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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Biographical Sketch

Scope and Contents of the Records

Arrangement of the Records

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records, 1865-1866,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton:

An Inventory of Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton Records at the Texas State Archives, 1865-1866



Overview

Creator: Texas. Governor (1865-1866 : Hamilton)
Title: Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records
Dates: 1865-1866
Abstract: The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Andrew Jackson Hamilton served as governor from 1865 to 1866. Records of Governor Hamilton's term in office relate to the aftermath of the Civil War, the beginning of Reconstruction, and the Constitutional Convention of 1866. Types of records are correspondence, petitions, circulars, telegrams and clippings, dating from May 1865 to November 1866.
Quantity: 3.5 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish, French, and German throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state, elected by the citizens every four years. The duties and responsibilities of the governor include serving as commander-in-chief of the state's military forces; convening special sessions of the legislature for specific purposes; delivering to the legislature at the beginning of each regular session a report on the condition of the state, an accounting of all public money under the governor's control, a recommended biennial budget, an estimate of the amounts of money required to be raised by taxation, and any recommendations he deems necessary; signing or vetoing bills passed by the legislature; and executing the laws of the state.

The office of the governor of the state of Texas was created by the Texas Constitution of 1845. It superseded the office of the president of the Republic of Texas upon the annexation of Texas by the United States. The 1845 Constitution defined the term of office as two years, with no more than four years served in a six-year period. The governor was required to be thirty years old at minimum, a U.S. citizen, and a Texas resident for at least three years (Article V, Section 4).

The Constitution outlined a number of powers held by the governor of Texas. The governor acted as the commander-in-chief of the army, navy, and militia of the state unless they were transferred into service under the federal government (Article V, Section 6). He could call up a state militia to "execute the laws of the State to suppress insurrections, and to repel invasions" (Article VI, Section 4). The governor made recommendations to the legislature and provided written information on the state of the government (Article V, Section 9). He could also convene the legislature when necessary and adjourn the legislature in the case of a disagreement between the House and Senate (Article V, Section 8). The governor had the power to grant reprieves and pardons in criminal cases except those of treason or impeachment, and to approve or disapprove bills, orders, resolutions, or votes from the legislature (Article V, Sections 11, 17 and 18). The governor also appointed supreme and district court judges and an attorney general with the consent of two-thirds of the Senate (Article IV, Sections 5 and 12).

The 1845 Constitution also created the office of secretary of state, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate for the governor's term of service. The secretary of state worked closely with the governor, and was required to "keep a fair register of all official acts and proceedings of the governor" (Article V, Section 16). The Constitution called for the election of a lieutenant governor at the time of the governor's election with the same qualifications and term of office, but to be voted for separately by electors. The lieutenant governor served as president of the Senate and could cast a deciding vote in ties, as well as take on the governor's powers in his absence or until a new governor was elected and qualified or the previous governor was able to resume office (Article V, Section 12). In addition, it further called for the biennial election of a state treasurer and comptroller of public accounts by the legislature, with vacancies to be filled by the governor (Article V, Section 23). However, a constitutional amendment in 1850 allowed the public election of the state treasurer and comptroller.

The constitutional language defining the office of the governor changed marginally with the Texas Constitution of 1861, which was written when Texas seceded from the United States to join the Confederate States at the onset of the Civil War. The 1861 Constitution replaced mention of the United States with the Confederate States, removed a requirement for U.S. citizenship for Texas governors, raised the governor's salary, and set a date for the governor and lieutenant governor to take office after an election.

The Constitution of 1866 arose out of the Constitution of 1861 with certain amendments made during the Constitutional Convention of 1866. These amendments were intended to bring the Texas constitution back into compliance with United States law. The Constitution of 1866 made minor alterations to the office of the governor, extending his term of office to four years with no more than eight years served in a 12-year period, and increasing his salary to $4,000 annually. He was also granted the power of the item veto on appropriations and to convene the legislature outside of the state capital if necessary.

Another constitutional convention took place in 1868-1869 under the Reconstruction Acts of 1867, ultimately producing the Constitution of 1869. It affected the office of the governor by again raising the governor's salary, this time to $5,000 annually, and giving the governor the right to appoint the attorney general and secretary of state, with the other state offices being appointed by election.

(Sources: Texas Constitution of 1845, Texas Constitution of 1861, and Texas Constitution of 1866, all online at the Tarlton Law Library; S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1845", Walter L. Buenger, "Constitution of 1861", and S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1866", Handbook of Texas Online, all accessed on February 20, 2014.)

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Biographical Sketch

Andrew Jackson Hamilton, also known as "Colossal Jack", served as governor of Texas from June 17, 1865 to August 9, 1866. Hamilton was born on January 28, 1815 in Alabama. He left in 1846 to practice law in La Grange, Texas. Governor Peter Hansbrough Bell appointed Hamilton attorney general in 1849, and he was elected state representative from Travis County in 1851 and 1853. After briefly considering the Know-Nothing party, Hamilton was elected to the U.S. Congress in 1859 as an Independent. In 1861 Hays, Travis, and Bastrop counties elected him to the state senate, but Hamilton refused to take the oath to the Confederacy and left the state in 1862. President Abraham Lincoln named him military governor of Texas, with headquarters at federally-occupied New Orleans and Brownsville.

In 1865, President Andrew Johnson confirmed Hamilton as provisional governor. Among the problems faced were Native American incursions, general lawlessness, chaotic finances, and the huge number of freedmen, emancipated since June 19, whom he advised to work hard and acquire property. He criticized the Constitutional Convention, which met in early 1866, for its reluctance to grant black suffrage. Hamilton chose not to run for governor in the 1866 election, but supported E.M. Pease, who lost to James W. Throckmorton. Hamilton did not finish his term, but turned the governor's office over to the secretary of state while he went to Philadelphia to fight President Johnson's plan for Reconstruction. After General Philip Sheridan removed Governor Throckmorton and the Texas Supreme Court, General J.J. Reynolds named Hamilton to the Supreme Court. In the Constitutional Convention of 1868-1869, and again in the gubernatorial election of 1869, A.J. Hamilton ran against the leader of the Radical Republicans, E.J. Davis. Having alienated General Reynolds, who threw his support behind Davis, Hamilton lost the election by a narrow margin. In 1871 Hamilton participated in the anti-Davis Non-Partisan Taxpayers' Convention. He died in Austin on April 11, 1875.

(Source: James A. Marten, "Hamilton, Andrew Jackson", Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on February 13, 2014.)

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Scope and Contents of the Records

The governor of Texas is the chief executive officer of the state elected by citizens every four years. Andrew Jackson Hamilton served as governor from 1865 to 1866. Records of Governor Hamilton's term as governor relate to the aftermath of the Civil War, the beginning of Reconstruction, and the Constitutional Convention of 1866. Types of records are correspondence, petitions, circulars, telegrams, and clippings, dating from May 1865 to November 1866. Although the majority of the records are incoming letters, several outgoing letters are found. Included with the general letters of inquiry are numerous applications and recommendations for appointments to offices, requests for removals from office, inquiries concerning amnesty, petitions for special pardons, letters relating to the election of delegates to the Constitutional Convention, reports of conditions in various counties, reports of lawlessness and Native American depredations, letters relating to the business of the railroads, letters relating to the sale and seizure of Confederate cotton, inquiries concerning the rights and treatment of freedmen and general reflections on secession, the Civil War, and the future of the state. Prominent correspondents include Major Generals H.G. Wright and Philip H. Sheridan; State Agents E.M. Pease, Swante Palm, and W.B. Coffee; U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward; J.W. Throckmorton; George W. Paschal; S.M. Swenson; and J.W. Magoffin.

Certain types of correspondence that appear consistently and frequently throughout the records have been omitted from the folder level description, including records related to appointments and removals of civil officials and the taking of oaths of office, general letters of introduction, and correspondence that acknowledges or inquires about the receipt of other correspondence. Some of the descriptions of individual items were taken directly from notes made on the back of the records, likely by a secretary around the same time that the letters were received.

In the past, many items relating to the State Penitentiary in Huntsville were removed from the records of governors, secretaries of state, treasurers and comptrollers to create an artificial collection of records relating to the penitentiary. Items related to railroads and Native American affairs may have also been removed from the records. In addition, the original order of the records was disrupted when they were sorted by date. As a result, letters or petitions that were enclosures of other letters may have been separated from their original context.

