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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Scope and Contents of the Records

Arrangement of the Records

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Governor Pendleton Murrah records, 1863-1865,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Governor Pendleton Murrah:

An Inventory of Governor Pendleton Murrah Records at the Texas State Archives, 1863-1865



Overview

Creator: Texas. Governor (1863-1865 : Murrah)
Title: Governor Pendleton Murrah records
Dates: 1863-1865
Abstract: Records of Pendleton Murrah's term as governor of Texas from 1863 to 1865 relate predominantly to Texas and Confederate military affairs during the Civil War. Records are correspondence, including letters, petitions, reports, orders, and letterpress books, dating from January 1863 to May 1865.
Quantity: 2.25 cubic ft.
Language These materials are written in English.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Biographical Sketch of Pendleton Murrah

Pendleton Murrah served as governor of Texas from November 5, 1863 to June 17, 1865. Murrah was probably born in Alabama in 1826 or South Carolina in 1827, either illegitimate or orphaned early. He attended the University of Alabama and graduated from Brown University in 1848. Murrah moved to Marshall, Texas and began practicing law there around 1850. In 1857, he was elected to the state legislature after losing a race in 1855. He announced as a candidate for the Confederate Congress in 1861 but withdrew due to ill health. He served briefly as a quartermaster officer in the Fourteenth Texas Infantry in early 1862 but was forced by poor health to resign his commission. He defeated T.J. Chambers in the gubernatorial election of 1863. During his administration, military and financial difficulties pushed the state and the Confederacy into contests over conscription, frontier defense, and the impressment of cotton, cattle, and slaves. In addition, Murrah was dying of tuberculosis. In May 1865, as the occupation of Texas by U.S. forces was imminent, Governor Murrah fled to Mexico, where he died at Monterrey on August 4, 1865. In Murrah's absence (May to June 1865), Lieutenant Governor Fletcher S. Stockdale was acting governor.

(Source: Ralph A. Wooster, "Murrah, Pendleton," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on October 18, 2013.)

Biographical Sketch of Fletcher S. Stockdale

Fletcher Stockdale was born in Kentucky in 1827 and moved to Indianola, Texas in 1846. In 1856 he was a promoter of the Powderhorn, Victoria, and Gonzales Railroad. He served in the state senate from 1857 to 1861, and was on the committee which drafted the Ordinance of Secession in 1861. Stockdale was lieutenant governor from 1863 to 1866 and served as acting governor in 1865 after Governor Pendleton Murrah vacated his office and fled to Mexico as Union forces advanced to occupy Texas. After the Civil War, Stockdale practiced law and promoted land in Cuero. He was active in a number of Democratic National Conventions, and in the Constitutional Convention of 1875. He died in Cuero in 1902.

(Source: "Stockdale, Fletcher," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on October 18, 2013.)

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Agency History

The office of the governor of the state of Texas was created by the Texas Constitution of 1845. It superseded the office of the president of the Republic of Texas upon the annexation of Texas by the United States. The 1845 Constitution defined the term of office as two years, with no more than four years served in a six year period. The governor was required to be thirty years old at minimum, a U.S. citizen, and a Texas resident for at least three years (Article V, Section 4).

The 1845 Constitution outlined a number of powers held by the governor of Texas. The governor acted as the commander-in-chief of the army, navy, and militia of the state unless they were transferred into service under the federal government (Article V, Section 6). He could call up a state militia to "execute the laws of the State to suppress insurrections, and to repel invasions" (Article VI, Section 4). The governor made recommendations to the legislature and provided written information on the state of the government (Article V, Section 9). He could also convene the legislature when necessary and adjourn the legislature in the case of a disagreement between the House and Senate (Article V, Section 8). The governor had the power to grant reprieves and pardons in criminal cases except those of treason or impeachment, and to approve or disapprove bills, orders, resolutions, or votes from the legislature (Article V, Sections 11, 17 and 18). The governor also appointed supreme and district court judges and an attorney general with the consent of two-thirds of the Senate (Article IV, Sections 5 and 12).

The 1845 Constitution created the office of secretary of state, appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate for the governor's term of service. The secretary of state worked closely with the governor, and was required to "keep a fair register of all official acts and proceedings of the governor" (Article V, Section 16). The 1845 Constitution called for the election of a lieutenant governor at the time of the governor's election with the same qualifications and term of office, but to be voted for separately by electors. The lieutenant governor served as president of the Senate and could cast a deciding vote in ties, as well as take on the governor's powers in his absence or until a new governor was elected and qualified or the previous governor was able to resume office (Article V, Section 12). The 1845 Constitution further called for the biennial election of a state treasurer and comptroller of public accounts by the legislature, with vacancies to be filled by the governor (Article V, Section 23). However, a constitutional amendment in 1850 allowed the public election of the state treasurer and comptroller.

The constitutional language defining the office of the governor changed marginally with the Texas Constitution of 1861, which was written when Texas seceded from the United States to join the Confederate States at the onset of the Civil War. The 1861 Constitution replaced mention of the United States with the Confederate States, removed a requirement for U.S. citizenship for Texas governors, raised the governor's salary, and set a date for the governor and lieutenant governor to take office after an election.

(Sources: Texas Constitution of 1845 online at the Tarlton Law Library; Texas Constitution of 1861 online at the Tarlton Law Library; S.S. McKay, "Constitution of 1845," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on October 18, 2013; Walter L. Buenger, "Constitution of 1861," Handbook of Texas Online, accessed on October 18, 2013.)

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Scope and Contents of the Records

Materials are the records of Pendleton Murrah's term as governor of Texas from 1863 to 1865, relating predominantly to Texas and Confederate military affairs during the Civil War. There do not appear to be any documents from Fletcher Stockdale's tenure as acting governor among these records. Types of records are correspondence, including letters, petitions, reports, orders, circulars, newspaper clippings, and letterpress books, dating from January 1863 to May 1865. The two letterpress books contain copies of some of Governor Murrah's outgoing letters from November 1863 to May 1865. The records include letters relative to coastal and frontier defense, requests and recommendations for civil and military appointments, letters in reference to military conscription, communications between Governor Murrah and Major General J.B. Magruder and General E. Kirby Smith relative to troop movements and the status of state troops, requests and petitions for exemptions and discharges from military service, requests for supplies from the Texas Military Board and State Penitentiary in Huntsville, letters relative to the sale and shipment of cotton, letters involving relations with Native American tribes, and letters concerning the railroads. Other significant correspondents include Colonel Guy M. Bryan, Brigadier General J.W. Throckmorton, Brigadier General J.D. McAdoo, Cotton Agent E.B. Nichols, Secretary of State R.J. Townes, and Confederate Treasury Agent P.W. Gray.

