Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Governor Elisha Marshall Pease:

An Inventory of Governor Elisha Marshall Pease Records of his Third Term at the Texas State Archives, 1865-1869, undated, bulk 1867-1869



Overview

Creator: Texas. Governor (1867-1869 : Pease)
Title: Governor Elisha Marshall Pease records of his third term
Dates: 1865-1869
Dates: bulk 1867-1869
Abstract: The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Elisha Marshall Pease served his third term as governor of Texas from August 8, 1867 to September 30, 1869. Records of Governor Pease's third term relate predominately to the progress of Reconstruction in post-Civil War Texas. A large portion of the correspondence consists of letters, telegrams, and reports sent to military officials in Texas, particularly Generals Griffin, Reynolds, and Canby, which were then forwarded to the governor's office. Types of records are correspondence, including letters, petitions, telegrams, reports, lists, circulars, and letterpress books dating from September 1865 to September 1869, and undated, bulk 1867-1869.
Quantity: 3.25 cubic ft.
Language These materials are written in English with a single letter written in Spanish.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state, elected by citizens every four years. The duties and responsibilities of the governor include serving as commander-in-chief of the state's military forces; convening special sessions of the legislature for specific purposes; delivering to the legislature at the beginning of each regular session a report on the condition of the state, an accounting of all public money under the governor's control, a recommended biennial budget, an estimate of the amounts of money required to be raised by taxation, and any recommendations he deems necessary; signing or vetoing bills passed by the legislature; and executing the laws of the state.

The office of the governor of the state of Texas was created by the Texas Constitution of 1845. It superseded the office of the president of the Republic of Texas upon the annexation of Texas by the United States. The 1845 Constitution defined the term of office as two years, with no more than four years served in a six-year period. The governor was required to be thirty years old at minimum, a U.S. citizen, and a Texas resident for at least three years (Article V, Section 4).

The Constitution outlined a number of powers held by the governor of Texas. The governor acted as the commander-in-chief of the army, navy, and militia of the state unless they were transferred into service under the federal government (Article V, Section 6). He could call up a state militia to "execute the laws of the State to suppress insurrections, and to repel invasions" (Article VI, Section 4). The governor made recommendations to the legislature and provided written information on the state of the government (Article V, Section 9). He could also convene the legislature when necessary and adjourn the legislature in the case of a disagreement between the House and Senate (Article V, Section 8). The governor had the power to grant reprieves and pardons in criminal cases except those of treason or impeachment, and to approve or disapprove bills, orders, resolutions, or votes from the legislature (Article V, Sections 11, 17 and 18). The governor also appointed supreme and district court judges and an attorney general with the consent of two-thirds of the Senate (Article IV, Sections 5 and 12).

The 1845 Constitution also created the office of secretary of state, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate for the governor's term of service. The secretary of state worked closely with the governor, and was required to "keep a fair register of all official acts and proceedings of the governor" (Article V, Section 16). The Constitution called for the election of a lieutenant governor at the time of the governor's election with the same qualifications and term of office, but to be voted for separately by electors. The lieutenant governor served as president of the Senate and could cast a deciding vote in ties, as well as take on the governor's powers in his absence or until a new governor was elected and qualified or the previous governor was able to resume office (Article V, Section 12). In addition, it further called for the biennial election of a state treasurer and comptroller of public accounts by the legislature, with vacancies to be filled by the governor (Article V, Section 23). However, a constitutional amendment in 1850 allowed the public election of the state treasurer and comptroller.

The constitutional language defining the office of the governor changed marginally with the Texas Constitution of 1861, which was written when Texas seceded from the United States to join the Confederate States at the onset of the Civil War. The 1861 Constitution replaced mention of the United States with the Confederate States, removed a requirement for U.S. citizenship for Texas governors, raised the governor's salary, and set a date for the governor and lieutenant governor to take office after an election.

The Constitution of 1866 arose out of the Constitution of 1861 with certain amendments made during the Constitutional Convention of 1866. These amendments were intended to bring the Texas constitution back into compliance with United States law. The Constitution of 1866 made minor alterations to the office of the governor, extending his term of office to four years with no more than eight years served in a 12-year period, and increasing his salary to $4,000 annually. He was also granted the power of the item veto on appropriations and to convene the legislature outside of the state capital if necessary.

Another constitutional convention took place in 1868-1869 under the Reconstruction Acts of 1867, ultimately producing the Constitution of 1869. It affected the office of the governor by again raising the governor's salary, this time to $5,000 annually, and giving the governor the right to appoint the attorney general and secretary of state, with the other state offices being appointed by election.

(Sources: Texas Constitution of 1845, Texas Constitution of 1861, and Texas Constitution of 1866, all online at the Tarlton Law Library; S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1845", Walter L. Buenger, "Constitution of 1861", and S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1866", Handbook of Texas Online, all accessed on February 20, 2014.)


Biographical Sketch

Elisha Marshall Pease served his third term as governor of Texas from August 8, 1867 to September 30, 1869. For biographical information through his first two terms in office, refer to the finding aid for the "Texas Governor Elisha Marshall Pease Records of the first two terms" collection. As a Unionist, Pease spent 1858 through 1866 in semi-retirement from public life, refraining even from practicing law during the Civil War. After attending the Convention of Southern Loyalists at Philadelphia, Pease ran for governor in 1866 as the candidate of the Union Party, but lost to James Throckmorton. When General Philip Sheridan removed Throckmorton, he appointed Pease as provisional governor. Sheridan's successor, General Winfield Scott Hancock, did not provide the full military support Pease needed to impose a provisional government on Texas, since he ruled by order of congress and the army and against the will of the people. As a result, civilian control waned. Pease urged the Constitutional Convention of 1868-1869 to accept radical reconstruction so that Texas could normalize relations with the Union as soon as possible. Pease supported A.J. Hamilton in the gubernatorial race of 1869, but when General J.J. Reynolds interfered to secure the election of Edmund J. Davis, Pease resigned on September 30. In 1870, Pease joined A.J. Hamilton and James Throckmorton in protesting the conduct of the Davis administration; in 1871 he helped lead a taxpayers' revolt; and in 1872 he helped gain amnesty for disenfranchised Democrats. Pease accepted a post as collector of the Port of Galveston in 1879. He died in Lampasas on August 26, 1883.

(Source: Roger A. Griffin, "Pease, Elisha Marshall," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on March 28, 2014.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Elisha Marshall Pease served his third term as governor of Texas from August 8, 1867 to September 30, 1869. Records of Governor Pease's third term in office relate predominately to the progress of Reconstruction in post-Civil War Texas. Types of records are correspondence, including letters, petitions, telegrams, reports, lists, circulars, and letterpress books dating from September 1865 to September 1869, and undated, bulk 1867-1869. A large portion of the correspondence consists of letters, telegrams, and reports sent to military officials in Texas, particularly Generals Charles Griffin, J.J. Reynolds, and Edward Canby, which were then forwarded to the governor's office. Other frequent correspondents include acting Comptroller George C. Rives, Comptroller M.C. Hamilton, Brigadier General James Oakes, State Treasurer John T. Allan, and President of the Constitutional Convention Edmund J. Davis. The majority of records are related to civil officers, including applications, petitions, and lists of men for appointment to or removal from office, letters from officers regarding taking oaths of office and paying official bonds, complaints about salary owed, petitions for pardon or amnesty, and removal of political limitations imposed on former Confederate supporters. Another common topic is violence in the state, with numerous reports of assaults, murders, Native American depredations, and activities of anti-Union groups such as the Ku Klux Klan. Records also include letters relating to the treatment and rights of freedmen, the Constitutional Convention of 1868-1869, the State Penitentiary, railroads, trials and the holding of special terms of court, registration for elections, state and local taxes, outbreaks of yellow fever, and the building of a lighthouse on Matagorda Island. The majority of the loose records consists of incoming letters, with approximately 20 letters sent by Pease. Copies of outgoing letters by Governor Pease are found in two letterpress books, many of which refer directly to incoming correspondence found elsewhere in the records.

Certain types of correspondence that appear consistently and frequently throughout the records have been omitted from the folder level description, including records related to appointments and removals of civil officials and the taking of oaths of office, general letters of introduction, and correspondence that acknowledges or inquires about the receipt of other correspondence. Some of the descriptions of individual items were taken directly from notes made on the back of the records, likely by a secretary around the same time that the letters were received.

In the past, items relating to the State Penitentiary in Huntsville were removed from the records of governors, secretaries of state, treasurers and comptrollers to create an artificial collection of records relating to the penitentiary. Items related to railroads and Native American affairs may have also been removed from the records. In addition, the original order of the records may have been disrupted when they were sorted by date. As a result, letters or petitions that were enclosures of other letters may have been separated from their original context.


