Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Governor James Webb Throckmorton:

An Inventory of Governor James Webb Throckmorton Records at the Texas State Archives, 1866-1867



Overview

Creator: Texas. Governor (1866-1867 : Throckmorton)
Title: Governor James Webb Throckmorton records
Dates: 1866-1867
Abstract: The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. James Webb Throckmorton served as governor from 1866 to 1867. Records of Governor Throckmorton's term in office relate predominately to the progress of Reconstruction in post-Civil War Texas. Much of the confusion that accompanied the imposition of military rule in March 1867 is reflected in the correspondence. Types of records are correspondence, petitions, lists, circulars, and telegrams dating from October 1866 to December 1867.
Quantity: 2 cubic ft.
Language These materials are written in English.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state, elected by the citizens every four years. The duties and responsibilities of the governor include serving as commander-in-chief of the state's military forces; convening special sessions of the legislature for specific purposes; delivering to the legislature at the beginning of each regular session a report on the condition of the state, an accounting of all public money under the governor's control, a recommended biennial budget, an estimate of the amounts of money required to be raised by taxation, and any recommendations he deems necessary; signing or vetoing bills passed by the legislature; and executing the laws of the state.

The office of the governor of the state of Texas was created by the Texas Constitution of 1845. It superseded the office of the president of the Republic of Texas upon the annexation of Texas by the United States. The 1845 Constitution defined the term of office as two years, with no more than four years served in a six-year period. The governor was required to be thirty years old at minimum, a U.S. citizen, and a Texas resident for at least three years (Article V, Section 4).

The Constitution outlined a number of powers held by the governor of Texas. The governor acted as the commander-in-chief of the army, navy, and militia of the state unless they were transferred into service under the federal government (Article V, Section 6). He could call up a state militia to "execute the laws of the State to suppress insurrections, and to repel invasions" (Article VI, Section 4). The governor made recommendations to the legislature and provided written information on the state of the government (Article V, Section 9). He could also convene the legislature when necessary and adjourn the legislature in the case of a disagreement between the House and Senate (Article V, Section 8). The governor had the power to grant reprieves and pardons in criminal cases except those of treason or impeachment, and to approve or disapprove bills, orders, resolutions, or votes from the legislature (Article V, Sections 11, 17 and 18). The governor also appointed supreme and district court judges and an attorney general with the consent of two-thirds of the Senate (Article IV, Sections 5 and 12).

The 1845 Constitution also created the office of secretary of state, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate for the governor's term of service. The secretary of state worked closely with the governor, and was required to "keep a fair register of all official acts and proceedings of the governor" (Article V, Section 16). The Constitution called for the election of a lieutenant governor at the time of the governor's election with the same qualifications and term of office, but to be voted for separately by electors. The lieutenant governor served as president of the Senate and could cast a deciding vote in ties, as well as take on the governor's powers in his absence or until a new governor was elected and qualified or the previous governor was able to resume office (Article V, Section 12). In addition, it further called for the biennial election of a state treasurer and comptroller of public accounts by the legislature, with vacancies to be filled by the governor (Article V, Section 23). However, a constitutional amendment in 1850 allowed the public election of the state treasurer and comptroller.

The constitutional language defining the office of the governor changed marginally with the Texas Constitution of 1861, which was written when Texas seceded from the United States to join the Confederate States at the onset of the Civil War. The 1861 Constitution replaced mention of the United States with the Confederate States, removed a requirement for U.S. citizenship for Texas governors, raised the governor's salary, and set a date for the governor and lieutenant governor to take office after an election.

The Constitution of 1866 arose out of the Constitution of 1861 with certain amendments made during the Constitutional Convention of 1866. These amendments were intended to bring the Texas constitution back into compliance with United States law. The Constitution of 1866 made minor alterations to the office of the governor, extending his term of office to four years with no more than eight years served in a 12-year period, and increasing his salary to $4,000 annually. He was also granted the power of the item veto on appropriations and to convene the legislature outside of the state capital if necessary.

Another constitutional convention took place in 1868-1869 under the Reconstruction Acts of 1867, ultimately producing the Constitution of 1869. It affected the office of the governor by again raising the governor's salary, this time to $5,000 annually, and giving the governor the right to appoint the attorney general and secretary of state, with the other state offices being appointed by election.

(Sources: Texas Constitution of 1845, Texas Constitution of 1861, and Texas Constitution of 1866, all online at the Tarlton Law Library; S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1845", Walter L. Buenger, "Constitution of 1861", and S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1866", Handbook of Texas Online, all accessed on February 20, 2014.)


Biographical Sketch

James Webb Throckmorton served as governor of Texas from August 9, 1866 to August 8, 1867. The son of a physician, James Throckmorton was born in Tennessee in 1825. As a boy he moved to Arkansas in 1836, then to Fannin County, Texas in 1841, and again to Collin County. In 1844, he left the Rangers to study medicine in Kentucky with his uncle. He served as an army surgeon in the Mexican War, but received a medical discharge. Disliking the practice of medicine, he turned to law and politics. After five years each as a state representative and state senator, he was elected a delegate to the Secession Convention of 1861, where he numbered among the seven who voted against secession. Although a Unionist, he joined the Confederate army when war came, and eventually served as brigadier general in charge of troops guarding the Texas frontier, and Confederate commissioner to the Indians.

After acting as president of the Constitutional Convention of 1866, Throckmorton defeated E.M. Pease in the race for governor, taking office in August 1866. When presidential reconstruction gave way to congressional reconstruction in March 1867, Throckmorton and the U.S. military differed: he disagreed with their deployment of troops in the interior rather than on the frontier of the state, and they accused him of failing to punish crimes against blacks and Unionists. In July, General Philip Sheridan removed Throckmorton from the governorship as "an impediment to reconstruction." E.M. Pease was appointed in his place. After fighting against radicalism in the early 1870s, Throckmorton was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives (1874-1888), where he argued among other things for government encouragement of and government regulation of railroads. He ran for governor twice more, in 1878 and 1890 before he died in McKinney on April 21, 1894.