Certain types of correspondence that appear consistently and frequently throughout the records have been omitted from the folder level description, including applications or recommendations for appointments to various official positions, petitions or requests for exemptions or details from military service, requests to and appropriations from the Military Board for cloth, cotton, and wool, and reports on cotton sales and shipments.

In the past, items relating to the State Penitentiary in Huntsville were removed from the records of governors, secretaries of state, treasurers and comptrollers to create an artificial collection of records relating to the penitentiary. Items related to Native American affairs may have also been removed from the records. In addition, the original order of the records was disrupted when they were sorted by date. As a result, letters or petitions that were enclosures of other letters may have been separated from their original context. One oversized item transferred from folder 68 has not been located as of the update of this finding aid in October 2013.

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Arrangement of the Records

Arrangement is chronological within each month; letters having no specific day date have been placed at the end of the month. Undated letters are located at the end of the correspondence, followed by the letterpress books.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Letterpress volumes are extremely fragile and may not be photocopied.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Murrah, Pendleton, 1824-1865.
Magruder, John Bankhead, 1807-1871.
Smith, E. Kirby (Edmund Kirby), 1824-1893.
Bryan, Guy M. (Guy Morrison), 1821-1901.
Throckmorton, J.W. (James Webb), 1825-1894.
McAdoo, John David, 1824-1883.
Nichols, Ebenezar B., 1815-1872.
Townes, R. J. (Robert J.),1806-1865.
Gray, Peter W., 1819-1874.
Corporate Names:
Texas. Office of the Governor.
Confederate States of America. Army.
Texas. State Penitentiary at Huntsville.
Military Board of Texas.
Texas. Militia.
Subjects:
Governors--Texas.
Cotton trade--Texas.
Recruiting and enlistment--Texas.
Indians of North America--Texas--Wars.
Railroads--Texas.
Places:
Texas--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Texas--Politics and government--1861-1865.
Texas--Officials and employees--Selection and appointment.
Texas--Frontier troubles.
Confederate States of America.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Petitions--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Reports--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Orders (military records)--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Circulars--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.
Clippings--Texas--Governors--1863-1865.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State, Executive record books, 1835-1917, 14 reels of microfilm.
John Salmon Ford papers, 1838, 1844, 1858-1866, 1869-1876, 1883-1896, undated, bulk 1861-1865, 4.45 cubic ft.
Military Board of Texas records, 1861-1867, 1955, bulk 1861-1865, 6.75 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Civil War records, 1855, 1860-1866, undated, bulk 1861-1865, 17.96 cubic ft.
Texas Comptroller's Office claims records, Confederate indigent families lists, 1863-1865, 0.94 cubic ft.
Texas Department of Criminal Justice records, Convict record ledgers, 1849-1954 (indexes date 1849-1970), 29.95 cubic ft. (21.75 cubic ft. for the ledgers, 8.2 cubic ft. for the indexes) (29 convict ledgers, 10 indexes, also on 20 rolls of microfilm).
Records relating to the Penitentiary, 1846-1921, undated, 87.85 cubic ft.
Records relating to Indian affairs, 1825-1957, bulk 1825-1880, 3.62 cubic ft.
Pendleton Murrah death certificate, 1865 Aug. 5, 1 item. [There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed item. Call number is 2-22/976.]
Center for American History, University of Texas at Austin
Pendleton Murrah letter, 1865, 1 item.
Guy Morrison Bryan papers, 1821-1901, 3 ft.
Frontier protection records, 1857-1865, 1.5 inches.
William Pitt Ballinger papers, 1815-1909, 17 ft., 5 in.
Sterling Clack Robertson Family Papers, 1824-1865, 2 in.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Governor Pendleton Murrah records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

No accession information for these records has been located.

Processing Information

Processed June 1984

Finding aid updated by Tonia J. Wood, November 1995

Corrections and further encoding to TARO project standards by Tonia J. Wood, March 2001

Finding aid converted from EAD 1.0 to 2002 by TARO using the style sheet v1to02.xsl, July 22, 2003

Description added and finding aid made DACS compliant by Caitlin Burhans, October 2013

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Detailed Description of the Records

 

Governor Pendleton Murrah records, 1863-1865,
2.25 cubic ft.

