Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Legation (U.S.)

An Inventory of Texas Legation (U.S.) Correspondence at the Texas State Archives, 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, undated, bulk 1836-1839



Overview

Creator: Texas. Legation (U.S.)
Title: Texas Legation (U.S.) correspondence
Dates: 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, undated
Dates: bulk 1836-1839
Abstract: The Texas legation in Washington, D.C., headed by a Minister Plenipotentiary, conducted diplomacy between the Republic of Texas and the United States. Records of the legation document that diplomatic business, consisting of correspondence (272 items) and an index, dating 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, and undated, bulk 1836-1839. Subjects include U.S. recognition of Texas independence, proposals for annexation of Texas to the U.S., boundary issues, Native Americans, the slave trade, relations with Mexico (including the repudiated public and secret Treaties of Velasco), the Texas Navy, financial arrangements for loans, bonds, queries regarding land claims, emigration plans, news of relatives supposedly in Texas, etc.
Quantity: 4.75 cubic ft. (272 items)
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

In 19th-century diplomacy, a legation was a diplomatic representative office lower than an embassy. Whereas an embassy was headed by an Ambassador, a legation was headed by an Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary. The distinction between a legation and an embassy was gradually dropped following World War II.

The history of the Republic of Texas legation to the United States began informally in late 1835 with the appointment of Stephen F. Austin, Branch T. Archer, and William H. Wharton as commissioners to the United States to seek U.S. help for the Texas Revolution. After the Texian victory at San Jacinto in April 1836, and the ratification of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas in September 1836, the people of Texas overwhelmingly voted to seek annexation to the United States of America. Texas President Sam Houston appointed Wharton as Minister Plenipotentiary to the U.S. in November 1836 (heading the Texas Legation in Washington, D.C.), to gain U.S. recognition of Texas's independence and hopefully also annexation to the United States. Wharton held conferences with U.S. Secretary of State John Forsyth, U.S. congressmen, and President Andrew Jackson. Wharton resigned February 28, 1837, and Memucan Hunt (who had been named Minister Extraordinary in December 1836) took his place as Minister Plenipotentiary. The U.S. recognized Texas independence on March 3, 1837. After a formal presentation of the subject of annexation to the U.S. on August 4, 1837, the proposal was hotly debated in the U.S. Congress, opposed mainly by those against slavery. Hunt did manage to negotiate a boundary convention with the U.S., signed on April 25, 1838. Peter Wagener Grayson initially declined appointment as Minister Plenipotentiary to replace Hunt in June 1838, then accepted, but ended up committing suicide in Tennessee on the trip to Washington (July 1838). Anson Jones replaced Hunt by August 1838, and Hunt became Secretary of the Texas Navy in December 1838. Jones withdrew the annexation offer at Houston's request on October 2, 1838, and the Texas Senate approved of the withdrawal on January 23, 1839.

(Although these Legation records essentially end in February 1839, additional records of the Republic of Texas legation in Washington, D.C. are found in the Andrew Jackson Houston collection at the Texas State Archives. What follows is a history of the legation for that later period.)

Mirabeau B. Lamar replaced Houston as president in December 1838, and no longer pushed for annexation, but rather tried to strengthen the Republic of Texas as an independent nation. Anson Jones was replaced by Richard G. Dunlap as Minister Plenipotentiary to Washington in March 1839. Dunlap in turn was replaced by Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. in April 1840; he was already in the United States. Shortly afterward, Bee traveled to South Carolina to visit family and did not return to Washington until December, due partly to health problems. In February 1841, Bee was instructed to try to negotiate a general treaty of amity and commerce with Spain and its colony Cuba. Bee also dealt with the problem of Indian raids from U.S. territory into the Republic of Texas, especially after John Tyler was inaugurated U.S. President in April 1841 after William Henry Harrison’s death. A treaty of amity between Texas and the U.S. was submitted to U.S. Secretary of State Daniel Webster in July 1841. When Sam Houston was elected president again, he began to urge annexation once more. About two weeks after his inauguration, Houston recalled Bee on December 27, 1841, citing his multiple absences from Washington as being "injurious to the interests of this Government and disrespectful to that of the United States." Houston replaced him with James Reily, who arrived in Washington in March 1842. Reily and U.S. Secretary of State Daniel Webster renegotiated the treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation, which the United States Senate failed to ratify. Houston reappointed Reily, but he was not confirmed because he was opposed to annexation. By August 1842 Isaac Van Zandt was Minister Plenipotentiary (or chargé d’affaires). The U.S. Senate ratified the treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation in January 1843, but refused to ratify a treaty of annexation in June 1844. In December outgoing U.S. President Tyler (after James K. Polk’s election as U.S. President on an annexation platform) proposed that Texas be annexed by a joint resolution of the U.S. Congress, which passed in February 1845. By this time former Minister Plenipotentiary Anson Jones had become the last president of the Republic of Texas (December 1844-February 1846). Jones presented two propositions to the Congress of the Republic of Texas: one for annexation to the U.S., the other for Mexican recognition of the Republic provided annexation did not take place. The Texas Convention of 1845 chose annexation. In March 1846, U.S. Senator Sam Houston was given authorization to take possession of the books, papers, and belongings of the Legation of the Republic of Texas in Washington D.C.

Ministers plenipotentiary included: William H. Wharton (1836-1837), Memucan Hunt (1837-1838), Peter Wagener Grayson (1838), Anson Jones (1838-1839), Richard G. Dunlap (1839-1840), Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. (1840-1841), James Reily (1841-1842), Isaac Van Zandt (1842-1845).

Secretaries of the Texas legation to the United States included: James M. Wolfe, Fairfax Catlett, Moses Austin Bryan (1839), Samuel Alexander Roberts (March-May 1839), Nathaniel C. Amory (1839-1842), and Charles H. Raymond (July 1842-January 1845).

(Sources include: The Handbook of Texas Online articles "Diplomatic relations of the Republic of Texas" by Joseph W. Schmitz; "William Harris Wharton" by Merle Weir; "Memucan Hunt" by C. T. Neu; "Peter Wagener Grayson" by Leslie H. Southwick; "Anson Jones" by Herbert Gambrell; "Richard G. Dunlap" by Carolyn Hyman; "Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr." by Thomas W. Cutrer; "James Reily" by Thomas W. Cutrer; "Isaac Van Zandt" by John B. Wilder; documents from the Andrew Jackson Houston collection as well as the Legation records.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The Texas legation in Washington, D.C., headed by a Minister Plenipotentiary, conducted diplomacy between the Republic of Texas and the United States. Records of the legation document that diplomatic business, consisting of correspondence (272 items) and an index, dating 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, and undated, bulk 1836-1839. Subjects include U.S. recognition of Texas independence, proposals for annexation of Texas to the U.S., boundary issues, Native Americans, the slave trade, relations with Mexico (including the repudiated public and secret Treaties of Velasco), the Texas Navy, financial arrangements for loans, bonds, queries regarding land claims, emigration plans, news of relatives supposedly in Texas, etc. Correspondents of particular note are Stephen F. Austin (as Secretary of State of the Republic); succeeding Secretaries of State from Texas, including James Pinckney Henderson and R.A. Irion; John Forsyth (Secretary of State for the U.S.); James Treat (diplomatic agent for the Republic of Texas to Mexico); William H. Wharton (first minister plenipotentiary of the Texas legation); succeeding Texas ministers plenipotentiary Memucan Hunt and Anson Jones; agents and personnel of the Texas Navy; financial agents for Texas; and persons of note, such as Samuel F. B. Morse, Joel Poinsett, Robert Triplett, Thomas Toby (acting with his brother Samuel, as Toby and Brother Company), Branch T. Archer, Thomas Jefferson Chambers, Samuel May Williams, W. Fairfax Gray, and G.W. Hockley. The alphabetical index links correspondents to page numbers assigned to the Legation correspondence.

For later Texas legation correspondence (1839-1845) see the Andrew Jackson Houston collection.

The notes in the inventory are full of references to the following: Austin Papers (Barker, Eugene C., editor, The Austin Papers, October 1834-January 1837, The University of Texas, 1927); Garrison (George Garrison, editor, Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas, Washington, Government Printing Office, 1908-1911, 3 volumes); and Streeter (Thomas W. Streeter, Bibliography of Texas, 1795-1845, Research Publications, 1983); also Sloan (the original inventory compiled by Dorothy Sloan, October 2004, on which most of the individual document "Notes" and "Contents" descriptions are based).


 

Arrangement of the Records

These records were at some point sewn into a book format and given page numbers by someone unknown, in roughly chronological order. The documents are listed in this inventory in more precisely chronological order, with the page numbers indicated. At the end are 15 unnumbered but related items, also in chronological order, plus an alphabetical index.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

None.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Austin, Stephen F. (Stephen Fuller), 1793-1836.
Henderson, James Pinckney, 1808-1858.
Irion, Robert A.
Forsyth, John.
Treat, James, d. 1840.
Wharton, William H. (William Harris), 1802-1839.
Hunt, Memucan, 1807-1856.
Jones, Anson, 1798-1858.
Morse, Samuel Finley Breese, 1791-1872.
Poinsett, Joel Roberts, 1779-1851.
Triplett, Robert.
Toby, Thomas, d. 1849.
Archer, Branch Tanner, 1790-1856.
Chambers, Thomas Jefferson, 1802-1865.
Williams, Samuel May, 1804-1888.
Gray, William Fairfax, 1787-1841.
Hockley, George Washington, 1802-1854.
Catlett, Fairfax.
Corporate Names:
Texas (Republic). Dept. of State.
Texas. Navy.
Texas (Republic).
Subjects:
Treaties--Texas--Mexico.
Treaties--Texas--United States.
Emigration and immigration--Texas.
Boundaries--Texas.
Slavery--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Diplomatic and consular service.
Texas--Foreign relations--United States.
Texas--Foreign relations--Mexico.
Texas--Foreign relations--Treaties.
Texas--Annexation to the United States.
United States--Foreign relations--Texas.
Mexico--Foreign relations--Texas.
Texas (Republic)--Boundary.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Diplomatic and consular service--1835-1839, 1841, 1844-1845.
Functions:
Developing diplomatic relations.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State diplomatic correspondence, 1831-1832, 1835-1846, undated, 6.9 cubic ft., 3 reels of microfilm
Texas Secretary of State consular correspondence, 1836-1850, 1873-1875, bulk 1836-1846, 2.12 cubic ft.
Texas Department of State treaties between the Republic of Texas and other nations, 1838-1844, 3.59 cubic ft.
Texas Secretary of State general correspondence of the Department of State, Republic of Texas, 1822-1859, undated, bulk 1835-1846, 4.96 cubic ft., 4 microfilm reels
Texas Secretary of State boundary records, 1837-1843, 1858-1860, 1873-1877, 1882, 1885-1887, 1911, undated, 1.5 cubic ft.
Texas Secretary of State records relating to passports, 1836-1845, 1855, 1858, 0.4 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Navy papers, 1835-1847, 1852, 1855, bulk 1836-1846, 17.24 cubic ft.
Records relating to Indian affairs, 1825-1957, bulk 1825-1880, 3.62 cubic ft.
Texas State Archives: Manuscript Collections
Andrew Jackson Houston collection, 1812-1941, bulk 1812-1867, 31.41 cubic ft. [especially Documents 4602.1 thru 4602.195 (dating 1839-1841), but also other documents scattered throughout the collection, constituting the later correspondence of the Republic of Texas Legation in Washington, D.C., 1839-1845.]
Letter to Sam Houston from F.B. Morse, August 9, 1860, re: telegraph [There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed collection. Call number is 2-23/1059.]
McKinney, Williams and Company papers, 1835-1839, 0.3 cubic ft. [There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed collection. Call number is 2-23/934.]
Publications
Stevens, Kenneth R. and Gregg Cantrell (eds.), The Texas Legation Papers, 1836-1845, Fort Worth, Texas Christian University Press, 2012.
Garrison, George (ed.), Diplomatic Correspondence of the Republic of Texas, Volume I: Correspondence with the United States, Washington, Government printing office, 1908.
Barker, Eugene C. (ed.), The Austin Papers, October 1834-January 1837, The University of Texas, 1927.
Binkley, William C. (ed.), Official Correspondence of the Texas Revolution, 1835-1836, New York, D. Appleton-Century Co., 1936, 2 volumes.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Texas Legation (U.S.) correspondence. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2006/385

Based on records in the Texas State Archives, following the close of the Legation Office in 1845, Acting Secretary of State Charles Mariner, in a letter to the newly elected U.S. Senator Sam Houston dated March 7, 1846, directed Houston, at the request of Governor James Pinckney Henderson, to "obtain control over the books, papers, etc. belonging to the Legation of the late Republic of Texas" that had been placed with the Office of the U. S. Adjutant General in Washington, D.C., following the close of the Legation. Houston did acquire custody of the records but, rather than depositing them with the Texas Secretary of State in Austin as requested, he instead took them to his home. From all indications, the records were passed down to Sam Houston’s second son, Andrew Jackson Houston, who died in 1941, leaving two daughters. In 1961, during Hurricane Carla, the house where the documents were located was destroyed and caught on fire. Most of the extensive collection of Texas documents in the house were rescued, and ended up in the Andrew Jackson Houston Collection at the Texas State Archives, part of which can be identified as records of the Republic of Texas Legation in Washington, D.C. (1839-1845). The earlier records of the Texas Legation (1836-1839), however, were somehow missed, and at an undetermined time came to be in the custody of other individuals who lived in Southeast Texas. During 2004-2006, the documents were stored in a bank vault, but prior to that they were kept in a private home and at one point for several months, in the trunk of a car. In March 2006 the Texas State Historical Association was offered the opportunity to auction the right of the high bidder to select a state approved institution to exhibit and provide researcher access to the collection for five years in accordance with the Texas State Library and Archives Commission’s rules for the loan and exhibition of state archives. As part of the Commission’s agreement with the association, the collection received necessary preservation treatments prior to their placement at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas. Following the end of their loan to TCU, the Legation records were returned to the Commission for permanent retention in the State Archives on December 6, 2012.

