown.
10 in. x 2-1/4 in.
c. An envelope addressed to Miss Emily Garvey, Livingston, Texas, She was perhaps Florida's daughter. April, 1902. A card with poetry and a copy of an envelope to Mrs. A. E. McDougle, 2723 Caroline Way, Houston, Texas.
5-1/4 in. x 3-3/8 in.
d. A. D. G. Garvey's Bill of Lumber showing a payment on account. Jan. 27, 1875.
10 in. x 7-1/2 in.
27. Mrs. Garvey's account with Geo. W. Paschal. June 28, 1871.
A. D. S. 10 in. x 8 in.
This is the accounting of the money due to Florida from the estate of Nathan Walker showing that she received $715.16 of $953.54; $238.38 being for legal services. She had by this time married Gus Garvey.
28. To Mr. Gus Garvey and wife. From W. B. Denson, Attorney, Cold Springs. July 22, 1871.
A. L. S. 9-1/4 in. x 8 in.
He has received from Mr. Geo. W. Paschal a draft for $715.00 He has the gold ready and wants Mr. Garvey and wife (if she is well enough) to come to get it. This partial settlement with Jonathan T. Walker of the estate of Nathan and Elizabeth Harvey is about 30 years after the father died. Poor Florida might have had a little more for schooling had this account been settled sooner. By now she is in her thirties.
29. To Mrs. Florida F. Garvey. Cousin Fillmore Beall, Attorney and Counselor-at-law, Washington City. Feb. 20, 1878.
A. L. S. 10-1/4 in. x 8-1/4 in.
On letterhead stationery of his law office. Florida's cousin is telling her that he does not expect her to pay anything except the acknowledgment of the papers sent her in January, and suggests that she remit the amount--presumably postage--on receipt of papers. He cautions her that "this" is a venture. Judge Paschal (see above Nos. 27 and 28) has died. He still has not had a satisfactory conversation with Uncle Tom. He tells her that itemized bills are not customary. Apparently "this" is another attempt to get the estate of Nathan and Elizabeth settled finally. He goes on to say that Jennie is married to Mr. Leech and gives her their address in Washington and says that Lizzie is unmarried. He gives her address as Beltsville and that of Uncle Charles as in Washington. He also says in what appears to me to a presumptuous manner that he would like to have the letters from Uncle Sam to Ann Walker, particularly the one written as a Mier prisoner. She no doubt refused to send them for they remained in her possession.
30. To Florida Garvey. From Fillmore Beall, Washington, D. C. April 19, 1880.
A. L. S. 8-3/4 in. x 5-3/4 in.
Different letterhead paper. He gives family news, including the tidbit that he is about to be thirty and has no intentions of marrying. Uncle Tom's daughter, Alice, has married a Mr. Townshend. The matter of Uncle Sam's estate has not come to anything yet, but he hopes that it may. He thinks it might have been better if he had gone to Texas but there was not enough money among the relatives. The Austin men in charge of the case are Stewart, Lowcay & Labicht. Like her, he probably would not go to see "Mr. Grant" but hopes for a "Bayard" or a "Thurman." Bayard was, of course, the Chevalier sans peur et sans reproche. Allen Granberry Thurman (1813-1895) was a United States Senator and frequent candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination. He was nominated as vice-president when Grover Cleveland ran unsuccessfully in 1888. He seems to be the only politician likely to be the one mentioned.
31. To Mrs. Florida F. Garvey. From Fillmore Beall, Washington, D. C. May 28, 1881.
A. L. S. 8-1/2 in. x 5-1/2 in.
Another letterhead. He has received her letter of May 23 and hastens to reply. He gives a statement of the money he has collected from the State of Texas. $620.75 was collected with a charge of $2.30 for exchange. Half of the remainder--$309.23--going for attorney fees. Left then to divide among the eight heirs of which she counts as one, $309.22. She is entitled to $38.65 less 15c postage. The State of Texas apparently paid the heirs of Samuel H. Walker this sum but one cannot tell for what precise reason. Fillmore goes on to tell her that John Beall, Aunt Mary's husband, has died, as has her father's half sister, Aunt Beck.
32. To Mrs. Florida F. Garvey, Spring, Harris Co., Texas. From Fillmore Beall. March 3, 1884.
A. L. S. 10-1/4 in. x 8-1/8 in.
Another letterhead. Encloses a sketch about the family (not present) written by her Cousin Sam on the occasion of his parents' fiftieth wedding anniversary. Several other items of family interest are related, including that if his parents' will live until July 29, they will celebrate their fiftieth anniversary. She has apparently moved to Spring. Mr. Garvey was a school man who taught in Polk County and Spring, Harris County.
33. To Florida Garvey, Dear Neice (sic). From her Uncle Charles, Washington, D. C. Jan. 25, 1885.
A. L. S. 8 in. x 5 in.
Apologizes for not answering her letters previously. Speaks of her dead father. He regrets that of all his large family connections she is the only one unknown to him. Soon he will be an old man. He tells her about his children and various family deaths. Of her father's family, Brother Thomas and Sister Jane have had a golden wedding anniversary, but the health of both of them is cause for concern. Sister Katherine Beall is growing feeble, but Sister Mary is still hale and hearty. These are the only ones left of his brothers and sisters. Most of the family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he hopes that she is connected with some church, but doubts her "privilidges" are as great as theirs in this beautiful city. He will send her a likeness of himself and wife and will be glad to receive any that she sends in return. He sends regards to her husband and children.