Box Folder
2014/022-1 1. Correspondence, January 1863
[Records include a requisition by the Ordnance Department for 5000 yards of coarse domestic to be made into knapsacks and a bill for blacksmith work.]
2. Correspondence, February 1863
[Records include letters regarding the sale of bonds for the purchase of cotton.]
3. Correspondence, March 1863
[Records include a letter regarding the enforcement of a treaty made with the Comanches.]
4. Correspondence, April 1863
[Records include a letter regarding the appointment and resignation of notaries public.]
5. Correspondence, September 1863
[Records include a letter from a railroad representative denying a request to store tithe tax in their depots and making a recommendation for an agent in Brazoria County.]
6. Correspondence, October 1863
[Records include a letter from A.J. Harrison requesting to remain agent of the Alabama tribe in Polk County.]
7. Correspondence, November 1-8, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major E.W. Cane, chief of the Clothing Bureau, referencing the provision of cloth from the State Penitentiary in Huntsville; a letter from Major General J.B. Magruder on fears of attacks on eastern Texas and the coast, the retention of the State Troops, and manufacture of arms and munitions; a typescript copy of Governor Murrah's inaugural address delivered November 5, 1863 in Austin; and a letter regarding the reappointment of Dr. J.M. Steiner as principal of the State Lunatic Asylum.]
8. Correspondence, November 9-12, 1863
[Records include letters from Major General Magruder on retaining the State Troops, transferring the State Troops to the Confederate service, and addressing the poor condition of roads and bridges in the state; a letter from Columbus on behalf of the Colorado Female Aid Society requesting cloth from the State Penitentiary for soldiers' families; a letter from Governor Murrah to Major General Magruder; and a letter from the Senate confirming the appointment of Secretary of State R.J. Townes.]
9. Correspondence, November 13-20, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder on the movement of Union troops; a message of Governor Murrah to the Senate and House of Representatives; a letter of resignation of Colonel J.Y. Dashiell from the offices of adjutant and inspector general; a letter from the county court of Bosque County regarding a member of the Frontier Regiment selling food at inflated prices and paying friends to perform unnecessary labor; and a letter from Seguin urging the Governor to declare a day of prayer.]
10. Correspondence, November 22-30, 1863
[Records include letters regarding Major General Magruder's arrest of D.J. Baldwin, R.R. Peebles, O.F. Linke, and others on charges of treason against the Confederacy; a letter from Major General Magruder requesting that the Frontier Regiment be transferred to the Confederate service; a letter from Louisa Hillebrand asking that her husband, Reinhard Hillebrand, be turned over to civil authorities and given a trial after being arrested and held by Major General Magruder; a circular from Major W.H. Haynes of the Clothing Bureau restricting use of cloth from the State Penitentiary; a letter from G. Holland regarding a state agent sent to Europe to purchase arms and munitions; and a letter from Major Haynes regarding the provision of cloth from the State Penitentiary.]
11. Correspondence, December 1-6, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder regarding a possible attack on Matagorda Bay and the need to retain current troops and draft more men; a letter regarding legislation for calling up a militia as a home guard; a report from Louis A. Bryant, surgeon in charge at the Texas General Hospital; and letters from Major General Magruder discussing destroying the railroad from Lavaca to Victoria.]
12. Correspondence, December 8-14, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the destruction of the railroad from Lavaca to Victoria and the transportation of the engine to Columbus and a letter from Sam Randall in Huntsville asking to be appointed to the State Penitentiary Board of Directors.]
13. Correspondence, December 15-17, 1863
[Records include correspondence regarding the destruction of the railroad, including a letter from J.O. Wheeler, superintendent of the San Antonio Railroad in Victoria, asking that just the iron and ties of the railroad tracks be destroyed.]
14. Correspondence, December 18-21, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder urging the conscription of militia under new legislation; a letter from the President of the San Antonio and Mexican Gulf Railroad asking Governor Murrah to intervene in the railroad's destruction; a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the Frontier Regiment; a letter from Louisa Hillebrand regarding her husband's continued imprisonment; and letters from Magruder in reference to the destruction of property on the east coast of Texas, a conspiracy in East Texas to release Federal prisoners in Tyler to join with deserters and the Federal Army in North Texas, and the requisition of pistols.]
15. Correspondence, December 24-26, 1863
[Records include a letter to the Military Board regarding the exchange of cotton for rope and a letter from Erath County asking that agricultural products that the troops cannot use be sold.]
16. Correspondence, December 27-29, 1863
[Records include a report from enrolling officer of Atascosa County W.W. Whitby describing resistance to the draft; a letter from Brigadier General W.J. Kyle regarding exemption of railroad employees from the draft; and a letter from Major General Magruder inquiring after the disposition of the Frontier Regiment.]
17. Correspondence, December 30-31, 1863
[Records include a letter from Major H.W. Cooke on eligibility of State Troops to join the new Frontier Organization when their service term expires and a letter from Major General Magruder referring to an incident in Huntsville and the appointment of Colonels Ford and Sulakowski as Brigadier Generals.]
18. Correspondence, January 1-3, 1864
[Records include a letter regarding the conscription of the State Troops.]
19. Correspondence, January 4-5, 1864
[Records include a letter from a friend of the governor, R.H. Ward, reflecting on Murrah's administration and the progress of the war, and applying to the position of Brigadier General; a letter from John S. Griffith regarding lawlessness and murders in Kaufman County, and applying to the position of Brigadier General; a letter to Major General Magruder from John Sayles regarding the Militia Law passed in the legislature; and a letter from R.R. Haynes discussing Murrah's administration and reputation, attitudes toward the war, and the impressment of slaves.]
20. Correspondence, January 6-7, 1864
[Records include a letter to Major General Magruder regarding conflicts between a circular and General Order 138.]
21. Correspondence, January 8-11, 1864
[Records include letters from Major General Magruder acknowledging receipt of a letter from Governor Murrah, and denying a request for an exemption from service; a letter to Major General Magruder from Brigadier General W.R. Boggs regarding the enrollment of the State Troops and the effect of recent legislation on furloughs and the end of service terms; and a letter regarding obtaining a passport to Mexico for a recruiting officer.]
22. Correspondence, January 12, 1864
[Records include a letter to from Governor Murrah to Major General Magruder regarding the distinction between the State Troops and Confederate troops.]
23. Correspondence, January 13-15, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the impressment of slaves into military service; a request for cloth from the penitentiary by a printing establishment employed by the state; and a letter to the Military Board regarding the manufacture of pistols.]
24. Correspondence, January 16-17, 1864
[Records include a letter regarding political prisoners held in San Antonio; a letter from a treasury agent regarding the sale of cotton; a typescript copy of an address by the governor to the people of Texas; a letter from Gillespie County detailing the hardships imposed on the area by the enforcement of the draft; letters from Major General Magruder regarding the designation of a day for organizing the State Troops and militia; and a letter from Governor Murrah to Major General Magruder regarding impressment of slaves.]
25. Correspondence, January 18, 1864