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Arrangement of the Records

Arrangement is chronological; letters having no specific day date have been placed at the end of the month. Undated letters are located at the end of the correspondence.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

None.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Hamilton, Andrew Jackson, 1815-1875.
Throckmorton, J. W. (James Webb), 1825-1894.
Wright, Horatio Gouverneur, 1820-1899.
Pease, E. M. (Elisha Marshall), 1812-1883.
Palm, Swante, 1815-1899.
Seward, William Henry, 1801-1872.
Paschal, George W. (George Washington), 1812-1878.
Sheridan, Philip Henry, 1831-1888.
Swenson, S. M. (Svante Magnus), 1816-1896.
Magoffin, James Wiley, 1799-1868.
Corporate Names:
Texas. Office of the Governor.
Texas. Constitutional Convention (1866).
Texas. State Penitentiary at Huntsville.
United States. Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands.
Subjects:
Governors--Texas.
Secession--Texas.
Reconstruction--Texas.
Freedmen--Texas.
Cotton trade--Texas.
Indians of North America--Texas--Wars.
Railroads--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Politics and government--1865-1950.
Texas--Officials and employees--Selection and appointment.
Texas--Frontier troubles.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Governors--1865-1866.
Petitions--Texas--Governors--1865-1866.
Telegrams--Texas--Governors--1865-1866.
Circulars--Texas--Governors--1865-1866.
Clippings--Texas--Governors--1865-1866.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State, Executive record books, 1835-1917, 14 reels of microfilm.
Texas Applications for special pardons, 1865-1867, 3 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Reconstruction records, 1865-1873, undated, 7.87 cubic ft.
Records relating to the Penitentiary, 1846-1921, undated, 87.85 cubic ft.
Records relating to Indian affairs, 1825-1957, bulk 1825-1880, 3.62 cubic ft.
Records relating to Railroads, 1836-1950, undated, bulk [ca. 1880]-[ca. 1910], 9.4 cubic ft.
Texas Legislature Memorials and petitions, 1836-1937. [There is no finding aid for this unprocessed collection.]
Dolph Briscoe Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
Andrew Jackson Hamilton papers, 1847-1913, 1 ft. 3 in.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Texas Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2014/042

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by an unknown agency during the 20th century. An accession number was assigned for control purposes on November 3, 2013.

Processing Information

Processed by State Archives staff, June 1984

Finding aid updated by Tonia J. Wood, November 1995

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tonia J. Wood, March 2001

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the style sheet v1to02.xsl, July 22, 2003

Additional subject description and finding aid made DACS compliant by Caitlin Burhans, February 2014

Corrections and additional DACS revisions by Aditi Worcester, May 2014

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Detailed Description of the Records

 

Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton records, 1865-1866,
3.5 cubic ft.

