Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Comptroller's Office:

An Inventory of Comptroller's Office Claims Records at the Texas State Archives, 1835-1990, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas. Comptroller's Office.
Title: Comptroller's Office claims records
Dates: 1835-1990, undated
Abstract: The Office of Comptroller of Public Accounts was initially created by the General Council of the Provisional Government of Texas on December 29, 1835, for the purpose of examining and approving or rejecting any monetary claims presented to him by the Auditor. These functions continued under the governments of the Republic of Texas (1836-1845) and the State of Texas (1845 onwards). These records document the claims (including pensions) that were audited and either accepted or rejected by the government of the Republic of Texas, and by the government of the State of Texas for civil and (especially) military service to the Republic of Texas, as well as for Confederate service, and for service in the Texas Rangers. Types of records include claim files, pension applications files, pension registers and indexes, public debt registers and indexes, drafts for payment, and associated records. They comprise more than 951 cubic ft. of loose records, plus 61 volumes, dating 1835-1990 and undated.
Quantity: 966.81 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The Office of Comptroller of Public Accounts was initially created by the General Council of the Provisional Government of Texas on December 29, 1835, elected by the General Council and commissioned by the Governor, for the purpose of examining and approving or rejecting any claims presented to him by the Auditor (also created by this ordinance).

The Comptroller first appeared as a constitutional officer in the first state Constitution of Texas (1845), elected for a two-year term by a joint ballot of the House and Senate. A constitutional amendment in 1850 abandoned this method of selection in favor of election by the voters of the state. The term of office was increased to four years by the Constitution of 1866, returned to two years by the present Constitution of 1876, and finally increased once again to four years by a constitutional amendment adopted in 1972. (Article IV, section 1)

On April 11, 1846, the First Legislature of the State of Texas approved an act defining the duties of the Comptroller. These included the following:

  • to superintend the fiscal concerns of the state;
  • to perform such official acts as were required of the Secretary of the Treasury under the Republic of Texas, when not otherwise provided for by law;
  • to report to the Governor annually, giving an exact and complete statement of the funds of the State, of its revenues, and of the public expenditures during the preceding year, with a detailed estimate of the expenditures to be defrayed from the Treasury for the ensuing year, distinguishing between special and general appropriations;
  • to keep all accounts between Texas and the United States, and all other accounts in which the State has an interest, and to suggest plans for the improvement and management of the public revenue;
  • to examine and settle the accounts of all persons indebted to the State, to certify the amount or balance to the Treasurer, and to direct the collection of all monies due the State;
  • to audit the claims of all persons against the State in cases where provisions for the payment thereof have been made by law;
  • to draw warrants on the Treasurer for the payment of all monies directed by law to be paid out of the treasury;
  • to number each warrant and to take a receipt for each warrant from the person receiving the same;
  • to furnish the Treasurer with a monthly report of all warrants drawn;
  • to prescribe and furnish the forms to be used by all persons in the collection of the public revenue;
  • to receive and file all liens, mortgages, bonds and other sureties for money given to the State or to any officer thereof for the use of the State;
  • to close all Comptroller accounts annually, and to allow these accounts to be examined by either house of the legislature, or by any legislative committee;
  • to examine all disbursements of the Treasurer quarterly, and to cancel those warrants which have been paid;
  • to preserve the books, records, papers, and other things belonging to his office, and to deliver the same to his successor. ( Gammel's Laws, vol. 2, pp. 1374-1378)

In other words, in the mid-19th century as in the late 20th century, the Comptroller was and is the central accounting officer or chief fiscal officer of the state, and as such is responsible for maintaining effective methods for accounting for the state's funds. He or she is the state's principal tax administrator and collector of tax revenue. The Comptroller must also provide the research and statistics necessary for revenue estimating and certification.

Other duties were added from time to time through specific legislation. These duties will be explained as required in the appropriate series descriptions in this finding aid.

In addition, the Comptroller was made an ex officio member of various other state boards and commissions, as for example the following: the Insurance Department (superintendent, 1875), the Board of Education (1876), the Capitol Building Commission (1879), the East Texas Penitentiary Board (1879), the Board to sell useless State property (1879), the Board of Claims (1883), the Land Board and the Land Fraud Board (1883), the State Tax Board (1905), the Automatic Tax Board (1907), the Texas Bond Commission (1933), etc.

As the business of the office grew in volume and in complexity, the staff of the office increased as well. In 1852 the legislature created the office of Chief Clerk of the Office of Comptroller. Other specialized clerks were added as needed, and as the state budget permitted: tax clerk(s) (about 1859); corresponding clerk(s) (about 1874); an examining clerk (about 1881); delinquent tax clerks, auditing clerks, and warrant clerks (about 1882); a redemption clerk (about 1888); a deposit warrant clerk, a sheriff and witness accountant, a stenographic clerk, and a receiving clerk (all about 1891); a direct tax clerk (about 1893); a special warrant clerk, a bond clerk, mailing and filing clerks, and pension clerks (about 1901); etc. By the turn of the 19th/20th century, the total clerical staff of the office was approximately 44. This had increased to over 400 by 1950. In 1994, the total staff exceeded 2,800.


Scope and Contents of the Records

The Office of Comptroller of Public Accounts was initially created by the General Council of the Provisional Government of Texas on December 29, 1835, for the purpose of examining and approving or rejecting any monetary claims presented to him by the Auditor. These functions continued under the governments of the Republic of Texas (1836-1845) and the State of Texas (1845 onwards). These records document the claims (including pensions) that were audited and either accepted or rejected by the government of the Republic of Texas, and by the government of the State of Texas for civil and (especially) military service to the Republic of Texas, as well as for Confederate service, and for service in the Texas Rangers. Types of records include claim files, pension applications files, pension registers and indexes, public debt registers and indexes, drafts for payment, and associated records. They comprise more than 951 cubic ft. of loose records, plus 61 volumes, dating 1835-1990 and undated. This includes the following: audited Republic claims, public debt claims, Republic pension records, unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, Confederate claims, Confederate pension records, and Texas Ranger pensions.

Claims files contain such documents as claim vouchers, official authorization of services or purchases, Auditor's affidavits, War Department pay certificates, discharges, assignments of benefits, powers of attorney, pay accounts, invoices, court dockets, public debt certificates, affidavits concerning service, petitions to the legislature, acts for the relief of an individual, partial or complete lists of soldiers for whom payment was being collected by a single individual, etc. Pension application files contain such documents as affidavits of service, transcripts of county court rulings on the validity of the claim, certifications of continuing indigence, certified copies of muster rolls, powers of attorney, pension certificates, oaths of identity, additional affidavits and interrogatories relating to any of the requirements for eligibility, correspondence, original discharges, death certificates, printed material (including newspaper clippings), mortuary warrants, etc.