[Records include a letter from General E. Kirby Smith regarding the transfer of the Frontier Regiment to the Confederate service; a letter from the railroad in Victoria regarding Major General Magruder's plans to remove locomotives and rolling stock to Columbus; and a letter from Major Haynes, chief of the clothing bureau, regarding cloth and shoes needed to supply the troops.]
26. Correspondence, January 19-21, 1864
[Records include a letter from John Sayles regarding actions by the State Troops upon the State Penitentiary; a letter to the Military Board regarding the procurement of gunpowder; a letter from Company E at Camp McCord regarding the disposition of the mounted regiment; a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the exemption of express line agents and riders from militia service; and a letter from A.J. Woods, lieutenant of a company in Tarrant County, requesting that the company be returned to serve on the frontier.]
27. Correspondence, January 22-24, 1864
[Records include a letter requesting clarification on the newly passed law providing for the furloughing of the State Troops; a letter from Brigadier General J.W. Throckmorton on the enrollment of militia; and a letter from the Texas Powder Company in San Antonio regarding the exchange of gunpowder for cotton.]
28. Correspondence, January 25-26, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder on orders from General Smith to enroll the State Troops into Confederate service and a letter from Brigadier General J.D. McAdoo regarding Major General Magruder's order to enroll the State Troops.]
29. Correspondence, January 27-29, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder requesting that Governor Murrah join him in Houston to receive General Smith.]
30. Correspondence, January 30-31, 1864
[Records include an enrollment notice for Comal County and a detailed report from Commissioner N.G. Shelley on Texas state claims for frontier defense against the Confederate States.]
31. Correspondence, February 1-4, 1864
[Records include a letter from Colonel J.M. Norris on the attitudes among the troops regarding their conscription into Confederate service; a circular from the Office of the Cotton Bureau regarding the regulation of cotton in Texas; a report from Eubanks and Co. on the manufacturing of cotton cards; a letter from Major General Magruder regarding calling up the Frontier Organization and the disposition of the Frontier Regiment; and a letter from Captain Moses Barnes regarding confusion among the troops about reorganization and conscription.]
32. Correspondence, February 5-9, 1864
[Records include letters from Major General Magruder inquiring whether the State Troops will be turned over to Confederate service in companies or regiments, and requesting that no petitions for detail from the State Troops in staff departments be granted.]
33. Correspondence, February 10-12, 1864
[Records include a letter from Dallas requesting permit for the export of cotton to Europe in order to exchange it for carding, spinning, and weaving machinery.]
34. Correspondence, February 13-15, 1864
[Records include a certificate for the purchase of a horse by the Confederate States.]
35. Correspondence, February 16-17, 1864
[Records include a letter referencing the construction of a cotton and wool factory in Robertson County; a letter from Harden County asking that the destitute families of the county be furnished with bread; a copy of a letter from Major General Magruder to Brigadier General Boggs regarding conscription of the State Troops; and a letter in reference to a foundry for casting cannons.]
36. Correspondence, February 18-20, 1864
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Brazoria County on the drafting of county commissioners into state service; an application by Louisiana Governor Henry W. Allen for the transfer of a soldier from the Texas State Troops to the Louisiana State Troops; a letter regarding plans for the state to purchase cotton with bonds; and a letter regarding a circular put out by General Smith on the Confederate purchase of cotton with Confederate money.]
Box Folder
2014/022-2 37. Correspondence, February 22-24, 1864
[Records include a letter from General Smith regarding the theft of lead from of a Confederate wagon train in Bell County; a letter from a farmer in Dallas County describing the impressment of crops by the Confederate army; and a petition from Williamson County in reference to the impressment of a horse.]
38. Correspondence, February 25-29, 1864
[Records include a letter from Matagorda Country regarding the impressment of slaves; a letter regarding the use of the State Penitentiary for criminals against the Confederacy convicted by court-martial; a letter from Captain Cates requesting the loan of six pistols; a letter from Shreveport, Louisiana regarding Confederate impressment of lands for use by the Texas Iron Works; and a letter regarding freedmen Union soldiers held in Tyler.]
39. Correspondence, March 1-2, 1864
[Records include an application from Captain Lacour of Liberty County for ammunition and cloth for his troops; a letter discussing legal details of discharge from military service due to disability; a report from Eubanks and Co. on the manufacturing of cotton cards; and a letter from General Smith regarding conflict between the State of Texas and the Confederacy over the state purchase of cotton.]
40. Correspondence, March 3-5, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major S. Madin regarding the drafting of purchasing commissaries for the Confederate Subsistence Bureau; a letter from Brigadier General James W. Barnes reporting on the troops; and a letter from W.J. Hutchins of the Cotton Office in Houston regarding the state purchase of cotton.]
41. Correspondence, March 6-8, 1864
[Records include letters from Major General Magruder and Brigadier General McAdoo regarding the reorganization of the State Troops; a letter from Major Quayle in reference to organizing a force to be kept on duty in the northwestern part of the state; letters from Brigadier General E. Greer on military details and exemptions from conscription for government officials; and a letter from Bell County regarding the theft of lead from a Confederate wagon train.]
42. Correspondence, March 9-10, 1864
[Records include a letter from A.R. Roessler at the State Foundry in Austin regarding misappropriation of foundry products; a letter from the State Chemical Laboratory in reference to the manufacture of carbonate of ammonia and related products; and a letter from Shelby County complaining of Military Board policies for the distribution of cotton cards and cloth.]
43. Correspondence, March 11, 1864
[Records include typescript copies of acts of the Louisiana General Assembly passed at the 1864 Legislative Session and a letter from Major General Magruder regarding Brigadier General McAdoo's assumption of command over certain the State Troops.]
44. Correspondence, March 12, 1864
[Records include a letter from A.C. Caldwell regarding lead found in the Colorado River and a letter requesting to export cotton in order to finance the building of a cloth factory in New Braunfels.]
45. Correspondence, March 13-14, 1864
[Records include a letter from Hays County proposing the export of cotton in order to obtain carding and spinning machines and letters from Major General Magruder urging the organization of the State Troops and their transfer to Confederate service to defend the coast.]
46. Correspondence, March 15-16, 1864
[Records include a letter regarding the sale of cotton for the purchase of a reaping and thrashing machine and steam engine from Mexico.]
47. Correspondence, March 17-18, 1864
[Records include a request from a physician in Washington County for a permit to export cotton to Mexico in order to buy medicines; a letter from Governor Murrah authorizing the exploration of the Colorado River and its tributaries for lead; a letter from an agent at the State Loan Agency regarding the interest associated with state bonds; a letter from Brenham requesting a detail of the State Troops to deliver a shipment of cotton sold to the state; a letter to the Military Board regarding a mission to examine a knitting machine in Matagorda County and a spinning jenny in Houston; and a request for a permit to remove cattle to the Concho River in order to avoid a drought in Denton County.]
48. Correspondence, March 19, 1864