(Source: David Minor, "Throckmorton, James Webb", Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on February 13, 2014.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. James Webb Throckmorton served as governor of Texas from 1866 to 1867. Records of Governor Throckmorton's term in office relate predominately to the progress of Reconstruction in post-Civil War Texas. Much of the confusion that accompanied the imposition of military rule in March 1867 is reflected in the correspondence. Types of records are correspondence, petitions, lists, circulars and telegrams dating from October 1866 to December 1867. Although the majority of the records are incoming letters, several outgoing letters are found. Letters directly to Throckmorton from military authorities exist in abundance, as well as copies of military correspondence forwarded to the governor's office. Letters of Major Generals Philip H. Sheridan, Charles Griffin, J.B. Kiddoo, and S.P. Heintzelman concerning the activities of federal troops and the Freedmen's Bureau constitute a large portion of the materials. Other frequent correspondents include State Comptroller W.L. Robards, Agent of the State Penitentiary D.C. Dickson, U.S. Treasury Secretary Hugh McCulloch, and U.S. Secretary of State W.H. Seward. Common topics within the correspondence include applications and recommendations for appointments to office, reports of vacancies in county offices, reports of crime, violence, and Native American depredations, requests to raise companies for frontier protection, letters relative to the disposition of federal troops throughout the state, reports of conditions in various counties, correspondence on the collection of taxes, and letters relating to the physical and financial condition of railroads.

Certain types of correspondence that appear consistently and frequently throughout the records have been omitted from the folder level description, including applications or recommendations for appointments to various official positions, and copies of amnesty oaths. Some of the descriptions of individual items were taken directly from notes made on the back of the records, likely by a secretary around the same time that the letters were received.

In the past, items relating to the State Penitentiary in Huntsville were removed from the records of governors, secretaries of state, treasurers and comptrollers to create an artificial collection of records relating to the penitentiary. Items related to railroads and Native American affairs may have also been removed from the records. In addition, the original order of the records was disrupted when they were sorted by date. As a result, letters or petitions that were enclosures of other letters may have been separated from their original context. One oversized item transferred from folder 103 has not been located as of the update of this finding aid in February 2014.


 

Arrangement of the Records

Arrangement is chronological; letters with no specific day dates have been placed at the end of the month. Undated letters are located at the end of the correspondence.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

None.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Throckmorton, J.W. (James Webb), 1825-1894.
Kiddoo, Joseph Barr, 1840-1880.
Robards, Willis L. (?-1872).
Heintzelman, Samuel Peter, 1805-1880.
Sheridan, Philip Henry, 1831-1888.
McCulloch, Hugh, 1808-1895.
Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872.
Dickson, David Catchings, 1818-1880.
Griffin, Charles, 1825-1867.
Corporate Names:
Texas. Office of the Governor.
United States. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands.
Texas. State Penitentiary at Huntsville.
Subjects:
Governors--Texas.
Amnesty--Texas.
Militia--Texas.
Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)--Texas.
Freedmen--Texas.
Indians of North America--Texas--Wars.
Railroads--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Politics and government--1865-1950.
Texas--Officials and employees--Selection and appointment.
Texas--Frontier troubles.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Governors--1866-1867.
Petitions--Texas--Governors--1866-1867.
Circulars (fliers)--Texas--Governors--1866-1867.
Telegrams--Texas--Governors--1866-1867.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State, Executive record books, 1835-1917, 14 reels of microfilm.
Texas Applications for special pardons, 1865-1867, 3 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Reconstruction records, 1865-1873, undated, 7.87 cubic ft.
Records relating to the Penitentiary, 1846-1921, undated, 87.85 cubic ft.
Records relating to Railroads, 1836-1950, undated, bulk [ca. 1880]-[ca. 1910], 9.4 cubic ft.
Records relating to Indian affairs, 1825-1957, bulk 1825-1880, 3.62 cubic ft.
James W. Throckmorton papers, 1857-1940, bulk 1857-1897.
Texas Secretary of State Voter registration lists, 1867-1869.
Texas Secretary of State Fugitive records, 1837-1965, bulk 1875-1915, 83.13 cubic ft. (originals), 13 reels microfilm (duplicates).
Texas Secretary of State Executive clemency records, 1840, 1845-2009, 110.68 cubic ft., 168 reels of microfilm (originals), 22 reels of microfilm (duplicates).[RESTRICTED]
Texas Legislature Memorials and petitions, 1836-1937. [There is no finding aid for this unprocessed collection.]
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
James Webb Throckmorton papers, 1838-1888, 1 ft., 4 in.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Texas Governor James Webb Throckmorton records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2014/061

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by an unknown agency during the 20th century. An accession number was assigned for control purposes on January 22, 2014.

Processing Information

Processed by State Archives staff, June 1984

Finding aid updated by Tonia J. Wood, November 1995

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tonia J. Wood, March 2001

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the style sheet v1to02.xsl, July 22, 2003

Additional subject description and finding aid made DACS compliant by Caitlin Burhans, February 2014

Corrections and additional DACS revisions by Aditi Worcester, May 2014


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Governor James Webb Throckmorton records, 1866-1867,
2 cubic ft.