 

Arrangement of the Records

Arrangement is chronological; letters having no specific day date have been placed at the end of the month. Undated letters are located at the end of the correspondence. Military communications were originally filed by the date written and not the date on which they were referred to Governor Pease. That order has been maintained. When records were rehoused in March 2014, items within existing folders were found to be out of strict chronological order at the item level; this arrangement was not altered during rehousing. Some proclamations related to the creation of a day of thanksgiving are filed after the correspondence files; letterpress books follow the proclamations.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Letterpress volumes are extremely fragile and may not be photocopied.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Pease, E. M. (Elisha Marshall), 1812-1883.
Griffin, Charles, 1825-1867.
Oakes, James, 1826-1910.
Reynolds, Joseph Jones, 1822-1899.
Canby, Edward Richard Sprigg, 1817-1873.
Hamilton, Morgan Calvin, 1809-1893.
Allan, John T., 1821-1888.
Davis, E. J. (Edmund Jackson), 1827-1883.
Corporate Names:
Texas. Office of the Governor.
Texas. Constitutional Convention (1868-1869)
Texas. State Penitentiary at Huntsville.
Texas. Ku Klux Klan (19th century).
Subjects:
Crime--Texas.
Convict labor--Texas.
Elections--Texas.
Governors--Texas.
Indians of North America--Texas--Wars.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) Texas.
Freedmen--Texas.
Frontier and pioneer life--Texas.
Lighthouses--Texas.
Railroads--Texas.
Taxation--Texas.
Voter registration--Texas.
Yellow fever--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Politics and government--1865-1950.
Texas--Officials and employees--Selection and appointment.
Matagorda Island (Tex.)--Lighthouse--Design and construction.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.
Circulars (fliers)--Texas--Governors--1866-1867.
Petitions--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.
Telegrams--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.
Reports--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.
Lists--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas--Governors--1865-1869.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
There are several holdings indexed under Elisha Marshall Pease in the Manuscripts Collection database. See Archives Staff for assistance.
Texas Secretary of State, Executive record books, 1835-1917, 14 reels of microfilm.
Texas Office of the Governor, Records of the first two terms of Elisha Marshall Pease, 1853-1857, 1.88 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Reconstruction records, 1865-1873, undated, 7.87 cubic ft.
Records relating to the Penitentiary, 1846-1921, undated, 87.85 cubic ft.
Records relating to Indian affairs, 1825-1957, bulk 1825-1880, 3.62 cubic ft.
Records relating to railroads, 1836-1950, undated, bulk about 1880-1910, 9.4 cubic ft.
Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records, 1865-1866, 3.5 cubic ft.
Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Matagorda Island Air Force Base and Lighthouse records, 1863-1974, bulk 1962-1973, 94 drawings
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
Elisha Marshall Pease papers, 1834-1927, 1 in.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Governor Elisha Marshall Pease records of his third term. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2014/076

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by an unknown agency during the 20th century. An accession number was assigned for control purposes on February 11, 2014.

Processing Information

Processed by Archives staff, June 1984

Finding aid updated by Tonia J. Wood, November 1995

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tonia J. Wood, March 2001

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the style sheet v1to02.xsl, July 22, 2003

Additional subject description and finding aid made DACS compliant by Caitlin Burhans, March 2014

Corrections and additional DACS revisions by Aditi Worcester, May 2014


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Governor Elisha Marshall Pease records of his third term, 1865-1869, undated, bulk 1867-1869,
3.25 cubic ft.