[Records include a request from a physician in Washington County for a permit to export cotton to Mexico in order to buy medicine and a letter from the city of Houston on the legality and consequences of exchanging state bonds for cotton.]
49. Correspondence, March 20, 1864
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General H.C. McCulloch in Bonham on conditions in his district and a letter from Major G.B. Erath in Waco on exemption from the Confederate service for men in frontier counties.]
50. Correspondence, March 21-22, 1864
[Records include a letter from Clarksville requesting a permit to sell cotton in order to buy medicine.]
51. Correspondence, March 23, 1864
[Records include a letter from Columbus in reference to theft from civilian businesses by soldiers; a letter from Major James M. Hunter regarding the robbery and murder of officers in Fredericksburg; and letters from Major General Magruder regarding the conscription of the State Troops into Confederate service under the Conscript Acts of Congress.]
52. Correspondence, March 24-25, 1864
[Records include a report from Washington County on the condition of the Brazos Manufacturing Company and letters from T.C. Collins, sheriff of Travis County, regarding a Supreme Court writ for the recovery of prisoners.]
53. Correspondence, March 26-27, 1864
[Records include a letter from the Dallas Manufacturing Company requesting a permit to export cotton and a loan to purchase machinery in order to manufacture cloth; a request from Judge A.S. Walker for an escort of the State Troops when he performs his circuit; the opinion of Judge Townes on the Stribbling case; and an application from a machinist in Houston to start a foundry near Austin to repair thrashing machines and produce brass buttons.]
54. Correspondence, March 28-29, 1864
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton in Bonham in reference to the conscription of frontier troops, the arrest of William Clarke Quantrill, and depredations by deserters and criminals in the area; letters in reference to the Executive Department's receipt of lead from Bell County; and a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the program of exchanging state bonds for cotton and its effect on supplying the Confederate Army.]
55. Correspondence, March 30-31, 1864
[Records include a bill of sale for the purchase of soap by the Confederate States; a request from agent in Chappell Hill for the detail of the State Troops to haul cotton to the Rio Grande; a letter from Major General Magruder warning of a possible raid on Marshall and reporting on the conditions in northern Texas; a letter from General Smith reporting on Union troops gathering along the Red River Valley and the threat of invasion in North Texas, and requesting the calling of furloughed State Troops into service; and a report from Major Hunter on the investigation of the murder of Captain Schultz and other murders in the 3rd Frontier District.]
56. Correspondence, April 1-2, 1864
[Records include a letter to the Texas State Penitentiary regarding increasing its manufacturing capacity; a report on undecided Supreme Court cases from Judge James H. Bell; a letter from Brigadier General Barnes on a discussion with Major General Magruder concerning the conscription of troops; a letter from the Confederate Secretary of the Treasury discussing the auditing of claims of the State of Texas upon the Confederate States; a letter from Major General Magruder reporting on the organization of the State Troops and the possible advance of the Union Army through Shreveport and the east coast of Texas; and a request from Karnes County for a permit to sell cotton in order to purchase machinery for a steam mill.]
57. Correspondence, April 3-4, 1864
[Records include an inquiry from the Burleson County treasurer as to whether civil officers are exempt from service and a letter from Major General Magruder regarding cotton shipments passing the Rio Grande.]
58. Correspondence, April 5-7, 1864
[Records include a letter regarding the Peebles case in the Supreme Court and a letter from Brigadier General Barnes discussing detailed men.]
59. Correspondence, April 8-11, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the organization of the State Troops; a letter from Austin requesting permission to sell cattle in Mexico in order to purchase three wool carding machines; a letter from Huntsville on the interpretation of a December 1863 Act of Legislature providing for the defense of the state; a letter from Brigadier General McAdoo on the organization of two regiments in his brigade; a letter from Collin County requesting a passport in order to buy medicines in Mexico; and a letter regarding the impressment of slaves.]
60. Correspondence, April 12-14, 1864
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General Greer regarding the exemption of state officers from service; a letter from Mountain City reporting horse thieves; a letter from Brigadier General Greer regarding the organization of the State Troops; and a letter from Major General Magruder on granting a leave to an officer appointed by the governor to a civil position.]
61. Correspondence, April 15-17, 1864
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General McAdoo on the disposition of the troops in his district; a letter from the chief justice of Bell County regarding the purchase of bacon to feed destitute families; and a letter from Bell County regarding conscription of individuals needed to tend stock.]
62. Correspondence, April 18-22, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major B. Bloomfield in Houston discussing Major General Magruder's intentions to fortify the State Penitentiary against raids and the use of the penitentiary for Union soldiers; a letter from Colonel George Madison presenting the governor with a flag won in battle in Mansfield, Louisiana; a letter from Lieutenant and Enrolling Officer W.W. Holland in Burnet County reporting on conditions on the frontier, including the hanging of German Texans in Fredericksburg; and special orders from General Kirby Smith exempting from service agents transporting cattle owned by the state to Mexico.]
63. Correspondence, April 23-25, 1864
[Records include a letter from Colonel John S. Ford regarding a communication from Pryor Lea and the receipt of Enfield rifles; a letter from General Smith discussing the governor's incompliance with the Confederate enrollment of state officers; a letter from Major General Magruder to General Smith on troop movements; a letter from General Smith on granting certain details and protecting state property; and statements from the State Treasury of Confederate notes on hand, funds, receipts and disbursements.]
Box Folder
2014/022-3 64. Correspondence, April 26-30, 1864
[Records include a letter notifying the governor of a vacancy on the Board of Trustees of the Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum in Austin; a letter from Major General Magruder on the organization of a reserve corps, enclosing a letter from General Smith; a letter from Major General Magruder upon leaving for Arkansas giving orders for the organization of troops and disposition of arms; a letter from Denton County inquiring about the conscription of county officers; a special order by Major General Magruder requiring residents of Galveston to register with the provost marshal; a letter from S.B. Hendricks, financial agent of the State Penitentiary, on establishing a system for the disposition of their products; and a letter from Brigadier General McAdoo regarding supplies for the troops and the raising of a reserve corps.]
65. Correspondence, May 1-5, 1864
[Records include a letter from the city of Houston on the sale of cotton near the railroads; a letter from Gillespie County on conditions and morale in that area; and a letter from James H. Bell in Tyler regarding the commission of a special judge.]
66. Correspondence, May 6-10, 1864
[Records include a letter from Fort Bend County on raising a reserve corps; a letter from Colonel Ford regarding communications with the governor; a statement of cotton passing through Eagle Pass and Laredo; and a letter from the state comptroller regarding taxes collected.]
67. Correspondence, May 11-17, 1864