Box Folder
2014/042-1 1. Correspondence, May 1865
[Records include a letter from Mankato, Minnesota regarding conditions in Texas and voting rights for freedmen; and a letter from a prisoner of war in Johnson's Island, Ohio, requesting an order for his release.]
2. Correspondence, June 1865
[Records include a letter on creating press coverage for the evils of secession; a letter concerning men loyal to the Union in Texas; a letter regarding a meeting of citizens in Houston and on A.J. Hamilton's appointment as governor; a letter from a German Texan loyalist to the Union requesting transportation back to San Antonio; and a letter from W.P. Ballinger regarding a cancelled trip to Washington.]
3. Correspondence, July 1-15, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding the sentiments of the people of the northern counties toward secession and the war; a letter from John Steiner, superintendent of the Texas State Lunatic Asylum, reporting on finances and requesting assistance; a letter relating to the return of the Kickapoo to their home in Texas; a letter from A.A. Deavalon regarding Confederate sentiments of citizens in and around Corpus Christi; a letter warning of disloyal men seeking appointments; and proceedings from the Bexar County court regarding the payment of taxes by transient persons in the county.]
4. Correspondence, July 16-20, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding a public reception for Governor Hamilton in Travis County; and a letter containing resolutions produced by a meeting of the citizens of Belton.]
5. Correspondence, July 21-23, 1865
[Records include a recommendation for a special pardon for Colonel W.J. Hutchins.]
6. Correspondence, July 24-25, 1865
[Records include a letter from Bonham congratulating the governor on his new position and reporting on conditions in the area; letter from R.G. Laughlin, provost marshal of the East District, turning over records of the U.S. and Confederate District Court; and a letter from the clerk of the Galveston County court, reporting on records and office furniture in his possession.]
7. Correspondence, July 26, 1865
[Records include a letter from Houston regarding a special pardon for T.W. House; a letter inviting Governor Hamilton to a public dinner in Houston; a letter from Dudley Randall in relation to the officers of the State Penitentiary in Huntsville; and a letter from Houston regarding a special pardon for Colonel W.J. Hutchins.]
8. Correspondence, July 27, 1865
[Records include a letter from Houston regarding Colonel J.D. Weeters' petition for a pardon; a letter from K.B. Debray in Houston regarding his rank in the Confederate Army; a letter from J.R. Morris on the governor's role in directing the future of the state; and a letter from San Antonio regarding the treatment of freedmen, widows and orphans.]
9. Correspondence, July 28, 1865
[Records include letters from the sheriff, county clerk, district clerk, and chief justice of Washington County reporting on the records of their offices.]
10. Correspondence, July 29, 1865
[Records include a petition from the frontier counties requesting federal protection from Native American raids and lawlessness; a letter from the treasurer of Washington County reporting on the records of his office; a letter from a Philadelphia land agent hoping to sell land in southern states to northerners; and a letter from Major General Gordon Granger on being replaced.]
11. Correspondence, July 30, 1865
[Records include a letter from Ferdinand Flake regarding the appointment of officers in Galveston; and a form for the surrender of a prisoner of war belonging to the Trans-Mississippi Department under General E. Kirby Smith to Major General Edward Canby.]
12. Correspondence, July 31, 1865
[Records include a letter from John S. Besser regarding the condition of the State Penitentiary and his previous tenure there as financial agent; proceedings of a public meeting in Austin regarding a reception for the governor; and a petition for the protection of federal troops from outlaws in Angelina County.]
13. Correspondence, August 1, 1865
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Austin County reporting on the records of his office; and an inventory of soldiers' families receiving support in Austin County.]
14. Correspondence, August 1, 1865
[Records include petitions from Angelina County requesting federal protection from outlaws.]
15. Correspondence, August 2, 1865
[Records include letters from the county clerks of McLennan and Bexar counties reporting on the records of their individual offices.]
16. Correspondence, August 3, 1865
[Records include a letter from Mrs. M.L. Poland asking that the governor make more positive mention of the Southern people in his speeches.]
17. Correspondence, August 4, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding the records of a justice of the peace in Liberty County; an extract from General Order Number 9 from headquarters in the Port of Galveston; and a letter from the State Penitentiary asking for assistance in conducting a full report of its condition and operations.]
18. Correspondence, August 4, 1865
[Records include a letter from J.W. Throckmorton recommending the special pardon of Brigadier General Ross, likely Lawrence Sullivan Ross; a letter from the Matagorda County Union League warning of secessionists who may be seeking appointments to public offices; a letter from Wharton County regarding the future of freedmen in the state; and a letter from the clerk of the district court of Lavaca County reporting on the records of his office.]
19. Correspondence, August 5, 1865
[Records include a letter from the clerk of the district court of Fayette County reporting on the records of his office per General Order Number 11; and a letter regarding J.S. Rains' application for special pardon.]
20. Correspondence, August 5-6, 1865
[Records include a letter from a committee in Blanco County organized to confer with the governor on the theft of horses and depredations by Native Americans; a letter from Bastrop regarding the administration of an estate that was seized by Confederate authorities; a letter from Loren Kent in Galveston discussing General Order Number 9; and a copy of General Order Number 1 from New Orleans.]
21. Correspondence, August 7, 1865
[Records include a petition from Washington County asking that the collection of taxes by the United States be suspended due to the destitution of the people there; a petition from Travis County protesting the levying of an extra tax on liquor; a letter from New Braunfels describing conditions during the war and discussing appointments; a letter from the former sheriff of Fayette County reporting on the records of his office; and a letter from the chief justice of Washington County reflecting on the future of the state.]
22. Correspondence, August 7, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding compensation from the federal government for the burning of bales of cotton; and a letter from Fredericksburg regarding the need for financial provisions for prisoners and on raising a company of men to protect against depredations in the area.]
23. Correspondence, August 8, 1865
[Records include a letter from San Antonio regarding a group of Unionists making recommendations for appointments; and a letter from Huntsville offering knowledge of conditions and people in the area.]
Box Folder
2014/042-2 24. Correspondence, August 8, 1865
[Records include a letter from the former treasurer of Fayette County reporting on the records and funds of his office; and a letter from J.M. Brown regarding his request for a special pardon.]
25. Correspondence, August 8, 1865
[Records include a report from the chief justice of Trinity County; a newspaper clipping from Austin County in relation to the first raising of a U.S. flag in Texas after the war's end; and a letter from Travis County regarding the theft of Confederate cotton.]
26. Correspondence, August 9, 1865
[Records include a letter from Lockhart asking that state troops be called to defend against depredations by Native Americans; a letter from Major General Stanley regarding the establishment of a postal route from Indianola to San Antonio; a letter from R.W. Johnson regarding his request for special pardon; and a letter from Jack County discussing Native American troubles on the frontier.]
27. Correspondence, August 9, 1865
[Records include a typescript letter from Lockhart asking that state troops be called to defend against depredations by Native Americans; a typescript letter from Jack County discussing Native American troubles on the frontier; and a letter from Hermann Seele discussing the selection of government officials and the formation of the Constitutional Convention.]
28. Correspondence, August 10, 1865
[Records include a letter cautioning the governor about food or drink sent to him by non-Unionists; letter from the commander of a post in Austin containing a list of prisoners brought from Burnet; a letter from the State Department in Washington requesting a report on the measures taken to encourage immigration to Texas; and a letter from New Braunfels accompanying a box of fruit given to the governor.]
29. Correspondence, August 10, 1865
[Records include a letter from a justice of the peace in Austin County reporting on the records of his office; a petition from Burnet and Williamson Counties for a weekly mail route; and a letter from Matagorda listing known secessionists and Unionists in the area.]
30. Correspondence, August 11, 1865
[Records include a letter from Independence requesting an appeal from the governor on behalf of prisoner Colonel W.B. Lowry; a letter from a notary public and justice of the peace in Austin County reporting on the records of his office; a letter from F.S. Stockdale regarding the purchase of copies of Paschal's Digest; a letter from Lockhart on the raising of the United States flag at the county court; a letter from Williamson County regarding the release of two prisoners; and a letter from the clerk of the district court in Hays County reporting on the records of his office.]
31. Correspondence, August 12, 1865
[Records include an inventory of letters regarding cotton delivered to the governor; and a report from Austin of specie found in the state treasury and elsewhere.]
32. Correspondence, August 12, 1865
[Records include a letter from Jack County discussing the treatment of secessionists and disloyal men in the future; a letter from Houston on a proclamation issued and appointments made by the governor; and a letter from Waxahachie describing conditions in the area and offering aid.]
33. Correspondence, August 13-14, 1865
[Records include a letter from the district clerk of Tarrant County reporting on the records of his office; a letter from Independence regarding the confiscation of property; and a letter from George C. Red consulting on the future of the state.]
34. Correspondence, August 14, 1865
[Records include a letter from the treasurer for Lavaca County reporting on the records and funds of the treasury; a letter from Upshur County protesting appointments recommended in a public meeting; a letter from Montgomery from a former slaveholder with questions regarding freedmen; and a letter from Major General H.G. Wright taking command of the Department of Texas.]
35. Correspondence, August 14, 1865
[Records include a letter from the home guard companies of Comal County on the raising of these companies and their purpose; and a letter from Ferdinand Flake in Galveston on the publication of official proclamations and appointments.]
36. Correspondence, August 15, 1865
[Records include a letter from Galveston from the office of an agent of the treasury department regarding the collection of county assessor records and tithes; and a letter from the treasurer of Austin County reporting on records and funds of the treasury.]
37. Correspondence, August 15, 1865
[Records include letters from J.E. Harrison in Waco and J.D. Giddings in Austin concerning applications for special pardon.]
38. Correspondence, August 15, 1865
[Records include a letter from Austin on appointing an agent to sell state property; a letter recommending John A. Winn for special pardon; a letter from the clerk of the county court in Tarrant County reporting on records of his office; and a letter from San Antonio written in German.]
39. Correspondence, August 16, 1865
[Records include a petition from Fayette County protesting the appointment of E. Henkel as a justice of the peace; and a letter from Governor Hamilton appointing commissioners to investigate cotton or other property transferred to Governor Murrah.]
40. Correspondence, August 16, 1865