Box Folder
2014/076-1 1. Correspondence, September 1865, October-December 1866
[Records include a letter from J.S. Holman in Austin to members of the committee on the Military Board Governor Pease, S. Palm, and J.S. Spence regarding Holman's role in the organization; a letter from the district attorney of DeWitt County transmitting documents in the case, E.W. Richards v. M.J. Kelly; a letter from Brigadier General John Hatch in San Antonio regarding orders of operation for the 4th Cavalry; and a report on the property of a foundry.]
2. Correspondence, February 1867
[Records include a letter from Sherman County regarding the amount of a bond.]
3. Correspondence, April 1867
[Records include a copy of General Orders Number 34 containing "a resolution for the relief of the destitute in the Southern and Southwestern states."]
4. Correspondence, May 1867
5. Correspondence, July 1867
[Records include a letter from the State Penitentiary in Huntsville requesting a pardon for Mike Dean and W.H. Osborne; a letter from Clarksville regarding relief for Union men; a letter from Millican, TX complaining of certain local officials; a letter from Menard County regarding the administration of the oath described in General Orders Number 13; and a letter in support of the governor from Houston, TX.]
6. Correspondence, August 1-6, 1867
[Records include a letter from J.J. Holt regarding General Orders Number 13; a letter from Dallas regarding property lost by a Union man when he was in hiding during the war; a letter from Henderson, TX regarding a possible polygamy charge; a letter from Henderson, TX regarding sureties on official bonds; and an exchange of letters from La Grange, TX regarding a writ of certiorari.]
7. Correspondence, August 7-8, 1867
[Records include a letter from Paris, TX regarding the possession of a press and type for the printing of the newspaper The Texas Vindicator on the subject of women's rights and Republican ideals; a letter from Kaufman County complaining of the county clerk; and a letter from Richmond, TX regarding disenfranchisement under the laws of reconstruction.]
8. Correspondence, August 9-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from Galveston regarding a plan of immigration.]
9. Correspondence, August 11-13, 1867
[Records include a letter from J.W. Brown, agent of convicts in Brenham, TX, asking to be relieved of his position; a letter from the county surveyor in Bonham, TX requesting relief of his political disability; and a letter from the county judge of Lampasas regarding relations between citizens and U.S. soldiers and expressing fears for his safety.]
10. Correspondence, August 14-15, 1867
[Records include a letter from Waco regarding General Orders Number 13 in courts; and a telegram from Colonel Sledge, the president of Air Line Railroad, in Hempstead regarding convict laborers for the railroad in light of the resignation of the agent in charge of convicts.]
11. Correspondence, August 16, 1867
[Records include a letter from Waco requesting that a proclamation be issued offering rewards for the capture of certain outlaws.]
12. Correspondence, August 17-18, 1867
[Records include a letter detailing Native American depredations in San Saba and requesting relief; a letter from San Marcos protesting an order from Major General Charles Griffin; and a letter from Kaufman reporting on the progress of registration and complaining of Judge Good.]
13. Correspondence, August 19, 1867
14. Correspondence, August 20, 1867
[Records include an extract from a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding affairs in the 8th Judicial District; a letter from Judge Shropshire in La Grange, TX regarding conditions in the local jail and the calling of a special term; and a letter from Colonel Sledge, president of Air Line Railroad, Brenham, TX regarding convict laborers for the railroad in light of the resignation of the agent in charge of convicts.]
15. Correspondence, August 21-22, 1867
16. Correspondence, August 22, 1867
[Records include a report from the Board of Registers in Tarrant County including mention of threats against the board.]
17. Correspondence, August 23-24, 1867
[Records include a report from the Board of Registers in Tarrant County including mention of threats against the board; and a letter from New Braunfels regarding the legitimacy of the local tax assessor and collector.]
18. Correspondence, August 26, 1867
[Records include a letter from Judge Pace in Lampasas reporting on an encounter in which certain outlaws were pursued by citizens and soldiers, and requesting that U.S. soldiers be retained.]
19. Correspondence, August 27-29, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Charles Griffin forwarding Special Orders Number 160; a letter from Major General Charles Griffin forwarding a letter from Major General P.H. Sheridan authorizing him to remove disloyal county officials; a letter from Brigadier General James Oakes regarding the dispatch of soldiers to pursue the criminal Samuel Rutledge; and a copy of Special Order Number 429 regarding the appointment of civil officials in the military districts.]
20. Correspondence, August 30-31, 1867
[Records include a letter to Brigadier General James Oakes from Governor Pease forwarding an account of murders in Lampasas and asking that troops there be retained; a letter from Brigadier General James Oakes to Governor Pease regarding the retention of troops in Lampasas; a letter from Houston, TX requesting that a reward be offered for the arrest of Isaac Hopkins; a letter from Sutherland Springs regarding the act passed by the Texas Legislature titled "An Act Regulating Public Schools"; and a letter to Major General Charles Griffin from Huntsville asking for his assistance in the cases of Michael J. Dean and William H. Osborne.]
21. Correspondence, September 2, 1867
[Records include letters from J.G. Wheeler to various county clerks removed from office requesting that they turn over their record books, seals of office, and public papers.]
22. Correspondence, September 3, 1867
[Records include a letter reporting on the pursuit of the criminal Samuel Rutledge by Lieutenant J.P. Richardson.]
23. Correspondence, September 4-5, 1867
[Records include a letter from Joseph Spence in the General Land Office in Austin regarding the issuing of patents; a letter from Spring Hill asking that a reward be offered for the arrest of Joseph L. Lawrence; and a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding various matters related to his office.]
24. Correspondence, September 6-7, 1867
[Records include a letter from Castroville, TX regarding the organization of judicial districts; and a letter from state agent W.L. Smith in Navasota regarding the treatment of convict laborers and guards employed by the Brazos Branch Railroad Company.]
25. Correspondence, September 9-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from Crockett, TX regarding the pursuit of the criminal Wallace Carter; and a letter from a mail contractor regarding his mail contract under the Confederacy.]
26. Correspondence, September 10, 1867
[Records include copies of Special Orders Number 169 by Major General Charles Griffin removing certain Supreme Court judges and making new appointments; and a petition from the president of the Brazos Branch Railroad regarding convict laborers.]
27. Correspondence, September 10, 1867
[Records include affidavits from Bexar County regarding a jury list; and a letter from a judge in Seguin, TX regarding his salary.]
28. Correspondence, September 11-12, 1867
[Records include a letter from Livingston, TX regarding the acts of the 11th Legislature as they relate to the payment of taxes; a typescript letter from Major General Charles Griffin relating to violence on the frontier, including Native American depredations and other murders; and a letter from Livingston, TX regarding the estate of John Bergess under escheat law.]
29. Correspondence, September 13-15, 1867
[Records include a detailed letter from G.W. Whitmore in Tyler, TX reporting on political affairs; instructions from Secretary of State W.C. Philips regarding the oath of office; a letter from Notary Public James B. Morris in Austin protesting his removal and refusing to comply with a request to return his seal and record book; and a telegram relaying the death of Major General Charles Griffin.]
30. Correspondence, September 16, 1867
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to Major General Charles Griffin regarding the provisions of "An Act Regulating Public Schools"; and a letter from Governor Pease to Brigadier General James Oakes regarding the refusal of removed Travis County Notary Public James B. Morris to turn over the records and seal of his office.]
31. Correspondence, September 17-20, 1867
[Records include a letter on behalf of Brigadier General James Oakes ordering the arrest of former Notary Public James B. Morris; a letter from Waco regarding various aspects of registration; and a letter from Houston, TX asking that debt due to the state be suspended.]
32. Correspondence, September 21-25, 1867
Box Folder
2014/076-2 33. Correspondence, September 26-27, 1867
[Records include a letter from the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston discussing appointments and the location of Major General J.J. Reynolds; a letter from Illinois proposing that a company be raised to start factories for wool and cotton; and a letter from Lieutenant Albert A. Metzner in San Augustine reporting on rumors of lynch law in effect in Shelby County.]
34. Correspondence, September 27-30, 1867
[Records include a letter from J.W. Brown in Webberville requisitioning goods for convicts working on the Air Line Railroad.]
35. Correspondence, October 1-5, 1867
[Records include a copy of the indictment and judgment in the case, State of Texas v. George, a freedman; letters from the Houston Insurance Company requesting a schedule of taxes for the state and counties for publication in a tax preparation manual; and a letter from E.H. Cushing in Houston, TX discussing certain laws of the Confederacy and the United States.]
36. Correspondence, October 1-5, 1867
[Records include a letter from Anderson describing the need for the appointment of an officer capable of enforcing quarantine laws to prevent the spread of yellow fever; a letter from Helena regarding the difficulty in selecting a jury under General Orders Number 13; a letter from Brigadier General James Oakes in Austin regarding a request to send troops to Milam County; and a letter from General Mower of the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans conveying copies of General Orders Number 151.]
37. Correspondence, October 6-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from Buchanan regarding the payment of salary; letters from Brazoria asking that the sale of property to pay state taxes be suspended due to the failure of the cotton crop; and a telegram from General Mower in New Orleans requesting a list of judicial districts, counties, and district judges.]
38. Correspondence, October 6-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from La Grange, TX relating to an epidemic within the community, likely yellow fever; a letter from the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway regarding leasing the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad Company; a letter from Governor Pease to Major General J.J. Reynolds regarding the restoration of Judges W.P. Bacon and Thomas H. Stribbling; a letter from Lexington protesting tax assessed on land; a letter from McKinney regarding the payment of county officers; a letter from Judge Thomas H. Stribbling in San Antonio regarding the parcelling out of judicial districts; and a letter from Richmond, TX asking that the collection of judgments be suspended for coastal counties affected by the cotton crop failure.]
39. Correspondence, October 11-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General McCook in Austin requesting the use of the capitol for a ball; a letter from Galveston reporting on hurricane damage; an indictment in the case, State of Texas v. John T. Burleson; a letter from Lampasas asking for aid in capturing Mr. Burleson; a letter in Spanish from the county judge in Zapata County; and a telegram from S. Caldwell regarding service on the Supreme Court.]
40. Correspondence, October 11-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Marshallville, Georgia requesting a map of the state of Texas; a letter from Bastrop regarding defaulting witnesses and jurors in court; a letter from the tax assessor in Beeville regarding a matter of land complicated by the absence of a county court; and a letter from Judge Thomas H. Stribbling in San Antonio regarding the restoration of a district attorney under an order by Major General P.H. Sheridan.]
41. Correspondence, October 11-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Chappell Hill, TX requesting aid for the yellow fever epidemic; a letter from Judge John Good in Stockton regarding the whereabouts of certain criminals; a letter from Austin regarding the location of a bridge built by the Austin City Bridge Company; a letter from Judge John Good in Stockton requesting advice in a court case of assault against a freedman; and a letter from Bryan regarding the division of a tract of land.]
42. Correspondence, October 11-20, 1867
[Records include an affidavit from Trinity County against Anson Pollan for pig stealing; and a letter from Lampasas regarding the pursuit of the suspected criminal Thomas C. Wilson.]
43. Correspondence, October 21-25, 1867
[Records include a receipt for funds appropriated by Governor Pease for the freedmen of Brenham; a statement by Francis Marion Buckalew regarding time spent with certain Native Americans; a letter from a prisoner in Houston, TX asking that he be sent to trial or be offered bail; a letter from Houston, TX regarding the comptroller's failure to pay civil officials' salaries based on an opinion of the attorney general; and a letter from Brigadier General James Oakes regarding the arrest of the criminal Wilson.]
44. Correspondence, October 21-25, 1867
[Records include reports from Brigadier General James Oakes regarding the arrest of the criminal Wilson; a letter from E.H. Cushing in Houston, TX regarding suffrage for freedmen; and a detailed letter from Jasper Starr, editor of the Bosque Beacon, in Meridian, TX.]