These records were received by the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission from the Texas State Historical Association on June 8, 2006.

Processing Information

Most of the individual document descriptions based on the work of Dorothy Sloan, October 2004

Finding aid encoded by Tony Black in EAD Version 2002 as part of the TARO project, June 2006

Processed by Tony Black after conservation and scanning completed, December 2006

Corrections and further encoding to DACS standards by Tony Black, January 2013

Other Formats for the Records

The records have been digitized. Digital versions in jpg format can be provided on request.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Republic of Texas Legation in Washington correspondence, 1835-1839, 1841, 1843-1845, undated, bulk 1836-1839,
4.75 cubic ft. (272 items)

Box Pages
2006/385-1 1-4 George Lincoln to William H. Wharton (Worcester, Massachusetts), December 25, 1836
[2 pages,
integral address and note of receipt.]
[Content: Recommending to Wharton the son of Levi Lincoln and mentioning the Texas Navy; after the main letter are transcriptions of two other recommendations. See also pages 152-153.]
[Note: This document is out of chronological order.]
5-6 Contract, April 1, 1836
[2 pages,
docketed. Streeter 1237 (3 loc.). Margins chipped (loss of most of last line on p. 1)]
[Note: Dated at end at Harrisburg, and with printed signatures of President David G. Burnet and other Texas officials, and the contractors, Robert Triplett and W. F. Gray. An additional clause dated April 2, has Burnet's printed signature.] [New Orleans: Printed by Benjamin Levy?, April 1, 1836]
[Content: Contract containing terms of a compromise of the loan agreements of January 11 and 18, 1836. Text begins: "Whereas, Branch T. Archer, William H. Wharton, and Stephen F. Austin, Commissioners on behalf of the Provisional Government of Texas, obtained money from certain individuals in the United States, upon two Loans, one for two hundred thousand Dollars, the other for fifty thousand Dollars, upon conditions, a part of which the Government of Texas are desirous of being relieved from..."]
7-12 Andrew Jackson to Santa Anna (Hermitage), September 4, 1836
[4-1/2 pages,
Secretarial copy ( "Copy" at top of p. 1). Pages damaged at bottom with loss of several lines on each page.]
[Content: Jackson acknowledges Santa Anna's letter of July 4, outlines the U.S. Government's position on the Texas conflict, and remarks that it is difficult to deal with any proposal Santa Anna puts forward since his government has repudiated any agreement he may make while he is in captivity.]
13-14 Peyton Sterling Wyatt to William H. Wharton (Charlotte Court House, Virginia), November 8, 1836
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: War news and his desire to again become part of the Texas Army to avenge his friends who fell at Goliad.]
15-18 Richard Ellis to William H. Wharton (Place not present or difficult to read), November 17, 1836
[4 pages]
[Content: Long discussion of the problems of using the Red River as the boundary.]
19-20 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Peach Point, [Texas]), November 22, 1836
[1 page]
[Note: "Department of State" at top left. Not in Austin Papers. Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 141-142.]
[Content: Austin tells Wharton he has sent a tin case with credentials, instructions, and other documents relating to Wharton's office of Plenipotentiary to the U.S.]
21-22 James M. Wolfe's oath of office as Secretary to the Texas legation, sworn to and subscribed by William H. Wharton at end (Republic of Texas, Brazoria), November 24, 1836
[1 page]
23-28 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), November 25, 1836
[6 pages (letter is 1-1/2 pages, extracts from the treaty are remaining 4 pages)]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 143 (lists the original letter in Austin's hand; the present document is in a secretarial hand but signed by Austin). The Treaties of Velasco are not in Garrison.]
[Content: Informing Wharton that Santa Anna has left for Washington, D.C. with Barnard Bee and George W. Hockley; stating it is desirable that Wharton meet with the President; enclosing copies of both the public and secret versions of the Treaty of Velasco, here present and signed and certified by Austin as Secretary of State.]
29-30 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia), November 29, 1836
[1 page]
[Note: Not in Austin Papers.]
[Content: Austin tells Wharton about financial arrangements for paying his salary and expenses as Plenipotentiary from the Republic of Texas to Washington, D.C. and authorizes him to draw up to $5,000.]
31-34 William H. Wharton to President [Samuel] Houston (on board Steam Boat General Gaines near Natchez), December 2, 1836
[3 pages]
[Note: Similar to a letter Wharton wrote to Austin on the same date (see Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 148-149).]
[Content: Wharton writes that he is having great difficulty communicating consistently because of the inconvenient circumstances and comments on the mechanism whereby Texas may become part of the U.S., including the possibility that "the U.S. may give Mexico what hush money she pleases." Wharton's retained copy with his ms. note on last leaf.]
35-36 Peyton Sterling Wyatt to William H. Wharton (Alabama), December 6, 18[36]
[1 page,
right and lower margin damaged with some loss of letters.]
[Content: Wants Texas news; expresses his continued desire to avenge his men fallen at Goliad and the Alamo; regrets his absence and explains he has been in Alabama fighting in the Creek War; etc.]
37-38 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton, (Columbia, [Texas]), December 10, 1836
[2 pages]
[Note: signed twice; Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 150-151 (documenting another secretarial copy with postscript in Austin's hand). Not in Austin Papers.]
[Content: Regarding annexation, transferring the Texas Army and Navy to the U.S.; granting discretionary powers to Wharton in his role as Plenipotentiary to the U.S. Austin begins: "It is certainly desirable that Texas should enter the American Union at once and undivided, but should you discover that this condition, if positively insisted upon is likely materially to offer the main object which is annexation, I am directed by the President to say that you are at liberty to waive it and agree to a territorial Government with the necessary guarantees as to a State Govt. so soon as petitioned for. This Govt. has too much confidence in the just and liberal principles by which the United States are governed to doubt that full and ample justice will not be done as in every respect." Austin advises that if Mexico is willing to give a quit claim for Texas to the U.S., then President Houston will be amenable to Texas entering the U.S. by that method.]
39-42 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia), December 10, 1836
[2-1/2 pages,
integral leaf. "Duplicate"at top left.]
[Note: Docket on integral leaf (in Austin's hand): "S. F. Austin to Wm. Wharton 10th Decr. 1836" and in another hand: "Hon. S. F. Austin to Hon. W. H. Wharton Dec. 10th 1836." Not in Garrison, but see Vol. I, pp. 149-150 (publishes the text of the copy at the State Archives without "Duplicate" at top). Not in Austin Papers.]
[Content: Reports good progress organizing the Republic of Texas government, Army, and Navy; excitement of populace to become part of U.S.; recently discovered conspiracy of Native Americans in the Nacogdoches District to join the Mexicans last spring to attack Texans (which plot was foiled by the defeat at San Jacinto); urges Wharton to ensure that U.S. troops continue to be stationed at Nacogdoches.]
43-46 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia), December 10, 1836
[Content: Same as above, without "Duplicate" at top.]
47-48 [Stephen Hendrickson Everitt] to William H. Wharton (Senate Hall, Columbia, [Texas]), December 10, 1836
[1 page,
damaged at lower margin with loss of a few lines and signature.]
[Note: Everitt was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.]
[Content: Letter with current events; mentions Collinsworth, Ellis, et al.]
49-50 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), December 14, 1836
[1 page,
"No. 5" at top.]
[Note: Text not published in Austin Papers, but noted as omitted on p. xxxiv.]
[Content: Austin tells Wharton how to draw his salary--that he should present his drafts to David White of Mobile.]
51-52 Henry Smith to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), December 14, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Informing him that David White of Mobile will soon have the money to honor his drafts.]
53-54 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), December 14, 1836
[1 page,
"No. 6" at top.]
[Note: Noted by Garrison (Vol. I, p. 155), but not published.]
[Content: Informing him that Fairfax Catlett has been appointed Secretary of the Legation mission to the U.S.]
55-56 P. P. Rea to unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton]) (New Orleans), December 14, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Forwarding letters back and forth between Washington and Texas and mentioning that Lorenzo de Zavala may have died.]
57-58 F. T. Wells to William H. Wharton (New York), December 16, 1836
[1-1/2 pages,
damaged, with loss of several lines at lower margin.]
[Content: Asks for a loan of $150 and complains that he has never been reimbursed even one dollar for his services to Texas.]
59 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Department of State, Columbia, [Texas]), December 19, 1836
[1 page,
"No. 8" at top; Pages 59 and 60, although different letters, are both written on the same sheet of paper, recto and verso.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 156. Not in Austin Papers.]
[Content: Regarding Felix Huston's news from Treviño that the Cherokee chiefs were in Matamoros last summer; reports from interpreter Cortinez who was been with the Cherokee around Nacogdoches; that the Cherokee had agreed with Urrea "to appear friendly with the Texans, until the Mexicans crossed the Guadalupe, and then they were to march on the frontiers with five thousand warriors"; preparations for war; news that John Woodward has been appointed general consul for the Republic at the ports of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore.]
60 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Department of State, Columbia, [Texas]), December 21, 1836
[1 page,
"No. 9" at top.]
[Note: Not in Austin Papers or Garrison. This is one of the last letters written by Austin-- only four days before his death. Garrison (Vol. I, p. 156) states that the letter numbered 8 [Austin to Wharton, December 19, 1836] is the last of the numbered series from Texas. However, as can be seen, Austin continued to practice through No. 9.]
[Content: With news that the Republic of Texas judicial system has been established and appointments for judgeships have been conferred on James Collinsworth, R. M. Williamson, and J. W. Robinson.]
61-62 Stephen F. Austin to William H. Wharton (Department of State, Columbia, [Texas]), December 16, 1836
[1-1/2 p.,
"No. 7" at top. Docketed on p. 2: "Hon S. F. Austin to Hon. Wm. H. Wharton Decr. 19th, 1836."]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 155-156. This document is out of chronological and numerical order.]
[Content: Informing Wharton of an illegal plot to introduce slaves into Texas from the U.S. via the Sabine River and stating: "This attempt to evade the prohibition of the African slave trade, contained in our constitution certainly will not be sustained by the tribunals of this Republic, but it is also desireable that the Govt. of the U.S. should be apprised of such attempts to carry on a piratical commerce by her own citizens through her territory and in American vessells. I am therefore directed by the president to instruct you to lay this subject before the Govt. of the U.S. and to request its co-operation on the Sabine frontier and in the Gulf of Mexico, to enforce the laws for the suppression of the African slave trade."]
63-64 James Pinckney Henderson to unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton] (Columbia, Texas), December 31, 1836
[1 page]
[Note: This document is out of chronological order. Henderson succeeded Stephen F. Austin as Secretary of State for the Republic of Texas.]
[Content: Informing that Memucan Hunt is Minister Extraordinary from the Republic of Texas to the U.S. to gain recognition of Texas.]
65-68 Stewart Newell to William H. Wharton (Philadelphia), December 21, 1836
[3 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Regarding going to Texas and taking a company of citizens; the importance of having representatives of the Republic of Texas in large U.S. cities; Capt. Berbeck[?] of Texian Army in Philadelphia seeking to buy arms for Texas; etc.]
69-70 George Riber to William H. Wharton (Lancaster, [Ohio]), December 23, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Inquiring about the prospects and climate in respect to emigration to Texas stating that if Wharton would provide such information, many people would relocate to Texas.]
71-72 James M. Wolfe to William H. Wharton (Washington City), December 23, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Regarding Texas Navy ships Invincible and Brutus and their detention due to unpaid debts of $20,000 incurred by Captains Jeremiah Brown and William A. Hurd.]
73-74 Samuel May Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), December 23, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Informing him that he has made arrangements with his brother Henry Williams to furnish funds to Wharton from time to time as he may need them.]
75-76 Lorrain Thompson Pease to William H. Wharton (Hartford), December 24, 1836
[2 pages]
[Content: Expressing admiration for Texas; stating that his son L.T. Pease escaped the Goliad Massacre; inquiring if Wharton can furnish any information about his other son, Elisha Marshall Pease (future Governor of Texas). See also pages 98-101]
77-80 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), December 24, 1836
[3 pages,
integral address leaf]
[Note: Treat advocated annexation of Texas to the U.S. as early as 1836 and served as Republic of Texas diplomat to Mexico in 1839 and 1840.]
[Content: Reviewing the current situation in Texas as regards being completely free of Mexico; stating Texas must be ready to defeat Mexico again if need be; further informing him that Mexican war ships have sailed from Tampico and that it is vital that the Texas Navy either defeat the Mexican Navy or bottle them up in port in order to prevent another land invasion, which the Mexican Army will not attempt without naval support.]
81-82 C. P. McKennie to William H. Wharton (Charlottesville), December 27, 1836
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Seeking information about moving to Texas and whether he should enter the mercantile business or become a planter.]
83-84 Edward Willoughby Kenny to William H. Wharton (Middleburgh, Tennessee), December 27, 1836
[1 page]
[Note: Nothing on John Hoskins in Miller, Bounty and Donation Land Grants.]
[Content: Seeking information on his son John Hoskins who went to Texas.]
85-88 John White to David Russell (U.S. Congressman) (Ellington, New York), January 2, 1837
[1-1/2 pages,
damaged at lower margin with loss of two lines.]
[Note: This document is out of chronological order. Docket indicates it was received January 16.]