[Records include a letter from Huntsville advising on the reorganization of the state; a copy of the coroner's inquest from the shooting death of a freedman; a letter from Kaufman County protesting the appointment of certain office holders in the county; and a letter from the chief justice of Hays County in relation to indictments for murder.]
41. Correspondence, August 17, 1865
[Records include a letter requesting assistance in arresting individuals who murdered a man acquitted of treason in McLennan County; and a letter from M.H. Beaty in Gonzales County applying for special pardon and the office of sheriff.]
42. Correspondence, August 18, 1865
[Records include a letter from Bonham regarding a special pardon; a letter from Round Top relating to the assessment of cotton tithes by the Confederate states; and a letter regarding the president's amnesty proclamation as it applies to crops.]
43. Correspondence, August 18, 1865
[Records include a letter from U.S. Secretary of the Interior James Harlan sending copies of the president's amnesty proclamation and proclamation appointing provisional governors; a letter from the chief justice of Fayette County regarding the records and funds of his office; letters from Georgetown regarding lawlessness in the area and the administration of the amnesty oath, and a related letter from Bonham referring to the amnesty oath; and a letter from W.F. McLean of New Orleans in relation to his use of the governor as a reference for his business as a purchasing agent.]
44. Correspondence, August 19, 1865
45. Correspondence, August 20, 1865
[Records include a letter from New Braunfels written in German; a letter from Marshall requesting support in the development of manufacturing; and a letter from Melinda Rankin regarding her right to the property for her female seminary.]
46. Correspondence, August 20, 1865
[Records include a letter from San Antonio on the administration of the amnesty oath; a letter from Throckmorton on conditions in the frontier counties, including depredations by Native Americans and crimes committed; and a letter from Palestine regarding the raising of regiments for service on the frontier.]
47. Correspondence, August 21, 1865
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector of state and county taxes in Fayette County reporting on funds of the county and records of his office; a letter regarding the application of the amnesty oath in Brownsville; and a letter regarding exclusion from the amnesty oath.]
Box Folder
2014/042-3 48. Correspondence, August 21, 1865
[Records include a letter relative to W.R. Cowan's application for a special pardon; and a letter from the former sheriff of Austin County regarding the records of his office.]
49. Correspondence, August 22, 1865
[Records include a letter from Richmond regarding attitudes toward freedmen and the administration of the amnesty oath; a letter from Dallas County advocating the suppression of "drinking houses"; and a letter from the editor and proprietor of The News, a newspaper in Jefferson, asking for assistance with public printing.]
50. Correspondence, August 23, 1865
[Records include a letter from Georgia requesting information about outrages committed in Confederate Texas for a publication; a letter from a district attorney in San Antonio in relation to salary owed; and a letter from Marion County discussing the governor's speech in Houston.]
51. Correspondence, August 24, 1865
[Records include a letter from Smith County commenting on displeasure with appointments made in Harris and Cherokee Counties; and a letter recommending applications for special pardon by Simeon Hart, J.H. Hatch, and Dunham D. Withers.]
52. Correspondence, August 25, 1865
[Records include letters from the Assessor and Collector, and Justice of the Peace of Washington County reporting on the records of their offices; and a report by E.M. Pease and Swante Palm in relation to property owned by a works in Van Zandt County.]
53. Correspondence, August 26, 1865
[Records include papers related to the court case, State of Texas v. Captain William Banta; a letter from C.C. Andrews in Memphis on various topics, including a mention of the governor's speech in the Chicago Tribune, U.S. government policies, and freedmen; a letter from a freedman in Burnet County regarding a robbery; a letter objecting to the appointment of Richard Coke as a district judge in McLennan County; a letter from Brazos County cautioning against the reappointment of existing county officials; and a letter from U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward requesting that the governor designate newspapers in which to publish United States laws passed since March 3, 1861.]
54. Correspondence, August 27-28, 1865
[Records include a letter from DeWitt County questioning recommendations made for county appointments.]
55. Correspondence, August 28, 1865
[Records include a letter from Livingston regarding the state of affairs in that area.]
56. Correspondence, August 29, 1865
[Records include a letter from E.M. Pease and Swante Palm concerning a transaction involving U.S. bonds between the former Military Board and George White and John Chiles; a letter from Colonel J.L. Haynes regarding his regiment, the First Texas Cavalry, being released from service; affidavits regarding cases of murder, robbery, and imprisonment in Blanco County; and petitions from Wise County protesting the appointment of Daniel Howell as chief justice.]
57. Correspondence, August 29, 1865
[Records include a petition from Wise County protesting the appointment of Daniel Howell as chief justice; a letter from acting Surgeon General of the Army C.H. Crane to U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward regarding cholera outbreaks reported by the U.S. legation in Constantinople and recommended quarantine regulations; and a letter protesting the appointment of S.R. Perry as sheriff of Harrison County.]
58. Correspondence, August 30, 1865
[Records include a letter from Captain T.S. Post regarding threats against Union men making recommendations for appointments in Brenham; a letter from a special agent of the state regarding the seizure of cotton as state property; and a letter from Parker County enclosing copies of petitions for protection against depredations by Native Americans.]
59. Correspondence, August 31, 1865
[Records include a report from E.M. Pease and Swante Palm regarding payment of the former chief clerk of the office of the treasurer; and a report from E.M. Pease and Swante Palm regarding state property in the possession of Edward Burleson.]
60. Correspondence, August 1865
[Records include a petition from Collin County requesting the removal of Leonidas M. Martin as chief justice, J.M. Benge as county clerk, and other officers.]
61. Correspondence, August 1865
[Records include a petition from Fayette County protesting the appointment of E. Henkel as justice of the peace.]
62. Correspondence, August 1865
[Records include a letter from Nathaniel Hart Davis in Montgomery County on conditions in the county and the future of the state.]
63. Correspondence, August 1865
[Records include a letter from Cass County in support of the governor's speech in Houston.]
64. Correspondence, September 1, 1865
[Records include an executive order to the sheriff of Travis County for the seizure of liquor; a letter from Independence regarding two murders; a letter from G.H. Giddings in San Antonio regarding possession of state bonds; and a letter from the Department of State regarding quarantine measures to prevent the spread of cholera.]
65. Correspondence, September 2, 1865
[Records include a letter from Bastrop County complaining of the board elected to administer the amnesty oath; a letter from a board member in Bastrop County regarding payment for administrating the amnesty oath; and resolutions from a public meeting in Grimes County in reference to the restoration of civil government in the county.]
66. Correspondence, September 3, 1865
[Records include a letter from the Mayor's office in San Antonio on the vacancy of the mayoralty; and a letter from I.A. Paschal in San Antonio on behalf of G.H. Giddings.]
67. Correspondence, September 4, 1865
[Records include a statement from Tarrant County regarding the association of Judge R.W. Scott with a woman of ill repute; a letter from Galveston from George W. Paschal on bringing a suit upon the bond of a bonded officer who was robbed; a letter from the chief justice of Bexar County regarding the resignation of the mayor in San Antonio; a letter from a Justice of the Peace in Colorado County regarding the execution of the sentences of four freedmen convicted of theft; and a letter regarding the relocation of the post office in Mason County.]
68. Correspondence, September 5-6, 1865
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Blanco County regarding the administration of the amnesty oath; a petition from Parker, Jack and Wise Counties in reference to Unionist sentiment in those counties; a statement from Tarrant County regarding the association of Judge R.W. Scott with a woman of ill repute; and a letter from Bosque County regarding outrages committed upon freedmen.]
69. Correspondence, September 7, 1865
[Records include a statement from Tarrant County regarding the association of Judge R.W. Scott with a woman of ill repute.]
70. Correspondence, September 8, 1865
[Records include a letter from Burleson County regarding plans for the removal of a chief justice for being a loyal Union man; a letter from Fayette County complaining of the actions of a U.S. treasury agent; and a letter from Wise County complaining of appointed officers.]
71. Correspondence, September 9-10, 1865
[Records include a petition from Wise County regarding conditions in the county and the need for protection; a statement from Tarrant County regarding the association of Judge R.W. Scott with a woman of ill repute; a letter from Throckmorton on the appointment of officers; a letter from Columbus regarding the State Blind Asylum; and a letter from Robert D. Johnston regarding his application for special pardon.]
72. Correspondence, September 11, 1865
[Records include a letter from New Braunfels regarding payment for the provision of alcohol under a contract with the former Military Board; a letter from N.A. Davis in Sabine County regarding the state of affairs there and inquiring as to the rights of soldiers from Louisiana collecting U.S. property in Texas; a letter from citizens in Falls County requesting changes in county officers; a letter regarding the application of the president's amnesty proclamation; and a letter and a petition from Mason County regarding dissatisfaction with county officer appointments.]
73. Correspondence, September 12-13, 1865
[Records include letters regarding the appointment of Judge R.W. Scott of the 16th Judicial District; a letter from Philadelphia asking for the governor's help in regaining a library of medical books; and a letter from the governor of Louisiana regarding a claim of the Texas State Penitentiary against the state of Louisiana.]
Box Folder
2014/042-4 74. Correspondence, September 14-15, 1865
[Records include a letter from S. Baumgarten & Son wishing to make government and public seals; a letter from the clerk of the county court of DeWitt County regarding the valuation of U.S. currency; a letter from the county clerk of Chambers County regarding the records of his office and the county court; a verdict in the case, State of Texas v. Sam W. Lockhart, in Polk County; a letter in reference to an application for pardon by Judge Simeon Hart; a notice advertising the services of Joseph B. Nones, notary public and commissioner; and a business card for George Goldthwaite, attorney, with a note regarding the renewal of J.B. Nones' commission.]
75. Correspondence, September 16-17, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding the rights of freedmen; a letter from J.B. Nones in New York on the appointment of commissioner of deeds for New York; and a letter in reference to outrages committed during the war against Unionists.]
76. Correspondence, September 18, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding the moral character of Judge R.W. Scott; a letter protesting the appointments for sheriff and county clerk in Harrison County; a letter regarding an application for pardon by A.H. Rippetoe; a telegram from Houston regarding a shipment of cotton; and a letter from Lampasas regarding a theory involving "the Northers."]
77. Correspondence, September 19, 1865
[Records include documents related to the sale and shipment of cotton by state agents, A.M. Alexander and Edward Finnin; and a letter from New York regarding a business proposition.]