45. Correspondence, October 26-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from Columbia regarding the sale of bonds to fund the building of a railroad bridge.]
46. Correspondence, October 26-31, 1867
[Records include a copy of Special Orders Number 192 from the District of Texas Headquarters in Austin issued by Major General J.J. Reynolds; and a letter from Governor Pease in Austin to Captain L.E. Edward regarding certain funds to benefit freedmen.]
47. Correspondence, November 1-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from Allen Lewis in Chappell Hill, TX regarding the convict laborers in the Air Line Railroad; a letter from Hockley, TX asking for the return of land sold for taxes due to destitution; a letter from the Post Office in Austin regarding a safe said to be state property; and a letter from Galveston regarding certain rumors of Major General J.J. Reynolds' opposition to the Galveston mayor and chief of police.]
48. Correspondence, November 1-10, 1867
[Records include a letter regarding expenditures by H.L. Allen, agent of the Fireman's Charitable Organization.]
49. Correspondence, November 1-10, 1867
[Records include a telegram from Galveston reporting charges of assault against the chief of police; a letter from the chief justice of Menard County on ordering a new election; and a document from Brazos County reporting the results of an election in Bryan.]
50. Correspondence, November 11-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Nacogdoches advocating the delay in the sale of land for taxes owed; and a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding the suspension of the sale of land for taxes owed.]
51. Correspondence, November 11-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to Major General J.J. Reynolds regarding the suspension of the sale of land for taxes owed; an order from the police court of Cameron County ordering that the county assessor and collector, James Kearns, suspend the collection of state and county taxes; a letter from Castroville, TX regarding the governor's request for a list of names of governors of states along the Mexican border; and a letter from Hillsboro requesting financial assistance in order to perform duties for the board of registration of Ellis County.]
52. Correspondence, November 11-20, 1867
[Records include a contract of mutual releases between the State of Texas and White and Chiles; and a copy of Special Orders Number 207 issued by Major General J.J. Reynolds at the District of Texas Headquarters in Austin.]
53. Correspondence, November 21-25, 1867
[Records include a letter from the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans enclosing a news clipping of the legal opinion of attorney J.P. Boyd regarding the validity of certain laws relating to the payment of civil officers; and letters from removed Judge O.H.P. Garrett in Brenham asking that he be restored to office and alleging official corruption in his county.]
54. Correspondence, November 21-25, 1867
[Records include a petition from Madison County for the enfranchisement of F.W. Harnes; and a letter from E.P. Hunt in Galveston regarding difficulties registering.]
55. Correspondence, November 26-30, 1867
[Records include a letter from Huntsville asking that protection be provided for freedmen at the ballot box in Polk County; a letter from the district judge in Lockhart regarding the theft case against William Steadham; and a letter from Lockhart regarding a complaint to Major General J.J. Reynolds against Lieutenant Peterson.]
56. Correspondence, November 26-30, 1867
[Records include a letter from Uvalde regarding the release of the prisoner Wall and bills owed; and a letter from Daniels, gardener at the asylum, regarding his salary.]
57. Correspondence, December 1-10, 1867
[Records include a draft of resolutions from the Public Labor Board regarding debt owed by the Air Line Railroad for convict labor; a letter from J. Monks & Cobb in Louisville, Kentucky regarding the sale of the Southern Pacific Railroad to the state; a letter from Houston, TX regarding the election of city officers; and a letter from San Antonio regarding the creation of a United States Consulate General in Budapest and Hungary.]
58. Correspondence, December 1-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from Castroville, TX providing a list of names of governors of Mexican states along the border; a letter from San Augustine regarding the payment of state officers; and a notice of bankruptcy for L.W. Grace in Galveston.]
59. Correspondence, December 1-10, 1867
60. Correspondence, December 1-10, 1867
[Records include a detailed letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton in Austin regarding salaries for state officers; a letter from Weatherford regarding payment of a debt keeping a mentally ill prisoner in the county jail; a letter from G.W. Whitmore in Tyler, TX on the state of affairs there; a letter from Oakville regarding the murder of the county clerk by J.M. Wadkins; a letter from Spring Hill describing violence against Union men and freedmen in Navarro and Limestone Counties and requesting protection; and a letter from the county judge of Lavaca County in Hallettsville regarding the Constitutional Convention.]
61. Correspondence, December 11-15, 1867
[Records include a letter from Gonzales regarding a military order to stop the sale of property under executions in Gonzales and Lavaca Counties; and a letter from Uvalde regarding Captain Conway, Native Americans in the area, and the theft of cattle.]
62. Correspondence, December 11-15, 1867
[Records include a letter from the appointed assessor and collector in Victoria, TX regarding difficulties giving a bond for the position; a letter from Montgomery, TX regarding the district court of Grimes County; and a letter and statement by J.A. Paschal in San Antonio regarding the oath of office taken by Judge W.P. Bacon.]
63. Correspondence, December 11-15, 1867
[Records include a letter from Eagle Pass regarding the prisoner G.W. Wall; a letter from District Judge G.H. Noonan in Castroville, TX to Captain Conway regarding certain prisoners; and a letter from Dallas reporting on violence against Union men and the theft of county assessments.]
64. Correspondence, December 16-25, 1867
[Records include a letter from Bryan City asking that a mayor be appointed who could then appoint a counsel and police for protection against lawlessness; a copy of court documents from Collin County related to the case, John C. Easton v. Catherine Reid, Nancy Wilson, and F.L. McReynolds; a letter from the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans requesting a statement of aggregate votes cast for the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention in 1865; and a letter from Tyler, TX regarding a special term of the district court.]
65. Correspondence, December 16-25, 1867
[Records include a letter from Vine Grove regarding a murder; a letter from Galveston protesting tax assessed on the sale of liquor; a letter from High Hill reporting the refusal of removed Notary Public C.A. Kessler to return his notarial seal and record book; and a set of resolutions from the Union League Council in San Antonio.]
66. Correspondence, December 16-25, 1867
[Records include a letter from Fort Inge regarding the delivery of prisoner John T. Pulliam to the sheriff of Uvalde; a letter from Judge G.H. Noonan in Castroville, TX regarding costs associated with a U.S. prisoner held in Piedras Negras, Mexico; and a letter from the chief justice of Rusk County in Henderson, TX reporting on the activities of the police court.]
Box Folder
2014/076-3 67. Correspondence, December 26-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from Jefferson, TX describing efforts to prevent freedmen from voting and reporting on the state of affairs in the area; a letter from Judge C. Caldwell in Jefferson, TX regarding recent county meetings; a letter from Judge Wesley Ogden in Lavaca regarding the refusal of Notary Public Robert J. Clow to leave office; and a letter from Brenham charging the military guard there with murder.]
68. Correspondence, December 26-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans regarding a request by Major General J.J. Reynolds for a military commission for the trial of G.W. Wall and other prisoners; a letter from C.G. Keenan in Huntsville, a disenfranchised member of the state legislature, asking that his disability be removed; a letter from Judge Thomas H. Stribbling in San Antonio regarding nonpayment of his salary; and a letter from Anderson regarding General W.S. Hancock's order for an election.]
69. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1868
[Records include letters from Judge D.O. Norton in Weatherford saying that he has no power to interfere in a matter described in an enclosed letter from Dallas, and stating that Palo Pinto and Jack Counties have been disorganized and should be attached to Parker and Wise Counties respectively in order to allow cases to be tried; a letter from Judge G.H. Noonan in Castroville, TX regarding expenses in the Wall case, the Uvalde prisoners, and Native American depredations; and a letter from C.M. Wilcox in Bonham regarding registration for men who held petty offices under the Confederacy.]
70. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Saluria regarding land for the building of a lighthouse; a letter from Judge William O'Hara in Belton, TX requesting a special term of the district court; and a letter from Secretary of State W.C. Philips in Austin regarding Volume 25 of the Texas Reports.]
71. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from J.K. Williams in Carthage to the U.S. Congress requesting an act of relief to be passed reinstating him as a "soil U.S. citizen"; a letter from Anderson relating suspicions that the former assessor and collector absconded with public funds; a letter from Lieutenant Colonel D.L. Montgomery in Tyler, TX to Judge Rasbury of Smith County asking for information on obtaining relief for indigent freedpeople; a reply from Judge Rasbury stating that there are no funds available to provide relief; a letter from Tyler, TX regarding a court case on a land dispute involving freedmen; and a statement by John S. Bland in Lamar County accusing County Clerk Richard Peterson of perjury in taking the oath of office.]
72. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1868
[Records include a detailed letter from James B. Morris in Travis County regarding his removal as a notary public.]
73. Correspondence, January 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge C. Caldwell regarding the riot in Marshall and the need for protection for freedmen voting in elections; a letter from Eagle Pass regarding prisoners held in Piedras Negras, Mexico; and a petition by officers of the police court of Freestone County asking for the reversal of the order to remove County Clerk A.G. Anderson from office.]
74. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Corpus Christi regarding the capture of the criminal Daniel Haverty from Illinois; a letter from Tyler, TX regarding appointments and elections; a letter from Bastrop reporting an assault; a report from the General Land Office in Austin regarding the murder of Alexander McQuinn in Denton County; and a letter from Bonham regarding the sale of land under execution.]
75. Correspondence, January 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from the president of the Board of Registration in Columbia regarding his intention to prevent freedmen from registering to vote; a statement of additional appropriations made for the civil government of Texas in 1868 and to "supply deficiencies" during the year 1867; and a letter from the county judge of Brazos County regarding the need for a jail and courthouse in the county.]
76. Correspondence, February 1868
[Records include a copy of a telegram from Major General W.S. Hancock in Austin to Major General J.J. Reynolds in Galveston requesting information on crimes reported to him, and referencing a newspaper article written by Governor Pease on an increase in crime in the state; a letter from Huntsville regarding the return of criminal and removed District Clerk J.O. Stevens; a letter from San Augustine regarding the disruption of elections by a rebel mob; a letter from Judge N. Hart Davis in Montgomery, TX regarding his salary; and a letter from the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans acknowledging the receipt of a letter from the Governor and enclosing copies of Special Orders Numbers 14 and 18.]
77. Correspondence, February 1868
[Records include a letter from Kaufman County regarding a law passed in the 1856 legislature relating to the collection of tolls on bridges; and a letter from Marshall reporting interference with freedman voting in elections.]
78. Correspondence, February 1868
[Records include a letter from Dallas County regarding the effort of Judge Good to be returned to his official position; and a letter from Governor Pease granting leave to Comptroller M.C. Hamilton to visit New Orleans on public business.]
79. Correspondence, February 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge J.J. Thornton in Seguin, TX reporting on difficulties executing criminal law in the area, particularly in convicting white men for crimes; and a letter from Judge Jeremiah Galvan in Brownsville reporting a tornado that destroyed the local courthouse and jail.]
80. Correspondence, March 1-20, 1868
[Records include a statement from Mount Pleasant regarding the shooting of a freedman, Peter Fitzpatrick; a detailed letter from G.W. Whitmore in Tyler, TX on several topics, including military leaders at the district headquarters, crimes in the area, and appointments of civil officials; and a letter from the mayor of Galveston applying for a spot in the Asylum for the Blind in Austin for a young man in his city.]
81. Correspondence, March 1-20, 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge A.J. Evans in Marlin regarding the criminal James McRae of Falls County; a letter from Corpus Christi regarding official appointments and rebels voting in the election; a letter from Lavaca regarding Captain Perine, acting as a pilot; a letter from Judge Wesley Ogden reporting on the disorganization and lack of civil officials in Refugio County; and a bankruptcy notice issued by the District Court of the United States against the estate of A.M. Moore of Dallas.]
82. Correspondence, March 1-20, 1868