Box Folder
2014/061-1 1. Correspondence, June 1866
2. Correspondence, July 2-16, 1866
3. Correspondence, July 19-25, 1866
[Records include letters from A.M. Gentry in New Orleans in reference to a convention in Philadelphia and the political climate in the country; and a jury verdict regarding a murder in Victoria.]
4. Correspondence, July 27-30, 1866
5. Correspondence, July 31, 1866
6. Correspondence, August 1-2, 1866
[Records include a letter from Gainesville regarding an incident during which horse thieves shot and killed several citizens of the town; and a petition from Ellis County in reference to raising a company for frontier protection.]
7. Correspondence, August 3-5, 1866
8. Correspondence, August 6-7, 1866
9. Correspondence, August 8-10, 1866
[Records include a report from a committee in Bell County on the state of affairs in the county.]
10. Correspondence, August 11-12, 1866
[Records include a letter from acting Secretary of State Henry Stanbery in Washington in regard to relieving former Governor Andrew J. Hamilton of his trust and asking him to transfer the archives of the state; and a letter from Anderson County regarding benefits for the position of state agent.]
11. Correspondence, August 13, 1866
[Records include a copy of resolutions adopted in a meeting in Bell County.]
12. Correspondence, August 14, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General H.G. Wright in reference to frontier protection; and a letter from Cherokee Village regarding an encounter between the Caddo and Osage Native Americans.]
13. Correspondence, August 15, 1866
[Records include a letter from Lampasas regarding recent Native American depredations in the area.]
14. Correspondence, August 16-18, 1866
[Records include a writ of habeas corpus from a commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau to the sheriff of Bosque County regarding the custody of freedman Daniel Jones; a letter from Cherokee Village regarding appointments made in the "Indian Country" and a recent annual council held by the Kiowa and Comanche; and a letter accompanying a report and resolutions from a committee in Bell County on the state of affairs in the county.]
15. Correspondence, August 20, 1866
[Records include a letter from the Senate regarding the use of the State Cemetery for the burial of U.S. soldiers; a letter from a citizen of Victoria asking for the governor's intervention in his arrest by military authorities; and a letter from Belton advocating the withdrawal of U.S. troops.]
16. Correspondence, August 21, 1866
[Records include instructions to an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau regarding outrages committed against freedmen and the trial of freedmen; a letter from Meridian regarding the treatment of freedmen in the area and pay for county clerks; a letter from Major General Wright at the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding interior garrisons; and a letter from the chief justice of Meridian County complaining of the actions of Philip Howard, an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau.]
17. Correspondence, August 22-23, 1866
[Records include a letter from Anderson County in relation to the arrest of a justice of the peace by the military; an indictment in the murder case of State of Texas v. Franklin Smith, freedman; and a letter from Major General J.B. Kiddoo in Galveston asking for the governor to support his actions in the Bureau of Labor.]
18. Correspondence, August 24, 1866
[Records include a letter and statement of facts from the justice of the peace in Anderson County regarding his arrest by military officials.]
19. Correspondence, August 25-27, 1866
[Records include a statement of pay due to attorneys and judges of the provisional government sent by Comptroller W.L. Robards; a letter from Major General Kiddoo of the Freedmen's Bureau in Galveston regarding the governor's message to the legislature in reference to equality and education for freedmen; letters from U.S. Direct Tax Commissioner R.K. Smith regarding taxes collected in the state and the suspension of the collection of the U.S. direct tax; and a letter from Governor Throckmorton to Comptroller Robards regarding bonds issued by the state.]
20. Correspondence, August 28-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General S.P. Heintzelman in anticipation of a meeting with the governor in Austin; a letter from M.J. Hall in Marshall requesting that the state stop the payment of U.S. bonds loaned to the Southern Pacific Railroad Company and then loaned to R.&D.G. Mills; a statement from Treasurer M.H. Royston regarding railroad bonds; and a set of resolutions regarding the enforcement of laws in an unnamed county.]
21. Correspondence, September 1-3, 1866
[Records include a letter from J.J. Cureton in Searsville requesting the organization of a military force to protect the frontier; a letter regarding the murder of Mr. Box in the city of Montague by Native Americans and requesting assistance with frontier protection; an affidavit from San Patricio County regarding the theft of a wagon; a letter from Major General Philip Sheridan in New Orleans regarding frontier protection and the removal of troops stationed throughout the state; and a letter from San Antonio regarding the disposition of troops sent to Bell County.]
22. Correspondence, September 4-7, 1866
[Records include a letter from Montague regarding the pursuit of a band of Native Americans responsible for the murder of Mr. Box; a letter from Sulphur Springs requesting aid in the arrest of Horatio Weaver, accused of murder; and a description of Horatio Weaver.]
23. Correspondence, September 8, 1866
24. Correspondence, September 9-11, 1866
25. Correspondence, September 12-13, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Heintzelman in San Antonio regarding the disposition of troops in Bell County; and a detailed letter from Major General Kiddoo of the Freedmen's Bureau.]
26. Correspondence, September 14-15, 1866
[Records include a letter regarding an outbreak of cholera among recruits en route to camp in Austin; a letter from the president of the National Bank of Texas in support of Major General Kiddoo; and a letter from Henry E. McCulloch regarding personal matters.]
27. Correspondence, September 16-18, 1866
[Records include a receipt for costs associated with the court case of State of Texas v. Rufus, a freedman.]
Box Folder
2014/061-2 28. Correspondence, September 19-20, 1866
[Records include a letter from Fort Worth reporting on conditions on the frontier; a letter from the county judge in Victoria regarding the military authorities guarding the jail; a letter from Fort Worth regarding individuals recovered from capture by Native Americans; subpoenas from Bell County in the case of State of Texas v. Jonathan Lindly and Lieutenant Carpenter; and a petition from citizens of Cooke County requesting the removal of D.W. Steadham as assessor of the U.S. internal revenue tax.]
29. Correspondence, September 20, 1866
[Records include an indictment from Bell County commanding the sheriff of Travis County to arrest Lieutenant Carpenter; a letter from Major General Sheridan in New Orleans regarding the arrest of certain soldiers in Brenham on charges of arson; and documents regarding the background of the Judge of the 11th Judicial District, William P. Bacon.]
30. Correspondence, September 21, 1866
[Records include statements from Gainesville regarding a dispute between a citizen and the assessor and collector for Cooke and Montague Counties; and a letter from Victoria forwarding affidavits regarding a dispute between a freedman soldier and another citizen of the town.]
31. Correspondence, September 22, 1866
[Records include letters from Cherokee in relation to murders and captives taken by Native Americans, and the condition of Native Americans on the reserve.]
32. Correspondence, September 23-25, 1866
[Records include a report from Lampasas County on Native American presence in the area.]
33. Correspondence, September 26-28, 1866
[Records include General Orders Number 5 from Major George W. Smith disbanding local armed guards and patrols; and a letter from W.J. Hutchins, president of the Houston and Texas Central Railway, regarding the funding for the completion of the railroad.]
34. Correspondence, September 29-30, 1866
[Records include a statement from El Paso regarding the commission of Judge Bacon; a letter from Major General Heintzelman regarding certain troops in San Antonio; and a report on a conflict between citizens of Gainesville County and U.S. officer Captain Steadham.]