78. Correspondence, September 20, 1865
[Records include a letter from Lavaca County asking permission to sell merchandise tax free; a petition from Washington County requesting permission to organize a police force; a report from E.M. Pease and Swante Palm regarding the actions of W.L. Robards, former comptroller; a petition from Tarrant County regarding the case, State of Texas v. A.J. Andrews; and a letter from R.H. Taylor, chief justice of Fannin County, resigning his position and discussing murders in the area.]
79. Correspondence, September 21, 1865
[Records include a letter from an agent of the state regarding the condition of and payment owed to the State Foundry; and a set of resolutions from a public meeting in Fort Bend County.]
80. Correspondence, September 21, 1865
[Records include a letter from DeWitt County regarding the use of U.S. currency as payment for the administration of amnesty oaths; a letter from Paschal in Washington D.C. in reference to bonds and coupons; and a letter from the chief justice of DeWitt County denying accusations related to payment for amnesty oaths.]
81. Correspondence, September 22, 1865
[Records include a petition from Mason County asking for the resignation of the appointed assessor and collector, and treasurer; a letter from Major General Wright discussing cooperation between civil and military authorities and the Freedmen's Bureau; a letter from Major General C.C. Andrews regarding a visit to Washington D.C.; and an application for special pardon by R.M. Dickson.]
82. Correspondence, September 23-24, 1865
[Records include a detailed letter from Paschal in Washington D.C.; a petition of the First Texas Cavalry asking that Gillespie County be provided with protection from Native Americans; a certificate for the sale of cotton by a state agent; a letter from the chief justice of DeWitt County related to payment for the administration of amnesty oaths; and a letter from Fort Worth regarding the character of Judge R.W. Scott.]
83. Correspondence, September 25, 1865
[Records include a letter from Daniel D. Atchison in Navasota regarding the Brazos Manufacturing Company; a letter regarding applications for special pardon by John S. Smith, A.A. Hammond, and J.W. Route; a certificate for the sale of cotton by a state agent; a transcript of the proceedings of a meeting of the Board of School Commissioners in reference to a loan from the school fund for the Eastern Texas Railroad Company; a letter from the Moran Brothers in New York regarding a claim against the state involving railroad iron; and a letter regarding the Moran Brothers' claim against the state.]
84. Correspondence, September 26, 1865
[Records include a detailed letter by Paschal to Robert W. Tayler, the comptroller of the U.S. Treasury, regarding Texas indemnity bonds.]
85. Correspondence, September 26, 1865
[Records include a certificate for the sale of cotton by state agent Finnin; a letter from J.K. Holland in Farmingdale suggesting the sale of public lands in order to relieve taxes; and a letter from Adele Lubbock in regard to the release of her husband, former Governor Francis Richard Lubbock.]
86. Correspondence, September 27, 1865
[Records include a detailed letter from Governor Hamilton to Major General Wright on topics including the use of military force to protect against lawlessness in the state, his role as provisional governor, and the treatment of freedmen; a letter from Austin regarding Military Board property rescued from the plundering of state and Confederate property after the war's end; and a letter regarding the release of former Governor Lubbock.]
87. Correspondence, September 28, 1865
[Records include a letter to the clerk of the Supreme Court of Texas inquiring as to the outcome of several court cases; a letter from Parker County requesting that G.W. Cooper be appointed a captain to raise a company for frontier defense; a letter from the tax assessor and collector in San Augustine requesting information on the assessment of taxes; a typescript letter from Weatherford regarding the raising of a battalion of volunteers for frontier defense; a petition from Parker County asking that Charles L. Jordan be allowed to raise a company to defend the frontier against Native Americans; a detailed letter by Paschal to U.S. Comptroller Taylor; a letter from G.B. Erath, formerly a major of a frontier regiment, reporting on powder and ammunition belonging to the state; and a letter from Charles L. Jordan in Weatherford asking to be commissioned to raise a company for frontier protection.]
88. Correspondence, September 29, 1865
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector of Basque County asking to be supplied with blanks and rolls; a report from E.M. Pease and Swante Palm on compensation owed to managers of the State Foundry; a letter from Houston in relation to former Governor Lubbock; and a letter from Doctor S.B. Door on being unjustly charged with smuggling.]
89. Correspondence, September 30, 1865
[Records include a letter from New Braunfels on debts owed by the late Military Board and inquiring after the price of a pair of scales; documents concerning accusations against John Selfe regarding his involvement in hanging Union men; a letter from Houston regarding the sale of cotton in New Orleans; a statement by Samuel B. Richardson disputing a lease granted for Jordan's Saline in Van Zandt County; a muster roll for Charles Roesch; a petition from Hood's Virginia Brigade for the release of former Governor Lubbock; and a letter asking that an agent of the Freedmen's Bureau be appointed in Van Zandt County.]
90. Correspondence, October 1-2, 1865
[Records include a letter from H.S. Lubbock requesting the release of his brother, former Governor Lubbock, from state prison; an annual report for the year ending October 1865 from the State Lunatic Asylum; and a letter from Wharton County praising the governor, particularly his September 11th address to the people of Texas.]
91. Correspondence, October 3, 1865
[Records include letters relating to charges against Judge R.W. Scott; a letter regarding an application for special pardon by Ignacio Cassiano; a letter from Judge W.P. Hill regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from the assessor and collector of taxes from Kendall County requesting information on the assessment of taxes; a letter regarding cotton purchased by State Agent A.M. Alexander; and a certificate for the sale of cotton by a state agent.]
92. Correspondence, October 4, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding an application for special pardon by Major J.L. Dial; and a letter from M.J. Hall in Marshall relative to state cotton.]
93. Correspondence, October 5-6, 1865
[Records include a letter from Alexandria, Louisiana, complaining of an injustice done involving Governor Hamilton's assistance in delivering horses to Governor of Louisiana J. Madison Wells; a copy of the order and petition for the minute company of Parker County; a letter regarding the murder of Dr. S.P. Porter; and a letter from the county clerk of Guadalupe County regarding attitudes among the people in the county.]
94. Correspondence, October 7-9, 1865
[Records include a letter relating to an application for special pardon by W.G. Webb; a letter from Anderson County relative to levying of county taxes and actions of former slaveholders; a letter from Castroville praising the governor and referring to the governor's administration of a loyalty oath to the Union by the governor in a Pedernales cave; a letter from Harris County protesting the appointment of Captain McMahon as justice of the peace; a letter on the incorporation of the Brazos Manufacturing Company by an act of legislature; and a letter from Lexington on the application of the president's amnesty proclamation to county tax collectors.]
95. Correspondence, October 9, 1865
[Records include a letter from Hartford, Connecticut on the rights of freedmen; an affidavit regarding crimes of assault, battery and kidnapping committed against a freedwoman in Wilson County; a petition from Fayette County protesting the appointment of Henkel and Syberlich as justice of the peace and notary public; and a letter from officers in Bell County asking that troops be sent to the county to protect against lawlessness.]
96. Correspondence, October 10, 1865
[Records include a report, likely from Pease and Palm, regarding various claims upon the state government for payment; a letter from Austin regarding invoices and receipts for state property; a letter from the chief justice of Wilson County regarding the kidnapping of a freedwoman; a letter from Major General Wright regarding the Freedmen's Bureau and raising troops to protect from lawlessness and depredations; and a letter from New Orleans regarding immigration to Texas and the purchase of land.]
97. Correspondence, October 10, 1865
[Records include a letter from James Shaw in Lexington disavowing secessionist sentiments; a copy of a letter to U.S. Secretary of the Treasury Hugh McCulloch from Paschal regarding bonds of the former Military Board; a letter to Major General Philip Henry Sheridan from Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton; and a letter from the provost marshal of Brazos County regarding cattle taken by an agent of the Confederate government.]
98. Correspondence, October 11, 1865
[Records include a letter and a statement from Georgetown in reference to three murders; a letter from John A. Buckholts on conditions in Washington County; a letter from Governor Wells of Louisiana requesting assistance in collecting cotton claims; a letter from Houston in relation to the collection of the U.S. direct tax; a letter from a state agent in Houston regarding the sale of cotton; and a letter from the chief justice of Wood County on the state of affairs in the county.]
99. Correspondence, October 12, 1865
[Records include a letter from a Union man in Fort Bend County who fought for the Confederacy but wishes to be recognized for his loyalty to the Union.]
100. Correspondence, October 13, 1865
[Records include letters relating to the pardon of James Stevenson and Edward S. Smith, prisoners; a request from Governor Hamilton for a pass to Matamoros, Mexico for Emma Mahon of Houston; and a letter and proposal from San Augustine regarding the carrying of mail from Natchitoches, Louisiana to Alto, Texas.]
101. Correspondence, October 14-15, 1865
[Records include a letter from a freedman in Brenham regarding the treatment of his wife and children by their former owners; a report regarding debts between the former Military Board and the managers of a percussion cap factory; a letter from Judge R.W. Scott of Tarrant County regarding his scandal and petitions for his removal from office; a letter from a Union man in Brenham who objects to taking the amnesty oath; a letter from Williamson County regarding the hanging of Valentine Pearl; and a letter from Kerr County regarding the boundaries of the county.]
Box Folder
2014/042-5 102. Correspondence, October 16, 1865
[Records include a letter regarding a telegram from the Secretary of War; a letter from Paschal in Travis County regarding a special pardon for Daniel Devine; a letter regarding cotton shipped to Mexico from the State Penitentiary during the war; and a letter from the sheriff in Weatherford requesting the aid of troops in arresting criminals.]
103. Correspondence, October 17, 1865
[Records include a detailed letter from William Banta in Fredericksburg; a letter from the comptroller's office suggesting a general order to pay claims by agents of the state; and a letter from Harris County on the special pardon of Briggs and Yards.]
104. Correspondence, October 17, 1865
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector of McLennan County regarding the payment of taxes; a letter from the assessor and collector in Burnet County regarding assessment rolls; a letter from Parker County regarding conditions in the county; a letter from the chief justice of Bell County relative to the location of a suspected murderer; a letter from William Carey Crane at Baylor University on publishing a collection of Sam Houston's works; and a letter on voter registration in Collin County.]
105. Correspondence, October 18, 1865
[Records include a letter from the assessor and collector of Gillespie County asking for information; a letter from William Carey Crane at Baylor University on prosecuting the sale of liquor; a letter from a justice of the peace in Gonzales County regarding sentencing freedmen; and a letter from the chief justice of Harrison County complaining of various appointments made.]
106. Correspondence, October 18, 1865