[Records include a letter from Tyler, TX reporting on conditions in the area, particularly complaining of Sheriff W.P. Anderson and the handling of elections.]
83. Correspondence, March 21-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge W.V. Tunstall in Palestine, TX to Major General J.J. Reynolds with a detailed account of violence and riots taking place in Anderson County, and requesting troops be sent for protection.]
84. Correspondence, March 21-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Houston, TX regarding the refusal of the city council to grant certain appointments made by Major General J.J. Reynolds; a letter from Henderson, TX requesting information on the disposition of an estate; a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton reporting no taxes paid for Panola County; and a letter from Bastrop reporting several murders.]
85. Correspondence, March 21-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Fort Worth reporting Tarrant County's disorganization and recommending individuals for civil offices; a letter from Bastrop reporting murders and requesting troops for protection; a letter from Limestone County reporting on conditions in the county; and a letter from Austin County regarding emigration from Europe to Texas.]
86. Correspondence, March 21-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Galveston relaying a message from Major General J.J. Reynolds that certain recommendations had been endorsed; a letter from New York requesting information on working as a builder of cotton and agricultural machinery in the state; and an extract of a report of Lieutenant H.E. Scott regarding actions of civil and military officials in Grayson County.]
87. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1868
[Records include telegrams from Bryan regarding the court case of freedman Sam Johnson moving to the federal court under reconstruction law; a petition for the pardon of the freedman Monroe Ake, convicted of "betting on a gaming device"; a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding a complaint against the assessor and collector of Navarro County; and a letter from the sheriff of Brazoria County regarding the murderer C.C. Millican.]
88. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Georgetown enclosing applications to remit certain fines; a letter from Hillsboro requesting a special term of the court be called; and letters from Bastrop reporting crimes and murders in the county.]
89. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding the state of affairs in that area; a letter from Tyler, TX complaining of certain civil officers; a letter from Galveston requesting the return of papers of a certain office; a telegram from Mount Pleasant requesting that U.S. troops be retained; and a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding a new appropriation for the Blind Asylum.]
90. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Point Pleasant reporting on the murder of a freedman; a telegram from Huntsville recommending that convicts be employed on farms near the penitentiary; and documents related to the case, State of Texas v. Patrick Connelly.]
91. Correspondence, April 16-20, 1868
[Records include a letter from Marshall regarding affairs in Harrison County; a letter from the trustees of the Blind Asylum in Austin on a disagreement with the comptroller regarding the accounts of the institution; an opinion of Attorney General E.B. Turner regarding the powers of the Board of Trustees of the Blind Asylum; a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding nonpayment of taxes from San Saba and San Augustine Counties; and a letter from Kingston, Arkansas seeking the perpetrator of a robbery during the war.]
92. Correspondence, April 16-20, 1868
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to Comptroller M.C. Hamilton in reference to a conflict with the Board of Trustees of the Blind Asylum; a letter from Refugio County regarding certain appointments and the removal of U.S. troops from the county; a letter from Cameron County questioning a person acting as a notary public without taking the test oath; and a letter from Galveston regarding the case, State of Texas v. Patrick Connelly.]
93. Correspondence, April 16-20, 1868
[Records include a detailed letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton in reference to a conflict with the Board of Trustees of the Blind Asylum; and a letter from Judge Andreas Kieschnick in Serbin regarding an attack by a band of outlaws and resigning because of a lack of protection for civil officials.]
94. Correspondence, April 21-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from San Marcos reporting on a shooting at a ball being held by freedpeople; and a letter from Wharton regarding the murderer Mimms.]
95. Correspondence, April 21-30, 1868
[Records include a certificate from the New York State Library acknowledging Governor Pease's donation of Texas Reports Volume 25 to the library; a letter from Stephenville to Attorney General E.B. Turner regarding the salary of officials in certain counties; a letter from Tyler, TX regarding a person appointed by the police court as county attorney without taking the oath of office; a letter from the Fourth Military District Headquarters (Mississippi and Arkansas) to John Lovell regarding his service on a certain commission; a letter from Joseph Boone in Montgomery, TX on being denied registration; and a letter from Richmond, TX in Fort Bend County relative to taxes due from other counties.]
96. Correspondence, April 21-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from Danville requesting a copy of Sayles' Treatise; a letter from F. Flake of Flake's Daily Bulletin in Galveston requesting an appropriation be made for printing for the Supreme Court; a letter from Jackson, Mississippi inquiring about the need for a stenographer at Texas' upcoming Constitutional Convention; and a letter from the Blind Asylum in Austin regarding the reorganization of the Board of Trustees.]
97. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding the state of affairs in that area; a letter from Jefferson, TX reporting on threats of violence against Union men and convention delegates; and a letter from Huntsville protesting a citation.]
98. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from the sheriff of Collin County in McKinney enclosing documents on the murder of freedmen; a letter from Hempstead on the requisition for D.B. Otis and Franklin Patterson, charged with embezzlement and theft from the Texas Express Company; a letter from J.K. Williams in Tyler, TX regarding his application for special pardon; and a letter from British citizens jailed in Bryan City to the British Consul.]
99. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Fort Worth regarding the Constitutional Convention and elections for convention delegates.]
100. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Chalon-sur-Saone, France regarding the estate of Mr. Guidot; a letter from Galveston requesting information on establishing a "savings institute"; a letter from Caldwell County reporting the conduct of the criminal James M. Sullivan; and a letter from Quitman reporting violence in the area.]
Box Folder
2014/076-4 101. Correspondence, May 11-31, 1868
[Records include a document from Hempstead regarding the custody of D.C. Otis and Franklin Patterson, accused of embezzlement from the Texas Express Company; an extract from a letter from Weber's steam mill regarding several murders; a letter from Millican, TX inquiring about the election or appointment of county officers in the future; a letter from Paris, TX requesting the remission of a fine; and a letter from Brigadier General McAlister in New Orleans regarding a lighthouse in Matagorda Bay and property claims there.]
102. Correspondence, May 11-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Paris, TX regarding the need for an alderman and recent murders; a letter from Columbus, TX advising against the withdrawal of the Bureau, likely the Freedmen's Bureau; a letter from Helena regarding necessary endorsements and authorities to allow B.F. Fly of Corpus Christi to conduct trade via steamer with Cuba; a letter from Owensville reporting threats of violence by the Ku Klux Klan; a letter from the Office of the Freedmen's Bureau in Columbus, TX reporting on conditions in Colorado and Fayette County; and a letter from Blue Earth City, Minnesota requesting information on emigrating to Texas.]
103. Correspondence, May 11-31, 1868
[Records include a circular from the military post of Austin asking for donations of books and papers to be added to the post library; a letter from Sheriff Leroy Lord in Georgetown requesting military aid in making arrests; a letter from the Texas Express Company in Galveston and a telegram from Governor Pease regarding a requisition on the governor of Mississippi for D.C. Otis; a letter from acting Governor of New Mexico H.H. Heath responding to a letter from Governor Pease regarding children taken captive by Native Americans; and a telegram from James McKee in New Orleans regarding an appropriation by Major General Robert C. Buchanan for use of the penitentiary.]
104. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Austin reporting murders and outrages in Freestone County; a letter from Owensville regarding a petition for the use of convict labor on the Houston and Texas Central Railroad; an indictment from the Galveston County Criminal Court against John alias Jack Kirby; a letter from Owensville charging that Sheriff Wheelock took the iron clad oath despite having served under the Confederacy; a certificate signed by Governor Pease authorizing Daniel L. Russell to capture the fugitive Charles P. Willard in Washington D.C.; and a detailed message from Governor Pease to the Constitutional Convention.]
105. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from James Burke in Houston, TX regarding his eligibility to take the oath of office as a Freedmen's Bureau agent; a letter from the State Treasurer John T. Allan enclosing various reports; a letter from Cleburne, TX reporting poor treatment of freedmen by county officers; a detailed message from Governor Pease to the Constitutional Convention; a letter from Major General Robert C. Buchanan at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans forwarding copies of Special Order Number 124 regarding a change of venue in the case of Thomas Dwyer; a letter from Austin listing murders committed in the area; and a letter from State Treasurer John T. Allan providing estimates of certain state expenses.]
106. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from County Judge H.R. Bell in Montgomery, TX inquiring about the removal of his disability; a letter from Denton County reporting two murders; a letter from Edmund J. Davis, president of the Constitutional Convention, enclosing a resolution regarding the Commission of the Land Office passed by the convention; a letter from the British Consulate in Galveston regarding the bill of costs for British subjects on trial in the state; a letter from Washington County reporting murders committed in the county; a letter from Judge N. Hart Davis in Anderson regarding threats made against the court; and a letter from J.D. McAdoo in Brenham regarding the state of affairs within the Union League there.]
107. Correspondence, June 1-15, 1868
[Records include a document from the Post Office Department in Washington requesting that postmasters record certain accounts to determine future salary; letters from the cities of Belton and Brazoria regarding murders committed; a letter from the auditor of the treasury requesting returns from the Graytown post office for the quarter ending March 31, 1868; and a letter from Spring Hill reporting lawlessness and theft.]
108. Correspondence, June 16-31, 1868
[Records include an affidavit regarding a violent incident in Houston, TX; a letter from Houston, TX regarding power of attorney for W.L. Robards; and a letter from Edmund J. Davis, president of the Constitutional Convention, forwarding certain declarations passed by the convention.]
109. Correspondence, June 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from the Milwaukee and St. Paul Railroad requesting a title and charter in order to build railroads in Texas; an affidavit in the case, B.W. Tarkington v. George Cox, E. Perry, et al; a letter from Kaufman regarding official appointments; a letter from Chatfield, TX requesting that sales of property under execution be suspended; and a letter from Austin reporting desperadoes in northern Texas.]
110. Correspondence, June 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Wallisville reporting on conditions in the area and requesting military aid; a letter from Galveston regarding a petition to remove a disability; a letter from Lockhart regarding certain land sold to pay tax debt; a letter from Brenham reporting on conditions there; a resolution passed by the Constitutional Convention appropriating funds to frame a portrait of Sam Houston; and a letter from Georgetown requesting military aid to protect against lawlessness.]
111. Correspondence, June 16-31, 1868
[Records include a telegram from Hempstead requesting military aid in rearresting two freedmen criminals released by a mob of freedmen; a letter from William Perry in Anderson asking for advice on anti-Union bias in his trial sentencing; an estimate of expenses from the Comptroller's Office for the year ending July 1st, 1869; a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Fort Worth on conditions in the area and on Barkley's office; a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives requesting permission to retain certain papers on conditions in San Augustine; a letter from Hopkins County requesting that certain bills be presented to the Constitutional Convention; a letter from Jack Helm in Caldwell County reporting the capture of criminals and asking for Major General J.J. Reynolds' approval; and a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding certain appropriations to be made by the Constitutional Convention and receipts from the General Land Office.]
112. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from the State Penitentiary in Huntsville asking for permission to detain convicts sent from cities with yellow fever outbreaks; a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the assessor and collector of Cameron County and the assessment of taxes for 1865-1867; a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Tarrant County regarding conditions in the area; a letter from the sheriff of Kaufman County requesting assistance in conducting the business of his office; a letter from Cleburne, TX regarding a case in the county courts between Mr. Smith and a freedman; a letter from the Department of State in Washington D.C. requesting documents related to "associations of workingmen"; a letter from Austin regarding the bail bond for Daniel Haverty; a letter from New York desiring information on emigration to Texas; and a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding information requested by the Constitutional Convention.]
113. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the Constitutional Convention appropriating funds to frame a portrait of Sam Houston; a letter from Limestone County reporting on conditions there, particularly relations between freedmen and rebels; and a letter from Belton, TX inquiring about the governor's intentions to run in the upcoming election.]
114. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1868
[Records include a resolution from the citizens of Bosque County for the arrest of the convict A.J. Chewning; a letter from Manchester, England in which a mother inquires after her son in Texas; and a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding a resolution passed by the Constitutional Convention in reference to the loyalty of certain state employees.]
115. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Bonham reporting on conditions in Fannin County; and a letter from Major General Robert C. Buchanan at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in New Orleans on the removal of Judge George R. Scott.]
116. Correspondence, July 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Edmund J. Davis, president of the Constitutional Convention, regarding a resolution passed by the convention; a letter from a freedman in Chappell Hill, TX regarding a poll tax; a letter from the sheriff in Navasota City regarding the arrest of Abner Womack; a letter from Clarksville regarding a reward for the capture of an escaped convict; and a copy of a communication to the Constitutional Convention on State Penitentiary affairs.]
117. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives requesting an account of treasury money spent on the State Penitentiary; a letter from Davis County regarding depredations and activities of the Ku Klux Klan; an affidavit from Bosque County describing individuals who aided the escape of the prisoner A.J. Chewning; a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding the treatment of Union men in the area; a letter from Galveston requesting a warrant for the arrest of fugitive R. Freeman; and a letter from the chairman of the Committee on the Treatment of Prisoners of War and Union Citizens requesting information on the treatment of Union men in the state.]
118. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from the Office of the Lighthouse Board in Washington D.C. approving a site for a lighthouse on Matagorda Island; and affidavits from Travis County regarding the shooting of a freedman, forwarded to the governor by Major General J.J. Reynolds.]
119. Correspondence, August 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Chappell Hill, TX regarding the conviction and release of two freedmen.]
120. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Huntsville reporting on the murder case against Mr. Wooten; an application by the members of the Constitutional Convention for the restoration of Judge George R. Scott; a letter from D. Campbell in Jefferson, TX regarding violence against freedman and requesting that criminals be tried by military commission; a letter from D. Campbell in Jefferson, TX regarding fears for his safety; a report by Judge Wesley Ogden on the disorganization of Refugio County and recommending that the county be attached to Goliad County; and letters from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding settling balances owed to the state by certain assessors and collectors and district attorneys, and regarding a circular on the appointment and removal of assessors and collectors.]
121. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1868
[Records include letters from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding his circular to county judges on the removal of assessors and collectors, and regarding appropriations for the repair of the treasury building; a petition from Montgomery, TX reporting violence against freedmen and requesting military protection; a letter from Edwin Waller in Austin County asking for a fair trial for his son, accused of murder; and a letter from Brenham requesting a special term of the district court for Washington County in order to reduce the number of prisoners in jail.]
122. Correspondence, August 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives reporting on bonds for assessors and collectors; a letter from Lynchburg, Virginia requesting a copy of the proposed Texas constitution; a letter from Galveston inquiring about payment of a county judge attending the Constitutional Convention; a proclamation by Governor Pease setting November 26th as a day of thanksgiving; and a land grant for John C. Bailey in Clay and Wichita Counties.]
123. Correspondence, September 1-5, 1868
[Records include a letter from Lockhart reporting disorder and chaos in the county court.]
124. Correspondence, September 1-5, 1868
[Records include a letter from the Board of the Deaf and Dumb Institution and affidavits related to certain charges made against the matron and superintendent of the institution.]
125. Correspondence, September 1-5, 1868
[Records include a letter from Bosque County forwarding a letter from the district court of Braxton County in West Virginia regarding the criminal A.J. Chewning; a letter from Boerne, TX reporting murders committed; a letter from San Gabriel reporting crimes going unpunished by county officials; and letters and a newspaper clipping from D. Campbell in Jefferson, TX regarding conditions in the area, particularly threats and violent activities of rebels.]
126. Correspondence, September 6-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Brazoria regarding troops to be stationed in Wharton and Columbia; a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding the state of affairs there; a letter from an invalid in Independence requesting assistance with collecting on debts; a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the convention tax; a letter from Belton, TX inquiring about an instrument for detecting gold and silver; and a letter from Judge C.B. Sabin in Cameron County reporting on difficulties in enforcing laws in his court.]
127. Correspondence, September 6-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Robert Crudup in Waco regarding charges made against him by N. McPhaul; a letter from Max Herris Langenschwartz, chairman of the U.S. Peoples League regarding immigration to Texas; and a circular from First Assistant Postmaster General George Earle discontinuing the post office at Fairview.]
128. Correspondence, September 6-15, 1868
[Records include testimony and a report related to charges against the Deaf and Dumb Institution.]
129. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano in New Orleans regarding the building of a lighthouse on Matagorda Bay; a letter from Dallas County on the state of affairs there; letters from Treasurer John T. Allan and acting Comptroller George C. Rives enclosing an annual report for the fiscal year ending August 31st, 1868; a letter from Huntsville regarding the forced sale of property under execution; and a letter from Kaufman County on the state of affairs there.]
130. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from Major General J.J. Reynolds regarding an escort for Judge Hardin Hart and special terms for certain county courts; a letter from Alden McLaughlin in Corpus Christi regarding the disappearance of the warrant and records of a certain court case; and a letter from Judge William A. Fayle in Galveston regarding his salary.]
131. Correspondence, September 16-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from the Texas Land Office in New York regarding immigration to Texas; a letter from Judge C. Caldwell in Jefferson, TX regarding lawlessness and violence in the area; a letter from Aaron Grigsby in Jefferson, TX resigning as a delegate of the Constitutional Convention.]
Box Folder
2014/076-5 132. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Franklin regarding the founding of a school for young ladies; a letter from Navasota regarding the presence of the criminal Jack Duke in the area; a letter from Austin regarding the sale of certain lots of land; a letter from the assessor and collector of Anderson County regarding the collection of taxes on land outside the county; a letter from Columbus, TX regarding the state of affairs there; a letter from Spring Hill on behalf of L.C. DeLisle, imprisoned in Marshall; and a letter from Waco regarding a certificate of conviction for A.J. Chewning.]
133. Correspondence, October 1-15, 1868
[Records include a petition from the citizens of Polk County regarding the petition of the chief and assistant chief of the Coushatta Native Americans; a letter from the assessor and collector of the city of Palestine in Anderson County regarding the collection of taxes on land outside the county; a letter from Kaufman County on the state of affairs there; a letter from Matagorda regarding a debt owed by the Freedmen's Bureau to a citizen; a copy of James McKee's lease agreement for the State Penitentiary in Huntsville, with a note by Major General J.J. Reynolds on James McKee's surrender of his contract; and letters from Marshall describing violence in the area.]
134. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1868
[Records include a copy of a telegram from Major General J.J. Reynolds to Judge J.B. McFarland regarding the estate of J.C. Clark; a letter from Navasota regarding a murder in the area; and a letter from Stephensville on the state of affairs there.]
135. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Richmond, TX regarding various court cases; a letter from Richmond, TX regarding Major General J.J. Reynolds' telegram to Judge McFarland on the case, the Clark heirs v. the State; a letter from the county judge in Refugio County regarding the clerk of the county court and quarantine expenses; a letter from Austin regarding the legality of selling liquor on Sundays; a circular from the Governor of Illinois, Richard J. Oglesby, regarding an investigation of the cattle disease called Texas fever; a letter from Lamar County describing a crime; a letter and newspaper clippings from Navasota regarding a murder; and letters from Major General J.J. Reynolds disapproving declarations of the Constitutional Convention relative to the Texas Central Railroad and the Houston Tap and Brazoria Railroad.]
136. Correspondence, October 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from New York regarding immigration to the state.]
137. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from D. Campbell in New Orleans regarding his letter to Major General J.J. Reynolds from Marshall and affairs in Jefferson, TX; a letter from Weatherford on the state of affairs there; a letter from Bastrop reporting a stabbing; and a letter from Brazoria relative to H.B. Waller's case.]
138. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from the district surveyor in Victoria, TX reporting on a survey of Matagorda Island; and a letter from Beaumont on the state of affairs there.]
139. Correspondence, November 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Palo Pinto regarding bonds for county officers; a letter from Palo Pinto County on the state of affairs there; a letter from Denton requesting military aid for protection against Native American raids; a letter from Navasota regarding Mr. Duke and his trial; a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano in New Orleans regarding the construction of a lighthouse on Matagorda Bay; a letter from Abilene regarding the prevention of Texas cattle fever; and a letter from Wharton County complaining of a lack of a county court.]
140. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from Brownsville reporting on the holding of an election; a petition from the citizens of Brazos County requesting a cotton weigher for the Port of Bryan; a letter from Washington County reporting lawlessness; a letter from Wharton requesting assistance in arresting Mr. Copeland; and letters from C.B. Sabin in Washington D.C. regarding canal and railroad routes to expand trade.]
141. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1868
[Records include a letter from Brownsville requesting copies of Oldham and White's digest of state laws and the laws of 1866; a letter from Brownsville regarding bids to furnish beef for a military post; a letter from state agent W.L. Murray of the Air Line Railroad requesting clothing from the State Penitentiary; a letter from the Office of Union Republican regarding money owed to Dr. Hatch; a letter from Huntsville regarding money owed by the assessor and collector Sinks; a letter from C.B. Sabin in Washington enclosing a check; and a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton regarding the indebtedness of J.B. Morris of Houston, TX.]
142. Correspondence, November 16-30, 1868
[Records include letters from James H. Bell in Houston, TX regarding the exchange of bonds of the Central Railroad Company, as well as one on behalf of James McKee regarding a lack of funds at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville; a letter from Galveston regarding sealed measures belonging to the state; a letter from Judge A.B. Norton in Fort Worth regarding the removal of Major General J.J. Reynolds and the courts and county officers of various counties; and a letter from New York regarding furnishing uniforms for the "Boys in Blue."]
143. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from the county judge of Wilson County regarding affairs in the county and the Constitutional Convention; a letter from Judge A.B. Norton in Dallas requesting an escort; a letter from Gonzales describing a shooting; a letter from Columbus, TX requesting that troops attend an execution; a telegram from Marshall regarding a bill by Major General J.J. Reynolds found after his removal; a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano in New Orleans regarding the construction of a lighthouse on Matagorda Bay; a letter from J.C. Rushing in Dallas proposing changes in criminal penalties; a letter from Austin describing the condition of the Coushatta Native Americans; a letter from Dallas regarding the murder of Shelton L. Howard; and a letter from Washington D.C. regarding the purchase of land from the state of Texas.]