[Records include a letter from the Texas Cotton Office on obtaining tithe cotton; a letter requesting a home in Texas for the Tonkawa tribe; a letter from W.J. Hutchins regarding the effect of the state purchase of cotton on the Confederate Cotton Bureau; a letter from the chief justice and county commissioners of Caldwell Country urging the legislature to pass a law providing food for families; a report by Governor Murrah to the Senate on the state plan to purchase cotton with bonds; a letter from General Smith on the use of the State Penitentiary to hold Confederate soldiers convicted by court-martial; and a report by Governor Murrah to the Senate on military details.]
68. Correspondence, May 18-23, 1864
[Records include reports by various officials on the state purchase of cotton and arms; a letter regarding measures taken to address a conspiracy in Weatherford; and a letter from the chief justice of Atascosa County regarding state funds for families in the county.]
69. Correspondence, May 24-27, 1864
[Records include letters from Vance & Bro. regarding State cotton seized by the Confederate Cotton Bureau in Laredo and a letter from Brigadier General Barnes on obtaining a spinning jenny.]
70. Correspondence, May 28-31, 1864
[Records include a letter from Blanco County warning of a possible attack by renegades; a report by Governor Murrah to the Senate on the activities of the Military Board; a proclamation by Governor Murrah of a joint resolution passed in the legislature on Confederate conscription of state officers; a message from Governor Murrah to senators and representatives on appropriations for the State Lunatic Asylum and Deaf and Dumb Asylum; a letter from Nacogdoches County in reference to dishonest officials; and a letter regarding appropriations for a hospital fund for soldiers.]
71. Correspondence, June 1-4, 1864
[Records include a year-end report from the Southern Pacific Railroad Company; a request for a permit to transport cotton across the Rio Grande in order to purchase medicines; and a request for cloth from the State Penitentiary from a regiment stationed in Alexandria, Louisiana.]
72. Correspondence, June 5-11, 1864
[Records include a newspaper clipping with a report of casualties and the movements and actions of the Thirtieth Texas Cavalry; a letter from H.B. Andrews of Galveston asking for Governor Murrah's support of an application to President Jefferson Davis for Major General Magruder's promotion; a newspaper clipping from the Daily Telegraph commenting on the relationship between the state government and the Confederate States; general orders from the headquarters of the Trans-Mississippi Department regarding courts-martial; and general orders from the Adjutant and Inspector General's Office regarding the resignation of officers.]
73. Correspondence, June 12-20, 1864
[Records include a special order from Major General Magruder prohibiting the exportation of cotton past the Rio Grande and a letter from the chief justice of Uvalde County describing the presence of Native Americans, renegades, deserters, and thieves, and requesting further protection.]
74. Correspondence, June 22-25, 1864
[Records include a letter from Rockwall County requesting a permit to ship cotton at Eagle Pass in order to purchase machinery for spinning cotton and wool; a typescript address from the governor regarding the reporting of slave desertion from the Department of Labor; a letter from the Trans-Mississippi Department regarding the special order to halt transportation of cotton beyond the Rio Grande; a letter from Kendall County requesting that a court be called; and general orders from Brigadier General J.M. Hawes in Galveston in reference to the release of a slave boy to his owner.]
75. Correspondence, June 27-30, 1864
[Records include a letter from Cotton Agent J.B. Root on the sale and purchase of cotton; a letter from Confederate Treasury Agent P.W. Gray on the state purchase of cotton; and a letter from Mason County denying its citizens' involvement in the killings in Fredericksburg.]
76. Correspondence, July 1-5, 1864
[Records include a letter requesting that iron belonging to the state in Davis County be sold to the Confederate government; a report from Louis A. Bryant, surgeon in charge of the Texas Hospital; and letters from General Smith on the exportation of cotton under the laws of the Confederate States.]
77. Correspondence, July 8-11, 1864
[Records include a letter from the chief justice of Wharton County on payments from closed estates to the State Treasurer; a letter from Santa Rosa in reference to the Kickapoo tribe; letters from General Smith on the detention of state cotton at the Rio Grande; and a letter from Marshall requesting cloth from the State Penitentiary for soldiers' clothing.]
78. Correspondence, July 13-15, 1864
[Records include an order from General Smith regarding state cotton passing through San Antonio; and statements from agents of the state regarding State Plan cotton.]
79. Correspondence, July 16-24, 1864
[Records include a request from Hillsboro for a passport to Mexico; a request that an iron cage in Davis County be sold to the Field Transportation Department; a letter regarding the purchase of bacon in Bastrop County; a letter requesting permission to sell cotton in order to buy medicine; and a letter from the president of Waco University, Rufus Burleson, on raising a company of cadets to study there.]
80. Correspondence, July 25-31, 1864
[Records include a report from Fredericksburg on conditions in that district and the appointment of Brigadier General McAdoo; a letter from an agent of the Dallas Manufacturing Company regarding the sale of cotton under Confederate regulations; and a letter regarding the funding of the Texas Hospital at Auburn.]
81. Correspondence, August 1-6, 1864
[Records include a typescript copy of Confederate regulations regarding foreign commerce; a letter referencing Confederate prisoners to be held in the State Penitentiary; and a letter from Nueces County regarding the imprisonment and forced conscription of a British citizen.]
82. Correspondence, August 8-15, 1864
[Records include a request from Louisiana Governor Allen for prisoners to be transferred to the State Penitentiary; a letter from H.B. Andrews in Galveston to Major General Magruder regarding the actions of Governor Murrah; and a letter from General Smith regarding the supply of cotton.]
83. Correspondence, August 16-20, 1864
[Records include a letter from District Judge J.W. Ferris in Waxahachie regarding treasonous conspiracies in Parker County and an appeal for a writ of habeas corpus and from Lieutenant Colonel George W. Guess, a Texas soldier in Alexandria, Louisiana.]
84. Correspondence, August 21-27, 1864
[Records include a letter from General Smith regarding regulations on the export of cotton and a letter from lawyer George Goldthwaite on being barred from speaking to his client by Major Thomas at Camp Greer.]
85. Correspondence, August 29-31, 1864
[Records include a letter from lawyer George Goldthwaite regarding the legal rights of a detained soldier; letters from F.J. Cooke in Hempstead regarding the sale of cotton under the State Plan; and a report from Fort Bend County in reference to the opinion of planters on the Confederate impressment of cotton.]
86. Correspondence, September 1-6, 1864
[Records include a letter from Mount Pleasant on the price of corn, beef, and cotton and a letter from Tyler on supplying the public with cotton and cotton cards.]
87. Correspondence, September 7-13, 1864
[Records include a letter regarding the right to use the salt lakes of Corpus Christi; a letter from Brigadier General Barnes discussing public perceptions of the Governor; a letter from the justice of the peace in Van Zandt County on the issuing of commissions to county officers; and a letter in reference to a claim against the Confederate States for clothing and hauling.]
88. Correspondence, September 14-23, 1864
[Records include a letter from Confederate Treasury Agent Gray on the funding of treasury notes; a letter to the Military Board requesting printing paper; a letter regarding the detention of impressed slaves detained by the sheriff of Harris County as runaways; a letter from Cotton Agent E. B. Nichols discussing State Plan cotton; a typescript copy of General Orders Number 73 issued September 22, 1864; a typescript prospectus on the creation of a newspaper in Austin by Pryor Lea; and a letter from a physician in Dallas requesting a permit to sell flour in order to purchase medicines.]
89. Correspondence, September 24-30, 1864