34. To Miss Emily E. Garvey, Spring Station, Harris Co., Texas. From Hattie B. Walker, Washington, D. C. Jan. 1, 1887.
A. L. S. 8-1/4 in. x 4-5/8 in.
This perhaps is a daughter of Charles Walker. Writes a friendly, newsy letter to her "Cousin." She describes the preparations for Christmas and the Christmas lights and streets full of shoppers with mysterious parcels. Hardly had that come to an end "when Logan's death filled the streets again." (John Alexander Logan, 1826-1886, was a legislator and Senator, once even nominated for vice-president. He was a Northern Civil War hero and author of The Great Conspiracy. He died Dec. 26, 1886.) Hattie speaks of the pictures that Emily has sent and says that Pa will send some photographs in a few days. Hattie goes on to say that Emily says that she has not had many advantages but all of the family think that she writes a very good hand. Pa wants to know is she (Emily) has ever seen the monument erected at San Antonio to the memory of his brother, Samuel H., or if she knows anything about it.
35. To Florida Garvey. From H. B. Walker, Washington, D. C. May 13, 1889.
A. L. S. 8-1/4 in. x 5 in.
A newsy family letter written for "Pa" because of his rheumatism. She is busy at day with school and has been on a round of activities including lectures, musicales and concerts that left her quite wornout when Lent came. She thinks that Florida and Emily would have enjoyed the 4th of March celebration although the storm robbed the parade of its grandeur. The fireworks a night or two later were the finest she ever saw and at the Promenade Concert the Marine Band played beautifully. The occasion was the inauguration of Benjamin Harrison as President of the United States. They are taking a cottage at Washington Grove for the family for the summer.
36. To Mrs. F. F. Garvey, Livingston, Texas. From "Uncle" Joe (probably Stone, her mother's brother), Blountstown, Calhoun Co., Florida. March 8, 1895.
A. L. S. 10-1/4 in. x 8 in.
He was glad to hear from her and to assure her that he is yet "in the land of the Living, but not of the Free." He goes on to explain that he is not in jail but that he has voted for men who are selling our Freedom to the English and to Wall Street. He complains about the "Riotous living of Congress" and the extravagance of their servants who are ruining the state government. Florida (state) has even enacted the so-called "Winchester law" that makes a man pay a $100.00 bond to own or carry a repeating rifle! He cannot send her the tobacco without finding out who has some, but he will. He gives her news of his own family. He has "burried" two lovely wives and nine children, enough to make him crazy, but instead he has been elected to the Legislature (Florida) which will convene on the 20th of the next month. This 5-page letter is very interesting and shows a vigorous and intense man. He calls her Dollie.
37. To Mrs. F. F. Garvey, Livingston, Texas. From Uncle Joe, Tallahassee, Florida. May 11, 1895.
A. L. S. 11-1/8 in. x 8-1/2 in.
Lithographed letterhead of the Legislature of the State of Florida, House of Representatives. There is an envelope with a clear postmark of May 12, 1895. A 2-page letter. He has, he tells her, laid aside the most of his wild ways and with his wife and two daughters joined the United Free Will Babtist (sic) church. He intends to spend the rest of his life getting ready to join the ones who have gone before. He repeats that he has "burried" two lovely wives and this time ten children. He has no doubt of their future. He regrets that he did not in the past sell out and go to Texas but now you cannot sell anything in this county for money. It grieves him to think of leaving his family in "sutch" a country, our land being handed over to the Land Grabbers and the English Lords. Since he has been in the Legislature he has found out how much control is exerted over the Legislature by the Corporations, but he and "a few good old Democrats" are holding the Corporation crowd at bay on a good many points. The rest of the letter is asking about various friends and family.
38. Group of documents, as follows:
a. To J. R. McDougall, Groveton Front. From Jas. A. Hill, Groveton, Texas. Oct. 3, 1903.
A. L. S. 10 in. x 8-1/8 in.
A letter of recommendation for Miss Nannie King.
b. To the Trustees of Magnolia School, Groveton Front. From C. H. Crow, Jas. A. Hill, M.D., and Furlow & Linder. Oct. 3, 1903.
A. L. S. 10-1/8 in. x 8 in.
Recommending Miss Nannie King for a teaching position.
c. Part printed, part manuscript Teacher's Certificate. Feb. 21, 1903.
10 in. x 8 in.
From Porter Newman, County Judge of Houston Co., Texas, Crockette, Houston Co., Texas. Porter Newman has satisfied himself that Miss Nannie get a Teacher's Certificate of the second class.
d. Part printed, part manuscript document being a contract between Miss Nannie King and the School Trustees of Magnolia. Oct. 10, 1903.
7-1/2 in. x 7-1/2 in., plus tab signed and approved by C. H. Crow.
She is to teach at least three months of the school year 1903-04 to begin Nov. 2, 1903. Her salary will be $30.00 a month.
e. To Miss Nannie King, Lovelady, Texas. From C. H. Crow, Groveton, Texas. Oct. 14, 1903.
A. L. S. 10-7/8 in. x 8-1/2 in.
On Trinity County stationery, Crow, who is County Judge, is returning to Miss King the teacher's copy of an approved contract.