35. Correspondence, October 1-2, 1866
[Records include letters from Major General Sheridan regarding the cavalry force authorized by the legislature for frontier protection and "the Brenham affair"; letters from Huntsville and Hillsboro offering companies for service on the frontier; and a letter from Brownsville protesting the stay of executions on legal judgments in the case of defaulted tax collections.]
36. Correspondence, October 3-4, 1866
[Records include a letter from Athens, Georgia in reference to an act of the Texas legislature providing artificial limbs for men injured in the war; an indictment from Freestone County for Virgil A. Bond in State of Texas v. Virgil A. Bond; a letter from El Paso regarding Judge Bacon, stating that he is a citizen of Mexico and ineligible to hold office; a letter from Judge Bacon regarding his certificate of election and the 1861 extradition treaty between the U.S. and Mexico; a letter from La Grange suggesting that the state turn to the federal government for support in the event of violence enacted by freedmen in the state; and a message from the governor to the Senate and House of Representatives vetoing a bill on the incorporation of Woodland College and regarding the sale of liquor near the college.]
37. Correspondence, October 6-8, 1866
[Records include an affidavit in the case of State of Texas v. Robert Anderson alias P. Edmonds; a letter to Captain J.B. Barry in Bosque County from Governor Throckmorton authorizing the raising of a company in Bosque, Erath, and Palo Pinto Counties, and a reply from Captain Barry stating that a company cannot be raised because not enough men in those counties are willing to serve without a draft; a letter from Gainesville reporting on conditions in the area, referencing Native American depredations; a letter from Mason on the disposition of a horse believed to be state property; a letter from Montague County offering a company of men for service on the frontier; a letter from the county officers of Guadalupe County involving the mistreatment of county records by Captain Craig; and a letter from the district attorney of the 13th Judicial District asking for assistance in arresting indicted citizen Virgil A. Bond who fled to New Orleans.]
38. Correspondence, October 9-11, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Sheridan regarding the volunteer force authorized by the Texas legislature for frontier protection; and a letter from Commissioner of the Office of Indian Affairs D.W. Cooley in Washington D.C. regarding the protection and subsistence of the Tonkawa.]
39. Correspondence, October 12, 1866
[Records include a letter from Greenville reporting on conditions on the frontier and discussing the need for protection; a detailed letter by John H. Reagan on topics including the reorganization of the state, the constitutional convention, suffrage for freedmen, and the condition of the state; and a resolution passed by the House of Representatives asking that the governor report on debt and liabilities of the railroad companies to the state.]
40. Correspondence, October 13-15, 1866
[Records include General Orders Number 44 from Assistant Adjutant General E.D. Townsend in Washington D.C. with regards to bringing crimes that have been neglected by civil authorities to trial; a letter from Assistant Adjutant General Townsend on recent presidential proclamations; and a letter to Major General Heintzelman and Governor Throckmorton from Major General Sheridan regarding the disposition of federal cavalry troops to Texas for frontier protection.]
41. Correspondence, October 16-18, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Sheridan regarding the disposition of federal cavalry troops to Texas for frontier protection, with reference to freedmen soldiers; a telegram from President Andrew Johnson in reference to civil rights for freedmen; and a letter from U.S. Secretary of State W.H. Seward on a scheme to bring freedmen to Peru to be sold into indentured service.]
42. Correspondence, October 19-20, 1866
[Records include a letter from U.S. Secretary of State Seward forwarding a warrant for pardon for Frederick Voight and Charles B. Stewart; a letter from General Ulysses S. Grant in Washington D.C. rejecting volunteers raised within the state for frontier defense; and a report on the election returns for a state representative for Dallas County.]
43. Correspondence, October 21-25, 1866
[Records include a letter requesting that a commission be granted for a Native American to obtain the release of captives of the Kiowas; a letter from Judge James G. Shephard in Brenham requesting the removal of Captain Smith; a letter from John W. Sansom in Bandera County accepting his commission to raise companies for frontier protection in Comal, Kendall, Kern, Bandera, and Edwards Counties; a letter from Comptroller Robards regarding the scholastic census; a letter from Major General Sheridan regarding the provision of cavalry troops to the frontier; and a letter from Governor Throckmorton to the Senate and House of Representatives recommending the relinquishment of state taxes for Calhoun County due to its impoverished condition.]
44. Correspondence, October 26-29, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Heintzelman on the movement of troops to the frontier; a letter from Secretary of State John A. Green in Austin to Judge Bacon asking that he send proof of his qualifications for office; a letter from Boston, Massachusetts regarding artificial limbs; a letter from Blanco describing Native American raids; a letter from J.P.C. Hambrick in San Saba accepting his commission to raise companies for frontier protection; a report of the Finance Committee; a letter from Galveston regarding the forcible release of certain prisoners of the county by the Freedmen's Bureau; and an order for the arrest of the defendants in the case of State of Texas v. Franklin Smith and William Stanley, freedmen.]
45. Correspondence, October 30-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from Matagorda enclosing the affidavit of Sherriff E.J. Inglehart; a letter from Matagorda County regarding charges against a freedwoman; a letter from Major General Heintzelman forwarding copies of the records of the office of George Boyd; a letter from Milam County regarding the election of congressional representatives; and a message from the governor to the Senate and House of Representatives on matters regarding freedmen.]
46. Correspondence, November 1-6, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Sheridan on the movement of additional troops to aid in frontier protection; a letter from the principal of Fort Worth High School on new educational systems being implemented; a letter from B.H. Epperson in Clarksville regarding certificates of election and a proposal to build a new railroad; a letter from U.S. Attorney General Henry Stanbery on orders issued to the military regarding the civil and military jurisdictions of the state; and a letter from Major General Sheridan containing orders for the disposition of troops for frontier protection.]
47. Correspondence, November 7-13, 1866
[Records include a letter from James B. Shaw in Galveston regarding state bonds taken to Europe; a letter from the superintendent of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville forwarding a list of names of freedmen and freedwomen incarcerated there; a letter from Austin in relation to the Asylum for the Blind; a letter from Governor Throckmorton to Major General Sheridan regarding indictments for Franklin Smith and William Stanley, freedmen, for the murder of William Walker, in the Victoria County district court; a letter from Major General Sheridan regarding the governor's orders to call up a volunteer force for frontier protection under an act of the Texas legislature; and a letter from Major General Heintzelman containing a copy of Special Orders Number 28 on the movement of troops.]
48. Correspondence, November 14-21, 1866
[Records include a letter from Captain Sansom in Hodges Mills asking for instructions on organizing a company of rangers; a letter from citizens in El Paso protesting their imprisonment by Chief Justice A.H. French; a telegram from the Houston and Texas Central Railroad Company asking to employ convicts from the State Penitentiary for railroad construction; a telegram from the W.C. Railroad Company asking to employ freedmen convicts for railroad construction; and a letter from Captain Sansom in Hodges Mills on organizing his company and the U.S. government's view of the state raising a company.]
49. Correspondence, November 22-26, 1866