[Records include a letter from Cotton Agent T.C. Armstrong on the details of state purchase of cotton; a request in reference to the appointment of a state agent for the salt lake known as El Sal del Rey; a letter from Montgomery County on the condition of the soldiers' families; a letter from Major General John Walker, replacing Major General Magruder; a letter from State Comptroller C.R. Johns on the payment of support to soldiers' families; and a letter from Confederate Treasury Agent Gray on a new act regulating foreign commerce, particularly of cotton.]
90. Correspondence, October 1-5, 1864
[Records include letters from State Penitentiary Agent Hendricks regarding the indebtedness of the Clothing Bureau, the reception of military criminals into the penitentiary, and the production of clothing; and letters regarding the purchase of cotton passing across the Brazos and Rio Grande Rivers.]
91. Correspondence, October 6-9, 1864
[Records include a letter from Major General S.B. Maxey enclosing typescript copies of General Orders Number 61 from October 7th, 1864 and a joint resolution from September 22, 1864.]
92. Correspondence, October 10-23, 1864
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General James E. Slaughter on unlawful exportation of beef from Presidio del Norte by Major Hunter; a letter from Major General Maxey on the disposition of captured slaves; a letter from Major C.S. West in the Trans-Mississippi Department on frontier protection and the Confederate Enrollment Acts; a copy of a judgment from the Walker County district court on the punishment of military offenses; a letter from Lieutenant Colonel Giddings in reference to Colonel Ford; letters on the condition of slaves in military service imprisoned in Houston; and a request from the House of Representatives for a detailed report on State Plan cotton.]
93. Correspondence, October 24-31, 1864
[Records include letters from Major General Walker on the detention of military prisoners in the State Penitentiary and the arrest of slaves under government employ; a copy of the proceedings of a meeting of Confederate governors in Augusta, Georgia; a resolution requesting information from the governor on the granting of permits for cotton export; a letter from Rio Grande City discussing the governor's response to General Smith's demands in the matter of State Plan cotton; a letter from Hackly on the plan to expand the Militia Law; and a resolution from the House requesting a list of property left by the Frontier Regiment.]
Box Folder
2014/022-4 94. Correspondence, November 1-11, 1864
[Records include a request from Hempstead for cloth from the State Penitentiary to clothe slaves for the winter; a report from Governor Murrah to the House of Representatives on the purchase of cotton by the state; a letter from Bastrop on the manufacture of guns; an address by the governor to the House and Senate on the arrest and detention of slaves under government employ; letters from Grayson and Collin Counties requesting that regiments be assigned to protect the counties from the depredations of deserters and criminals; and a letter from Comptroller W.L. Robards requesting a legislative remedy to the changing value of treasury warrants.]
95. Correspondence, November 14-24, 1864
[Records include a report from W.H. Hart on a commission to provide aid to Texas soldiers in Arkansas; a message from the governor to the House and Senate on the issuing of treasury warrants; a letter from Brigadier General Slaughter on the need for the Frontier Organization in certain counties; and a letter from H.R. Latimer in Clarksville on furloughing the State Reserve Corps.]
96. Correspondence, November 25-30, 1864
[Records include a letter from Captain E.W. Taylor in Houston on the need for more cloth for the troops; a letter from General Smith on the designation of a day of prayer; a letter from Brigadier General J.B. Robertson in Brenham on calling the Frontier Organization onto the field in the event of an invasion of the state; a letter from Brigadier General Slaughter on the need for the Frontier Organization; and a report by Governor Murrah to the Senate in reference to State Plan cotton.]
97. Correspondence, December 1-13, 1864
[Records include a letter from Governor Murrah inquiring after slaves for sale; a request for the use of slaves owned by Texas citizens in order to build fortifications at Galveston, Houston, Marshall, and other locations; a letter from the State Penitentiary on the appropriation of cloth for counties in the state; a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton in reference to the Frontier Organization; a letter from Major General Maxey regarding the detention of slaves in the State Penitentiary; and a letter from a salt maker in Jefferson County.]
98. Correspondence, December 15-20, 1864
[Records include an address by Governor Murrah to the Senate withholding approval of a bill; a letter from Louisiana Governor Allen regarding the detention of slaves; a letter from Wise County regarding a mass movement of citizens out of the area in connection with a conspiracy to rob people of the county; a letter from General Smith in reference to the Frontier Organization; and a detailed letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton mentioning treasury issue, the creation of a spy company for Indian Country, a winter campaign north of the Red River, the need for ammunition, information gleaned from a Kansas scout, and a kidnapping case.]
99. Correspondence, December 22-30, 1864
[Records include a letter from Colonel James E. Harrison to Secretary of War James A. Seddon on employing an agent to treat with the Creek and Comanche tribes; a letter from Brigadier General Slaughter on posting a guard to protect the salt lake; a letter from a citizen in Cherokee County on manufacturing in the state, comparing activity in Louisiana to that in Texas; a letter from Brigadier General McAdoo on the seizure of citizens' cattle by Captain Mitchell in Burnet County; and a letter from George Howard King at the Ordnance Works in Grimes County requesting timber and penitentiary cloth.]
100. Correspondence, January 1-12, 1865
[Records include a circular by State Penitentiary Agent Hendricks in reference to the provision of cloth to counties for the use of soldiers' families; a letter from Major General Maxey in appreciation of the passage of resolutions of thanks to the Ninth Regiment of Texas Infantry; and letters from Comptroller Robards regarding the funding of Confederate notes and funds for the support of the Tonkawa tribe.]
101. Correspondence, January 13-19, 1865
[Records include a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton in reference to placing the Frontier Organization into Confederate service; letters from E.R. Hord regarding funds for interest payments on state bonds; a letter from A.W. Terrell on the provision of clothing for his brigade; and a letter from the Collin County court requesting the deposit of old issue money.]
102. Correspondence, January 20-25, 1865
[Records include documents relating to the creation and incorporation of the Texas Paper Manufacturing Company; a letter from B.H. Epperson asking for protection from the Confederate impressment of cotton; a letter from the chief justice of Fannin County concerning penitentiary cloth; a letter from Major General Walker on possible attacks on Galveston and Houston; a letter from D. Richardson of the Texas Paper Manufacturing Company on the production of school books; a detailed report from Shreveport from Colonel Guy M. Bryan; and a letter from Enrolling Officer J.W. Hale on attempting to enroll a portion of Brigadier General Throckmorton's troops.]
103. Correspondence, January 27-31, 1865
[Records include detailed reports from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; a circular from the Office of the Comptroller on the distribution of penitentiary cloth; a letter from San Antonio on the punishment of military offenses; and a letter from John Burke on the legality of Confederate impressment of cargo exported by the state.]
104. Correspondence, February 1-7, 1865
[Records include detailed reports from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; a letter from George H. Sweet at the offices of the San Antonio Herald on behalf of druggists and physicians; and a letter from Huntsville on the invention of a machine for manufacturing cotton and wool cards.]
105. Correspondence, February 8-13, 1865