[Content: Seeking information about his son Walter White who supposedly went to Texas and was associated with William H. Wharton.]
89-91 Thomas W. Faulkner to William H. Wharton (New York), December 28, 1836
[2-1/2 pages,
with address leaf.]
[Content: Asking Wharton to secure a commission for him in the Texas Army or Navy.]
92-93 Henry Carleton to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), December 29, 1836
[1 page]
[Content: Concerning his efforts to free the schooner Liberty by legal means.]
94-95 Richard Mentor Johnson to William H. Wharton (House of Representatives, [Washington, D.C.]), December 29, 1836
[1 page]
[Note: At the time of the letter, Wharton was in the U.S. urging annexation of the Republic of Texas, and Johnson was serving in the U.S. Congress.]
[Content: Making an appointment and pledging: "I shall not fail to do everything in my power within my power for Texas."]
96-97 Andrew Janeway Yates to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), December 29, 1836
[2 pages,
marked "Confidential" at top.]
[Note: Yates served under Texian Loan Commissioners Austin, Archer, and Wharton.]
[Content: Regarding a financial scheme to sell five million dollars in bonds for the benefit of Texas.]
98-101 Lorrain Thompson Pease to William H. Wharton (Enfield, Connecticut), December 30, 1836
[4 pages]
[Content: Thanking him for news of his son, and pledging to organize support for the Texian cause in Connecticut (to have Texas annexed to the U.S. See also pages 75-76).]
Box Pages
2006/385-2 102-103 John Stouffer to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), December 30, 1836
[2 pages]
[Content: Seeking information on his son Henry S. Stouffer who perished at Velasco on August 10, 1836, after serving in the Texian Army, enquiring about his demise, and possible benefits due to his heirs.]
104-107 Thomas J. M'Ray [?] to Henry A. Wise (Cumberland), December 30, 1836
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Asking that he approach Wharton for information such as Austin's pamphlet that his younger brother needs to debate a question in college about the nature of assistance that the United States gave to Texas during its war with Mexico; long letter on historical and legal aspects of Texas independence.]
108-109 W. W. McCoy to William H. Wharton (Shelbyville, Iowa), December 31, 1836
[1 page,
marked "answered same day."]
[Content: Inquiring about what equipment is necessary for the company he is raising to join the Texan Army.]
110-111 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton (State Department, Columbia, Texas), December 31, 1836
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 160.]
[Content: Regarding his and Memucan Hunt's credentials as agents of Texas to the U.S. "to be used by you in the event of the Government of the United States refusing to receive you as Minister"; denying that James H. Wolfe has credentials as secretary of the legation; and lamenting the death of Texas's founder General Stephen F. Austin ("In his death the country has sustained an irreparable loss").]
112-113 James Collinsworth to William H. Wharton (Quintana), December 31, 1836
[2 pages]
[Note: Collinsworth was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.]
[Content: Reviewing recent political developments in Texas (including his appointment as Chief Justice); remarking that he doubts annexation will occur any time soon; and mentioning Stephen F. Austin's death. Personal letter with significant political content.]
114-115 Richard Royster Royall to William H. Wharton (Matagorda), January 1, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Royall was an early Texas Ranger.]
[Content: Stating he has used Wharton's name as a reference for his Land Office business and apologizing for not securing Wharton's permission in advance.]
116-119 Thomas Jefferson Chambers to William H. Wharton (Cincinnati), January 1, 1837
[3 pages,
signed in full at end of body of letter and signed "Chambers" after a P.S.]
[Note: Chambers was the first Anglo attorney in Texas.]
[Content: Outlining the difficulties of obtaining munitions and supplies for the Texan Army in the U.S.; inquiring about status of Texas annexation in Washington; long postscript about Marguerite Preston, a fellow South Carolinian whom he meet on board the steamboat from New Orleans to Cincinnati.]
120-121 Samuel May Williams to an unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton] (Baltimore), January 2, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Note: Not in Nichols (Williams Papers at Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Tex.). Williams was Stephen F. Austin's long-time secretary, right-hand man, and partner in colonization of Texas.]
[Content: Regarding paying repair bills for the Invincible, and Williams' concern that he is not authorized to pay for it in scrip although the people who made the repairs are willing to accept scrip.]
122-123 Samuel May Williams to William H. Wharton, [Baltimore], January 3, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Not in Nichols (Williams Papers at Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Tex.).]
[Content: Informing Wharton he is not going to New York today; enclosing $500 in bank notes; requesting that Wharton ask Mr. Cochrane about the cost and schedule for obtaining a 12- or 18-pounder which his brother Henry Williams wants that he is proposing to outfit.]
124-125 F. T. Wells to William H. Wharton (New York), January 3, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Informing Wharton that Captain [Jeremiah] Brown says there is no vacancy on the Invincible.]
126-127 Thomas Green to unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton] (Richmond), January 4, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Green was one of four generals in the Texian Army.]
[Content: Looking forward to seeing the recipient again and enclosing a letter of introduction for Wharton to an unnamed Senator.]
128-131 J. C. Rogers to William H. Wharton (University of Virginia), January 4, 1837
[1 page,
with integral address leaf.]
[Note: Supposedly the brother was in the Texas Congress, but he is not in Biographical Directory of the Texan Conventions and Congresses.]
[Content: Seeking information about his brother W. H.[?] Rogers who supposedly was near death in Texas the previous summer.]
132-133 Stewart Newell to William H. Wharton (Philadelphia), January 5, 1837
[1-1/4 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: Follow-up letter to a previous letter (see pages 65-68 herein).]
[Content: Regarding going to Texas and the appointment of Mr. James Patton as Texas's representative in Philadelphia.]
134-137 James Treat to William H. Wharton, (New York), January 5, 1837
[3 pages,
with integral address leaf.]
[Content: Reporting progress that the Brutus sailed, giving personal news, mentioning the impending arrival of Samuel May Williams; efforts to further the cause of Texas annexation, and regretting they have not been able to meet.]
138-139 Samuel May Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), January 6, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: The Liberty was the first ship purchased by the Texas Navy. Not in Nichols (Williams Papers at Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Tex.).]
[Content: Stating that he and his brother Henry Williams think it would be a good idea if a 12-pounder were ordered from Mr. Cochrane and two 4-pounders for use by the Texan Army; also relaying news about Toby's legal maneuvers trying to get the Liberty released in New Orleans.]
140-141 Unattributed and unsigned letter to Thomas Toby (Tampico), January 7, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Enclosed in following letter, pages 142-143.]
[Content: Unattributed and unsigned letter. The writer reports that Mexico is not pleased that Santa Anna will be released; Bustamante is already in Mexico; confidence that their business dealings will work out properly; $700,000 expected in a few days; things will turn out better than Toby might expect.]
142-143 Toby and Brother to Samuel May Williams or William H. Wharton (New Orleans), January 24, 1837
[1 page,
with address on verso.]
[Note: Enclosure preceding. Enclosure is in correct chronological order, but not this item.]
[Content: Enclosing an anonymous report from Tampico which they deem reliable; briefly reviewing recent events in Texas.]
144-145 Branch T. Archer to unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton] (Velasco), January 7, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: This was the first corporation established in the Republic of Texas.]
[Content: Relaying news that the Texas Rail Road, Navigation, and Banking Company has been formed and urging Wharton's support.]
146-147 Thomas H. Pitts to William H. Wharton [Baltimore?], January 8, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Praising the brave people of Texas and offering to send a company of twenty men to assist but noting he is without any means of outfitting them.]
148-151 Henry H. Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), January 9, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Discussing ways in which they can use scrip to pay for the Invincible and to buy other arms and cannons.]
152-153 George Lincoln to William H. Wharton (Worcester, Massachusetts), January 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: See pages 1-4.]
[Content: Stating his desire to join the Texas Navy and asking Wharton for letters of recommendation.]
154-155 Toby and Brother to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), January 10, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Content: Mostly concerned with events in Mexico (news that 3,000 troops are at Matamoros and 4,000 more at Saltillo (noting that the greater part are convicts); Bustamante's arrival in Mexico and how that has created much excitement; news that Col. Stephen F. Austin has died ("we were aware of his being sick").]
156-157 Benjamin Chew Howard to William H. Wharton, January 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Writing in his capacity as U.S. Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations, Howard requests Wharton to schedule an interview with the Committee.]
158-159 Randolph Ross to William H. Wharton (Lynchburg, Virginia), January 10, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Encloses a letter for his son [Reuben Ross] and one to his friend Sam Houston; praises Texas and its battle for independence; writes the latest gossip about Santa Anna.]
160-161 Edward R. Gibson to William H. Wharton [Washington, D.C.], January 11, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Letter of introduction for Mr. Gaither who is publishing something about Texas and Mexico.]
162-163 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), January 12, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: enclosure follows.]
[Content: Enclosing additional instructions (see next document) and relaying news that the Mexicans are amassing an army at Matamoros; General Houston has left to re-organize the Army; these developments do not appear to disturb the Texans because Henderson observes: "The whole country is quiet and full confidence appears to reign in the minds of all in the government."]
164-165 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Columbia, Texas), January 12, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: in a secretarial hand (Peter Wagener Grayson); enclosure of previous letter; Garrison, Vol. I, p. 174.]
[Content: Ordering William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt to enter into negotiations with Santa Anna before he leaves Washington to arrange for an exchange of prisoners and outlining the conditions under which the negotiations should be conducted.]
166-167 Peter Wagener Grayson to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, [Texas]), January 13, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Extensive review of recent depredations by Native Americans (including two people killed by Caddos presumably), stealing of livestock and horses, and other deplorable instances of murder and bloodshed; because the Caddos flee into U.S. territory, Wharton and Hunt are instructed to insist to the U.S. that it keep sufficient forces within the confines of Texas to restrain such acts.]
168-169 Unknown writer to William H. Wharton, (New York), January 13, 1837
[2 pages of unknown total,
lacking at least one page, signature missing.]
[Content: Outlining an elaborate scheme to introduce blacks from the West Indies, asking how the consent of Congress might be attained, promises he could within four months introduce from the West Indies several free blacks as apprentices.]
170-171 Joseph Segar to William H. Wharton (Richmond), January 14, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: See Streeter 1290 for Joseph Eggleston Segar's speech of February 23, 1837 in favor of recognizing Texas independence.]
[Content: Inquiring about present condition and prospects of Texas and apparently offering to intervene if appropriate with the U.S. Congress]
172-173 Henry H. Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), January 14, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Stating that his brother [Samuel May Williams] is confined to his hotel with a bilious attack and regretting that he cannot go to Philadelphia to be with him.]
174-175 James M. Wolfe to an unnamed correspondent [James Pinckney Henderson] (Washington), January 14, 1837
[1/2 page]
[Content: Enclosing letters for the President of Texas, Secretary of the Navy, and Commodore Hawkins.]
176-177 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to William H. Wharton (Wheeling, Virginia), January 14, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Santa Anna's progress toward Washington is commented on in a January 17, 1837, letter from Wharton to John Forsyth in which he says that on that date Santa Anna arrived in Washington (see Garrison Vol. I, pp. 166-167).]
[Content: Reporting on his journey to Washington [accompanying Santa Anna] and remarking "the General is quite well."]
178-179 George Lincoln to William H. Wharton (Worcester, Massachusetts), January 16, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Asking Wharton for letters of recommendation.]
180-181 Jeremiah Brown to William H. Wharton (New York), January 17, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Stating that he wishes he were already afloat and that the crew [of the Invincible] is out of sorts being ashore with no money; Brutus sailed Thursday; gossip including Samuel May Williams is sick in Philadelphia and J. M. Allen is married.]
182-183 M.P. Milford? to William H. Wharton (American Hotel, New York), January 18, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: The writer was the owner of the American Hotel.]
[Content: Stating that since the American Hotel is the headquarters for the friends of Texas in New York, he requests that Wharton use his influence to have Santa Anna visit.]
184-187 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), January 17, 1837
[3 pages,
with integral address leaf. Long P.S. written across p. 1.]
[Content: Discusses various events and people involved in the movement for Texas recognition and annexation; comment that "neither you nor your cause is forgotten by me"; relations with U.S.; efforts to get people to write articles favorable to Texas.]
188-189 Memucan Hunt to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), January 20, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Content: Announcing to Wharton that he has been appointed Minister Plenipotentiary from Texas to the U.S. and proposing that they meet soon.]