Audited Republic claims (including both civil and military claims) are those that were submitted to the Comptroller or Treasurer of the Republic, and were audited and approved (or allowed) and paid by that government during the Republic period; thus both the services and the payments for these services date between 1835 and 1846. Public debt claims records document the public debt of Texas (which included both the ordinary or non-revenue debt--consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army; and the revenue debt--principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas and State of Texas securities), accounted for by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts in claims files, registers, and indexes; the settlements of these public debt claims dated 1848-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, and undated. Republic pension records document the pensions authorized by the Texas State Legislature for persons who rendered military service to the Republic of Texas (and their widows) and signers of the Declaration of Independence, to be administered by the Office of the Comptroller; they consist of 15 indexes plus the actual Republic pension files, dating 1870-1920. Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims include records relating to services and losses during the era of the Republic of Texas that were denied, or that simply have no documentation in the records of the Comptroller of Public Accounts of having been settled, or that do not fit easily into an existing series; these date 1836-about 1879.

Confederate audited military claims comprise the claim files for payment for military and military-related services rendered for the defense of Texas during the Civil War, submitted to the Texas Comptroller's office for auditing and approval, some of which were eligible to be submitted for reimbursement by the government of the Confederate States of America, dating 1861-1865. Like military claims, claims for payment for civil services rendered for the State of Texas during the Civil War were submitted to the Texas Comptroller's office for auditing and approval, although it is unclear whether any of these could be submitted to the Confederate States government; these "Confederate" audited civil claims dated 1861-1865. "Confederate" indigent families lists were submitted by the counties and maintained by the Texas Comptroller's Office, designating and enumerating indigent families eligible for relief from the State of Texas during the Civil War, 1863-1865. Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. The Confederate pension applications records created and maintained by the Texas Comptroller's office provide detailed documentation of those persons applying for these pensions, as well as the process itself, dating 1899-1979. The Confederate pension payment records consist of 23 volumes maintained by the Texas Comptroller's office, which document payments of these Confederate pensions, as well as mortuary warrants.

Beginning in 1959, the Texas Legislature authorized the Comptroller's office to pay pensions to qualified former Texas Rangers and their widows. Texas Ranger pension files document both the persons applying for these pensions, and the process itself, consisting mostly of the pension files (applications and other documents) of deceased recipients of Texas Ranger pensions, 1959-1990, but also federal legislation and Texas Attorney General opinions.

This finding aid describes 10 series of records from the Texas Comptroller's Office. If you are reading this electronically, click here for an introduction to the Texas Comptroller's Office records. If you are reading this in paper, the introduction is at the beginning of the first binder labeled Comptroller.


 

Organization of the Records

These records have been organized by State Archives staff into 10 series, and 14 subseries:
Audited Republic claims, 1835-1846, 127.35 cubic ft.
Public debt claims records, 1848-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, undated, 57.73 cubic ft. (in 3 subseries)
  • Registers and indexes of Republic of Texas public debt claims, 1848-1861, undated, 1.4 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
  • Republic of Texas public debt claims files, 1848-about 1860, 55.62 cubic ft.
  • Registers of State of Texas public debt claims, 1860-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, 0.71 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
Republic pension records, 1870-1920, 38.36 cubic ft. (in 2 subseries)
  • Republic pension indexes, 1870-1920, 1.13 cubic ft. (15 volumes)
  • Republic pension files, 1870-about 1900, 37.23 cubic ft.
Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, 1836-about 1879, 10.1 cubic ft.
Confederate audited military claims, 1861-1865, 45.59 cubic ft.
Confederate audited civil claims, 1861-1865, 24.44 cubic ft.
Confederate indigent families lists, 1863-1865, 0.94 cubic ft.
Confederate pension applications records, 1899-1979, 652.71 cubic ft. (in 5 subseries)
  • Confederate pension applications, 1899-1979, 646.74 cubic ft.
  • Miscellaneous material relating to Confederate pension applications, 1903-1934, 2.12 cubic ft.
  • Confederate pension indexes, 1899-1967, 2.36 cubic ft. (12 volumes)
  • Confederate pension registers, 1899-1909, 1915-1917, 1.15 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
  • Affidavits of Confederate military service, 1909-1917, 0.34 cubic ft. (one volume)
Confederate pension payments records, 1899-1905, 1909-1910, 1915-1966, 8.65 cubic ft. (23 volumes) (in 4 subseries)
  • Quarterly Confederate pension records, 1899-1905, 1915-1916, bulk 1899-1905, 2.71 cubic ft. (6 volumes)
  • Confederate pension affidavit registers, 1900-1901, 1917-1920, 2.02 cubic ft. (5 volumes)
  • Confederate pension warrant registers and stubs, 1900-1903, 1909-1910, 1950-1955, 2.49 cubic ft. (8 volumes)
  • Confederate mortuary warrant registers, 1917-1966, bulk 1917-1943, 1.43 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
Texas Ranger pensions, 1917-1938, 1959-1990, bulk 1959-1990, 0.94 cubic ft.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Because Republic of Texas claims are fragile, access to these records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm for Republic claims are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow.

Microfilm readers are available in the Genealogy Section, Room 110 (which is closed on Mondays), and also in Room 300 of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Monday-Friday).


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Texas Rangers.
Subjects:
Claims--Texas.
Debts, Public--Texas.
Expenditures, Public--Texas.
Military pensions--Texas.
Military pensions--Texas--Revolution, 1835-1836.
Military pensions--Texas--Republic, 1836-1846.
Military pensions--Texas--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Payment--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Appropriations and expenditures.
Texas--Claims.
Texas--Politics and government--1836-1846.
Confederate States of America--History, Military.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Texas--History--Republic--1836-1846.
Document Types:
Affidavits--Texas--Claims--1835-1846.
Affidavits--Texas--Military pensions--1870-1979.
Affidavits--Texas--Public debts--1848-about 1860.
Applications--Texas--Claims--1836-about 1879.
Applications--Texas--Military pensions--1836-1990.
Application forms--Texas--Military pensions--1899-1979.
Certificates--Texas--Military pensions--1899-1979.
Correspondence--Texas--Claims--1836-about 1879, 1901-1913.
Correspondence--Texas--Military pensions--1836-about 1879, 1899-1979.
Financial records--Texas--Claims--1861-1865.
Indexes--Texas--Military pensions--1870-1967.
Indexes--Texas--Public debts--1848-1854, undated.
Legal documents--Texas--Claims--1835-1846, 1861-1865.
Legal documents--Texas--Military pensions--1870-about 1900.
Legal documents--Texas--Public debts--1848-about 1860.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas--Claims--1901-1913.
Lists--Texas--Claims--1863-1865.
Military records--Texas--Claims--1835-1846.
Military records--Texas--Military pensions--1870-1979.
Military records--Texas--Public debts--1848-about 1860.
Opinions--Texas--Military pensions--1928-1938.
Registers--Texas--Military pensions--1899-1910, 1915-1966.
Registers--Texas--Public debts--1848-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873.
Functions:
Administering claims.
Administering expenditures.
Administering military pensions.
Issuing pensions.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Treasurer's Office records are almost totally unprocessed, but are almost always related to the records of the Comptroller's office. Where appropriate, some specific Treasurer's office records are listed as related material under the corresponding series description.
Publications
Annual/Biennial Reports of the Comptroller, 1847-1853, 1855-1861, 1863-1877, 1880-1977 (Note: Published annual/biennial reports from the following time periods are missing: December 26, 1835-October 30, 1847; November 1, 1849-October 30, 1851; November 1, 1853-October 31, 1855; September 1, 1861-August 30, 1863; July 2, 1866-August 31, 1867; September 1, 1870-August 31, 1871; and September 1, 1878-August 31, 1879.)
Confederate Indigent Families Lists of Texas, 1863-1865, by Linda Mearse, San Marcos, Texas, 1995

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1933/003, 1933/007, 1939/004, 1960/003, 1961/006, 1961/046, 1962/218, 1963/030, 1963/145, 1964/029, 1965/042, 1968/072, 1969/002, 1970/044, 1977/080, 1980/302, 1990/069, 1992/154, and unknown

These records were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on February 21 and 24, 1934; April 7, 1939; during the September 1, 1960-August 31, 1962 biennium; on October 31, 1961; September 6, 1962; July 19, 1963; October 18, 1963; April 6, 1964; October 21, 1964; November 29, 1965; December 7, 1967; September 5, 1968; November 13, 1969; February 9, 1977; August 18, 1980; January 17, 1990; and May 26, 1992. Dates of many accessions are uncertain.