[Records include a circular from the office of State Penitentiary Agent Hendricks on the distribution of cloth; a detailed report from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; a letter from Major J.H. Brown in Fredericksburg on a future campaign against Native Americans in the area; a letter from Major West on conscription of the Frontier Organization; a letter from a camp near Shreveport on the progress of the war; and a letter to Confederate Treasury Agent Gray from General Smith on the Confederate government's poor credit.]
106. Correspondence, February 15-18, 1865
[Records include a letter from Major West on the contents of a private letter obtained by the Governor; a letter from the chief justice of Coleman County regarding an incident with the Kickapoo tribe; a letter from State Penitentiary Agent Hendricks regarding his dispute with the comptroller over the distribution of penitentiary cloth; a letter from a Confederate agent for the Creek tribe regarding peace negotiations between the Confederate States and numerous Native American tribes; resolutions drafted by a company of soldiers posted on Galveston Island; and a letter from Wood County in reference to difficulties building a works for the production of wool and cotton goods.]
107. Correspondence, February 20-25, 1865
[Records include a letter from W.C. Walsh in reference to the possibility of Union attacks from Kansas; a letter from Chaplain Thomas Castleton on the use of the general fund by the county courts; a letter from Confederate Treasury Agent Gray in reference to the poor credit of the Confederate States; a letter from Captain Adolphe Wolf in Shreveport in reference to transportation purchased from the State of Texas; a detailed report from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; and a letter from Mount Enterprise requesting a permit to sell cotton in western markets in order to purchase medicine.]
108. Correspondence, February 27-28, 1865
[Records include a detailed report from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; a letter from Confederate President Jefferson Davis regarding Governor Murrah's request to furlough the Texas brigade in Northern Virginia, likely Hood's Texas Brigade; and a letter from the Office of the Collector of Customs relaying an exchange with Confederate Treasury Agent Gray regarding Confederate regulations on private vessels carrying cargo for the state.]
109. Correspondence, March 1-10, 1865
[Records include a letter from Governor Murrah issuing state bonds in exchange for money to purchase guns and artillery; a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton asking to give 20 guns to the Tonkawa tribe; a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton regarding payment of the accounts of a state agent; a detailed report from Shreveport by Colonel Bryan; a request from Colonel J.B. Robertson, commander of the State Reserve Corps, to return men to their homes to protect their families; and a letter from Comptroller Robards, requesting an account of the general progress and transactions of the Military Board.]
110. Correspondence, March 11-21, 1865
[Records include a letter from Confederate Treasury Agent Gray regarding Confederate regulations on private vessels carrying cargo for the state; letters from Major General Walker and Major Hunter in reference to charges of Major Hunter supplying cattle to the Union in El Paso; a letter from General Smith regarding a letter written by Major West; a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton on events in his district; a letter from General Smith on the peaceful intentions of certain Native American tribes; a letter from Waco on raising a company of scouts from the frontier counties; a letter from several Texas railroad companies on compensation for government use of railroads; and a letter from Brenham on the success of newly invented carding machines.]
111. Correspondence, March 22-31, 1865
[Records include letters recommending the establishment of a state store and complaining of a lack of goods for citizens; a letter from Houston discussing legal aspects of Confederate regulations on private vessels carrying cargo for the State; a letter from Captain John Garey to Brigadier General Boggs in reference to transportation purchased from the state of Texas; a letter from Major J.H. Brown regarding the desertion of a large group of soldiers in Colonel McCord's regiment; and a letter in reference to a meeting with presidents of Texas railroads regarding compensation.]
112. Correspondence, April 1-8, 1865
[Records include a letter from Anderson County regarding the destruction of an iron works; a letter from Indianola in Calhoun County requesting relief for destitute soldiers' families; a letter from Brigadier General Throckmorton in reference to events involving Native Americans in his district; a letter from Major General Magruder on organizing troops under the new Conscript Law; a letter from General Smith regarding peace negotiations with the Comanche tribe; and a letter from Governor Murrah addressing the need for citizens in frontier counties to be permitted to sell their cattle in Mexico.]
113. Correspondence, April 10-18, 1865
[Records include a letter from Major West on the commission of Brigadier General Throckmorton to treat with the Comanche tribe; a letter from Major Haynes of the Clothing Bureau in reference to the manufacture of goods at the State Penitentiary; a letter from E.R. Hord regarding the robbery of a state cotton agent; and a letter from Guadalupe County urging the arming of slaves to fight in the war.]
114. Correspondence, April 19-30, 1865
[Records include telegrams from General Smith and Colonel Bryan requesting the governor's presence at a conference of governors of the Trans-Mississippi Department in Marshall; a letter from General Smith accepting the commission of Colonel Bryan as a representative of Texas in the Trans-Mississippi Department; an address by Governor Murrah to the citizens of Texas in response to news of General Robert E. Lee's surrender in Virginia; and a letter on the legal aspects of the state's right to export cotton.]
115. Correspondence, May 1865
[Records include a petition from San Antonio physicians and druggists to allow the importation of alcohol; a letter by the governors of Louisiana, Missouri, Texas, and Arkansas regarding the surrender of General Robert E. Lee; a letter from the governor to Colonel Ashbel Smith and W.P. Ballinger in reference to a trip to New Orleans to meet with Major General Canby; a letter from a citizen urging peace with the United States; drafts of secret instructions to prevent the invasion of Texas during negotiations between General Smith and General Ulysses S. Grant; a letter from Major General Canby on the state of the country; a letter from Major General Magruder regarding the distribution of Confederate public monies; and a special order by Major General Magruder giving Governor Murrah control of Confederate-owned steamers in Texas waters.]
116. Correspondence, undated
[Records include instructions on the transportation of cotton to the Rio Grande for the state; a permit for the export of cotton when an equal amount is sold to the state; a letter from state agents in Wharton County on the exportation of cotton; a letter on the appointment of commissioners; a letter from Williamson County on the impressment of guns.]
117. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a template letter for the appointment of state agents for the sale of state-owned cotton.]
118. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a typescript copy of a message from Governor Murrah to the Tenth Legislature.]
119. Correspondence, undated
[Records include a letter from Thomas J. Devine on a meeting with General Smith regarding enforcement of the Conscript Act.]
Box
2014/022-5 Letterpress volumes, November 5, 1863-May 13, 1865:
[Letterpress volumes contain copies of outgoing correspondence by Governor Pendleton Murrah. Each book contains an index listing correspondents alphabetically. In some instances, correspondence found in these volumes refers directly to incoming correspondence elsewhere in the records. Frequent correspondents include General E. Kirby Smith, Major General J.B. Magruder, Secretary of State R.J. Townes, and Cotton Agent E.B. Nichols, as well as numerous military officers, local and state government officials, and citizens. These volumes mainly consist of letters, but also contain messages from Governor Murrah to the Texas State Senate and House of Representatives.]
November 5, 1863-September 8, 1864
September 21, 1864-May 13, 1865

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