190-193 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), January 21, 1837
[3-1/4 pages,
docketed on verso.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 177-178.]
[Content: A lengthy review of the depredations committed by Native Americans in Texas, especially the Caddos and Cherokee (including recitations of several murders and the fact that General Urrea paid the chiefs $1,000 and gave them a draft on New Orleans for arms); the delegates are requested to urge the U.S. to place troops in the border areas sufficient to stop the depredations.]
194-195 Will K. Hill to unnamed recipient [William H. Wharton] (New Orleans), January 21, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Recommending his friend Memucan Hunt who has been appointed associate minister plenipotentiary and stating he is awaiting the arrival of John Austin Wharton (recipient's brother), whereupon Hill states he will leave for Texas.]
196-197 R. P. Waller to William H. Wharton (Fredericksburg, Virginia), January 20, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Edwin Waller was an important early Texan and a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.]
[Content: Inquiring about his relative Edwin Waller, discussing the politics of Texas possibly being annexed, and stating that he is thinking about establishing a press in Texas.]
198-199 Henry H. Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), January 21, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Content: Enclosing a copy of express mail from New Orleans which he advises Wharton to insert in the Globe newspaper (the mail concerns the composition of the Texas Rail Road, Navigation, and Banking Company).]
Box Pages
2006/385-3 200-201 Andrew Janeway Yates to William H. Wharton [Washington, D.C.], January 22, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Concerning the arrival of Santa Anna in Texas and other general news of Texas interest, including some remarks about the proposed annexation of Texas.]
202-203 Samuel Swartwout to William H. Wharton (New York), January 22, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Significant commentary about the late Stephen F. Austin and Santa Anna.]
204-205 John Fisher to William H. Wharton (New York), January 23, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Fisher was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.]
[Content: Concerning the status of the Invincible and other ships of the Texas Navy and his efforts to return to Texas in one of them.]
206-207 Samuel May Williams to William H. Wharton (Philadelphia), January 23, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Containing a detailed disquisition about ships of the Texas Navy and the amount of money it will take to get delivery of the Invincible; also, a moving paragraph about the death of Stephen F. Austin ( "...the truest and best friend I ever had. I wish he could have been spared long enough to have seen the country for which he has undergone so much and toiled so arduously declared and acknowledged free and independent").]
208-209 John Parvin to William H. Wharton (New York), January 23, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Asking how to initiate a claim for his deceased brother, Henry Parvin, who fell at the Goliad Massacre.]
210-211 O. H. Prince to William H. Wharton (Athens, Georgia), January 24, 1837
[2 pages,
lower margin damaged with loss of some words to last few lines on page 1.]
[Note: Prince was apparently related to Wharton.]
[Content: Attempting to arrange a mutual time for the families to get together, and a postscript recommending that Wharton get to know W.C. Dawson, a representative from Georgia who might well be of use to him in the annexation question.]
212-213 F. T. Wells to William H. Wharton (New York), January 24, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Reviewing the state of the finances for paying the bills due on the Invincible and stating that much of the delay is due to the fact that neither he nor [Samuel May] Williams answer their correspondence ("Mr. Williams does not even favor us with a reply").]
214-217 Henry Percy Brewster to Waddy Thompson (Eagle Island, Texas), January 24, 1837
[3-1/2 pages,
with integral address leaf.]
[Content: Asking Thompson for current information about the annexation of Texas, warmly promoting annexation and stating Texas now has a well-equipped Army to defend itself.]
218-219 P.W. Humphrys to William H. Wharton (Schooner Invincible, New York), January 24, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Letter signed Humphrys, but index of notebook indicates Humphries.]
[Content: Writing as first lieutenant of the Invincible, Humphrys complains bitterly about conditions aboard the ship, including such details as being unable to retrieve their laundry from the washer woman because they have no money, repeated appeals from Captain [Jeremiah] Brown have fallen on deaf ears, and unless they have a satisfactory reply within a week, the entire crew will walk off the ship and make their way back to Texas.]
220-221 C.M. West (Bishop of the Primitive Episcopal Church) to John Fenton (Philadelphia), January 20, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Stating that he wishes to pursue setting up a fund for the cause to support widows and orphans in Texas, especially those of the departed heroes who fell in the noble struggle for liberty, one of whom was his own brother, Edward Gardner [or Edward Garner?], who fell with Fannin at the Goliad Massacre; West sees enormous prospects, especially for British subjects in the expanding field of Texas; he asks, however, that Fenton seek Wharton's approval.]
222-223 Levi Woodbury to William H. Wharton, Treasury Department [Washington, D.C.], January 26, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: On June 28, 1836, Captain John M. Allen (later mayor of Galveston) was granted a letter of marque and reprisal for the schooner Terrible, which would go on to capture the Mexican merchant ship Matilda and would be taken in to Pensacola by the U.S.S. Boston on piracy charges, which were ultimately thrown out on a technicality.]
[Content: Informing him he has been apprised of the seizure of the Texian Schooner Terrible at New Orleans as a pirate and asking for documentation.]
224-225 U.S. Treasury Department, First Comptroller's Office: Circular to Collectors, Naval Officers, and Surveyors. February 17, 1838
[1 page,
printed but also signed.]
[Content: The Republic of Texas is placed on reciprocal favor with that of Mexico: "...by information received from the Department of State, it appears the fifth and sixth articles of the Treaty with Mexico are held to be obligatory on the Republic of Texas."]
226-227 R. J. Walker to William H. Wharton (Washington City), January 27, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Introducing Samuel Grice who is contemplating a visit to Texas and asking Wharton for letters of introduction.]
228-231 James M. Wolfe to William H. Wharton (New York), January 28, 1837
[2 pages,
with integral address.]
[Note: See pages 21-22 and 71-72 herein.]
[Content: Personal letter highly praising Wharton's efforts on behalf of Texas and mentions an enclosed letter which is not included.]
232-235 Arthur Henrie to William H. Wharton (Peach Point, Texas), January 28, 1837
[1 page,
with integral address.]
[Content: Asking Wharton if he can check on any news about his son Daniel D. Henrie who sailed in 1833 on the U.S. war ship Vincennes.]
236-237 William W. Gwathmey to William H. Wharton (Richmond), January 28, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Personal letter from a friend expressing a wish to meet at some point and exchanging news (Santa Anna is getting ready to sail; fears that a bank stock issue in Texas will fail because the sum being raised is too large).]
238-239 George B. McKinstry to William H. Wharton (Brazoria), January 28, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Regarding McKinstry, Stephen F. Austin commented elsewhere (citation unknown) that he had "done as much harm to Texas as any man in it."]
[Content: Asking Wharton to forward the enclosed letters (not present) concerning two protested drafts.]
240-242 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton (Columbia, Texas), January 29, 1837
[4 pages,
with integral address and docketing.]
[Content: Letter concerned in part with a reception of the U.S. administration's proposal for Texas annexation, military matters in Texas, and political matters; mentions that General Rusk has not arrived yet, tries to appease Wharton's complaints about not getting enough news from Texas, and notes that Wharton's brother John A. and Mr. Collinsworth have decided not to leave yet.]
243-246 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), January 30, 1837
[3 pages,
with integral address leaf.]
[Content: Long letter about internal affairs in Texas, relations with the U.S., and including the fact that he has gotten Captain [Jeremiah] Brown of the Invincible $320 for his use; mentions James H. Wolfe is involved in the negotiations.]
247-250 M[onroe] Edwards to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), January 31, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: Edwards was a notorious New York-Texas huckster, schemer, speculator, slaverunner, and forger.]
[Content: Trying to interest Wharton in investing in a new town on Galveston Bay (noting that Milam assured him Wharton would be interested), relays local news about the military and political situation in Texas, and wonders what the outcome of Texas annexation will be.]
251-252 Joel Roberts Poinsett to William H. Wharton (Charleston), February 2, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Poinsett tried to buy Texas from Mexico while he served as first United States minister to Mexico, 1825-1829.]
[Content: Warmly supporting the cause of Texas and hopes to influence the legislature to support it.]
253-254 F. T. Wells to William H. Wharton (New York), February 3, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Concerning discharge of the debts of the Invincible; reports that Captain [Jeremiah] Brown has good news on that front and sends Wharton his warmest thanks for his efforts on the crew's behalf.]
255-258 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), February 3, 1837
[3-1/2 pages,
integral address.]
[Content: Lengthy letter about events in Mexico, and the state of politics and military in that country, with long quotes from diplomatic instructions.]
259-260 James M. Wolfe to William H. Wharton (Philadelphia), February 3, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Personal letter discussing political and personal intrigues surrounding them both, also mentions preparing the Invincible to sail, speaks of G.W. Hockley, Samuel May Williams, Captain Brown, Judge Abner S. Lipscomb, and others.]
261-264 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), February 4, 1837
[3 pages,
with integral address leaf.]
[Content: Enclosing a publication of December 28, 1836 (not present) done in Mexico City that he feels should be dealt with; further commenting on political news around Washington; lengthy P.S. discussing Mexican feelings toward Santa Anna.]
265-266 Charles L. Wingfield to William H. Wharton (Norfolk), February 5, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Writes hoping that Wharton can stop for a visit on his way back to Texas, and asks advice for his sons, most of whom want to go to Texas.]
267-268 James M. Wolfe to unnamed recipients (probably William H. Wharton and Samuel May Williams) (Washington City), February 6, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Concerning the financial machinations surrounding the release of the Invincible, including his personal financial participation in discharging the debt.]
269-272 Jeremiah Brown to William H. Wharton (New York), February 6, 1837
[2-1/4 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Stating that the balance on the Invincible perhaps could be paid off and that Colonel Hockley might be better off putting his efforts toward finishing the Invincible instead of purchasing new vessels; upset that Captain Taylor has been made port captain (an office Brown feels he deserves instead); says he is laying in supplies for a four-month cruise.]
273-274 Toby and Brother to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), February 6, 1837
[1-1/2 pages,
damaged at left margin with loss of a few letters.]
[Content: Talking about the enthusiastic reception that took place in Mexico because of Santa Anna's release and where matters stand with the Invincible.]
275-278 John S. Wormly [?] to William H. Wharton (Cumberland), February 6, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf. Margin damaged, obscuring end of name.]
[Content: Interested in relocating to Texas, asks about citizenship matters, acquiring land, the operation of the Texas government, conviction that Texas will ultimately prevail.]
279-280 John M. Allen to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Washington City), February 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Allen was the first mayor of Galveston, instigated the "Charter War," and was with Lord Byron when he died at Missolonghi in 1824.]
[Content: Concerning his orders to procure a ship in Baltimore for the Texas Navy but he is unable to so because the condition of the credit of the Republic of Texas and the fact that the Invincible is still tied up in New York.]
281-282 D[avid Abel] Russell to William H. Wharton (House of Representatives, [Washington], D.C.), February 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Enclosure missing.]
[Content: Sending a letter (not present) from a friend seeking information about his son who is in Texas.]
283-284 E[dward] Hall to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), February 10, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Transmitting a transcript of An Act Supplementary to An Act for the Punishment of Crime and Misdemeanors which provides the death penalty for certain acts of slave smuggling. Note added at end in the hand of William H. Wharton, who sends the letter on to another person for use against the abolitionists.]
[Note: Sloan inventory erroneously has pages 283 and 284 as two separate documents, #112 and 111.]
285-288 William Bembeck [?] to William H. Wharton (Chambersburg, Pennsylvania), February 11, 1837
[3 pages,
integral address leaf and file note by Wharton. Lower margin damaged with loss of several words and signature.]
[Content: Reviewing his efforts and his authority to recruit emigrants for Texas and stating that he has in fact recruited a battalion's worth (mostly Germans), but now although he was promised money for passage, he learns that there is no way to transport these emigrants to Texas.]
289-290 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), February 11, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 184.]
[Content: Telling them that President Samuel Houston has instructed them to enter into negotiations with Santa Anna or any other authorized Mexican agent to terminate the present war.]
291-292 Samuel May Williams to William H. Wharton (Philadelphia), February 11, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Not in Nichols (Williams Papers at Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Tex.).]
[Content: Apologizing for the delay in responding to Wharton's last letter which he just found at the Post Office and reviewing financial arrangements to provide for Wharton's use.]