144. Correspondence, December 1-15, 1868
[Records include a letter from Judge George W. Scott in Galveston regarding a special term of the district court; a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the payment of removed officers; a resolution of the Constitutional Convention requesting information on the Houston and Texas Central Railroad Company; and a letter from Enoch Moore in San Marcos proposing a digest of Supreme Court reports.]
145. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1868
[Records include a detailed letter from Salado describing a murder; a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding money deposited in the treasury from the sale of cotton; a letter from Matagorda County reporting the organization of a vigilante committee to suppress crime; letters from Montgomery, TX reporting several murders; and letters from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding positioning troops within the state and official appointments.]
146. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Waco reporting the murder of freedmen near Round Rock; a bound collection of newspaper clippings from the San Antonio Herald related to charges against city officials; and a letter from Brenham, TX regarding a special term of the district court in Washington County.]
147. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector in Montgomery, TX explaining his reasons for not making returns; a letter from Victoria, TX regarding a survey to be conducted on Matagorda Island; a letter from a merchant in Bexar County regarding a license fee assessed by the collector of the county; and an affidavit by Dr. George Copples concerning the injuries of Woodson Jett.]
148. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter from Attorney General E.B. Turner regarding a financial dispute between the governor and District Attorney N.K. Makemson; a letter from Galveston with a request for certain papers; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding the creation of a military post on the Black River; and a letter from the General Land Office regarding laws on the sale of public domain lands.]
149. Correspondence, December 16-31, 1868
[Records include a letter of advice from C.B. Stewart to David A. Carrol, assessor and collector of Montgomery County, on his delay in collecting taxes; a letter from the Constitutional Convention's Committee on the Condition of the State requesting information on the possibility of a fair election in the state; letters from Victoria, TX regarding difficulties in surveying the site for a lighthouse on Matagorda Bay; and a letter from Washington County regarding a special term of the district court.]
150. Correspondence, January 1-20, 1869
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector of Anderson County in Palestine, TX requesting military aid for protection against the Ku Klux Klan and other rebel violence; letters from Judge Thomas H. Stribbling and Judge T.G. Anderson in San Antonio and E.P. Hunt in Galveston on the removal of political disabilities; a letter from the Virginia Military Institute transmitting a preliminary report on the physical survey of the state of Virginia; a letter from the governor to acting Comptroller George C. Rives transmitting Texas bonds; and a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin about stationing troops in Crockett, TX for the protection of Union citizens.]
151. Correspondence, January 1-20, 1869
[Records include a letter from Edward Rummel, secretary of state of Illinois, forwarding a copy of Volume 41 of the Illinois Reports; a letter from E. Arno Hensoldt in Indianola regarding the survey of public lands on Matagorda Island for a lighthouse; a letter from Washington D.C. desiring an ordinance from the Convention regarding a railroad; a letter from Washington City regarding railroads through the state and Mexico; a letter from Austin regarding the building of a bridge over Waller Creek; a letter from Theodore Wagner, the secretary of state of Arkansas, regarding the capture of the desperado Harry McCrane; a letter from Castroville, TX asking for assistance and relief for the victim of a robbery; a telegram from Houston, TX regarding the leasing of the New Orleans and Opelousas Railroad; and a letter from Hempstead reporting murder and lawlessness.]
152. Correspondence, January 21-31, 1869
[Records include a letter from New Orleans a letter from Sulphur Fork Iron Works in Davis County; a letter from Huntsville regarding an embezzlement case; letters from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding the cost of publishing an abstract of lands patented in 1867 and 1868, and an estimate of the population of the state; a letter from San Antonio regarding the state of affairs there; a telegram from Marshall regarding the requisition of the governor of Georgia for the criminal Holmes, under military arrest in Texas; a letter from C.B. Sabin in Washington D.C. regarding elections in the state; and a letter from Dewitt County reporting a murder.]
153. Correspondence, January 21-31, 1869
[Records include letters from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding troubles in Wharton County, the New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad Company, and convict labor performed by prisoners of the State Penitentiary; a letter from A. Mazek, minister of the Netherlands, in Washington D.C. requesting assistance in forwarding documents to D.A. van der Heuvel in Shelby; and letters from Galveston regarding the removal of the political disability of Oscar Farish and Henry M. Trueheart.]
154. Correspondence, January 21-31, 1869
[Records include letters from Henry M. Trueheart in Galveston regarding the removal of his political disability; and a letter from attorney William G. Hale in Galveston asking that action regarding the New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad Company be postponed.]
155. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from the county judge of Cameron County on the state of affairs there, including lawlessness and violence; a letter from F. Flake introducing John Sealy, desiring a meeting with Major General Edward Canby; a letter from Brenham, TX requesting military protection; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of C.C. Millican; and a letter from the Tobacco Leaf, "organ of the tobacco trade in the U.S.", regarding a plan for immigration.]
156. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1869
[Records include a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of William Green; a letter from Judge Thomas H. Stribbling in San Antonio enclosing a petition to remove the political disability of Chavis, Seguin, and Mondragon; a letter from Meridian, TX reporting on Native American attacks on the frontier and requesting protection; a letter from Waxahachie regarding the desperado Steven Meredith; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin forwarding copies of answers to applications in relation to the New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad Company; a letter from Major General Edward Canby to William G. Hale regarding action on ordinances and declarations of the Constitutional Convention; and a letter from Waco regarding the murder of a freedman and the location of certain criminals.]
157. Correspondence, February 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from Lockhart reporting rebel activity; an Austin post office receipt for a package sent by the governor to D.A. van der Heuvel in Shelby; a letter from Huntsville in support of the district clerk of Anderson County, seeking protection against military authorities; a letter from Cold Springs regarding an appropriation for the Coushatta Native Americans; a letter from East Greenwich, Rhode Island regarding the granting of pardons; a letter from Jacksonville requesting protection from lawlessness; a letter from Kaufman relating to the murder of the desperado Ed Burton, along with other arrests and crimes; and a letter from the governor's private secretary, Thaddeus McRae, regarding the survey for the lighthouse on Matagorda Island.]
158. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1869
[Records include a letter from Galveston introducing John Sealy, desiring a meeting with Major General Edward Canby regarding the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos, and Colorado Railway; letters from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the account books of the State Penitentiary and correspondence between Governor Throckmorton and White and Chiles on certain U.S. bonds; a telegram from New Orleans regarding the criminal Holmes; a letter from Austin on leasing the State Penitentiary; a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives in Austin questioning the legality of an act for the assessment and collection of taxes; telegrams from New Orleans regarding a requisition for a criminal from the governor of Georgia; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin granting Judge Hart's request for an escort; a letter from attorney William G. Hale in relation to an injunction against selling the New Orleans, Mobile, and Chattanooga Railroad; a letter from John H. Cochran in Fort Belknap to Judge B.F. Barkley regarding the removal of his political disability; and a letter for Constitutional Convention delegate D. Campbell requesting mileage.]
159. Correspondence, February 16-28, 1869
[Records include a letter from William Phillips in San Augustine regarding the close of the Constitutional Convention and the upcoming election; a letter from the sheriff in La Grange, TX regarding bail for a captured criminal; an exchange of letters between Governor Pease and acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the appointment and payment of a police court; a letter from Judge William R. Fayle of Harris County writing from Houston, TX regarding his salary; an annual report by the chief of the Bureau of Immigration in Louisiana; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of U.C. Colgrove; and a petition for the remittance of a fine charged by the district court of McLennan County for the aggravated assault of a freedwoman.]
Box Folder
2014/076-6 160. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin requesting a statement of taxes assessed in 1868 from the comptroller; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of John T. Petty; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of Fielding L. Smithey; a letter from Judge J.B. McFarland in Columbus, TX regarding an act of congress vacating all offices; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding taxes in Goliad County, the movement of troops, and a special tax for building a jail in Goliad; a letter from the Office of the Mississippi Valley Navigation Company in New Orleans regarding a commission to bring emigrants to Texas; a letter from John Paul Baker in New Orleans requesting the position of agent of immigration for the state; a letter from Washington D.C. to Crockett, TX reporting on the state of affairs there; a letter from Weatherford asking that Palo Pinto County be attached to Parker County for judicial purposes; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of John S. Hancock; a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Fort Worth transmitting the request of John H. Cochran at Fort Belknap asking that his political disabilities be removed.]
161. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from Houston, TX regarding warrants on the county treasury for salary; a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano in New Orleans requesting information about his lands in Texas; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin relative to Captain Hooker of Indianola; a letter from A.E. Prince in New Orleans to Thaddeus McRae enclosing drafts to pay for the land and patent for the building of a lighthouse in Matagorda; a letter from F.E. Prime in New Orleans applying for the cession of land for a lighthouse in Matagorda; and a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding the assessor and collectors and taxes collected in various counties.]
162. Correspondence, March 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from A. Siemering & Co., publishers in San Antonio, regarding the printing of the new state constitution; a letter from Matagorda reporting lawlessness and requesting military protection; a letter from the state librarian of Maryland forwarding certain reports regarding his state; a letter from Wharton regarding the Clark estate; a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano in New Orleans regarding the building of a lighthouse on Matagorda Bay; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of G.W. Kirkwood; a letter from Fort Worth recommending the removal of political disabilities for M.B. Loyd; a letter from Fairfield recommending the removal of political disabilities from F.M. Harms; a letter from the chairman of the Lighthouse Board in the Treasury Department in Washington D.C. regarding an appropriation for land; and a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding a certain survey of land in El Paso County.]
163. Correspondence, March 16-21, 1869
[Records include a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Fort Worth inquiring whether the governor will run for reelection and reporting crime and lawlessness; a letter from E. Bellinger in Prairie Lea regarding the levying of a special tax by the county court; a letter from the General Land Office regarding the survey of land on Matagorda Island; an act by Governor Pease ceding land on Matagorda Island to the United States for the building of a lighthouse; and a letter from Columbus, TX regarding Major General Edward Canby's hide order.]
164. Correspondence, March 16-21, 1869