[Records include two copies of a typescript letter translating a detailed article in German on crimes committed by rebels and conditions in the state; and a document written in German.]
107. Correspondence, October 19-20, 1865
[Records include a letter from M.C. Rogers in Huntsville inquiring after his application for pardon; and a letter from Austin bidding on a steam engine and equipment for sale by the state.]
108. Correspondence, October 21, 1865
[Records include a letter from a justice of the peace regarding the application of the governor's proclamation on the collection of debt to a case; a letter from the chief justice of Lamar County regarding a secret society organized against Union men, and protesting the recommendation of W.B. Wright for pardon; an application for the release of a major in the Confederate army; and a letter from Bell County on the rights of freedmen.]
109. Correspondence, October 22-23, 1865
[Records include a letter from Independence regarding an application for pardon by Thomas Power; a letter from Galveston County protesting appointments made; and letters from the superintendent of the State Lunatic Asylum inquiring about laws on committing patients to the asylum.]
110. Correspondence, October 24-25, 1865
[Records include a letter from A.M. Branch in Huntsville regarding the taking of money for special pardons by the judge and district attorney of Walker County; a letter from New York regarding an insecticide to exterminate the "army worm"; a letter from the chief justice of Cherokee County inquiring about exemptions from amnesty; a letter from Galveston regarding the establishment of the First National Bank of Galveston; a statement from Elizabeth Foster of McLennan County relative to the murder of her husband; and a letter from R.P. Pullium in Bexar County regarding a contract between Pullium, Smith & Ward and the former Military Board for cotton cards.]
111. Correspondence, October 26-27, 1865
[Records include a letter from State Agent W.B. Coffee in Indianola regarding state cotton; and a letter from Kent in Galveston on the state of affairs.]
112. Correspondence, October 28-30, 1865
[Records include a letter from B.F. Barkley in Birdville reporting on depredations and outrages committed; and a petition from Nueces County protesting the dismissal of a grand jury and making accusations of collusion between the judge and the defendants.]
113. Correspondence, October 31, 1865
[Records include a letter from F.H. Merrimen in Galveston regarding the sale of trust deeds; and a currency account and gold account of S.M. Swenson.]
114. Correspondence, October 1865
[Records include a petition from Sabine County protesting the appointment of officers; a letter from San Antonio regarding a refusal to administer the amnesty oath; a letter from Joseph B. Edmundson "complaining of hardships affecting the legal profession"; and a petition from citizens of Wise County requesting protection from crime and depredations.]
115. Correspondence, November 1-4, 1865
[Records include a letter from Goliad relative to a contract between State Cotton Agent C.H. Alexander and the former Military Board; a statement from Victoria County regarding an affray between Colonel J.T. Rose and S.A. White; a letter from Tarrant regarding murder indictments by the district court; a letter from the assessor and collector of Mason County regarding his settlement of accounts and payment due to him; and a letter from Samuel A. Roberts in Bonham describing conditions in North Texas.]
116. Correspondence, November 5-6, 1865
[Records include a letter from Prairie Lea regarding the provost marshal's seizure of a wagon and harness; a letter from the chief justice of Galveston County regarding sales under deeds of trust and probate sales; a letter from District Attorney E.L. Dohoney in Paris regarding an indictment for murder presented to the grand jury of Lamar County; a letter from H.P. Bee in Havana requesting a pardon and disavowing a connection with a hanging; and a petition from Liberty requesting troops for protection against freedmen.]
117. Correspondence, November 7, 1865
[Records include a letter endorsing William E. Harrison's application for special pardon and protesting the applications of James A. Cutler and E.A. Pearson; a letter from State Agent C.H. Alexander in Houston regarding cotton claimed by State Agent Coffee; and a letter from D.J. Baldwin in Houston regarding conditions in the area.]
118. Correspondence, November 8, 1865
[Records include a petition by merchants in Ellis County regarding the legality of certain legislative acts pertaining to the sale of liquor; a letter from the chief justice of Chambers County regarding charges of incompetency against him; a letter from Bastrop County complaining of a U.S. wagon master; a letter from Pease regarding appointments and allowing pardoned lawyers to practice in state courts; and a letter from McMahon & Gilbert regarding State Agent Coffee's assessment of a shipment of cotton.]
119. Correspondence, November 9-11, 1865
[Records include a petition from Chambers County recommending that the current chief justice be replaced; a petition from Grayson County requesting aid and protection from lawlessness; two newspaper clippings referencing a speech given by Judge R.W. Scott in Fort Worth; and a letter from John Twohig regarding his application for special pardon.]
120. Correspondence, November 12-13, 1865
[Records include a letter from Thomas Craddock of the First Texas Cavalry held under court martial on Ship Island, requesting to be released; a petition from Davis County protesting appointed officers; an order from Governor Hamilton asking the treasury to credit Confederate treasury notes to county assessors and collectors; and a letter from Brazoria in reference to the organization of a company to protect the county from lawlessness.]
121. Correspondence, November 14-15, 1865
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Chambers County relative to charges of incompetency against him; a letter from Bell County requesting troops for protection against lawlessness; a letter from State Comptroller A.H. Latimer in New Orleans relative to cotton claimed by the Alexander estate; detailed letters from Special Agent of the Post Office William M. Daily in Galveston; and a letter from New Orleans relative to cotton claimed by the Alexander estate.]
122. Correspondence, November 16-18, 1865
[Records include a letter from Cameron County complaining of certain appointments; a letter from John E. George in Danville regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from Special Agent of the Post Office William M. Daily in Galveston regarding mail and postmasters; a letter from lawyer William G. Webb in La Grange asking permission to practice law; a newspaper clipping from the New Era Extra in La Grange regarding the ability of freedmen to testify in court; a letter from San Antonio regarding trust deeds; a letter from U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward on the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment; a letter from Special Agent of the Treasury John M.G. Parker in Indianola relative to state cotton; and a telegram from La Grange regarding a proposal for the rights of freedmen.]
123. Correspondence, November 19-21, 1865
[Records include a letter from State Agent C.H. Alexander in Chappell Hill regarding a previous letter on the subject of a shipment of cotton; a letter from T.N. Waul in Gonzales County regarding attorneys being banned from practicing law; a letter from the chief justice of Hays County inquiring about the payment of debts of an estate; a letter from State Agent N.B. Pearce in New Orleans on his intention to return to Austin to settle his accounts; a writ of election to Williamson County for electing delegates to the constitutional convention; and a statement from the chief justice of Victoria County testifying as to the conduct of Colonel J.T. Rose.]
124. Correspondence, November 22-23, 1865
[Records include a petition from Matamoros, Mexico regarding the release of cotton and the granting of bonds; a letter from La Grange regarding the Freedmen's Bureau; and a letter from Major General G.A. Custer regarding the summoning of a military force to be deployed from Sherman in Grayson County.]
125. Correspondence, November 24-27, 1865
[Records include a letter from G.W. Whitmore in Crockett reporting on conditions in Cherokee County; a letter from Galveston regarding a draft for payment to Ball, Hutchins & Co. for transporting the Supreme Court library; a letter from the chief justice of Colorado County regarding currency accepted by the superintendent of the State Lunatic Asylum; a letter from Thaddeus McRae in New Orleans regarding hostile intentions toward the governor; a detailed letter from Charles B. Stewart in Danville regarding "public affairs present, past, and future"; a letter from Waco enclosing the petition of Elizabeth Foster; a letter from San Marcos regarding the orphan children of freedmen; a letter from H.P. Bee in Havana regarding his application for special pardon; and a letter in French from M. Jean Goncet regarding the publication, Histoire Generale.]
126. Correspondence, November 28-29, 1865
[Records include a letter from attorneys Herring and Farmer in Waco regarding the absence of a Supreme Court and the case, State of Texas v. Everett; and letters from the collector of internal revenue in Brownsville regarding U.S. excise tax owed by the salt lake in Hidalgo County.]
127. Correspondence, November 30, 1865
[Records include a letter from the clerk of the county court in DeWitt County on several topics including revenue stamps, voting eligibility, and marriage licenses for freedmen and freedwomen; a telegram from District Judge B.W. Gray in Jefferson in reference to people falsely claiming to be treasury agents and disobedience to district court decisions; a letter from Houston regarding the status of certain legislative acts; a petition from Liberty County desiring protection in light of rumors of a "resort to force" by freedmen to gain land; and a letter from Simeon Jones in New Orleans regarding hostile intentions toward the governor.]
128. Correspondence, December 1-2, 1865
[Records include a letter from John A. Buckholts in Milam County regarding public opinions in the county; a letter from Henderson relative to marriage licenses for freedmen and freedwomen; a letter from Newton regarding revenue stamps; a bill from the Tribune Association for advertisements placed by the governor, likely in the Daily Tribune newspaper; a newspaper clipping regarding cotton sold to the state under Governor Pendleton Murrah by White and Chiles for U.S. Texas indemnity bonds and coupons; a letter from J.A. Whittlesey, chief justice of Sabine County, protesting a petition for his removal; and a letter from Chandler & Turner in Austin regarding cotton seized by the state.]
129. Correspondence, December 3-6, 1865
[Records include a letter from Santa Maria regarding the captured outlaw Cortinas, possibly referring to Juan Nepomuceno Cortina; a letter from Paschal in Travis County regarding the books and records provided by the secretary of the interior to the state and on U.S. Comptroller Taylor's report on Texas indemnity bonds; a letter from James W. Magoffin in San Antonio requesting officers to man Fort Bliss; and a letter from the county clerk of Guadalupe County regarding the state of affairs in the county and John Ireland's application for special pardon.]
Box Folder
2014/042-6 130. Correspondence, December 7-8, 1865
[Records include a letter from State Agent A.M. Clare in Bastrop regarding ox wagons and steers collected in Travis County; a letter from Judge Gray in Jefferson enclosing transcripts of the proceedings from the cases of R.L. Robertson and A.O. Carolan; a letter from John Corbett of Galveston regarding Betsy Webster's case against him and the actions of the Freedmen's Bureau in relation to the case; a letter from Victoria inquiring about the purchase of state and school lands; and a letter from New York inquiring about the cost of education per capita in Texas.]
131. Correspondence, December 9-10, 1865
[Records include a letter from Thomas Craddock of the First Texas Cavalry requesting to be released from Ship Island; and a petition from the citizens of Comanche County asking that their current chief justice be removed.]
132. Correspondence, December 11, 1865
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Washington County regarding the suspension of the sale of liquor; a letter from Washington County in reference to the state of affairs in the county and the orphaned children of freedmen; and a letter from the Austin City Council in Austin on the organization of a volunteer police force in the city.]