293-294 Alphonse Pageot to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Washington), February 11, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 199.]
[Content: Stating that he has reviewed the materials they sent relative to perhaps negotiating a treaty of amity and commerce between the Republic of Texas and France, but declining to forward the materials to his government.]
295-296 James J. MacKall to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), February 11, 1837
[1 page,
with integral address.]
[Note: See Republic of Texas claims, #5517. http://www2.tsl.state.tx.us/trail/RepublicResults.jsp]
[Content: Requesting the status of John G. MacKall's claim.]
297-298 Joseph Eggleston Segar to William H. Wharton (Richmond), February 12, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Expressing his desire to introduce in the Virginia legislature a motion to recognize the independence of Texas but noting he must delay because of opposition to the cause, etc.]
299-300 James Tongue to William H. Wharton (Washington), February 14, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Enclosure missing.]
[Content: Enclosing a letter (not present) addressed to the delegation from Anne Arundel County, Maryland, requesting that after Wharton has reviewed it that he put it in the mail; also says he may send one or more of his sons to Texas.]
Box Pages
2006/385-4 301-302 Henry H. Williams to William H. Wharton (Baltimore), February 14, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Thanking him for sending the draft for $500.]
303-304 R.[?] Wharton to William H. Wharton (Washington City), February 14, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Content: Letter of introduction for a Mr. Harrison, a friend of Dr. J.O. Wharton, whom the writer recommends for employment in writing "of a confidential nature."]
305-306 John A. Wharton to William H. Wharton (Bedford Co., Virginia), February 14, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: In the appendix is a biography of John Austin Wharton, but this may not be the same as Jno. A. Wharton. John Austin Wharton seems to have been in Texas, not Virginia, when the letter was written.]
[Content: Long letter discussing the Texas situation and Mexico; mentioning that the expedition under General Bravo has not been abandoned ("The result of any attempt, however, which Mexico can make, on the Independence of Texas, it seems, cannot be doubtfull--The Spanish American wants perseverence & skill & it is deficient in energy & courage--Texas, it seems, is better prepared for that combat than she has ever been before"); praises the Texas Army and its improvement; mentions Santa Anna is still in Washington, and discusses impending recognition of Texas by the U.S.]
307-308 Thomas Walker Gilmer to William H. Wharton (Charlottesville), February 16, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Thomas W. Gilmer, Secretary of the U.S. Navy, died during the test firing of a new cannon on the USS Princeton on February 28, 1844. The town of Gilmer, Texas, is named for him.]
[Content: Thanking Wharton for the materials he has provided about Texas; stating he is leaving next Thursday to go down the Ohio and Mississippi to New Orleans and then to the Texas coast; includes many flattering remarks about Texas and his belief that the threat of Mexico invading Texas should no longer be taken seriously.]
309-310 Thomas J[efferson] Green to William H. Wharton (Charleston), February 16, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Informing Wharton that he has opened negotiations with James Hamilton to put the bank in operation; asking to meeting Samuel May Williams when he arrives in Washington so that these negotiations can get money into the country.]
311-312 Edwin C. [or G.?] Booth to William H. Wharton [Virginia], February 17, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Reviewing a purchase of a fraction of a league of land he and other investors made in Milam's Grant (Bastrop and Mina) but to which they seem unable to secure title from the seller Don Carlos Barrett and asking if Wharton has any further information about it that could help them, including the possibility of hiring an attorney in Texas.]
313-314 George Washington Hockley to unnamed recipient (probably William H. Wharton) (New York), February 18, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Urging the recipient to quickly make arrangements to cover the expenses of the escort for Santa Anna to Washington, D.C.; says he is trying to make arrangements to pay off the debt of the Invincible.]
315-318 James Pinckney Henderson to unnamed recipient (probably William H. Wharton) (Columbia, Texas), February 18, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address. Marginal damage with loss of some letters. (Difficult to read.)]
[Content: Reports on the unpleasant difficulty (duel) which took place between Albert Sidney Johnston and Felix Huston when the former took charge; military and intelligence reports; discusses recent intelligence that Mexican cavalry is massing at Matamoros to take over Bexar and Goliad; favorable remarks about the recently founded City of Houston (founded August 30, 1836).]
319-320 Samuel Swartwout to William H. Wharton (New York), February 18, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Informing Wharton that arrangements have been made to release the Invincible, and noting that if Colonel J. M. Wolfe will be prepared to pay the crew's expenses, she can sail within 48 hours.]
321-322 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton (Columbia, Texas), February 19, 1837
[2 pages,
integral address.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 194-195.]
[Content: Acknowledging receipt of certain dispatches, relaying the President's pleasure at their performance, but more significantly including a long review of further depredations in East Texas by the Caddo and the Kickapoo and repeating the Texas government's request that they again urge the United States to place troops at Nacogdoches.]
323-326 Robert Mayo to William H. Wharton (Washington, D.C.), February 22, 1837
[2 pages,
integral address.]
[Content: Reciting his personal references and requesting letters of reference for his proposed move to Texas.]
327-328 James [?] Hamilton to William H. Wharton (Charleston), February 22, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Hamilton was Financial Agent for the Republic of Texas.]
[Content: Discussing U.S. debate over recognition of Texas's independence, and stating that for personal reasons he cannot accept command of the Army of Texas which Texas Congress offered him. (Difficult handwriting and damage).]
329-332 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to William H. Wharton (Pendleton[?]), February 22, 1837
[3 pages,
integral address.]
[Note: Bee escorted Santa Anna from Texas to Washington, and subsequently went to Mexico to try to obtain recognition of Texas.]
[Content: Discussing Texas finances and the relationship between the captive Santa Anna; negotiations for recognition of Texas by the U.S. (including the possibility that Texas can merely purchase its recognition from Mexico).]
333-334 James Tongue to William H. Wharton (Prospect Hill Farm, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), February 23, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: See pages 299-300 herein.]
[Content: Saying he is seriously thinking about going to Texas and would like to know what grants of land are available and how to go about securing them; states he would rather live near the ocean and that for the last ten years he has been a dealer of vessels and ship timbers; finally remarks that Texas should build a navy and he could be instrumental in establishing a navy yard and building ships at low cost.]
335-336 James M. Wolfe to William H. Wharton (New York), February 25, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Stating the Invincible was put to sea today with orders to go to Galveston.]
337-338 Samuel May Williams to unnamed recipient (probably William H. Wharton) (Philadelphia), February 25, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Not in Nichols (Williams Papers at Rosenberg Library, Galveston, Tex.).]
[Content: Stating he plans to come for a visit; expressing regret that the question of recognition of Texas is not going well in Congress but he is not worried and will do anything he can for Texas ("You may rely upon me for what I am worth in any capacity or in any situation and at all times").]
339-340 John Richardson to William H. Wharton (Liberty, Virginia), February 27, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting information about Texas because he and several of his friends are thinking of emigrating and laments "the scarcity of printed information upon this subject," and requests a reply at Wharton's leisure.]
341-342 J[eremiah] Brown to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (New York), February 27, 1837
[1 page,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: A revealing look at the financial difficulties of the Texas Navy. Jeremiah Brown was the captain of the Invincible, said to be the finest ship of the Texas Navy.]
[Content: Informing him that his brother is escorting his wife to Charlotte Court House and requesting that they provide her $100 or $150 because she is destitute; he also states that the Invincible has sailed in complete repair, but only partially manned.]
343-344 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), February 28, 1837
[2 pages,
with P.S. written and signed by Henderson]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 194-195.]
[Content: Informing that Wharton has resigned; Hunt has been appointed to replace him; orders Hunt "You will receive from that Honbl. Gentleman [Wharton] all of the official documents in his hands in any way connected with his and your Mission which he has been instructed to deliver to you"; need to establish frequent and easy communication between the U.S. and Texas (proposed regular mail lines at border, Gaines Ferry, Ballews Ferry); P.S. [unpublished?] more on proposed mail routes.]
345-346 James Pinckney Henderson to William H. Wharton, (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), February 28, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 200.]
[Content: Informing him that the President regretfully accepts his resignation and telling him to hand over to Memucan Hunt all official papers in his hands.]
347-348 James Pinckney Henderson to "Dear General" [Memucan Hunt] (Columbia, Texas), February 28, 1837
[2 pages,
marginal damage with loss of some words.]
[Content: Informing him that William H. Wharton has resigned; that he has resigned as attorney general to become Secretary of State; the controversy between Albert Sidney Johnston and Felix Huston has been settled amiably; Johnston is still in command.]
349-350 Toby and Brother to William H. Wharton (New Orleans), February 28, 1837
[1-1/8 pages]
[Content: Conveying news about the thriving state of the Texas Army and political developments in Mexico, especially the potential reception of Santa Anna; stating that the entire Mexican fleet has been put to sea to prevent Santa Anna from landing.]
351-354 Joseph Eggleston Segar to "Gentlemen" (William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt) (Richmond), February 28, 1837
[3 pages]
[Content: Explaining that a resolution he put forth in the Virginia Legislature to recognize Texas independence was defeated; included is a certified copy of the Virginia House of Delegates, February 28, 1837, explanation that the resolution was defeated merely because they believe the subject should be taken up by the U.S. Congress and not because they believe Texas should not be recognized.]
355-356 C.A. Harris to "General" William H. Wharton, (Washington), February 27, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Introducing Dr. Reynolds who wishes to see him on some matters concerning Texas.]
357-358 G. M. Stone to William H. Wharton (Richmond, Virginia), March 2, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Informing him that he has just received a letter from Branch T. Archer, directing that Wharton be given $2,000 on Archer's account and that he will see to this as soon as possible.]
359-360 Robert John Walker to Memucan Hunt and William H. Wharton (Washington City), March 4, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Declining their offer to place his bust in the capitol of Texas in recognition of his efforts to get Texas recognized (the majority of the letter is taken up with a warm, effusive compliment to the two gentlemen and the Republic of Texas).]
361-362 William Campbell Preston to Memucan Hunt and William H. Wharton, (Washington City), undated [March 1837]
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Thanking them for the kind remarks they made and effusively praising Texas and predicting its ultimate success.]
363-364 G. M. Stone to William H. Wharton (Richmond), March 6, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Saying that he will be leaving for Texas in a few days and expressing his delight that Texas has been recognized.]
365-368 G. M. Stone to William H. Wharton (Richmond), March 6, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Discussing the process of getting the $2,000 to him that Branch T. Archer has authorized and congratulating him on the recognition of the Republic of Texas.]
369-372 Samuel Rhoads Fisher to William H. Wharton (Columbia, [Texas]), March 7, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: The capture of the Pocket was an important event in Texas maritime history and forced Texas to conduct its naval operations in a more formal and diplomatic way. See Streeter 121 re: Fisher, who was a signer of the Texas Declaration of Independence.]
[Content: Reporting unofficially on what he saw aboard the brig Pocket which was captured as a prize (among the things found were commissions for Mexican officers, plans of Galveston, letters to Santa Anna on how to conduct combat with Americans, etc.); denouncement of Captain Hawes (Captain of the Pocket).]
373-376 M. F. Delano to Col. William H. Wharton, (Waterloo, New York), March 27[?], 1837
[1-1/4 page,
integral address leaf. Page 376 is blank.]
[Content: Sending description and diagram of a new type of cannon shell which he is offering for the use of the Texas Army and Navy. Two-line testimonial as to the shell and its efficacy on reverse, signed by Isaac Kimball and James De Bois.]
377-378 J. O. Wharton to unnamed recipient (William H. Wharton?), (Philadelphia), March 8, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Expressing thanks for Wharton's concerns about his health, saying he is recovering from an operation, and congratulating him on the recognition of Texas independence.]
379-380 George Washington Hockley to unnamed recipient (William H. Wharton?) (Philadelphia), March 8, 1837
[1-1/4 pages,
stained.]
[Content: Congratulating him on the recognition of Texas and personal comments.]
381-382 Col. John Campbell to Memucan Hunt and William H. Wharton (no place), March 9, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Offering a manuscript volume of materials concerning the U.S. Treasury Department he has collected, hoping they will be of use to the infant republic (these appear to be copies, not originals).]
383-384 [John Forsyth to Mr. Hunt and Mr. Wharton]. Unsigned document in a secretarial hand, [Washington], March 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting Wharton and Hunt to be at the Department of State noon the next day so that Forsyth can examine their credentials and arrange for a time to introduce them to the President.]