Processing Information

Jean Young and Eddie Williams, August 1975

Laura K. Saegert, September 1983, July 1990

Tonia J. Wood, November 1995

Tony Black, November 1987, March 1994, October 1994, January 1995

Connie Hoxie, September 1996

Tony Black, August 2000

Other Formats for the Records

Republic of Texas claims have been microfilmed. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html. Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow. Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.


Other Finding Aids

Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are online at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html.

The index to Confederate audited military claims in a computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives matches the names of claimants with claim numbers.

The index to Confederate audited civil claims in a computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives matches the names of claimants with claim numbers. Because numbers were duplicated, the letter "A" precedes some voucher numbers in one group to avoid possible confusion. Entries in the index preceded by a dash (-) are missing. Entries that involved some question as to the correct spelling of a name or names are preceded by an asterisk (*).

An index of the names of the Confederate indigent soldiers is in a computer printout in the Texas State Archives search room, and is also available online ( http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/cif/index.html). This is an index only; transcriptions of the records have been published by Linda Mearse. Please note that lists are not extant for every county.

An alphabetical union Confederate pension application name index is available in the Texas State Archives search room, containing the following elements: pension number if accepted, "Rej" if rejected, or "Home" if a Confederate Home pension application; name of the pensioner; county of residence at the time of the application; name of husband if a widow, and husband's pension number if applicable. Researchers should request each pension application by number or (for rejected and Home pension applications) by name of applicant. Archives staff routinely check listings in the index for mail or phone requests, and will copy the records in the files. The Confederate pension application index is also available online at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/index.html.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Audited Republic claims, 1835-1846,
127.35 cubic ft.

The Office of Comptroller of Public Accounts was initially created by the General Council of the Provisional Government of Texas on December 29, 1835, elected by the General Council and commissioned by the Governor, for the purpose of examining and approving or rejecting any monetary claims presented to him by the Auditor. These functions continued under the governments of the Republic of Texas and the State of Texas. Claims that were submitted to the Comptroller or Treasurer of the Republic, that were audited and approved (or allowed) and paid by that government during the Republic period are considered audited claims. The series includes both civil and military claims. The services and the payments for these services date between 1835 and 1846. These records comprise Republic of Texas audited claims files. Types of documents in this series include the following: claim vouchers, official authorization of services or purchases, Auditor's affidavits, War Department pay certificates, discharges, assignments of benefits, powers of attorney, pay accounts, invoices, and court dockets, dating 1835-1846.
Republic-era claims that were not paid until after Annexation are included in Public debt claims described in a separate series in this finding aid. Additional information on the laws and the procedures relating to audited claims is included below, and may also be found on the online Laws About Republic Claims page: http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/replaws.html.
Potentially, audited claim documents can provide such information as the name of the claimant; amount of claim; dates filed, approved, and issued; authorizing official; type of materials or services provided; rank, company and company commander; dates of service; date enlisted and date discharged. Some files have only the endorsement wrapper showing the number of the voucher, the type and amount of the claim, the date approved, the date paid, the authorizing government official, and the signature of the person receiving the warrant.
Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html.
Historical Sketch
Two acts of the Texas Consultation determined the manner in which claims would be handled throughout the Republic period: An Ordinance prescribing the manner and form of settling the accounts of the Volunteer Army of Texas (November 24, 1835. Gammels I, 923) and Ordinance and Decree, creating the offices of Auditor and Comptroller of Public Accounts for Texas (December 26, 1835, Gammels I, 1003-8) The first ordinance required that "all bills, accounts, claims, debts, dues or demands, that are now or may hereafter be due or owing by this or a future Government to any person or persons for money, corn, provisions, stores, clothing, medicines, transportation, or any service whatever rendered or furnished, to and for the Volunteer Army of the people of Texas, now in the field, shall, before the same be admitted to audit and liquidation before the Standing Committee on War Affairs, of this House, or the proper department of a future Government, contain the day, date, name and description of the article or sum furnished, and place, and the certificate of the Standing Committee of Safety and Vigilance, or the order or certificate of the commanding officer or Colonel of the Regiment, or company by whose order and at whose requisition the same may have been rendered or furnished: or the receipt of the contractor, commissary or quarter-master to whom the same may have been furnished and delivered, together with the oath or affirmation before any Judge or Alcalde, of the person or persons so presenting the same for liquidation, that the said accounts, debts, dues, demands, or services were at the time and place specified, supplied, furnished, or rendered, made use of, delivered, pressed or taken, lost or killed in the service of the Volunteer Armies of the people of Texas aforesaid." The submission usually included 1) the account or voucher for services or goods, 2) certification of the claim's validity by the authorizing party (usually a department head, company commander, or government official of some sort) either on the account itself or as a separate document, 3) affidavit by the claimant that the claim was just and had not been satisfied heretofore, and 4) receipt for payment signed by the claimant or his representative or assignee and endorsed by the Auditor or Comptroller. The Auditor was required to enter the transaction in his office ledger and to "further number and file all claims, receipts, and other evidences of debts, against the Government, in his office, so that he can at any time refer to them." Even when the claim exceeded four thousand dollars (the largest amount the Auditor was allowed to authorize), the General Council or Governor would authorize the claim, but "the Auditor shall take the same, to his office, and place it on file, with such accompanying evidence as applies to said claim." The Comptroller, in turn, would approve payment of the claim after it had been acted upon and record the information concerning the issuance of the draft "after which he shall return the claim to the Auditor, that he may place it on file, according to the requisitions of the existing laws." In other words, all agencies authorized to approve and to pay claims were required ultimately to return the claim files to the Auditor's Office to be kept as a hedge against fraud. Furthermore, all transactions concerning the payment of claims had to be recorded by both the Auditor and the Comptroller. The Auditor "if said claim is admitted...shall make a record thereof, in a neat and business like manner, setting forth the time when said claim originated, the time it was audited, the name of said claimant, the name of the officer commanding, (if a military claim) to whose company attached, (if to any) by what officer certified, and for what consideration said claim originated." The Comptroller, "when any claim is presented him, approved by the Auditor as set forth in the foregoing, (should) strictly examine it, having previously well informed himself of the existing laws, and if found in all parts consistent and containing all the requisites of the laws, he shall write 'Approved' thereon, with the date, when acted on, and shall also enter the corresponding draft of record in a summary way, setting out in whose favour drawn, date, letter, and amount...." Both the audited claim files and the various ledgers recording the Auditor's and the Comptroller's actions therein were retained in the department's archives.
The audited Republic claims are made up of records submitted to the Texas Comptroller or Treasurer to document or to verify goods or services provided to the government of the Republic of Texas in order to receive payment. Records in the claims document the following:
  • attendance in an official capacity at any of the conventions, beginning with the Consultation in November 1835, the Convention of 1836, and the Annexation Convention of 1845.
  • services as an elected or appointed national official or as an employee in the executive, legislative or judicial department--in other words, any government employee or office holder on the national level from a clerk to the president--between November 1835 and February 1846.
  • military service or association with any military engagement during the period October 1835 through 1845.
  • any goods or services (other than military) provided to the Republic government.
  • payments for special services, such as acting as a witness in county court cases, and payments authorized by special relief acts.
Once a person's right to receive a payment for goods or services provided the government during the Republic period (1835-1846) was established by the Comptroller or the Treasurer, a voucher would be issued. The payment could be made to:
  • The person who performed the service or provided the goods.
  • That person's assignee--someone designated by the original claimant to receive the payment instead of himself. (Because the Republic government was usually broke, claimants would frequently sell their vouchers at a lower rate to a buyer who could supply immediate cash.)
  • That person's attorney.
  • That person's legal heir(s).
  • An entity rather than an individual. Vouchers were issued to the Steamer Savannah, the Tow Boat Daniel Webster, and the Richmond Telescope.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by name of claimant.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Audited Republic claims, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
Because the actual Republic claims are fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 130 reels of Audited Republic claims.)
Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Technical Requirements
Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm for Republic claims are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow.
Microfilm readers are available in the Genealogy Section, Room 110 (which is closed on Mondays), and also in Room 300 of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Monday-Friday).
Processed by
Connie Hoxie, September 1996
Tony Black, August 2000
Reel
1 thru 130 Audited Republic claims, 1835-1846