[Records include letters from Joseph Dunlap of the Kansas Agency in Council Grove, Kansas regarding Mrs. James Luster, who escaped the Kiowa Native Americans, and requesting a receipt for captives delivered into Texas; a letter from Cunningham regarding the governor's aid in petitioning the governor of Illinois for the pardon of R.H. Jenkins; a letter from Van Zandt County asking whether someone who has failed to take the amnesty oath can bring suit against someone who has taken the oath; and a letter from Captain A.J. Young in Denton regarding the frontier service.]
50. Correspondence, November 28-29, 1866
[Records include a letter from D.C. Dickson, agent of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville, in relation to the examination of penitentiary papers; a letter from Captain C.R. Perry in Blanco on the organization of his company of frontier troops; a letter from W.C. Durand in San Antonio on the organization of his company of frontier troops; a letter from C.B. Pearre, district attorney of Waco, regarding murder charges against Doctor Grandison F. German; and a letter from Captain Charles Peters regarding his investigation of the murder of William Walker of Victoria, Texas.]
51. Correspondence, December 1-9, 1866
[Records include a statement made by William Ferguson in Cameron regarding a gang of horse thieves; a letter from District Attorney Pearre in Waco regarding the offer of reward for the arrest of certain criminals; a letter from Salado regarding a mob breaking into a jail in Belton and murdering prisoners; a letter from Major General Heintzelman surrendering his post as commander of the District of Texas to Major General Charles Griffin; a letter from U.S. Secretary of State Seward acknowledging the receipt of the Governor's letter on the legislature rejecting a proposed constitutional amendment; a statement from Belton relating to the mob attack on the Belton jail, including the murder of Lindley and son; a letter from D.V. Stapleton, principal of Mantua Seminary, advising the governor on the use of Mulkey's Phonetic System of Teaching; a letter from Major T.H. Starr in Austin refusing to aid in obtaining state artillery; and a partial letter reporting on conditions in the State Lunatic Asylum.]
52. Correspondence, December 11-15, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding depredations by the Kickapoo and the protection of the frontier; a letter from W.J. Hutchins, president of the Houston and Texas Central Railroad Company, in relation to the payment of state warrants toward interest on school debt; a letter from the Southern Pacific Railroad Company regarding the payment of interest; an affidavit by Dick Perkins regarding an assault against him by Mr. Darwin and Mr. Stracon; a letter from W.C. Philips in Prairie Lea on violence committed in the area, particularly against freedmen; a letter from General A.H.M. Taylor at the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding papers in the case against Franklin Smith and William Stanley; a statement from Belton relating to the mob attack on the Belton jail, including the murder of Lindley and son; letters from Gainesville on the frontier company; a letter from District Attorney Pearre in Waco forwarding an indictment for Grandison F. German for the murder of Newton P. Webb; and a letter from the State Penitentiary in Huntsville regarding convict labor.]
53. Correspondence, December 17-24, 1866
[Records include proceedings of a meeting of citizens in Belton County regarding the murders of the Lindleys; a letter from the Freedmen's Bureau in Austin on violence against freedmen in the area; a letter from General Taylor at the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding a murder in Washington County; a letter from U.S. Internal Revenue Collector Milton Stapp in Galveston regarding tax on cotton at the State Penitentiary; a letter from General Taylor at the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding holding Private Williams in custody; a letter from William M. Sledge at the W.C. Railroad Company in Chappell Hill regarding convict labor and interest due; and a certified copy of the warrant of commitment in the case of State of Texas v. Robert L. Anderson.]
54. Correspondence, December 24, 1866
[Records include proceedings of the case of State of Texas v. Robert L. Anderson in Rusk County on the charge of theft; and a letter from Judge Kennard in Houston regarding the adjournment of his court.]
55. Correspondence, December 27-29, 1866
[Records include a letter from the Houston and Texas Central Railroad Company concerning convict labor; a letter from Assistant Adjutant General Townsend in reference to the trial of the freedman Perkins; a letter from the sheriff of Gonzales County regarding the criminal William Tucker; and a letter from U.S. Treasury Secretary Hugh McCulloch regarding an act of the Texas legislature regarding the payment of direct tax owed by the state.]
56. Correspondence, December 30-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from La Grange regarding the number of guards used by the sheriff; a letter from Greenville in regard to an iron works; a letter from Concrete inquiring about obtaining public lands; a letter from Judge Ireland regarding the number of guards used by the sheriff; a letter from the S.P. Railroad Company regarding interest due to the state; and a letter from District Attorney Pearre in Waco charging William Isaacs with the murder of Sam King and Black Nash.]
Box Folder
2014/061-3 57. Correspondence, January 1-4, 1867
[Records include a letter from the B.B.B.&C. Railroad Company in Harrisburg regarding interest due to the state; a letter from the Office of Longstreet, Owen & Co. regarding a possible called session; a letter from Judge John J. Good in Dallas regarding a circular discussing guards for convicts; a letter from the county judge of Mason County regarding a debt owed to the State Lunatic Asylum; a letter from Major General Kiddoo in Galveston on various court cases involving freedmen and suspicions regarding freedmen performing military drills; a letter from S.M. Swenson regarding the engravings on state bonds; and a letter from Attorney General Walton in Galveston regarding a bond controversy involving bonds sent to England.]
58. Correspondence, January 5-7, 1867
[Records include a letter from State Agent Dickson at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville on the cost of clothing convicts; a letter from General Sturgis in Austin in regard to freedmen troops; and a letter from U.S. Treasury Secretary McCulloch regarding state cotton seized by the Treasury Department.]
59. Correspondence, January 8-11, 1867
[Records include a report by State Agent W.B. Coffee regarding his efforts in relation to state cotton in Washington; a typescript copy of a joint resolution of the State of Ohio ratifying the 14th Amendment; and a letter from the sheriff of Victoria County regarding Private Williams being turned over to civil authorities for trial.]
60. Correspondence, January 12-15, 1867
[Records include letters from Major General Griffin at the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding orders as to the operations of the 4th U.S. Cavalry, a report on Native Americans on the frontier, the breaking up of an encampment of Native Americans near Fort Clark, and a freedman in the custody of civil authorities; a letter from Major A.J. Hogan in Fort McIntosh reporting to Major General Griffin of attacking a group of bandits; and a letter from U.S. Treasury Secretary McCulloch regarding Governor Throckmorton's efforts to obtain the return of state bonds.]
61. Correspondence, January 16-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Kiddoo on the treatment of a freedmen accused of murder in Wharton; a letter from commissioner Black Davis on the accounts of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville; a letter from State Agent Dickson at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville reporting on affairs at the Penitentiary; letters from Waco to Major General Kiddoo reporting crimes against freedmen; and a letter from Erath County describing the burning of the county archives, in reference to a court case.]
62. Correspondence, January 21-23, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston giving the account of a scout sent from Jacksboro; an application for the establishment of a post office in Caddo; a letter from Major General Griffin regarding a murder in the area between Lavaca and Indianola; a letter from Waco regarding the arrest of John McCreary by A.F. Manning, an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau; a report from a scouting party in Fort Clarke; and a letter from the American Emigrant Company in New York asking for information on the State of Texas.]