385-386 James Treat to William H. Wharton (New York), March 10, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Reviewing a multitude of matters and questions; stating he arrived Monday and found his clerk sick, an enormous number of unanswered letters, and unfinished business; his main question to Wharton is if an agent for Texas has been confirmed, and if so, is it [Henry Stuart?] Foote or [Alcée] LaBranche; and more.]
387-388 James Tongue to unnamed recipient (probably William H. Wharton) (Prospect Hill Farm, Anne Arundel County, Maryland), March 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Asking the best way for his son to go to Texas and inquiring about availability of lands ("some of us would be first-rate tobacco planters").]
389-392 John Forsyth to [William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt] (Department of State, Washington), March 13, 1837
[3-1/2 pages]
[Note: "The undersigned Secretary of State of the United States"]
[Content: Informing them that because their credentials are not in the usual form the President cannot receive them personally but assuring them that such formalities do not negate the fact that the U.S. recognizes Texas independence; the Texan flag is entitled to the same privileges as the Mexican flag; etc.]
393-394 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), March 14, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 202-203.]
[Content: Reiterating that news of Indian depredations continue to arrive at the capital on a weekly basis, the latest being that Congressman Robinson [i.e., John G. Robison] and five other persons have been murdered by Caddo tribesmen; he again urges that the United States station at least five hundred men on the Brazos and Red Rivers.]
395-396 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Columbia, Texas), March 16, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 202-203.]
[Content: Personal letter inquiring about news since he arrived in Washington; states the Texas Army is increasing rapidly; asks Hunt to write him frequently and that he will assist however he can; refers to instructions and the April 5, 1831 treaty between Mexico and the U.S. (neither of which is present with the letter).]
397-398 John Woodward to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (New York), March 18, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Asking if his commission as consul general for recognition has been received.]
399-400 William H. Ellis to William H. Wharton (Canandaigua, Ontario County, New York), March 18, 1837
[1 page,
docket on verso.]
[Content: Stating he is thinking of moving to Texas and asking about land available and what things the potential emigrant should bring.]
Box Pages
2006/385-5 401-404 John Forsyth to William H. Wharton and Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), March 21, 1837
[3 pages,
plus integral docket leaf.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 26 (Calendar).]
[Content: Stating that their communication concerning Indian depredations has made its way to the Secretary of War and that the Secretary believes that the present configuration of troops is better for containing attacks than if the troops were concentrated at Nacogdoches.]
405-406 William C. Montross [?] to William H. Wharton (Nunda Valley, Livingston County, New York), March 21, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Requesting information about lands in Texas, how one acquires title, and asking what inducements exist to persons who wish to remove to Texas.]
407-408 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Columbia, Texas), April 2, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 203.]
[Content: Enclosing a copy of Nathaniel Townsend's commission as consul for the Port of New Orleans and asking that he get the proper U.S. documents to effect the appointment.]
409-410 James Pinckney Henderson to "Genl" [Memucan Hunt] (Columbia, Texas), April 7, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Enclosing his letters of credence, hoping that the form is correct.]
411-412 William L. Lambeth to William H. Wharton (Lynchburg, Virginia), April 10, 1837
[2 pages]
[Content: Asking what would be the arrangements if a company of volunteers marched to Texas and wished to join the army, whether such a company would be entitled to land, what type of arms should they take, and what would be best route.]
413-414 John Forsyth to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State, Washington), April 14, 1837
[2 pages,
some damage to margins.]
[Content: Stating that the Republic of Texas's proposal to station troops on the frontier has been sent to the Secretary of War and a copy (not present) of his reply is included and that the proposal about postal routes between the U.S. and Texas has been sent to U.S. Postmaster.]
415-416 M. D. Jones to John Forsyth (Consulate of the U.S.A., Mexico [City]), March 28, 1837
[2 pages,
some damage and slight loss at lower margin. Letter in secretarial hand. "Extract" at top of page.]
[Note: This development was reported by Catlett to Henderson on April 29, 1837. Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 212-213; also see Catlett's report, Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 211-212.]
[Content: Revealing that in a secret session of the Mexican Congress last Saturday night there was a proposal to sell Texas to England at 25 cents an acre to pay on the debt which is about $68,000,000; the Mexicans have been in negotiations with Rubio [the commercial house that had a flag on the Pocket] and others for a monthly loan of $480,000.]
417-418 Joel Roberts Poinsett to John Forsyth (War Department, [Washington, D.C.]), April 14, 1837
[2 pages,
secretarial copy and secretarial signature of a letter.]
[Note: This item is bound out of order in the notebook and actually goes with pages 413-414, Forsyth's April 14 letter to Catlett.]
[Content: Stating that he has reviewed the request of the Texas legation for deployment of troops to Nacogdoches to restrain the Caddo and Kickapoo attacks but believes there are posts other than Nacogdoches that can be better occupied for the purpose.]
419-420 Joseph Segar to an unnamed recipient [Texas legation], (Eastville, Virginia), May 1, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Requesting information about the operations of Texas government and availability of land.]
421-424 Peter Wagener Grayson to Memucan Hunt (Houston), May 4, 1837
[2-1/4 pages,
integral address leaf. Postmark New Orleans.]
[Content: Reviewing the status of his credentials to the U.S. and chatting about military news such as the ineffective Mexican naval blockade.]
425-426 John Forsyth to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State, Washington), May 8, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Sending documents confirming Nathaniel Townsend's appointment as consul of the Republic of Texas for New Orleans.]
427-430 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Houston), May 25, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Content: Covering a wide range of topics such as efforts to prevent Cuban slaves being smuggled into the Republic, continued Caddo depredations aided by Holland Coffee, who trades with them and fences their stolen goods, and the fact he has been asked to be ambassador to England but is inclined to decline; states that Hunt need not keep this in his official files since it contains personal news.]
431-434 John Forsyth to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State, Washington), June 17, 1837
[3 pages,
docketed on p. [4].]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 230 (but as published includes a P.S. by Catlett not present here).]
[Content: Stating that the U.S. has learned that Texas has opened a land office and is selling off land in Miller County, Arkansas, and further requesting that such sales cease until the boundaries can be properly run.]
435-442 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), June 26, 1837
[6-1/2 pages,
plus docket.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 232-234.]
[Content: Written by Irion in his capacity as Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas, directing his attention to several important matters: a) running the boundary line between the U.S. and Texas, but only on the Sabine River, according to Melish's map; b) suppression of Holland Coffee's trading house which is encouraging Caddo raids; c) Texas being annexed by the U.S., but if not annexed, make a territory.]
443-446 [H. O. Dayton] to Memucan Hunt [Washington], July 3, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Unsigned letter written in the name of U.S. Acting Secretary of State, saying he would be happy to see Hunt today.]
447-448 H. O. Dayton to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), July 3, 1837
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 236.]
[Content: Stating that the President wishes to see him in order to accept his credentials, and that if he will come to the Department of State on the 6th, just before noon, that Dayton will accompany him to see the President.]
449-450 H. O. Dayton to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), July 10, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Asking Hunt to provide a list of the members of the Texas Legation and their domestics.]
451-452 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), July 24, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 26 (Calendar).]
[Content: Informing him that he is forwarding to the Department of War Hunt's letter complaining of depredations against Texas by Indians from the U.S. and Holland Coffee's trading post.]
453-456 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), July 14, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
plus integral address leaf.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 241-242.]
[Content: Written by Irion in his capacity as Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas, addressing the Red River Land District, which the U.S. claims for Arkansas; he hesitates to make a decision on a matter of such importance (boundary) to both countries without the input of President Houston.]
457-460 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), July 24, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
docketed on p. [4].]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, 249.]
[Content: Regarding the U.S.'s determination to frustrate the introduction of "African negroes" through the U.S. as a stratagem to avoid Texas's importation laws by supposedly landing the slaves first in the U.S. which would make them technically legal to bring into Texas.]
461-462 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), July 29, 1837
[1-1/4 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 126 (Calendar).]
[Content: Requesting more particular information on the plot to introduce slaves illegally into Texas.]
463-464 Joel Roberts Poinsett to John Forsyth (War Department, [Washington]), July 26, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: This is probably the letter referred to in Forsyth's July 29 communication to Hunt (pages 461-462) as being enclosed.]
[Content: Requesting more specific information about Indian depredations in East Texas and stating that Holland Coffee's activities are under investigation and he will lose his license if improper use of his establishment is made.]
465-468 Joel Roberts Poinsett to John Forsyth (War Department, [Washington]), August 4, 1837
[2-1/2 pages,
Secretarial copy with secretarial signature.]
[Note: This secretarial copy was probably made for Memucan Hunt.]
[Content: Stating that officials on the frontier have checked into the charges about Indian depredations but that the Caddo deny any involvement, but that it is believed that perhaps stragglers from the tribe had been the culprits.]
469-470 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), August 13, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 258.]
[Content: Written by Irion in his capacity as Secretary of State of the Republic of Texas, authorizing Hunt to confer with Colonel Peter W. Grayson about Texas annexation.]
471-474 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), August 13, 1837
[2-1/4 pages,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 256-257.]
[Content: Concerning issues regarding annexation and boundaries; instructions to try to get Texas annexed to the U.S. either as a state or a territory with some provision made for money to cover Texas's national debt; insistence that the southwest boundary is the Rio Grande; and stating that nothing should be done to aggravate the controversy about the Arkansas Land Office [Miller County, Arkansas].]
475-490 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), August 25, 1837
[14 pages,
plus integral address leaf. "No. 35."]
[Note: Not in Garrison, but see Vol. I, p. 258 (not transcribed but alluded to in footnote (a); also Garrison, Calendar (Vol. I, p. 27).]
[Content: Long, detailed review of why the U.S. cannot annex Texas, as desirable as that might be, the chief reason being that the U.S. and Mexico have a treaty of amity and commerce that precludes any annexation by the U.S.]
491-492 John Forsyth to unnamed recipient [Memucan Hunt] (Department of State, Washington), July 31, 1837
[2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 251.]
[Content: Assuring Hunt that the Secretary of War will establish a military post on the Sabine River and that a naval cruiser will patrol the mouth of the river, both of which actions are intended to prevent "the landing of African negroes" in the U.S.]
493-494 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), August 5, 1837
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 26 (Calendar).]
[Content: Transmitted copy of a letter (not present) of the Department of War concerning their investigations into the depredations in East Texas.]
495-496 [Aaron Vail] to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), October 17, 1837
[1 page]
[Content: Confirming Thomas Toby's appointment as consul from the Republic of Texas to New Orleans.]
497-504 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), December 31, 1837
[8 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 277-281.]
[Content: Long letter in which Irion laments the U.S. will apparently not annex Texas, partly because of fierce opposition from the northeast states; Irion prophesizes that if the U.S. fails to annex Texas, it will find itself the neighbor of a country that will extend all the way to the Pacific ("...this now small Republic will embrace the shores of the Pacific as well as those of the Gulf of Mexico; presenting to them the spectacle of an immense cotton and sugar growing nation in intimate connection with England, and other commercial and manufacturing countries of Europe, whose relations shall have been permanently adjusted on equitable principles of reciprocal interest..."); that Texas's first priority after having emancipated itself from "Mexican tyranny" was to restore its territory to the rightful owner--the U.S.; that now probably no Texas administration will entertain the idea of annexation again; concludes by observing that relations with Native Americans in East Texas have improved, that Holland Coffee has been cleared of any wrongdoing, and that Memucan Hunt should not raise the matter again with the U.S.]
Box Pages