 

Public debt claims records, 1848-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, undated,
57.73 cubic ft.

The public debt of Texas consisted of two types of debt: the ordinary or non-revenue debt (consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army, usually no more than a few hundred dollars per claim); and the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas securities). After the annexation of Texas into the Union, the Office of Comptroller of Public Accounts of Texas continued the task of examining and approving (or rejecting) any monetary claims presented to him by the Auditor. Republic-era claims that were not paid until after annexation are included in public debt claims, as are post-annexation claims. These records comprise the Republic of Texas and State of Texas public debt claims records. Types of documents in this series include the following: public debt certificates (1st, 2nd, or 3rd class), affidavits concerning service, powers of attorney, petitions to the legislature, acts for the relief of an individual, partial or complete lists of soldiers for whom payment was being collected by a single individual (usually a company commander), invoices, and/or court dockets (all dating 1848-about 1860); two registers and two indexes of Republic of Texas public debt claims (1848-1861 and undated); and three registers of State of Texas public debt claims (1860-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873). Although the dates of the services for which the claims are filed include both the Republic era (1835-1846) and the post-Republic era, the dates for the settlement of the public debt claims are 1848-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, and undated.
Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html.
Historical Sketch
Public debt claims fall into one of two categories: claims against the Republic of Texas, and claims against the State of Texas. Claims against the Republic were for services rendered or securities purchased between 1836 and 1845. Claims against the State include only those incurred after annexation (1846).
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into three subseries:
Registers and indexes of Republic of Texas public debt claims, 1848-1861, undated, 1.4 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
Republic of Texas public debt claims files, 1848-about 1860, 55.62 cubic ft.
Registers of State of Texas public debt claims, 1860-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873, 0.71 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Public debt claims records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1933/007, 1939/004, and unknown others
One register of public debt (erroneously labeled 1838-1840, but actually covering 1848-1861), along with "about 3000 documents" of "Public Debt Papers," was transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on February 21, 1934. 66 "Public Debt Papers" were transferred on April 7, 1939. Dates of other accessions are uncertain.
Restrictions on Access
Because the actual Republic claims are fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 69 reels of Republic of Texas public debt claims files.)
Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Technical Requirements
Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm for Republic claims are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow.
Microfilm readers are available in the Genealogy Section, Room 110 (which is closed on Mondays), and also in Room 300 of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Monday-Friday).
Processed by
Tony Black, October 1994, January 1995, August 2000
Connie Hoxie, September 1996
Registers and indexes of Republic of Texas public debt claims, 1848-1861, undated,
1.4 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts was responsible for accounting for the public debt of Texas, which included both the ordinary or non-revenue debt (consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army); and the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas securities). These records help document that public debt of the Republic. This subseries consists of four volumes, including the following: two registers of Republic of Texas public debt claims, 1848-1861; a partial index to public debt claims, 1848-1854; and an index to Republic of Texas audited claims, undated.
One register, covering 1848-1852, gives the following information for each class of the public debt: date of certificate, name, number of certificate/number of warrant, amount, and remarks. Arrangement is by class of debt (2nd Class, 3rd Class, 1st Class Audited Paper, 1st Class Funded Debt, 10% Funded Debt, Miscellaneous Liabilities, and Public Debt audited under Special Act of the Legislature). Order within each class of debt is unknown.
Another register, which covers 1848-1861, includes the following information for most of the classes of debt: file number paid, to whom issued, number of receipt, number of voucher, date of receipt, amounts (under each category of debt), and remarks. Other information occasionally given in this register (depending on the class of claim) includes: nature or description of claim, ostensible value and par value, or under what act issued. The amounts are given for each of the following categories of First Class claims (1848-1856):
  • 10% consolidated stock (Act of June 7, 1837),
  • 10% stock (Act of February 5, 1840),
  • 8% stock (Act of February 5, 1840),
  • 8% Treasury bonds (Act of February 2, 1840),
  • 10% Treasury notes,
  • Treasury notes without interest,
  • audited paper and
  • miscellaneous liabilities.
Also given for First Class claims are value, rate of interest, date to which interest is calculated, ostensible interest, par principal, par interest, ostensible principal and interest, par principal and interest. Arrangement within this register is by class of debt: First Class, Second Class, Third Class, Funded Debt of June 1837 (reported as “Document C--Hard cases” and audited February 6, 1856), certificates issued by Comptroller and countersigned by Treasurer under Special Acts of the Legislature (February 1848-September 1851), etc. Then within that class, arrangement is numerical (which is to say, chronological).
There is a partial index to the second register, covering 1848-1851 for 1st Class Claims and 1848-1854 for 2nd Class Claims. Next to each name--arranged by letter of the alphabet and then roughly numerical by claim--are listed each claim, consisting of two numbers: the class of claim (1, 2, or 3) over the number of the voucher. Thus, for example:
  • Hardin, Wm. B. 2/69
  • Hoya, F. Vander 2/70, 3/49, 2/762
  • Hart, Nathaniel 2/74 etc.
Finally, there is an Index to Republic of Texas audited claims, giving the name of the claimant (arranged alphabetically), followed by one or more file numbers. Included separately under each letter of the alphabet are lists of claims audited by Charles Mason and payments made by James W. Scott, Paymaster, usually with brief descriptions (e.g., Secretary Legation to U.S., pay as witness, military services 1836, Captain of Rangers, etc).
Historical Sketch
When Texas was annexed into the Union in 1845, the public debt of the Republic of Texas amounted to nearly $10 million, consisting of two major types of obligations:
  1. the ordinary or non-revenue debt (consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army, usually no more than a few hundred dollars per claim); and
  2. the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas securities). The United States considered the revenue debt to be preferred obligations, secured by the import duties of the Republic.
According to the joint resolution of annexation, the public lands of Texas (retained by the state) were to be used to settle the public debt.
In March 1848, the 2nd Legislature of the State of Texas passed "an Act to provide for ascertaining the debt of the late Republic of Texas." This act ordered the Auditor and the Comptroller of Public Accounts to do the following:
  • to publish notices in weekly newspapers in the cities of Austin, New Orleans, Washington, D.C., and New York (later adding Philadelphia and Louisville), requiring all persons having any claim for money against the former Republic of Texas to present those claims by November 1849 (the filing deadline was subsequently extended several times, ultimately to August 1, 1855);
  • to receipt jointly all these claims, setting forth the par value (i.e., face value), the name of the person to whom the debt accrued, the date, and the amount; and
  • each to keep "a correct list in books, kept for that purpose separately," of the three classes of claims:
    • First: "the audited or ascertained claims" (e.g. bonds, Treasury notes, military scrip, etc.);
    • Second: "all claims with sufficient evidences and vouchers to authorize them to audit;"
    • Third: "such claims as are not sufficiently authenticated by vouchers."
In February 1850, the 3rd Texas Legislature proposed that holders of public debt liabilities surrender them to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, in exchange for land certificates at the scaled-down rate of 50 cents per acre. It also proposed that interest on all liabilities cease after July 1, 1850. This plan was rejected by the creditors who held the debt.
In September 1850, the U.S. Congress passed that part of the Compromise of 1850 which established the present northern and western boundary of Texas; in return for the 67 million acres of land which was ceded to the newly-created New Mexico Territory, the U.S. government would pay Texas $10 million in 5% U.S. bonds. Half of this sum was delivered and used to pay the ordinary (nonrevenue) debt, with $3.75 million in bonds left over. The remaining half of the settlement was retained by the U.S. government to assure the payment of the revenue debt; the U.S. refused to pay any of these claims until all claims were filed.
The U.S. Congress finally settled the controversy in an Act passed February 1855 (accepted by the Texas legislature in February 1856). The federal government appropriated $7,750,000 in cash to be prorated among the holders of the revenue debt (amounting to a payment to each creditor of about 77 cents on the dollar).
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff in two groups: registers, and indexes, and roughly chronologically within each group. The creator arranged each of the two registers by class of debt; the second register is then arranged numerically (which is also chronologically) within each class. The creator arranged each of the indexes alphabetically by name of claimant.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Registers and indexes of Republic of Texas public debt claims, Public debt claims records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
304-2574 Register of public debt, 1848-1852
(beginning on page 120)
(also account ledger of assessors/ collectors and sheriffs, 1837-1839)
Volume
304-2575 Register of public debt claims, 1848-1861
Volume
304-2576 Index to public debt papers, 1848-1854
Volume
304-2577 Index to Republic of Texas audited claims, undated
Republic of Texas public debt claims files, 1848-about 1860,
55.62 cubic ft.
The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts was responsible for accounting for the public debt of Texas, which included both the ordinary or non-revenue debt (consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army); and the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas securities). These records help document that public debt of the Republic, especially the first kind. Types of documents found in this subseries include the following: public debt certificates (1st, 2nd, or 3rd class), affidavits concerning service, powers of attorney, petitions to the legislature, acts for the relief of an individual, partial or complete lists of soldiers for whom payment was being collected by a single individual (usually a company commander), invoices, and/or court dockets. They comprise the Republic of Texas public debt claims files, 1848-about 1860.
Claims for services or goods provided between 1835 and 1846 that could not be paid before Annexation in 1845 were eventually paid as public debt claims, mainly from the 1850 Boundary Compromise money awarded Texas in exchange for the territory it lost. The chief difference--apart from the payment date--between the audited and public debt claims is that many of the claims were settled by issuing one voucher to cover the separate claims of a large number of persons who had performed the same service. For example, Public Debt voucher 1634 covers payment for "Balance of Pay for Service as Minute Man in 1841." The voucher pays the debt described in certificates #3396 (John Anderson) through #3569 (Patrick Quinn)--173 certificates. The voucher and the entry in the Public Debt Warrant Register are in the name of the first certificate issued: John Anderson. All the information regarding the 173 men and their service as Minute Men, as well as documentation of attorneys and heirs, will be found in this one record. Additional information on the laws relating to Public debt is given below, and may also be found on the online Laws About Republic Claims page: http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/replaws.html.
These records, in turn, can give some or all of the following information: name, nature of service or type of debt, amount owed by Republic of Texas, amount allowed by State of Texas, endorsement (which could include supporting information concerning the claim or claimant), and amount of interest.
Where multiple claimants are paid with a single voucher, the typical file arrangement is: (1) a muster roll, company list, list of claimants, etc., that gives all the names associated with the claim. Often these lists include the signature of the claimant or his attorney or his heir, indicating receipt of the person's money. (2) the Public Debt Certificates and related matter, arranged in the order of the muster roll/list of claimants. All documents relating to an individual (affidavits of service, powers of attorney, probate information, etc.) are filed immediately in front of his public debt certificate.
Some Public Debt files, because of their size, are filmed on two reels. File 1634, for example covers payment for "Balance of Pay for Service as Minute Man in 1841." The voucher includes certificates #3396 (John Anderson) through #3569 (Patrick Quinn)-173 certificates. The initial list of claimants is filmed on Reel 132 Frames 528-534. The entire claim includes Frames 527 - 718 on Reel 132 and Frames 7 - 141 on Reel 133.
Historical Sketch
When Texas was annexed into the Union in 1845, the public debt of the Republic of Texas amounted to nearly $10 million, consisting of two major types of obligations:
  1. the ordinary or non-revenue debt (consisting of the claims of participants in the Texas Revolution or suppliers of the Texas army, usually no more than a few hundred dollars per claim); and
  2. the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of Republic of Texas securities). The United States considered the revenue debt to be preferred obligations, secured by the import duties of the Republic.
According to the joint resolution of annexation, the public lands of Texas (retained by the state) were to be used to settle the public debt.
In March 1848, the 2nd Legislature of the State of Texas passed "an Act to provide for ascertaining the debt of the late Republic of Texas." This act ordered the Auditor and the Comptroller of Public Accounts to do the following:
  • to publish notices in weekly newspapers in the cities of Austin, New Orleans, Washington, D.C., and New York (later adding Philadelphia and Louisville), requiring all persons having any claim for money against the former Republic of Texas to present those claims by November 1849 (the filing deadline was subsequently extended several times, ultimately to August 1, 1855);