63. Correspondence, January 24-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin requesting copies of laws and state or local publications related to education and schools in the state; a letter from a U.S. marshal in Champaign, Illinois regarding a reward for the return of criminal Newton Chance; letters from Major General Griffin in relation to justice for freedmen who were victims of violence in Waco and Port Sullivan; a letter from Lieutenant William A. Rafferty in Austin reporting on the treatment of U.S. soldiers, particularly freedmen soldiers; and a letter from Brigadier General J.P. Hatch in Fort Mason to General Taylor regarding locations for posts for U.S. soldiers.]
64. Correspondence, February 1-5, 1867
[Records include a letter from the president of the S.P. Railroad Company regarding interest due to the state; a letter from Major General Griffin regarding an report by Major A.J. Hogan of an encounter with a group of bandits; a letter from Missouri with a proposal to build factories in Texas; letters from Major General Griffin regarding captives held by Native Americans; and a letter from Waco regarding charges against Dr. Bell and John McCreary.]
65. Correspondence, February 6-9, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin reporting that U.S. troops have been stationed in Tyler to protect the court and citizens; a letter from Waco regarding charges against Dr. Bell and John McCreary; a letter from Judge M.D. Ector in Henderson regarding guards for the transport of convicts to the penitentiary; a letter to Lieutenant Manning from J.S. Kirkman asking that Dr. Bell and John McCreary be turned over to the civil authorities for trial; an official document from Davis County in which M.H. Alexander grants power of attorney to L.L. Tackit; a letter from the U.S. Secretary of State Seward in Washington regarding a bill filed in the English Court of Chancery relating to cotton sold to certain parties by agents of the Confederacy; and a letter regarding a plan to restore the Southern states to the Union.]
66. Correspondence, February 10-12, 1867
[Records include a typescript letter from Ashbel Smith regarding the National Militia Bill and the position of the Southern states in the United States; a letter from Charles F. Rand in Marshall to Lieutenant J.S. Kirkman regarding the refusal of civil authorities to care for orphans of freedmen; a letter from a police court in Washington County authorizing the governor to appoint a State Engineer and Superintendent of Public Works; and a letter from Judge W.R. Cowan of Lockhart regarding charges from Prairie Lea of mistreatment of freedmen.]
67. Correspondence, February 13-14, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding the case against Dr. Bell and John McCreary; a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding the establishment of a military post at Camp Colorado; a letter from Judge Beaumont in Indianola regarding the criminals Hays, Taylor and Clarke; a letter from J.D. Whitten in Wharton in regard to an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau; a letter from the S.P. Railroad Company in Marshall reporting on plans for the future of the railroad; a typescript letter from Ashbel Smith regarding the National Militia Bill and the position of the Southern states in the United States; and a letter from county Judge J.W. Veazey in Wharton County regarding the treatment of prisoners in jail.]
68. Correspondence, February 15-16, 1867
[Records include a letter from Governor Throckmorton in Austin to Brigadier General James Oakes regarding an encampment of Native Americans along the Concho River thought to be responsible for depredations in the area; a letter from Captain Charles F. Rand in Marshall to Lieutenant J.S. Kirkman complaining of a lack of action among the civil authorities in prosecuting crimes against freedmen; and a letter from Palestine regarding the building of machinery for the manufacture of iron.]
69. Correspondence, February 17-18, 1867
[Records include a letter from Guy M. Bryan recommending certain names to represent Texas at the World's Fair; and letters from Brigadier General Oakes regarding Native Americans along the Concho River and a post at Camp Colorado.]
70. Correspondence, February 19-23, 1867
[Records include a letter from Springfield, Illinois soliciting information on the state of Texas in order to write a book, Home for the Immigrant; a letter from Lavaca requesting the remission of a fine assessed by the court; a typescript copy of a joint resolution of the Michigan legislature ratifying the 14th Amendment; a letter from Judge W.B. Thompson in Hidalgo County regarding the lack of Native American depredations and crime in the area; and a letter from Governor Throckmorton to Thomas H. Dudley, U.S. consul in Liverpool, England, regarding a case in the Chancery Court of England.]
71. Correspondence, February 25-28, 1867
[Records include proceedings of a meeting of the Police Court in Harris County; resolutions of the mayor and city council of Houston regarding the construction of a railroad line between New Orleans and Houston; a letter from Galveston regarding the Paris Exhibition; a letter from Governor Throckmorton to U.S. Secretary of State Seward regarding his authorization of Thomas H. Dudley to represent Texas in the case of United States v. Prolean Frazer, Trenholm, et al. in the Chancery Court in Liverpool; a letter from Judge H. Tyler in Carthage regarding certain cases before the court; a letter from Governor Throckmorton to the chief justice of Panola County regarding certain persons' applications for special pardon; a letter from the office of the Texas and New Orleans Railroad Company in Houston requesting the appointment of a special engineer; a letter from Flint & Chamberlin in Waco regarding plans for an immigration agent to bring Norwegian laborers to the state; a letter from La Grange regarding the appointment of officers to dispose of school lands belonging to Fayette County; and a letter from Judge Samuel D. Gibbs in Smith County regarding conditions in the county.]
72. Correspondence, March 1, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston forwarding statements related to the murder of freedmen in Leon County; letters from Washington County Railroad in Chappell Hill regarding public perception and rumors about the railroad, and the movement of convict laborers along the road; a letter from J.B. Wheeler, county attorney for Travis County, regarding the shooting of two freedmen in the county; and a resolution from the State of Michigan ratifying the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.]
73. Correspondence, March 2-6, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston in regard to property captured from Native Americans on the frontier; a letter from the Texas and New Orleans Railroad Company asking for a statement on interest due on bonds; a petition for the removal of the Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port of Brazos Santiago; a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston reporting on conditions on the frontier; a letter from Seguin regarding several applications for special pardon; a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding the capture of a fugitive from justice; and a letter from State Agent Dickson at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville regarding tax on cotton manufactured there.]
74. Correspondence, March 7-10, 1867
[Records include a letter from county Judge A.S. Gardner in Centreville regarding the murder of freedmen; a letter from Comptroller Robards and the Auditorial Board regarding the payment of Captain Erath's company; a letter from the State Penitentiary at Huntsville applying for clemency for prisoner Newton Rosell; a letter to U.S. Treasury Secretary McCulloch from Commissioner E.A. Rollins regarding the affairs of the Texas Direct Tax Commission; a letter from William H. Clement in Tyler regarding his application for special pardon; and a letter from Bryan City to Comptroller Robards regarding the payment of court costs.]
75. Correspondence, March 11-13, 1867