2006/385-6 505-506 [Tennessee General Assembly], printed copy of two resolutions, each with printed signatures of John Cocke (Speaker of the House of Representatives) and Terry H. Cahal (Speaker of the Senate): (1) Preamble and Resolution in Favor of the Annexation of Texas to the United States (passed January 20th, 1838) and (2) Resolution Instructing our Senators in Congress, and requesting our Representatives, to endeavor to procure the passage of a law, providing for the payment of the Tennessee Volunteers of 1836 (adopted in the House of Representatives, January 3, 1838; concurred in by the Senate, January 4, 1838), January 1838
[1 page]
[Note: Perhaps printed in Washington and distributed to official persons. Not in Streeter. For a related item, see pages 507-508.]
[Content: Preamble and Resolution in Favor of the Annexation of Texas to the United States.]
507-508 [Tennessee Governor] Newton Cannon to Richard Cheatham (Executive Department, Nashville), March 20, 1838
[1 page,
integral address leaf.]
[Note: mailed with pages 505-506.]
[Content: Printed letter of transmittal for Preamble and Resolutions.]
509-510 John Forsyth to [Memucan Hunt] (Department of State, Washington), February 19, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Stating that he understands that Sandy Harris has become Hunt's secretary.]
511-512 John Forsyth to [Memucan Hunt] (Department of State, Washington), February 21, 1838
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Enclosing a copy of the circular from the first comptroller of U.S. Treasury addressed to customs officers instructing them to give the vessels and productions of Texas the benefits of the 5th and 6th articles of the treaty between the U.S. and Mexico.]
513-516 George Wolf (Comptroller). Secretarial copy of manuscript circular entitled "Circular to Collectors, Naval Officers, and Surveyors," undated
[2-1/2 pages,
with docket.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 313-314.]
[Content: This is the enclosure referred to above.]
517-520 Samuel F.B. Morse to Memucan Hunt (Washington City), March 1, 1838
[1 page,
docketed on p. 520. Pages 518-519 are blank.]
[Note: From the Handbook of Texas: In 1838 the Republic of Texas failed to accept an offer from Samuel F.B. Morse to give his new invention to that new nation. Morse, receiving no reply to his offer, withdrew it in a letter to Governor Sam Houston in 1860. His model instrument is kept in the State Archives Building at Austin. (This statement is incorrect, the result of misidentification.) The use of the telegraph for communication in Texas, which preceded the railroads and telephone as a national network, began with the chartering of the Texas and Red River Telegraph Company on January 5, 1854.]
[Content: Morse offers the Republic of Texas the exclusive use of the telegraph which he invented: "wishing to show some evidence of my interest in the rise and character of the new and independent state which you represent, I take this opportunity to offer unconditionally for the acceptance of your government the perpetual use of my electro-magnetic telegraph in the State of Texas" which he says is the single exception he has made of this type.]
521-524 [John Forsyth] to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, [Washington]), March 2, 1838
[1 page,
docketed on p. 524.]
[Pages 522-523 are blank.]
[Content: Secretarial note inviting him to the Department of State at 11 o'clock the next day.]
525-528 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, Washington), March 9, 1838
[1 page,
docketed on p. 528.]
[Note: Regarding the law, see Streeter 207 citing the imprint but locating no copy. Garrison, Vol. I, p. 318.]
[Content: Acknowledging receipt of a printed copy of the General Land Law of Texas to assist in the Miller County, Arkansas question.]
529-532 H. O. Dayton to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State), June 19, 1838
[3 pages,
docketed on p. 532.]
[Content: Inquiring to see whether Catlett can confirm the death of Evan Rice Evans in Houston on the 27th of October last year.]
533-536 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), March 21, 1838
[3-1/4 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 318-320.]
[Content: Deploring the relations between the U.S. and Texas with regard to the boundary caused by apparent misunderstandings between representatives; asking Hunt to see if he can get the U.S. to run the boundary up to a point near the Red River; reporting that Great Britain has not yet recognized Texan independence; and reporting that "emigration was immense" during the last winter; he concludes: "The depressed condition of the Enemy, and the rapid increase of our population have tended greatly to render the people indifferent to annexation."]
537-540 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt, March 21, 1838
[2-1/2 pages,
with docket.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 320-321. The present copy has the words "hastily, yr friend etc." present, whereas Garrison notes they are stricken in the published copy.]
[Content: Expressing anxiety about the boundary question between Texas and the U.S. and urging him to try to prevent the U.S. from running the boundary past the 42nd degree of north latitude because that country is a wilderness of savages and will not be settled for many years to come.]
541-546 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), May 18, 1838
[4-1/2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 327-320.]
[Content: Reporting that the Texas Congress has considered the problem of the disputed territory on the Red River and suggests that Texas suspend its laws there; discussing certain ideas about running the western boundary lines, and how that might work among Mexico, Texas, and the U.S.; noting indemnities will be granted to persons damaged in the capture of the Pocket and stating it will be desirable if the treaty between the U.S. and Mexico was delayed.]
547-548 Robert Anderson Irion to Memucan Hunt (Department of State, City of Houston), May 19, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 329-330.]
[Content: Stating that if the U.S. Congress adjourns without acting on Texas annexation, then the Texas Legation should withdraw the proposal.]
549-550 John Forsyth to Memucan Hunt, (Department of State, Washington), May 23, 1838
[2 pages]
[Note: Hunt resigned on June 5, 1838.]
[Content: Acknowledging that Hunt is going to be absent and Fairfax Catlett will be taking over his duties.]
551-552 John W. Crockett to Fairfax Catlett (House of Representatives, [Washington]), June 8, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: son of David Crockett.]
[Content: Regarding a letter to be forwarded to Hunt.]
553-554 Benjamin S. Ewell to Fairfax Catlett (York, Pennsylvania), June 18, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Outlining his education and experiences as a civil engineer and requesting to be employed to run the boundary line between the U.S. and Texas.]
555-556 John Woodward to Fairfax Catlett (New York), June 23, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting that the appointment of Charles H. Forbes as vice-consul of the City of New York be recognized and made known to the U.S. government.]
557-558 J. McClelland to Fairfax Catlett (Norfolk, Virginia), June 25, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting that he forward a communication to General Albert Sidney Johnston.]
559-562 James Manney to Fairfax Catlett (Beaufort, North Carolina), June 25, 1838
[1-1/2 pages, ?
docketed. Page 560 is blank.]
[Content: Requesting that he forward an unspecified memorial by Manney to the President of Texas and that any response be forwarded to him; inquiring on what rivers in Texas there are steamboats; informing Catlett that he is a doctor and asking if there is surveying work in Texas for William Bryan Hellen.]
563-564 John Forsyth to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State, Washington), June 28, 1838
[2 pages]
[Content: Acknowledges the documents acknowledging the appointment of Charles W. Forbes to be vice-consul of Texas to New York.]
565-566 William H. Wharton to Fairfax Catlett (Eagle Island), June 30, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: This is the earliest evidence of what would become a significant career in the Texas Navy. See Handbook where we learn Tod's appointment was made in July 1839; and "...he lobbied the state department for annexation, although he apparently was not acting in any official capacity. In 1845 he returned to Texas carrying the official notification of annexation."]
[Content: Recommending J. G. Tod for employment as an officer in the Texas Navy and requesting that Catlett follow up on Wharton's previous request for documents.]
567-568 John Forsyth to Fairfax Catlett (Department of State, Washington), July 5, 1838
[2 pages]
[Note: Not in Garrison, but see Vol. I, pp. 336-337.]
[Content: Concerning settling the claims for the brigs Pocket and Durango and requesting that he come to the Department of State the next day to exchange documents.]
569-570 Robert Anderson Irion to Anson Jones (Department of State, City of Houston), August [?], 1838
[1-1/2 pages]
[Note: Newell was the Texas consul to Velasco.]
[Content: Urging that despite whatever negative information may heard, Stewart Newell is a friend of Texas.]
571-574 Robert Anderson Irion to Anson Jones (Department of State, City of Houston), August 7, 1838
[3 pages, plus the address and red blob of sealing wax.]
[Content: Irion expresses satisfaction on hearing from Mr. Catlett that the indemnity offered for the capture of the Pocket and the impressment of the Durango has been ratified by the U.S.; discusses the withdrawal of the annexation proposal; asks Jones to press on the appointment of commissioners for a Northeastern loan, the commission to meet in New Orleans; expresses gratification that the U.S. is increasing its troop strength on the Southwestern frontier; refers to General Gaines and his "experience, discretion, and great energy"; says that the Indians, particularly the Caddos, are a greater danger to Texas than the Mexicans; says that rumors of hostilities in the West seem to be confined to robbers and are not of a national character; and reports that General Henderson has arrived in France but nothing has been concluded. In a postscript, he says that it is expected that Jones will offer every assistance to the commissioners who are authorized to make the loan. He then adds that Sam. M. Williams has been appointed Navy Agent in place of the late Colonel Grayson.]
575-576 Aaron Vail (Acting Secretary of State) to [Anson Jones] (Department of State, Washington), August 24, 1838
[2 pages]
[Content: Informing him that his credentials as Minister Plenipotentiary from Texas cannot be accepted at the moment because both the Secretary of State and President are out of town.]
577-578 Martin Van Buren to Anson Jones [Washington], October 9, 1838
[1-1/2 pages,
letter in a secretarial hand.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 347 (as part of Dispatch No. 40).]
[Content: Receiving him as the representative of the Republic of Texas and assuring him that he wishes continued good relations between the two countries.]
579-580 Robert Anderson Irion to Anson Jones (Department of State, City of Houston), September 7, 1838
[2 pages]
[Content: Urging Jones to try to consummate the boundary question and sending Fairfax Catlett's credentials which he is supposed to file.]
581-582 Stewart Newell to Anson Jones (Galveston), September 9, 1838
[2 pages]
[Content: Requesting that he be appointed consul to Galveston and giving reasons why he should be.]
583-584 E. Noah Barstow to Anson Jones (Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire), September 16, 1838
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Inquiring about the estate of his brother Joshua Barstow who fought in the Battle of San Jacinto and who died on September 28, 1836, while guarding Santa Anna at the home of Dr. Phelps at Orizimba; he also inquires about any bounty lands due his brother.]
585-586 E. R. Belcher to Anson Jones (Bolivar, [Texas]), September 18, 1838
[1-1/2 pages]
[Content: Attempting to ascertain the best way to sell one-third of the land holdings of the widow of Bomar [?].]
587-588 Thomas Toby to Anson Jones (New Orleans), October 5, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Enclosing his commission as consul for the Republic of Texas to New Orleans.]
589-592 Aaron Vail (Acting Secretary of State) to Anson Jones, (Department of State, Washington), October 11, 1838
[2 pages,
docket.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 348. The very next day Jones withdrew Texas's request to be annexed.]
[Content: Stating that that the Department of State is ready to exchange ratifications for the boundary convention. Jones had sent a note wanting to know when Vail wanted to meet about the matter. Vail proposes that they meet the following day at noon at the State Department for the exchange.]
593-596 TEXAS (Republic) and UNITED STATES (Department of State). [Printed half title]: Convention between the United States of America and the Republic of Texas, for Marking the Boundary between them. Concluded April 25, 1838; Ratifications Exchanged October 13, 1838. [text commences]: Convention between the United States of America and the Republic of Texas, for Marking the Boundary between them... [Signed in print at conclusion]: [L.S.] John Forsyth, [L.S.] Memucan Hunt. October 13, 1838
[4 pages]
[Note: Not in Streeter.]
[Content: Printed copy, with title page: "Convention between the United States of America and the Republic of Texas, for Marking the Boundary between them." Possibly attachments to previous item, pages 589-592. The boundary is to be run from the mouth of the Sabine to the Red River.]
597-598 Aaron Vail (Acting Secretary of State) to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), October 13, 1838
[2 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 27 (Calendar).]
[Content: Informing him that he has received notification that Texas has withdrawn its proposition to be annexed to the U.S.]
599-600 Aaron Vail (Acting Secretary of State) to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), October 19, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Informing him that he is enclosing the official qualifications for Henry H. Williams, as Republic of Texas consul for Baltimore.]
Box Pages
2006/385-7 601-604 John Day Andrews to Anson Jones (Hanover Court House, [Virginia]), October 20, 1838
[3 pages,
with integral address leaf and docket.]
[Note: from a leading early citizen of Houston.]
[Content: Thanking him for his previous letter on the subject of slavery in Texas; requesting information about properly importing slaves to Texas; expressing the opinion that Texas will not be able to be developed without the continuance and expansion of slavery; pledging that if he can be assured of safety, he will bring his slaves to Texas.]
605-608 Robert Strange to [Anson Jones] (Fayetteville, North Carolina), October 23, 1838
[1-1/4 pages,
with an address leaf, docketed.]
[Content: Inquiring about the method for the heirs of William S. Tutor to apply for his bounty lands.]
609-610 Alex Enriquez to [Anson Jones] (New York), October 26, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Writing on the advice of Fairfax Catlett regarding employment.]
611-612 Edmund C. Watmough to Anson Jones (Washington), November 20, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Asking Jones to forward some mail.]