  • to receipt jointly all these claims, setting forth the par value (i.e., face value), the name of the person to whom the debt accrued, the date, and the amount; and
  • each to keep "a correct list in books, kept for that purpose separately," of the three classes of claims:
    • First: "the audited or ascertained claims" (e.g. bonds, Treasury notes, military scrip, etc.);
    • Second: "all claims with sufficient evidences and vouchers to authorize them to audit;"
    • Third: "such claims as are not sufficiently authenticated by vouchers."
In February 1850, the 3rd Texas Legislature proposed that holders of public debt liabilities surrender them to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, in exchange for land certificates at the scaled-down rate of 50 cents per acre. It also proposed that interest on all liabilities cease after July 1, 1850. This plan was rejected by the creditors who held the debt.
In September 1850, the U.S. Congress passed that part of the Compromise of 1850 which established the present northern and western boundary of Texas; in return for the 67 million acres of land which was ceded to the newly-created New Mexico Territory, the U.S. government would pay Texas $10 million in 5% U.S. bonds. Half of this sum was delivered and used to pay the ordinary (nonrevenue) debt, with $3.75 million in bonds left over. The remaining half of the settlement was retained by the U.S. government to assure the payment of the revenue debt; the U.S. refused to pay any of these claims until all claims were filed.
The U.S. Congress finally settled the controversy in an Act passed February 1855 (accepted by the Texas legislature in February 1856). The federal government appropriated $7,750,000 in cash to be prorated among the holders of the revenue debt (amounting to a payment to each creditor of about 77 cents on the dollar).
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by name of claimant.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Public debt claims files, Public debt claims records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
Because the actual Republic claims are extremely fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 69 reels of Republic of Texas public debt claims files.)
Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.
Reel
131 thru 199 Republic of Texas public debt claims files, 1848-about 1860
Registers of State of Texas public debt claims 1860-1863, 1866-1867, 1871-1873,
0.71 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts was responsible for accounting for the public debt of the State of Texas, which included the revenue debt (principal and interest owed to holders of State of Texas securities). These records help document that public debt of the State. This subseries consists of three registers of claims against the State of Texas, 1860-1863, 1866-1867, and 1871-1873.
There is a Register of cancelled funds, reissued in 8% Bonds (One Million Loan) under Act of April 8, 1861 (February 1862-February 1863), which provides the following information: date of cancelling, numbers of warrants cancelled, class of warrants (amount military, amount civil), total amount, and description of bond (number, date, amount).
Another register contains two lists: a Register of 10% Treasury Warrants received (December 22, 1860-September 8, 1862); and a Register of 10% Warrants funded (under Act of November 9, 1866) (June 1860-December 1861). Information provided by each list varies, but usually includes the following: date of warrant, number of warrant, number of file, to whom payable, in whose favor, on what account, date of payment, period of interest, amount of principal, amount of interest, total, and remarks.
The final register contains the following ten lists or documents:
  1. Register of certificates of Public Debt issued by the Auditorial Board and description of claims for which they were issued (November-December 1866);
  2. Register of public debt certificates bearing 8% interest (January-February 1867);
  3. Alphabetical list of pay rolls of companies serving in defense of frontier prior to January 28, 1861, also called out by Governor Houston prior to March 2, 1861;
  4. Register of claims presented and certificates of public debt issued, under Act approved November 9, 1866 (November 1866-August 1867);
  5. Audit of 8% bonds issued under Acts of March 20 and April 8, 1861;
  6. Memorandum of public debt certificates issued... Act approved November 13, 1871;
  7. Memorandum of fractional certificates...;
  8. Memorandum of 8% debt certificates (January-February 1871);
  9. Register of Claims acted on by Auditorial Board (August 1871-April 1873); and
  10. Reports of Auditorial Board to Governor (August 1, 1867; September 1, 1867; September 1, 1871; September 20, 1871; and January 9, 1873)
Information provided in this volume varies from list to list, but normally includes the following: date of filing, date of certificate, number of file and certificate, by whom filed, owner's name/to whom issued, nature of claim, amount of unaudited claims, total amount of audited claims, total amount of rejected claims.
Historical Sketch
The 8th Texas Legislature (at the beginning of the Civil War) passed an act which was approved on April 8, 1861, authorizing the issuance of $1 million in 8% bonds (the One Million Loan), in order to retire the debt previously accumulated for the defense of the frontier, and to meet appropriations to pay the expenses of the Secession Convention.
The 11th Texas Legislature (the first one after the end of the Civil War) passed "an Act to ascertain the amount of, and adjusting and funding the State Debt," approved November 9, 1866. This act created an Auditorial Board, consisting of the State Comptroller and the State Treasurer, to audit all claims for money against the State, and to reaudit all audited liabilities of the State not voided by the Constitution of 1866. (Any war debts incurred by the state between March 2, 1861 and September 6, 1865 had been repudiated by Ordinance Number 2 of the Constitutional Convention, March 15, 1866.) The Governor would decide all differences of opinion between the Comptroller and the Treasurer. The Attorney General was later added to the Auditorial Board, as president and legal adviser (May 2, 1871).
The 12th Texas Legislature, in an act approved November 13, 1871, confirmed the actions of the Auditorial Board in issuing bonds and certificates of indebtedness; it also extended the time within which claims could be presented to the Auditorial Board, to January 1, 1873, after which deadline claims not presented were declared forever invalid.
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically by date of legislation. Within each register, arrangement by the creator is first by type of record, then chronological.
Related Material
The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.
Texas State Archives
Texas State Treasurer, Money claims for service 1835-1843, settled 1856-1859 (There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed volume. Call number is 2-1/293.)
Treasury Department, Auditor's Office: Register of claims audited, 1842-1846 (There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed volume. Call number is 2-7/912.)
2nd Auditor's Office, Journal, January 1840-January 1842 (There is no finding aid available for this unprocessed volume. Call number is 2-7/620.)
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Registers of State of Texas public debt claims, Public debt claims records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
304-2578 Register of cancelled funds, reissued in 8% bonds (One Million Loan) under Act of April 8, 1861, 1862-1863
Volume
304-2579 Register of 10% treasury warrants received, 1860-1862;
Register of 10% warrants funded (under Act of November 9, 1866), 1860-1861
Volume
304-2580 Register of public debt certificates issued by the Auditorial Board, Register of claims presented and acted on, etc., 1866-1867, 1871-1873