[Records include a warrant in the case of State of Texas v. Robert Anderson alias R. Edmonds; a letter from Captain W.L. Smith, agent of the Brazos Branch Railroad, regarding convict laborers; letters from Lieutenant Henry B. Mellen reporting on an investigation of murders in Rock Creek and the theft of horses from ranches along the Brazos River; a report from the chief justice of Grayson County regarding the murder of freedmen and the general treatment of freedmen in the county; and letters from U.S. Treasury Secretary McCulloch regarding the Direct Tax Law and payment of the direct tax.]
76. Correspondence, March 14-23, 1867
[Records include a letter from Brenham regarding escaped convicts; an application for pardon from the State Penitentiary in Huntsville; a letter from the county clerk of Rusk County regarding the transcript for the case of State of Texas v. Robert L. Anderson; letters from the county judge of Harrison county regarding crimes committed by and against freedmen in the area, and the treatment of orphan children of freedmen; a letter from the county judge of Rusk County regarding the case of State of Texas v. Robert Anderson alias R. Edmonds; a letter from the county judge of Panola County regarding several applications for special pardon; and a letter from the state engineer in Gilmer regarding orders for the inspection of certain railroads.]
77. Correspondence, March 25-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major Starr in Jacksboro regarding reports of Native Americans on the headwaters of the Concho and Colorado Rivers; a letter from Marshall forwarding correspondence with an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau; a letter from the President of the H.T.&B. Railroad regarding debts owed; a request from Major General Griffin requesting a list of election districts in the state; a letter from the vice president of the T.&N.O. Railroad Company regarding the company's president, Colonel Gentry, in New Orleans; a letter from Brenham regarding escaped convicts; a letter from Major General Sheridan in New Orleans regarding the reorganization of the state under the authority of Major General Griffin; a letter from Captain Charles F. Rand, sub-assistant commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau, to O. Hendrick, county judge of Harrison County; and an extract from a letter from Prairie Lea describing an armed conflict between citizens and U.S. military forces.]
78. Correspondence, April 1-11, 1867
[Records include a letter from Lieutenant Colonel A.W. Evans in Waco regarding the murder of James Bishop in Bell County; a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston on registering voters in the state; a letter from Pilot Grove asking that a reward be set for the capture of Hugh Hudson, accused of murder; and letters from Major General Griffin in Galveston, including a request for a list of officers under Governor Hamilton and a discussion of the governor's cooperation with the military government.]
79. Correspondence, April 12-18, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston forwarding a letter from Waco regarding a murder; a statement from the citizens of DeWitt County regarding the murder of a freedman, Wintz, by Thomas Dodd; a letter from Marshall regarding investors in the railroads; a letter from Major General Griffin regarding the passage of a bill for the relief of the destitute in Southern states; a letter from Galveston regarding the record of U.S. Detective George P. Douglas; and a letter from the Sabine and Galveston Bay Railroad Company reporting that the president of the railroad, Colonel Gentry, remains in New Orleans.]
80. Correspondence, April 20-24, 1867
[Records include a letter from Brenham regarding convict laborers; a copy of Special Orders Number 66 from Major General Griffin regarding the appointment of state officials; a letter from Indianola applying for clemency in the assessment of a legal judgment; a letter from Captain James Emerson in Waco regarding a petition for papers related to a murder case; a letter from Brownsville regarding the Board of Pilot Commissioners for the Port of Brazos Santiago; and letters from Major General Griffin regarding incidents in the port of Prairie Lea and Caldwell County, and the relief of destitute persons in the state.]
81. Correspondence, April 25-29, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding miscarriages of justice in the courts of Parker and Jack Counties and calling on the governor to act; a report from the mayor of Navasota regarding the treatment of U.S. soldiers in the area; a letter from a justice of the peace in Black Jack Grove reporting an affray in which three men were killed; and a letter from Major General Griffin regarding Circular Number 13.]
82. Correspondence, May 1-4, 1867
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General Oakes in Austin regarding General Griffin and Colonel Starr; a letter from Galveston reporting an individual acting as branch pilot without a commission; a letter from Major General Griffin regarding the election of officers; and a letter from W.J. Anderson, president of the Southern Pacific Railroad, in New York reporting on railroad business.]
Box Folder
2014/061-4 83. Correspondence, May 5-7, 1867
[Records include a letter from Governor Throckmorton to Comptroller Robards regarding an expenditure of private funds in the course of public duties by an agent of the Tonkawa Native Americans; a letter from the clerk of the Calhoun County court regarding details of the case of State of Texas v. Louisa and Anna Maax; and letters from Major General Griffin regarding Circular Number 13.]
84. Correspondence, May 8-11, 1867
[Records include a letter from Lavaca forwarding information on the Maax case; a letter from Judge M.D. Ector in Henderson regarding the effect of Circular Number 13 on the organization of juries; a letter from Judge Good in Weatherford regarding a grand jury hearing; a letter from Gonzales County regarding the establishment of a school for freedmen's children; and a letter from Marshall regarding funds for the building of the Southern Pacific Railroad.]
85. Correspondence, May 12-14, 1867
[Records include a letter from W.J. Anderson, president of the Southern Pacific Railroad, in New York reporting on railroad business; a set of letters between Secretary of State Green in Austin and the county judge of Wilson County regarding vacant county offices; a letter from Lieutenant Colonel N. Prine at the Bureau of Civil Affairs in Galveston to Comptroller Robards regarding official appointments; a letter from M.W. Allen in McKinney reporting on land surveyed for sale; a letter from Judge Good in Dallas on a number of subjects related to the Parker and Tarrant County courts; a letter from Lieutenant S.C. Plummer at Prairie Lea to Judge Ireland ordering that certain trials be stayed pending word from Major General Griffin; and a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding a case before the Llano court alleged to be improper and malicious.]
86. Correspondence, May 15-17, 1867
[Records include a letter from the county judge of Brown County regarding voter registration; a letter from Waco regarding the sale of state property; a copy of Circular Number 16 from the District of Texas Headquarters in Galveston regarding voter registration; a letter from the Southern Pacific Railroad Company in Marshall regarding a conflict with Northern stockholders.]
87. Correspondence, May 18-20, 1867
[Records include a letter from the Southern Pacific Railroad Company in Marshall regarding interest owed to the school fund; a letter from George Taylor in Washington reporting on an action of the U.S. Supreme Court; a letter from Vicksburg regarding artificial limbs for veterans of the war; and a letter from Brigadier General Oakes in Austin regarding claims of property damage done by U.S. soldiers.]
88. Correspondence, May 20, 1867
[Records include a letter from John E. George in Danville regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from the Judge A.J. Hunter of Parker County regarding an investigation into charges against the county court; and a letter from E.W. Taylor, president of the H.T.&B. Railroad, in Houston regarding debt owed to the state.]
89. Correspondence, May 21-22, 1867
[Records include a letter from Judge Good in Fort Worth regarding the qualification of jurors under General Order Number 13; a petition from Grimes County asking that a reward be offered for the capture of Captain Hunt and Thomas Bingham for the murder of Sam Forest, a freedman; a letter from the Houston and Texas Central Railroad Company in Houston regarding debt owed to the state; an extract of a letter from the assistant assessor of internal revenue to Major General Griffin regarding banknotes given during the war; and a letter from the revenue collector in DeWitt County to Major General Griffin regarding the execution of legal judgments against debtors.]