133. Correspondence, December 11-14, 1865
[Records include a letter from W.W. McNeill in Erath County complaining of State Agent C.W. Perry; a letter from John Dix in Corpus Christi complaining of Judge E.P. Upton, Charles Lovenskiold, and Thomas J.O. Callahan; and a letter from Brigadier General F.T. Sherman in New Orleans regarding the murder case against A.A. Diaz.]
134. Correspondence, December 16-18, 1865
[Records include a letter from U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward accompanying a telegram regarding the Thirteenth Amendment; a letter from M.J. Hall in New Orleans regarding the Alexander cotton; a letter from Judge William W. Wallace in San Augustine regarding the state of affairs in his county; a letter from Lieutenant Colonel Edward Colyer in Victoria regarding the release of prisoner Guinn; and a telegram from State Agent Coffee in Galveston regarding state cotton.]
135. Correspondence, December 20-22, 1865
[Records include a bill for cotton sold by Swenson; a letter from the chief justice of Nueces County complaining of Judge Upton; and a letter from Stephen Reaves in Tyler in reference to his petition for special pardon.]
136. Correspondence, December 23-27, 1865
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General S.D. Sturgis in Austin on the removal of federal troops from the Texas capitol; a letter from the chief justice of Fayette County reporting on the organization of a police force; a letter from A.A. Deavalon in Corpus Christi regarding charges against Judge Upton, Charles Lovenskiold, and Thomas J.O. Callahan; a letter from Central City, Colorado asking for information on moving to Texas; a letter from the mayor of Columbus inquiring about the arrest of federal troops by civil authorities; a letter from Secretary of State William H. Seward at the Department of State in Washington enclosing warrants of pardon; a letter from the chief justice of DeWitt County referencing freedmen and the administration of the amnesty oath; and a letter from San Antonio regarding applications for special pardon by John H. Kampmann and T.J. Devinsale.]
137. Correspondence, December 28-30, 1865
[Records include an unsigned petition to congress regarding the construction of a railroad as the southern branch of the Union Pacific Railroad; a letter from Swenson in New York regarding bonds and coupons held for the governor's brother, M.C. Hamilton; a letter from the chief justice of Williamson County regarding the need for protection by military force on election day, and the eligibility of First Texas Cavalry members to vote; a letter from Brownsville regarding the right of Mexican citizens to bring a matter to trial in the state; a letter from George W. Smith in Columbus regarding U.S. claims to the iron on the Columbus Tap Railroad; and a letter from Anton Medlinka in Houston asking that his case against John Kuhlman be brought to the Supreme Court.]
138. Correspondence, January 1, 1866
[Records include a typescript letter from New York written in Spanish; a letter from T.P. Macmanus in San Antonio complaining of the actions of a French general in Mexico; a letter from T.O. Wilson in Syracuse, New Jersey in reference to his application for special pardon; and a letter from Paris asking about the eligibility of a former U.S. soldier to vote.]
139. Correspondence, January 2-4, 1866
[Records include a letter from Fannin County regarding an attack against Union men; a letter from La Grange inquiring about the right to vote for foreigners in the state; a letter from Chief Justice William Bramlette in Lamar County referencing his circular on the prevention of lawlessness; and letters from Waco regarding the arrest and escape of the criminal Burns.]
140. Correspondence, January 6-8, 1866
[Records include a letter from J.W. McGoffin regarding the election of a delegate for the Constitutional Convention from El Paso County; a letter from Bell County regarding U.S. military arrests made of citizens; a letter from Peter W. Gray in Houston regarding the state of affairs in Washington D.C.; a letter from Ward Taylor Jr. in Jefferson regarding his application for special pardon; and a letter from Austin regarding ordnance now belonging to the U.S. government.]
141. Correspondence, January 9-10, 1866
[Records include a letter and telegram from Major General Wright in Galveston regarding cotton claimed by the state but seized by the U.S. Treasury Department; a letter from the chief justice of Goliad County regarding his duties toward freedmen and orphan children of freedmen; a letter from D.U. Cooley in the Office of Indian Affairs in Washington regarding captives released by the Kiowa tribe; a letter from Bastrop requesting a permit to sell cotton; a letter from Mason County inquiring about horses taken from Native Americans; a letter from Georgetown on the actions of certain voters in the election for the Constitutional Convention; and a letter from Brownsville on creating an asylum for orphaned children of soldiers.]
142. Correspondence, January 11-12, 1866
[Records include a letter from Georgetown regarding the election for Constitutional Convention delegates; a letter from New York regarding the benefits of settling in Texas; a letter from Major General G.A. Custer regarding prisoners from Bell County; and a letter from Magoffin in San Antonio requesting an escort to El Paso.]
143. Correspondence, January 13-14, 1866
[Records include a letter from Wilson County complaining of the actions of Chief Justice W. Longsworth; and a telegram from State Agent Coffee regarding U.S. Treasury Agent Dent taking control of Confederate property.]
144. Correspondence, January 15-16, 1866
[Records include a letter from M.D. Ector in Henderson regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from William Hersee in New York on land in Texas owned by his late father and Alamo defender, William Hersee; a letter from Washington D.C. enclosing a clipping from the New York Herald regarding General Kent settling in Texas and remarking on the governor; a letter from Fairfield in reference to orphaned children of freedmen; and a letter from Swenson in New Orleans on having credited J.M. Swisher in gold based on the governor's draft.]
145. Correspondence, January 17, 1866
[Records include a telegram from State Agent Coffee regarding federal treasury agent seizing state cotton and sending it to New York; a letter from John A. Williams in Harrisburg regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from Paschal in Washington City proposing the state purchase of three thousand copies of Paschal's Digest of Laws; a letter from Guadalupe County regarding the state of affairs in the county; and a letter from attorneys A.J. Evans and F.F. Davis in Waco regarding the case, Ross v. Standefer.]
146. Correspondence, January 18-19, 1866
[Records include a letter from the Condell Limb Company in New York regarding the provision of artificial limbs to citizens; a letter from San Antonio in reference to immigration policies; a letter from the Chief Justice of Cooke County reporting on the organization of a police force; and a letter from R.P. Burford, a prisoner arrested in Bell County, requesting an investigation into charges against him.]
147. Correspondence, January 20-22, 1866
[Records include a circular from the German Society of the City of New York regarding immigration; a letter from Richard Reily in Castroville regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from Lockhart regarding relief of penalties for army deserters; a letter regarding the murders of three U.S. soldiers in Panola County; a letter from Waxahachie regarding the speeches of candidates for the Constitutional Convention; and a letter from Waco regarding the seizure of machinery of the Waco manufacturing company by a U.S. treasury agent.]
148. Correspondence, January 23-24, 1866
[Records include a letter from Seguin reporting on Convention delegate Colonel James Ireland and conditions in the area; a letter from Harvey Smith in Belton regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from F.H. Coupland, special agent of the U.S. treasury department, regarding funds in the state treasury; a petition from Lockhart requesting protection by military force from lawlessness in the area; a letter from Frank Moore requesting a copy of legislative acts pertaining to reconstruction and ordinances of the Constitutional Convention in order to compile a record of the rebellion; and a letter from George C. Rives, acting comptroller, regarding taxes collected in unorganized counties.]
149. Correspondence, January 25-29, 1866
[Records include a detailed letter from acting Comptroller Rives in reference to taxes; a letter from Upshur County regarding the state of affairs in the county; a letter from Lampasas listing men involved in hangings of Union men in Williamson and Bandera Counties; a letter from acting Comptroller Rives on the Constitutional Convention and the financial operations of the state; and a letter from Marshall complaining of actions of U.S. treasury agents.]
150. Correspondence, January 30-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from Major General Wright in Galveston reporting on state cotton turned over to U.S. Treasury Agent Dent; a letter from Thomas Caruthers, superintendent of the state penitentiary, to Colonel F.W. Chandler suggesting that the governor mention Sam Houston in his message to the Constitutional Convention; a letter from Judge L.W. Cooper in Tyler regarding charges brought to the grand jury; a petition from Walker County for the release of prisoner J.L. Wyler; a letter from Thomas Caruthers, superintendent of the state penitentiary, recommending the pardon of prisoner William Brown; a letter from Governor Oglesby of Illinois enclosing a copy of Illinois State Law establishing the Soldiers Orphan Home; and a letter from Colonel C.H. Whittlesey to McMahon and Gilbert in reference to turning over state cotton to the U.S. treasury agent.]
151. Correspondence, February 1-3, 1866
[Records include a letter from Rosa Hull in Galveston requesting the release of her imprisoned husband, James Hull; a letter from Judge Gray in Jefferson regarding a conflict with military authorities, enclosing a newspaper clipping; a letter from R.W. Black in Eagle Pass regarding depredations by the Kickapoo Native Americans; and a letter from State Agent Finnin regarding state cotton shipped by Ball, Hutchings and Company.]
152. Correspondence, February 5-6. 1866
[Records include a letter from B. Frank Palmer in Philadelphia enclosing a circular from Palmer Arm and Leg advertising artificial limbs for veterans; a letter from Major General Sheridan in New Orleans on the necessity for retaining troops in Austin and San Antonio; a letter from Karnes County inquiring about marriage licenses for freedmen; a letter from Judge A.T. Howell in McKinney regarding charges against him of drawing faulty indictments; and a letter from Cooke County complaining of the appointment of officers in the area.]
153. Correspondence, February 7-10, 1866
[Records include a letter from Des Moines, Iowa regarding the establishment of a "soldiers' home"; a letter from Jefferson protesting petitions for the removal of Sheriff C.W. Stewart; a petition from Smith County asking for the release of prisoner Charles Richardson, a freedman; a letter from San Antonio regarding damage done by U.S. soldiers; and a letter from Brigadier General J.K. Mizner in San Antonio on the release of Dr. J.S. Bell.]
154. Correspondence, February 11-15, 1866
[Records include a letter from San Antonio requesting permission to raise a force to protect the frontier; a letter from A.S. Blake of Adams Express Company in New Orleans regarding John Hohl, imprisoned in Houston for theft; a telegram from U.S. President Andrew Johnson regarding the Texas Constitutional Convention; a letter from William W. Mills in Washington regarding wrongs done to him by Simeon Hart; and a letter from Matt Talbott Jr. in Caney regarding his application for pardon.]
Box Folder
2014/042-7 155. Correspondence, February 14-16, 1866
[Records include a letter from Jordan's Saline regarding the collection of taxes for the privilege of manufacturing salt; a letter from Houston applying for the pardon of Edward Smith, a prisoner in the penitentiary; a letter from Washington City on the state of affairs in El Paso; a letter from a notary public in Gonzales County on a new order received and the duties of his office; a letter from the chief justice of Refugio County reporting on the state of affairs in the county; and a letter from State Agent A.M. Clare in Bastrop County regarding the sale of property by his sub-agent.]