613-614 Daniel Gold to Anson Jones (Office H.R. [House of Representatives] U.S.), November 27, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Submitting papers (not present) reviewing the circumstances of Thomas Hastings' death and informing him that General E. Root is handling the estate.]
615-622 Robert Anderson Irion to Anson Jones (Department of State, City of Houston), November 29, 1838
[6 pages,
with an address leaf.]
[Content: Most of the letter is devoted to lengthy discussions of the boundary line and of Pedro Miracle's Journal and the evidence of a Mexican-Indian conspiracy. President Houston was gratified by the ratification of the Treaty of Limits and anxious to have the surveying work begin right away. Indian disturbances, specifically the Caddos, continue to plague Texas. Irion hopes that the U.S. is not indifferent to Indian encroachment in Texas from the United States. A brief discussion of the French blockade on Mexico and how it might affect Texas. Samuel Williams has contracted for five warships, which will force Mexico to acknowledge Texas independence. P.S. Catlett resigned.]
623-638 Miracle's Journal (copy accompanied the communication No. 65), December 31, 1838
[11 pages plus about 16 fragmentary pages (some losses),
docketed as having been included in Communication No. 65.]
[Note: Numbers legible only on pages 623-628, and pages 637-638. Garrison, Vol. I, p. 27 (Calendar). For discussion of Miracle's journal, see Irion to Jones, November 29, 1838 (Garrison, Vol. I, p. 350-354). UT Arlington has a version of Miracle's journal in the Irion Papers. Interesting chapter on the clash of cultures between the Republic of Texas, Mexico, and Native Americans. In May 1837, General Filisola, Commander in Matamoros, sent Julián Pedro Miracle into Texas to contact Mexicans and Native Americans to prepare to attack the Texans in the spring or summer of 1838. Supplies including: powder, lead, and tobacco would be supplied by Mexico. Miracle had with him 72 Mexicans, 34 soldiers, and 20 Indians who were Cherokees and Caddos. In June, they met Manuel Flores at the San Antonio River and on July 5 with Vicente Cordova (see in appendix Cordova Rebellion) at the Trinity River. Miracle also met with representatives of the Cherokee, Delaware, Shawnee, Kickapoo, Chickasaw, Caddo, Waco, Kichai, and Tawakoni Indians.]
[Content: Contemporary secretarial transcription and translation in English of a portion of the 1838 diary of Julián Pedro Miracle, including some instructions from Filisola.]
639-642 John Forsyth to José María de Castillo y Lanzas (Department of State, Washington), October 22, 1835
[2-1/2 pages,
docketed as enclosed with Forsyth to Jones, December 3, 1838.]
[Note: Enclosure in next item, therefore out of chronological order. Secretarial copy of a letter.]
[Content: Explaining the United States position on hostile Native Americans, stating that before the United States can act, some proof must be given that the tribes are hostile.]
643-646 John Forsyth to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), December 3, 1838
[3 pages,
docketed.]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 127 (dated December 2, 1838).]
[Content: Stating he has received his note on the 26th about Native Americans who emigrated from the U.S. to Texas and who are combining with other tribes to commit atrocities in Texas; explaining the government's position and enclosing the Department of State's October 22, 1835, communication to the Mexican government about their relations with Native Americans along their mutual borders.]
647-648 Samuel May Williams to Anson Jones (Philadelphia), December 6, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Sending Jones Texas bonds in the amount of $280,000 for the Texas Navy and requesting that he countersign them.]
649-650 Joshua Soule, Jr. to [Anson Jones] (Indianapolis), December 14, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: No one by the name of John Lawson is found in the Handbook, Defenders of the Republic of Texas, Miller, Bounty and Donation Land Grants, or Groneman's Alamo Defenders. No entry in Republic of Texas claims.]
[Content: About his brother-in-law John Lawson who supposedly perished at the Alamo next to David Crockett and wondering how he might claim any bounty lands.]
651-652 O.H. Smith to Anson Jones (Washington City), December 19, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: May relate to preceding letter, pages 649-650.]
[Content: Asking that the bearer of the letter be given information.]
653-654 Anson Jones to Samuel May Williams and A.T. Burnley (Texian Legation, Washington), December 21, 1838
[1 page,
Secretarial copy of a letter.]
[Note: See pages 647-648 above.]
[Content: Stating he has signed and returned the bonds.]
655-656 Henry H. Williams to Anson Jones (Baltimore), December 22, 1838
[1 page]
[Note: Sloan lists this out of order, given document number 239. See pages 647-648 and 653-654.]
[Content: Requesting that he give the bonds to the bearer of this letter.]
657-658 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to Anson Jones (City of Houston), December 26, 1838
[1 page]
[Content: Informing him of the December 10 election results in Texas and asking him to inform the U.S. government of such.]
659-660 Charles E. Heath to Anson Jones (Washington, D.C.), January 2, 1839
[1 page,
docket.]
[Content: Requesting information about the estate effects of the late Major Leander Smith, supposedly killed in 1837 or 1838 near Nacogdoches.]
661-662 William Bryan to Anson Jones (New Orleans), January 6, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting that he complete the work on his appointment as Texas consul to New Orleans.]
663-664 Wilson Lumpkin to Anson Jones (Senate Chamber, Washington), January 9, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting information about how the heirs of Alfred Bynum, one of Fannin's regiment at the Goliad Massacre, can collect the bounties to which they are entitled.]
665-666 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to unnamed recipient (Anson Jones) (Houston), January 14, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Informing Jones that the Texas Congress is considering various measures now that the petition for annexation has been withdrawn. Marked Private and in haste.]
667-668 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to Anson Jones (Department of State, Houston), January 14, 1839
[1/2 page]
[Content: Introducing Mr. [Moses Austin] Bryan as Secretary of the Texas Legation and requesting that he be introduced to the U.S. Secretary of State.]
669-670 John Forsyth to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), January 14, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Returning the appointment documents of William Bryan as Texas consul in New Orleans.]
671-672 Richard Mentor Johnson to Anson Jones (U.S. Senate, [Washington]), January 14, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Requesting assistance in allowing physician John Bennet[t] from Newport, Kentucky, to emigrate to Texas and join the Army.]
673-674 John Forsyth to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), January 19, 1839
[2 pages]
[Content: Informing Jones that he has received the note Jones sent about the new administration based on the latest elections in Texas.]
675-676 Robert Strange to Anson Jones (Senate Chamber, [Washington]), January 21, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Inquiring about the method for the heirs of [William S.] Tutor to apply for bounty lands; regrets that he has lost the previous reply and asking for another one.]
677-678 Richard Biddle to unnamed recipient (Anson Jones), (House of Representatives, [Washington]), January 22, 1839
[1/2 page]
[Content: Relaying some papers and asking that they receive his attention.]
679-680 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to Anson Jones (Department of State, Houston), January 31, 1839
[1 page]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, p. 362.]
[Content: Informing Jones that Texas Congress has accepted the withdrawal of the annexation proposal and that nothing further need be done; reviewing events with the border war in East Texas with the Indians stating that Caddos have been found killed in recent battles and that General Rusk crossed the Sabine in pursuit.]
681-682 Barnard Elliott Bee, Sr. to [Anson Jones] (Department of State, Houston), January 31, 1839
[1 page,
with P.S. in Bee's hand; signed twice.]
[Content: Informing Jones that his draft in favor of McKinney has been accepted.]
683-684 John Forsyth to Anson Jones (Department of State, Washington), February 8, 1839
[1 page]
[Content: Informing Jones that he has received the announcement of the appointment of Moses Austin Bryan as legation secretary.]
685-688 Stewart Newell to Anson Jones (Galveston), February 28, 1839
[3 pages,
with docket.]
[Content: Requesting a transfer to the Sabine and other matters.]
Unnumbered pages, 1836, 1841, 1844-1845
Box Item
2006/385-8 1 Stephen F. Austin to W. H. Wharton: "General Instructions to the Hon. W. H. Wharton Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States of America," (Columbia), November 18, 1836
[18 pages,
including cover sheet]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 127-135.]
[Content: Wharton is instructed that his most important objects are the recognition of the independence of the Republic of Texas and the annexation of Texas to the United States; establishing the boundaries, particularly those along the Red River; the proposal to eventually subdivide Texas into several states; concerning negotiations for Native Americans within Texas (preferably having all those around the Red River removed to south of the Rio Grande); addressing the potential problems of land claims and slavery in Texas.]
2 Stephen F. Austin to W. H. Wharton: "Private and Special Instructions to the Hon. W. H. Wharton Minister Plenipotentiary to the United States of America" (Columbia), November 18, 1836
[11 pages,
including cover sheet]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 135-140.]
[Content: In these instructions, Austin warns Wharton that the question of annexation is complicated because many people in Texas really are not in favor of it, and it is influenced by considerations of foreign policy and Texas's potential relations with other independent nations, such as Mexico and England. He also warns him to try to address the question of Native Americans so that they are no threat to the eastern part of Texas and that he should make every effort to have the eastern border run in a favorable conformation to Texas. Austin's added instructions at the end govern Wharton's conduct toward foreign ministers that he will meet in Washington. Signed twice by Austin (body of document in secretarial hand, signed at end "S. F. Austin Secy of State" followed by a one-half page addendum in Austin's hand and again signed by him.]
3 James Pinckney Henderson to Memucan Hunt (Columbia), December 31, 1836
[9 pages]
[Note: Garrison, Vol. I, pp. 161-165.]
[Content: These instructions while repeating the large outlines of the previous ones given to Wharton pay more attention to certain arguments for annexation, such as the vast riches that Texas would bring to the U.S., its potential key role in defense (including shipbuilding), and being a buffer against Native American depredations.]
4 Robert Anderson Irion (Department of State, City of Houston) to Anson Jones, July 12, 1838
[2 1/2 pages, margins damaged with loss of several words and letters.]
[Note: Page number 56_? legible on first page, but no other page numbers legible. Index lists first page as 568 1/8.]
[Content: Stating Jones has been appointed Republic of Texas Minister Plenipotentiary to the U.S.; ordering that "you will on your arrival there [Washington, D.C.] take possession of the archives, documents, papers, etc. that belong to the Texian legation"; giving further instructions, some of which concern annexation.]
5 G.W. Caldwell (House of Representatives) to B.E. Bee, August 12, 1841
[1 page]
[Content: Caldwell received a communication from one of his constituents with a request that he forward it to Bee.]
6 James McMaster (Washington City) to Colonel B. Bee, [August] 14, 1841
[2 pages]
[Content: Just arrived from New Orleans. He is interested in Texas securities and has heard contradictory reports; he is very anxious to get good information, as his investments have already embarrassed him much.]
7 J.C. Spencer to Isaac Van Zandt, January [?] 18, 1843
[1 page]
[Content: Spencer sends Van Zandt draft of a treaty, as promised. It has been communicated to [?] with instructions to proceed at once to the Waco village and to be there by March 10.]
8 W.S. Derrick (Department of State, Washington) to Isaac Van Zandt (chargé d'affaires of Texas), August 18, 1843
[2 pages]
[Content: Derrick, Acting Secretary of State of the U.S., has received Van Zandt's note dated August 16 concerning proposed joint treaty with Indian tribes, and has sent it to the Secretary of War.]
9 D. Parker (Chief Clerk, War Department) to A.P. Upshur (Secretary of State), August 22, 1843
[4 pages: one page copy of letter, 3 pages extract]
[Content: Parker, in absence of Secretary of War, answers Upshur's letter of August 17 by sending a copy of extract of report of Commissioner of Indian Affairs. Secretary of War confirms views of Commissioner and has given instructions on treating with wild Indians referred to by chargé d'affaires of Texas..]
10 James Logan to Isaac Van Zandt, (Washington), May 30, 1844
[2-1/4 pages,
integral address.]
[Content: Telling Van Zandt that as far as the Cherokee are concerned, he should employ a Cherokee by the name of Dutch, once a chief among the Western Cherokee and a force among the Texas Cherokee; Logan believes Dutch can probably negotiate a peaceful ending to the conflicts around the Red River; suggests that James Starr and Stand Watie be enlisted to assist in negotiations; states his "long experience among the Indian Tribes, and my deep anxiety for the inhabitants of Texas, and my personal knowledge of that frontier."]
11 Ashbel Smith to Charles H. Raymond, February 11, 1845
[4 pages]
[Content: Urging him to work for the annexation of Texas; and concerning Texas appointments to the U.S. government..]
[Note: Secretarial letter. Garrison, Vol. 2, pp. 358-359.]
12 E.D. Whitney and Co. (Philadelphia) to Barnard E. Bee (Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of Texas), August [no day, no year]
[2 pages]
[Content: Long article headed "Republic of Texas" in Pennsylvania Enquirer published August 11, quotes Commissioner for obtaining loans, General [James] Hamilton, as saying that negotiations have for the present ceased. He has reason to believe this is not true and would like verification.]
13 A.B. Quinby (New York) to Isaac Van Zandt, January 7, [no year]
[3 pages,
integral address.]
[Content: "I have not the least objection to endeavor [to] get access to the operation of the gun in question [from?] Mr. Brower....The inv[entor] to my knowledge had his mind fixed on anoth[er] than Texas for the sale of his new engine...."]
14 R.W. Bar[ton] (House of Representatives) to B.E. Bee, undated [but between March 1841 and March 1843]
[1 page]
[Content: Encloses something from one of his Virginia constituents.]
15 [name obliterated] (House of Representatives) to B.E. Bee, undated
[1 page]
[Content: One of writer's fellow citizens has a brother at Zavalla, Jasper County, to whom he wants to send money but does not know how.]
Index, 1836-1839
Box
2006/385-8 Alphabetical index: A-K, M, V-W
Alphabetical index: L, N, P-T, W