 

Republic pension records, 1870-1920,
38.36 cubic ft.

The Texas State Legislature authorized pensions for persons who rendered military service to the Republic of Texas (and their widows) and signers of the Declaration of Independence, to be administered by the Office of the Comptroller. These records document those pensions, consisting of claims files and indexes. The types of records in this series include the following: affidavits of service (usually handwritten, detailed accounts), transcripts of county court rulings on the validity of the claim, certifications of continuing indigence, certified copies of muster rolls (occasional), powers of attorney, pension certificates, oaths of identity, and/or widow's applications (1883 or later), plus 15 indexes and/or lists of pensioners. Although the service for which the pensions were granted included 1832-1837 and 1842, the pensions themselves date 1870-1920.
Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html.
Historical Sketch
On August 13, 1870, the 12th Texas Legislature, Called Session, passed "An Act granting pensions to the surviving veterans of the revolution which separated Texas from Mexico," including the Mier prisoners; this pension was to amount to $250 annually, or $500 annually for those wounded either in battle or as a prisoner of war. The Comptroller was to investigate all such claims and issue the resulting certificates. (Gammel's Laws, vi, 292-293).
On April 21, 1874, the 14th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, passed a new pension law which made the following changes:
  1. it extended the list of those eligible for pensions to include all who had served between January 1, 1832 and October 15, 1836, plus all veterans of the various campaigns of 1842 (including survivors of Dawson's Massacre, Santa Fe Expedition, Deaf Smith's Spy Company, etc.);
  2. it reduced the amount of the Republic pension to $150 annually ($300 to the permanently disabled);
  3. it defined what would be accepted as proof of service and of disability;
  4. it arranged for all arrearages of pension since the first pension law to be payable in 10 percent bonds of $100 denominations, payable 20 years after the date but redeemable at the pleasure of the state after 5 years; and
  5. it authorized the continued payment of these pensions after the pensioner's death, to widows or surviving descendents. (Gammel's Laws, viii, 116-120).
Further changes were made by the 15th Texas Legislature on July 28, 1876: extending eligibility to all surviving soldiers serving between October 1835 and January 1, 1837, to all signers of the Declaration of Independence, and to unmarried widows of these men; requiring proof of indigence; and shifting the duty of consideration of the pension applications from the Comptroller to the county courts. (Gammel's Laws, viii, 897-899).
The 18th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, on March 28, 1883, limited eligibility to residents of Texas, and specified the information to be included in the application presented to the county judge. (Gammel's Laws, ix, 342-344).
On March 5, 1885, the 19th Texas Legislature, Regular Session further refined the qualifications to include only those surviving indigent soldiers who were in actual military service at the time of the siege of Bexar (December 1835) or the battle of San Jacinto (April 1836), or who served at least six weeks between October 1835 and July 1836, plus surviving indigent signers of the Declaration of Independence, plus their surviving indigent unmarried widows. (Gammel's Laws, ix, 714-718). On April 4, 1889, the 21st Texas Legislature, Regular Session amended the law to include also anyone who actually participated in any battle in Texas in 1836. (Gammel's Laws, ix, 1071-1072).
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into two subseries:
Republic pension indexes, 1870-1920, 1.13 cubic ft. (15 volumes)
Republic pension files, 1870-about 1900, 37.23 cubic ft.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Republic pension records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
Because the actual Republic claims are fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 48 reels of Republic pension files.)
Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Technical Requirements
Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm for Republic claims are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow.
Microfilm readers are available in the Genealogy Section, Room 110 (which is closed on Mondays), and also in Room 300 of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Monday-Friday).
Processed by
Tony Black, March 1994
Connie Hoxie, September 1996
Tony Black, August 2000
Republic pension indexes, 1870-1920
1.13 cubic ft. (15 volumes)
These records document the pensions authorized by the Texas State Legislature for persons who rendered military service to the Republic of Texas (and their widows) and signers of the Declaration of Independence, to be administered by the Office of the Comptroller. This series consists of 15 indexes concerning Republic of Texas pensions, dating 1870-1920. The first index is a list of pensioners under four Acts of the Texas Legislature, 1870-1883. The lists of pensioners under the Acts of August 13, 1870 and April 21, 1874 are combined, and include certificate number, name, county, and amount per annum. The lists of pensioners under the Acts of July 28, 1876 and March 28, 1883 are listed separately, and include number of warrant, year (1876-1879), name, and county.
The second index is to pension bonds issued between August 1, 1874 and September 17, 1878, and includes the following items: name of pensioner, (serial?) number and amount of fractional bond, (serial?) numbers of $100 bonds, date of issue, and to whom delivered.
The other 13 indexes cover 1888 through 1920, with each volume covering two or three years (i.e., seven to twelve quarters). The information given varies somewhat, including name of pensioner, husband's name if a widow (until 1905), county, town or city (1901-1920, listed as “address”), occasional notations as to date of death, dates of service (1888-1889 only), and warrant numbers for each quarterly payment (this is sometimes omitted for a given quarter, and is replaced by a simple check-mark for most quarters after 1908).
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically. Arrangement by the creator within each index is roughly alphabetical by last name of pensioner. The first index is further arranged by Act within the letter of the alphabet. The second index is further arranged chronologically within each letter of the alphabet.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Republic pension indexes, Republic pension records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Volume
304-2581 List of (Republic) pensioners under Acts of 1870, 1874, 1876, 1883
Volume
304-2582 (Republic) Pension bonds index, 1874-1878
(Republic) Pension indexes:
Volume
304-2583 1888-1889
Volume
304-2584 1890-1892
Volume
304-2585 1893-1894
Volume
304-2586 1895-1896
Volume
304-2587 1897-1898
Volume
304-2588 1899-1900
Volume
304-2589 1901-1902
Volume
304-2590 1902-1905
Volume
304-2591 1905-1908
Volume
304-2592 1908-1911
Volume
304-2593 1911-1914
Volume
304-2594 1914-1917
Volume
304-2595 1917-1920
Republic pension files, 1870-about 1900,
37.23 cubic ft.
These records document the pensions authorized by the Texas State Legislature for persons who rendered military service to the Republic of Texas (and their widows) and signers of the Declaration of Independence, to be administered by the Office of the Comptroller. They comprise the pension files, including the following types of documents: affidavits of service (usually handwritten, detailed accounts), transcripts of county court rulings on the validity of the claim, certifications of continuing indigence, certified copies of muster rolls (occasional), powers of attorney, pension certificates, oaths of identity, and/or widow's applications (1883 or later). They date 1870-about 1900.
Pensions for service to the Republic were not generally awarded before the 1870s, although the congress or the legislature might, in an act passed during a legislative session, authorize a special pension for an individual. At first pensions were confined to "Each and every surviving veteran of the revolution which separated Texas and Mexico, including the Mier prisoners." Beginning in 1874, pension acts added later military services that would qualify pension applicants, but these acts required that the pensioner be indigent to qualify. More information on the pension laws and their different requirements and payments follows; information is also found on the online Laws About Republic Claims page: http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/replaws.html.
Statements of military service found in these files are among the most detailed in the Republic records. Affidavits testifying to the applicant's worthiness also provide considerable personal information. These records can provide name of claimant, date filed, by whom filed, disposition, amount of pension, company commander, service information, age, residence, heir's name, husband's name (for widow's pension), date of death, widow's age, widow's residence (county). The fact that a person has a Republic Pension file does not guarantee that he or she received a Republic pension.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by name of claimant.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Republic pension files, Republic pension records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Restrictions on Access
Because the actual Republic claims are extremely fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 48 reels of Republic pension files.)
Restrictions on Use
None.
Reel
200 thru 247 Republic pension files, 1870-about 1900



 

Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, 1836-about 1879,
10.1 cubic ft.