156. Correspondence, February 17-20, 1866
[Records include a letter from the commissioner of the Department of the Interior in Washington D.C. requesting statistics from the state regarding population, industry, trade, and other areas; a letter from J.M. Rodriguez, former county clerk of Webb County, reporting Captain W.C. Durkee's seizure of the records, books and county seal for the county; a letter from district attorney E.L. Dohoney in Paris regarding the state of affairs of the courts in that district; a letter from Colombus regarding the legislature deciding the meeting times of the court; a letter from William W. Mills in El Paso County regarding people who left the county after Henry Hopkins Sibley's defeat; and a petition from Lampasas County asking for protection from Native American depredations.]
157. Correspondence, February 22-27, 1866
[Records include a letter from Brenham including a roll of police officer names; a letter from Julius Schuetze in Bastrop requesting a letter of protection as he pursues his brother's murderer; a letter from Sherman regarding state-provided education for poor children; a letter from Ball, Hutchings and Co. in Galveston regarding the shipment of cotton; and a letter from Guadalupe County requesting the removal of W. Longworth as sub-agent of the Freedmen's Bureau in Wilson County.]
158. Correspondence, February 28, 1866
[Records include a letter from Galveston regarding a citizen petition from Chambers County for removing P. Banziza from his office of Chief Justice; documents relating to the survey and sale of land in San Augustine County; a petition from the citizens of Meyersville regarding the reopening of their post office; and a letter from the chief justice of Caldwell County regarding an order to the Freedmen's Bureau in reference to orphaned children.]
159. Correspondence, March 1-3, 1866
[Records include a telegram from Major General Wright regarding authorization to send troops to Jacksboro and other locations; a letter from San Augustine regarding the actions of the Constitutional Convention; and a petition of citizens in Lavaca County for the release of the prisoner Tennessee Patterson.]
160. Correspondence, March 4-8, 1866
[Records include a letter from Pleasanton regarding the murder of John Bell by John Burleson; a letter from J. De Cordova in Galveston regarding German immigration; a letter from Sheriff Edward Colyer in Victoria regarding the transportation of freedmen to the state prison; a letter from New York regarding land certificates; and a letter from Sheriff J.L. Cunningham in Victoria regarding freedmen sentenced to the penitentiary for horse stealing.]
161. Correspondence, March 9-10, 1866
[Records include a letter from Yorktown regarding murders committed by members of the Golden Circle; a letter from San Antonio regarding a draft assigned to the state; and a letter from J.S. Sullivan in Richmond regarding his application for special pardon.]
162. Correspondence, March 12-16, 1866
[Records include a letter from A.C. Zumevalt in Hallettsville regarding his application for special pardon; a letter from San Augustine regarding the applications of Matthew Cartwright and Leonidas Cartwright for special pardon; a letter from Lewisville regarding the sale of guns and munitions to freedmen; and a letter from William E. Crump in Bellville regarding the sale of land under a recommended petition for special pardon.]
163. Correspondence, March 17-20, 1866
[Records include a letter from Judge R.W. Scott in Waxahachie regarding the conviction of a freedman charged with theft; a letter and a newspaper clipping regarding the murder of John Hill by John Burleson in Zavala County; a letter from Brigadier General James Shaw Jr. regarding the relocation of the Tonkawa Native Americans; a letter from Brigadier General S.D. Sturgis regarding the dispatch of troops to northern Texas; a letter regarding the acceptance of jurors in the county court of Bell County; and a letter from Sheriff W.B. Pace in Lampasas County requesting the aid of military force.]
164. Correspondence, March 21-23, 1866
[Records include a letter from New York regarding land claims; a letter from Galveston arguing for the need for the appointment of a public weigher of cotton; a letter from Houston regarding an order from the Freedmen's Bureau in reference to paupers; a letter from Gatesville regarding the raising of a company of Cherokee Native Americans to protect the frontier; and a letter from John R. Pulliam in Harrisburg regarding the raising of a company to protect the frontier.]
165. Correspondence, March 26-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General James Shaw Jr. in San Antonio on ordering troops from Denton County to Parker County; a letter from John Handley in Olney, Illinois asking permission to raise a company to protect the Texas frontier; a letter from Georgetown Nursery in Georgetown, Connecticut requesting addresses of nurseries in Texas; and a letter from F.W. Chandler, attorney for George W. White and John Chiles, tendering state bonds and treasury warrants for U.S. bonds and coupons received under contract with the former Military Board.]
166. Correspondence, April 1-10, 1866
[Records include a letter from Ownesville asking for the pardon for B.F. Gregory, imprisoned in the penitentiary for hog stealing; a letter from the district attorney and chief justice of Cherokee County requesting the pardon of prisoner Augustus C. Pearl; an order from the Executive Department on the payment of state officers and clerks by the state treasurer; and a letter from Johan C. Kindrup at the Royal Danish Consulate inquiring about Clement Lindberg of Denmark who settled in Texas before the war broke out.]
167. Correspondence, April 11-15, 1866
[Records include a letter from the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury McCulloch regarding the Constitutional Convention's ordinance on taxes due from the state; a copy of petitions from the state of Wisconsin to the U.S. Congress regarding the equalization of soldiers' bounties and the construction of a canal; and a letter from Sheriff W.W. Brooks in Burnet regarding the arrest of John Townsend.]
168. Correspondence, April 18-20, 1866
[Records include a letter from George W. McLellan, assistant postmaster general, in Washington D.C. regarding the governor's selection of newspaper to run a postal service advertisement; a letter from Crockett regarding an article in the Sentinel, "Hamilton and the Radicals"; a letter from George W. Paschal Jr. in Washington D.C. requesting an advance on the state account for a digest of the laws of Texas; and a letter from Beaumont complaining of the Constitutional Convention.]
169. Correspondence, April 23-30, 1866
[Records include a letter from George W. Paschal Jr. in Washington D.C. regarding his article in the Tribune on Texas politics; a letter from Judge L.W. Cooper in Crockett requesting a pardon for Augustus C. Pearl, convicted in Cherokee County for hog stealing; a letter from Huntsville in reference to a "lunatic" freedwoman in his care; and a letter from Ruben Knowles of Upshur County applying for a special pardon.]
170. Correspondence, May 1-10, 1866
[Records include a letter from Paschal in Washington requesting an advance on his Digest; a letter from Galveston regarding the portrait of Sam Houston authorized by the Constitutional Convention; and a petition from El Paso County protesting the appointment of Magoffin to office.]
171. Correspondence, May 18-31, 1866
[Records include a letter from Colorado County requesting the pardon of Noah Russell, a freedman imprisoned for theft; a letter from the Comptroller's Office in Austin regarding a trip to Washington City to meet with the U.S. president in order to discuss frontier protection and tax owed by the state to the U.S.; a report from Magoffin on the organization of El Paso County; a letter from El Paso regarding the organization of El Paso County; a letter from D. Cleveland, mayor of San Antonio, regarding municipal elections; a letter from Assistant Adjutant General A.A. Nichols in Washington authorizing Major General Wright to lend military force to requisitions by the governor for the arrest of criminals; and resolutions drafted by Union men in El Paso County protesting the appointment of Magoffin to organize the county.]
172. Correspondence, June 1866
[Records include petition for an order to elect municipal officers in San Antonio; and a letter from U.S. Secretary of the Treasury McCulloch regarding indictments in Marion County against R.L. Robertson, an assistant special agent of the treasury department.]
173. Correspondence, July 1866
[Records include a statement related to the case, State of Texas v. Thomas Grier, for horse stealing; a report from the chief justice of Fannin County regarding a riot in Bonham; and a petition from frontier counties asking that a force be raised to protect the area from lawlessness and Native American depredations.]
174. Correspondence, August 1866
[Records include a report from J.M. Blackwell, agent for the Asylum for the Blind, regarding expenditures March through July 1866; statements related to the case, State of Texas v. Thomas Grier, for horse stealing; an act to pay outstanding salaries to officers of the provisional government; and a statement of payment due to officers of the provisional government.]
175. Correspondence, October 1866
[Records include a description of a horse.]
176. Correspondence, November 1866
[Records include a letter from Fredericksburg regarding a request to General Samuel Heintzelman that troops stationed at Fort Martin be retained and that more troops be sent to the area; a letter from Major General Sheridan regarding a request to General Heintzelman to turn over certain soldiers suspected of murder; and a petition from El Paso County regarding a salt mine near the Guadalupe Mountains.]
177. Correspondence, undated
[Records include an advertisement from Fitzhugh, Wilmer & Co. in New York, agents for emigration and real estate sales; a petition from Bastrop County protesting the appointment of A. Schultze as chief justice; a letter and petition from Lampasas County regarding the application of special pardon by Thomas H. Espy; and a petition from the citizens of San Antonio asking that an order to hold municipal elections be issued.]
178. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from W.R. Reagan regarding a remonstrance against him; a petition from citizens of Austin complaining of the use of funds collected for the improvement of roads; and a petition from Orange County requesting aid in making arrests for stock theft.]
179. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a petition from citizens of Jackson County requesting protection from depredations by U.S. freedmen soldiers; a petition from Ellis County for the remission of a fine for gambling; a petition from Johnson, Erath, Palo Pinto, and other counties requesting permission to raise a company for defense from Native American depredations; and a circular from the Condell Life-like Limb Company advertising artificial limbs.]
180. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a petition from Cherokee County by a freedman and freedwoman for the return of their children, held by force of arms by their former owner; and a petition from frontier counties requesting protection from lawlessness and Native American depredations.]
181. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a petition from Travis County requesting that soldiers be removed from the county courthouse and jail.]
182. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from Trinity County requesting the release of Thomas Cooper and Jesse Cooper from the State Penitentiary; a petition from Chambers County requesting that James Jackson replace the current chief justice; a letter from Thompson, Reed & Co. regarding privileges to collect salt at the saline works on Hubbard Creek; a letter from a blind man in Travis County requesting financial support; a letter from the chief justice of Burleson County proposing the construction of a marine railroad; a list of citizens recommended to congress to be relieved from political disability; and a statement from Van Zandt County regarding John E. Clark's treatment of freedmen.]
183. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a petition from the 16th Judicial District protesting the appointment of Judge R.W. Scott; a report by C.C. Stremme at the General Land Office; and a letter in reference to Colonel James Bourland seeking a special pardon for charges relating to executions in Hopkins County.]

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