[Records include a letter from New Orleans making inquiries regarding the land for the building of a lighthouse on Matagorda Island; a letter from Jasper, TX reporting registration lists as secure; a letter from Galveston relative to various state and city affairs; a letter from James P. Butler in Huntsville on the Republican party in the state; a letter from Major General Edward Canby at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding the maintenance of a military post in Fort Mason; a letter from Governor Pease to acting Comptroller George C. Rives requesting a statement of the assessment of taxes in 1868; a letter from the Orphan's Home at Bayland requesting an order to the State Penitentiary for cloth; a letter from the Department of State in Washington D.C. requesting copies of any existing reports on fisheries in Texas; and a letter from the Clerk's Office of the Supreme Court in Galveston regarding salaries for the officers of the criminal court.]
165. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from A.G. Boone, U.S. Indian Agent of the Kiowas and Comanches regarding two children recovered from the Kiowa; a letter from R.E. Borden in Homer, TX regarding applications for special pardon of John Granberry, P.C. Abney, J.W. Beathard, and Calvin Mantooth; letters from Judge A.B. Norton in Johnson County reporting the death of the desperado Bickerstaff and describing the state of affairs in his county; a letter from Judge B.F. Barkley in Fort Worth withdrawing his recommendation for the removal of the political disabilities of J.T. Morehead; a letter from E.R. Lane in Goliad regarding a petition for the pardon of William Sansford; a letter from Judge E. Basse in Brownsville explaining his failure to hold court; and a letter from Hillsboro regarding the Union party in the state and general political matters.]
166. Correspondence, April 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from Canada inquiring about lands in Texas and immigration to Texas; a letter from Mason, TX reporting on frontier matters; telegrams from Brenham, TX reporting a lack of court officers and requesting a special term of the district court be held; a letter from La Grange, TX regarding the status of several civil officers under order number 60; a letter from A. Gross & Co. in New York regarding immigration to Texas; a copy of an ordinance by the mayor and alderman of Galveston appropriating funds for the defense of the city; and a letter from Tyler, TX regarding Union men threatened by the Ku Klux Klan.]
167. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1869
[Records include a letter from New Orleans regarding the cession of land on Matagorda Island for the building of a lighthouse; and a letter from the mayor of Galveston relative to a war debt created by the Board of Alderman in 1861.]
168. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1869
[Records include a letter from Robert B. Johns in Austin regarding the removal of his political disability; and a letter from the British Consulate in Galveston introducing the Marquis de Bourkel of the Royal Engineers, seeking historical records.]
169. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1869
[Records include a letter from Fort Richardson regarding available land for immigrants, particularly Swedish immigrants; a letter from the agent for the state of Texas in the Missouri Mutual Life Insurance Company; a letter from T.B. Dooley in Newport desiring a divorce and general financial relief; a letter from the Office of Indian Affairs in Washington D.C. regarding two children recovered from the Kiowa; and a letter from London, England inquiring about immigration to the state.]
170. Correspondence, April 16-30, 1869
[Records include a letter from Boston, Massachusetts desiring information in relation to a world's fair in the U.S. in 1876; a letter from New Orleans regarding Governor Pease's act ceding land on Matagorda Island for a lighthouse; and a letter from Judge A.B. Norton requesting that Palo Pinto County be attached to Parker County for judicial purposes.]
171. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1869
[Records include a letter from Indianapolis, Indiana regarding land granted by the state of Texas to Colonel Adam Freeman; a letter from La Grange, TX regarding a special tax authorized by the 1866 legislature; a letter from Washington D.C. in relation to mail service from San Antonio to El Paso and from Concho to Fort Smith; a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of J.H. Wilbarger; and a petition from San Antonio by the citizens of Kerr and Bandera Counties for military protection against Native Americans.]
172. Correspondence, May 1-15, 1869
[Records include letters from C.B. Sabin in Washington D.C. regarding personal matters, affairs in Texas, and a recent legal judgment; a telegram from Galveston regarding a special term of the criminal court; a letter from Pleasanton, TX regarding the sale of several tracts of land to settlers; and a letter from Galveston requesting a copy of the charter of the Houston City Mills Manufacturing Company.]
173. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1869
[Records include a letter from Brenham, TX regarding views on the Texas Constitution and the Republican party in the state; a letter from Kemper City protesting the bridging of the Guadalupe River under a charter of the legislature of 1866; a letter from Victoria, TX regarding the fees of the surveyor of Matagorda Island; a letter from Houston, TX regarding political affairs in the state; and a letter from Lockhart reporting the rearrest of Mr. Sullivan.]
174. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1869
[Records include letters from Houston, TX regarding charges made against James M. Hart by H.D. Johnson; a letter from Mathias Stensey petitioning for the removal of political disability; a letter from County Judge Edward T. Austin regarding his actions in relation to the drafts drawn by Judge Fayle; a letter from Jefferson, TX regarding the military commission in session and the state of affairs there; and a letter from Waxahachie inquiring about the taking of the test oath for civil officers.]
175. Correspondence, May 16-31, 1869
[Records include a letter from John A. Buckholts in Cameron County regarding his disenfranchisement by a corrupt official; a letter from Galveston inquiring about deputy pilots taking the test oath; a letter from E. Bellinger in Prairie Lea regarding the upcoming election; a letter from Jasper, TX regarding a remedy for the cotton worm; and a letter from John M. Wade in Montgomery, TX petitioning for a removal of political disabilities.]
176. Correspondence, June 1869
[Records include a telegram for the president of the Southern Pacific Railroad in Marshall regarding the payment of interest on state debt; a letter from Brigadier General L.P. Graham in Austin in relation to the trespass of soldiers on lands; a letter from J.L. Dana in Nevada, Iowa regarding acts of congress granting land to states for agricultural colleges; a letter from the General Land Office in the U.S. Department of the Interior requesting certain information regarding resources in the state for an annual report; and a letter from Caney regarding indebtedness to the state.]
177. Correspondence, June 1869
[Records include a letter from William B. Dana & Co. in New York requesting information on the financial condition of the state; a letter from E.M. Wheelock, superintendent of public instruction, in San Antonio regarding his pay; a letter from G.W. Brackenridge, president of the San Antonio National Bank, requesting the discharge of Sergeant Henry James; a letter from Tyler, TX regarding lawlessness and danger to Union men in the area; a letter from Tyler, TX reporting multiple escapes by the convict Jack Richardson; and a letter from Henderson, TX relating to a railroad from Henderson to Earpville.]
178. Correspondence, July 1869
[Records include a letter from New York inquiring about immigration to Texas; a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton to E.M. Wheelock, superintendent of public instruction, regarding his pay; letters from H.M. Trueheart to Governor Pease and Major General J.J. Reynolds regarding penalties on the convention tax assessed by Comptroller M.C. Hamilton; a letter from the Department of State in Washington D.C. requesting copies of laws or other documents related to the treatment of mentally ill citizens of the state; a letter from the British Consulate in Galveston regarding lands in the estate of Joseph O'Neill; a letter from the Department of State in Washington D.C. regarding state laws preventing the immigration of "lunatic paupers" into the state; and a letter from Cynthia Nelson in Marlin asking that her husband's murder sentence be shortened.]
179. Correspondence, August 1869
[Records include a letter from Major General J.J. Reynolds at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin inquiring about the organization of Hamilton County; a letter from Mayor Leander Brown on danger to citizens from a project involving blasting rocks; a letter from Sparta, Wisconsin in which W.D. Hillyer inquires about lands for services rendered to the Republic of Texas in 1836; a letter from Galveston in relation to lands held by Bishop Dupuis as trustee; a letter from Louisville, Kentucky regarding emigration to the state; a letter from Bright Star, Arkansas regarding the reward for the capture of Cullen Baker; a letter from Major General J.J. Reynolds at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding a circular on vacancies in civil offices; a letter from La Grange, TX regarding the pardon of S. Townsend; and a letter from engineer M.F. Bonzano regarding the site for a lighthouse to be built on Matagorda Island.]
180. Correspondence, August 1869
[Records include a letter from Major General J.J. Reynolds at the Fifth Military District Headquarters in Austin regarding the case of Mr. Constant; and a blank form for listing recommendations for civil officers in a given county.]
181. Correspondence, September 1869
[Records include a letter from the British Consulate in Galveston making inquiries on behalf of the heirs of Joseph O'Neil; a letter from Governor Pease to Colonel H. Clay Wood regarding Major General J.J. Reynolds; a letter from the British Consulate in Galveston acknowledging the receipt of certain records; a letter from Comptroller M.C. Hamilton forwarding a notification from the U.S. Marshal's Office regarding the debt owed by the bankrupt estate of W.L. Sloan; and a letter from Baker & Maxey in Huntsville regarding a reward for the capture of a criminal.]
182. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from Judge Wesley Ogden recommending that Refugio County be attached to Goliad County for judicial purposes; a resolution acknowledging the service of Sheriff Frank Young and Captain Albert Hunter of Gillespie County; a petition by Senator Pickett on behalf of the Coushatta Native Americans asking for an appropriation to buy land; a business card from G.W. Crawford and James B. Simpson, attorneys; an expense account from E. Arno Hensoldt, surveyor in Victoria County; and an article regarding the financial affairs of the administration in the city of San Antonio.]
183. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from the Pacific Land, Real Estate, and Commission Agency in San Francisco offering assistance to emigrants from Texas; a petition from Falls County reporting violence and lawlessness and requesting the appointment of officers to maintain law and order; a resolution from the Constitutional Convention regarding the sale of a railroad by the state; a letter from the Washington Fire Engine Company Number 1 informing the governor of his election as an honorary member of the company; a copy of the freight tariff schedule for the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos, and Colorado Railway; and a petition of the citizens of Colorado County protesting the tariff charged by the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos and Colorado Railroad.]
184. Correspondence, undated
[Records include letters from John E. George in Montgomery County petitioning the removal of political disability.]
185. Correspondence, undated
[Records include an act providing for the geological survey of the state of Texas; a petition from Lavaca County asking that J.J. Helm be allowed to pursue and arrest a gang of horse thieves; and a letter from James B. Simpson in Galveston County petitioning for the removal of his political disability.]
186. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from acting Comptroller George C. Rives regarding a tax to reimburse the treasury for the cost of the Constitutional Convention; and a letter from Kaufman County regarding murders committed by a mob and the prosecution of the criminals.]
187. Correspondence, undated
[Records include petitions by Joseph E. Snygley, William H. Fleming, and Joseph A. Bagby in Red River County desiring political relief.]
188. Correspondence, undated
189. Correspondence, undated
[Records include an extract from a letter from Mrs. Constant in a camp near Bonham; and a detailed but partial report on violence in the state.]
190. Thanksgiving proclamations, November 1867-November 1868
[Records include proclamations by West Virginia Governor Arthur I. Boreman, Tennessee Governor William G. Brownlow, Pennsylvania Governor John W. Geary, New York Governor Reuben E. Fenton, Missouri Governor Thomas C. Fletcher, Indiana Lieutenant Governor Conrad Baker, Florida Governor Harrison Reed, and Connecticut Governor James E. English designating a day of thanksgiving for their respective states.]
Box
2014/076-7 Letterpress volumes, June 1868-September 1869:
[Letterpress volumes contain copies of outgoing correspondence by Governor Elisha Marshall Pease. In many instances, correspondence found in these volumes refers directly to incoming correspondence elsewhere in the records. Frequent correspondents include Major General J.J. Reynolds, Major General Edward Canby, President of the Constitutional Convention Edmund J. Davis, and acting Comptroller George C. Rives, as well as other civil and military officials. Common topics within the correspondence are official appointments and removals, resolutions of the Constitutional Convention, violence and lawlessness in the state, the rights of freedmen, taxation, appropriations, elections, and matters relating to the State Penitentiary. The volumes each contain an alphabetical index listing correspondents and subjects, located at the back of the first volume and the front of the second.]
June-November 1868
November 1868-December 1869