90. Correspondence, May 23-24, 1867
[Records include a warrant from Grimes County for the arrest of Thomas Bingham and Captain Hunt in the murder of Sam Forest; a letter from attorney A.P. Wiley in Galveston regarding a disagreement about compensation owed to the sheriff of Cameron County for the transportation of convicts; a letter from Major General Griffin requesting records related to lands ceded to the federal government by Texas during or following the state's annexation; and a letter from James Gillespie, superintendent of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville refunding costs in the case of State of Texas v. John Bartlett, who was pardoned.]
91. Correspondence, May 24, 1867
[Records include a detailed statement from A.J. Hunter, county judge of Parker County, refuting charges of improper conduct against the county court, commissioners, and citizens of Parker and Jack Counties.]
92. Correspondence, May 25-27, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston regarding official appointments; a letter from the county judge of Harris County regarding the number of voters in the county; an order from Brigadier General Oakes dismissing the case of State of Texas v. Jonas Bergstrom; a typescript copy of Circular Number 17; and a letter from Anderson County asking for a reward to be set for the capture of the murderers of freedman Sam Forest.]
93. Correspondence, May 27-30, 1867
[Records include a letter from Castroville responding to news of a kidnapping in El Paso County; a letter from Major General Griffin regarding his orders in the case of J.G. McFarland; a letter from Judge Ireland in Lockhart forwarding certain military orders; a letter from Major General Griffin in Galveston forwarding a petition for the pardon of A.C. Pearl; and an act of the state legislature providing for elections in certain cases.]
94. Correspondence, June 1-8, 1867
[Records include a letter from U.S. Internal Revenue Collector Stapp regarding taxes due on cotton purchased by a state agent of the State Penitentiary; a letter from Springhill regarding the case of Jacob Mickler v. Susan Wilcox; a report of Native American depredations in Mason County; a letter from the county Judge W.B. Pace in Lampasas regarding outrages committed; a letter from the elected sheriff of Fannin County regarding the validity of his election; and a letter from Anderson County regarding the murder of a freedman.]
95. Correspondence, June 9-12, 1867
[Records include a letter from Waco requesting the remission of a fine for gambling; a letter from State Agent Dickson at the State Penitentiary in Huntsville regarding taxes assessed on cotton purchased by an agent of the State Penitentiary; a letter from Brigadier General Oakes in relation to prisoners from San Saba County; and a letter from E.M. Randall, agent of the Treasury Department in Washington D.C., regarding the direct tax.]
96. Correspondence, June 15-17, 1867
[Records include a letter from U.S. Internal Revenue Collector Stapp regarding taxes due on cotton purchased by a state agent of the State Penitentiary; a letter from Superintendent Gillespie of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville regarding convict labor for the Brazos Branch Railroad; a letter from M.W. Allen, U.S. agent, regarding his pay and an examination of lands in Cook County; a letter from Menard County on the state of affairs in the county; a letter from Seguin regarding the remission of fines; and a letter from the American Board of Immigration in Washington D.C. regarding immigration into the state.]
97. Correspondence, June 18-21, 1867
[Records include a letter from Concrete regarding the enforcement of laws on the collection of debt; and a letter from the adjutant general in Washington D.C. on records in reference to U.S. Detective George P. Douglas.]
98. Correspondence, June 22-25, 1867
[Records include a letter from W.J. Anderson, president of the Southern Pacific Railroad, regarding debt owed to the state; a letter from Houston regarding the possible sale of the Houston Tap and Brazoria Railroad; a letter from G.W. Carter, an attorney in Houston, regarding state accounts; and a letter from Governor Throckmorton to E.M. Randall, agent of the Treasury Department in Washington D.C, regarding a plan to tally taxes collected in the state.]
99. Correspondence, June 26-30, 1867
[Records include a letter from Major General Griffin requesting copies of the charters for certain railroads; a letter from Zapata County asking that official correspondence be communicated in Spanish; and a letter from U.S. Treasury Secretary McCulloch regarding payment for State Agent W.B. Coffee.]
100. Correspondence, July 1-5, 1867
[Records include a letter regarding certain groups of outlaws at large near Waco; a letter regarding a gun used in a murder in San Saba County; a letter from Post Oak regarding a petition for the remittance of certain fines; a letter from Tarrant County forwarding documents related to a murder; and a letter from the county judge of Menard County in relation to the organization of the county.]
101. Correspondence, July 6-12, 1867
[Records include a letter from the State Engineer in Kaufman regarding communication between himself and the governor; a letter from Major General Griffin forwarding copies of Circular Orders Numbers 12, 14, 16, 19, and 20; a letter from a citizen in Spring Creek protesting the sale of his land to pay taxes owed; a letter from McCulloch County reporting on Native American depredations in the area; and a letter from Brenham requesting that a reward be offered to capture an accused murderer.]
102. Correspondence, July 16-22, 1867
[Records include a letter from Captain Smith, state agent of the Brazos Branch Railroad, regarding the escape of a convict; a letter from Brigadier General Oakes in Austin regarding a request for military escort; and a note from the Texas Express Company forwarding $230 in silver from J.H. Brown to B.A. Shephard Co.]
103. Correspondence, July 23-31, 1867
[Records include a letter from William G. Webb in La Grange withdrawing as attorney in the case of M.A. Wygal and R.A. Clark v. the State Treasurer; a letter from Captain Smith, State Agent of the Brazos Branch Railroad, regarding collections; a document in which R.A. Guffee grants power of attorney to C.R. Johns; a letter from Crockett protesting the appointment of Judge L.M. Cooper of the Ninth District; expense account of Captain Smith, state agent of the Brazos Branch Railroad, for June 1867; a report on the condition of the Institution for the Instruction of the Deaf and Dumb in Austin by the trustees of that institution; and a report on business conducted by the General Land Office in Austin.]
104. Correspondence, August 1, 1867
[Records include a report on the condition of the State Institution for the Education of the Blind in Austin; a report on the actions of the Auditorial Board in Austin; and a report from Secretary of State Green in Austin on the actions of his department.]
105. Correspondence, August 3-25, 1867
[Records include telegrams from Captain Smith, state agent of the Brazos Branch Railroad, reporting on a debt to be collected; a detailed report on the records and debts of the former Military Board by George J. Durham, accountant of the Military Board; a report on the Labor Board in Austin; expense accounts of State Agent Captain Smith; a letter from State Agent John W. Brown in Brenham regarding collections on debt; a letter from State Agent Captain Smith regarding payment for the transportation of convicts; a letter from Superintendent Gillespie of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville regarding convicts turned over to Captain Smith; and a report from the Board of Registration in Coryell County describing the holders of various county offices.]
106. Correspondence, October 1867
107. Correspondence, November 1867
[Records include a letter from the office of the Merchants' Union Law Company in New York requesting a list of the names and terms of office of executive, judicial, and county officers in Texas.]
108. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from Liverpool, England in reference to a circular on immigration to the state.]
109. Correspondence, undated
110. Correspondence, undated
111. Correspondence, undated
112. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a set of resolutions passed in an unnamed county.]
113. Correspondence, undated