Some of the claims relating to services and losses during the era of the Republic of Texas were denied. Many others, however, simply have no documentation in the records of the Comptroller of Public Accounts of having been settled. Other records do not fit easily into an existing series. These files include those kinds of records. The types of documentation in this series include the following: cover letters for inquiries addressed to the Court or Commissioner of Claims about the validity of land certificates issued to veterans, claims for compensation for Indian or Mexican depredations, applications for veteran's pensions, and/or claims for military service pay. Although the services for which these claims were filed date from the years of the Republic of Texas, 1836-1845, the documents themselves date 1836-about 1879.
Although claims submitted to the government that were not audited or allowed may be found in the Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, the "unpaid" designation in this series usually refers to the absence in the file of any record of the final disposition of the claim or the inquiry. The series also includes records that do not fit into the Audited Republic claims, Public debt, or Republic pension records series. The most noteworthy of these are letters received by the Commissioner/Court of Claims between 1856 and 1861.
The letters to the Court or Commissioner of Claims do not contain personal information: they note that certain numbered land scrip certificates were being forwarded to the Claims Court. Neither the land script certificates nor information about the outcome of these inquiries are in the holdings of the Texas State Library. A few files have nothing in them but the "wrapper" once used to enclose documentation. When that occurs, the "Claim Number" field will show "Wrapper #xxx." The wrapper has only a name or names and a file number: it has little or no research value.
Instructions on how to use the online database for the Republic claims, plus links to that database, are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by name of claimant.
Related Material
The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.
Texas State Archives
Texas General Land Office, Inventory of copies of county and district clerk returns (reports of headright certificates), 1857 (originals date from 1836 to 1855), 8.46 cubic ft. (used by Court of Claims to review legitimacy of land claims)
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
Because the actual Republic claims are fragile, access to the records is restricted to high-quality microfilmed copies of the documents. An online database provides the reel and frame location of more than 48,500 indexed names. Digital images from the microfilm are being linked to the database. The 35mm microfilm reels are available through interlibrary loan and, to view in person, at the Genealogy Collection of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. (There are 12 reels of Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims.)
Microfilming and indexing for the Republic claims project were made possible by two generous grants from the Summerlee Foundation.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Technical Requirements
Instructions on how to borrow or view the microfilm for Republic claims are at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/repclaims/rephowto.html#borrow.
Microfilm readers are available in the Genealogy Section, Room 110 (which is closed on Mondays), and also in Room 300 of the Lorenzo de Zavala State Archives and Library Building (Monday-Friday).
Processed by
Connie Hoxie, September 1996
Tony Black, August 2000
Reel
248 thru 259 Unpaid and miscellaneous Republic claims, 1836-about 1879



 

Confederate audited military claims, 1861-1865,
45.59 cubic ft.

During the Civil War, the Texas Legislature authorized and required the Comptroller of Public Accounts to audit and settle claims for military supplies and services, some of which were eligible to be submitted for reimbursement by the government of the Confederate States of America. Therefore the Comptroller maintained these audited military claims files, which have been labeled (rightly or wrongly) "Confederate" claims. These records comprise the claims for payment for military and military-related services rendered for the defense of Texas during the Civil War, submitted to the Texas Comptroller's office for auditing and approval. This series includes vouchers, accounts, powers-of-attorney, warrants, and claim jackets, dating 1861-1865. The majority of the claims were submitted by the men serving in the various volunteer companies ordered out by the Governor or Committee of Safety of Texas. There were also individual claims for quartermaster or commissary supplies, for munitions, for construction of fortifications and defenses, and for monies advanced for and use by any of the Texas State Troops. In addition, payments of claims for services and supplies furnished to the Adjutant General's office were made out of military appropriations as well.
Only 2,787 claims were submitted, but this included over 11,000 persons (whose names appear in the index in the computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives). Frequently groups of individuals, in some case entire companies of soldiers, would file a joint claim through an agent; thus, many of the claims contain individual powers-of-attorney, authorizing an agent to receive any monies due the claimants. These powers-of-attorney usually indicate the company or regiment, rank held, and term of service, or the amount and types of supplies provided.
All claims for goods and supplies were required to be authenticated by vouchers and accounts approved by the Acting Quartermaster or Commissary of a particular regiment, battalion, or company. These vouchers usually indicate dates, types, and amounts of goods provided. Accounts and vouchers specifying amounts due for pay, clothing, forage, and subsistence for an individual, and in some instances for his servant, were often included to support claims for military or military-related services.
However, not all the claims files provide such specific information. Approximately one-fifth of the claims consist of little more than the claim jacket and one or more Ten Per-Cent Treasury Warrants. These cancelled warrants provide basic but valuable information, such as name of claimant, amount, number and title of appropriation from which payment was drawn, service provided, and rank and company if military service. Claims comprised of these cancelled warrants have been so indicated by the use of the letter "A" preceding the entry number. In a few instances no cancelled warrants accompany the claim jacket. In such cases, only general information regarding the service performed and amount paid may be obtained by searching the various appropriation and warrant registers maintained by the Comptroller's office, described elsewhere in this finding aid (see especially Special appropriations ledgers: other, Frontier defense, 1860-1865 (Volume 304-2440).)
The index in a computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives matches the names of claimants with claim numbers.
Historical Sketch
On January 4, 1862, the 9th Texas Legislature approved "An Act to provide for auditing and settling all claims against the State on account of Volunteer Companies called out by the Governor or Committee of Safety, and for the defense of the State, and providing payment for the officers and men thereof." The Comptroller of Public Accounts was authorized and required to audit and settle these claims "for and during the term of service actually rendered the State according to the rules and regulations of the Confederate States for the government of the army thereof, upon the return of the muster-roll of each company to the Comptroller, duly authenticated; and also to audit and allow all claims and accounts brought against the State by any individual for Quartermaster or Commissary supplies, for munitions of war, for the construction of fortifications and all defences, and moneys advanced for the same...provided all such claims and accounts are authenticated and approved by the Acting Quartermaster or Commisary of the regiment, battalion or company." This law also provided "that the Comptroller shall keep a separate register of all claims presented under this act, and properly chargeable to the Government of the Confederate States, and arrange the vouchers and accounts as directed by the laws of the said Government for presentation thereto." $300,000 was appropriated at the time, plus an additional $200,000 on March 6, 1863, "to carry out the provisions of this act."
Note that although the legislation was approved in January 1862, the claims covered would begin in 1861.
Another piece of legislation that applied to this type of claim was approved by the 8th Texas Legislature on February 14, 1860, whereby warrants unable to be redeemed immediately were allowed to draw 10 percent interest per annum until paid. Once the warrant had been re-submitted for payment, it was cancelled and a new warrant for the initial amount plus interest was then issued.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged--probably by the creator--numerically by claim number. The index in a computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives matches the names of claimants with claim numbers.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate audited military claims, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processed by
Jean Young and Eddie Williams, August 1975
Confederate audited military claims
Box
2-12/852 1-20
Box
2-12/853 20-40
Box
2-12/854 41-60
Box
2-12/855 61-80
Box
2-12/856 81-100
Box
2-12/857 101-120
Box
2-12/858 121-140
Box
2-12/859 141-160
Box
2-12/860 160-180
Box
2-12/861 181-200
Box
2-12/862 201-220
Box
2-12/863 221-240
Box
2-12/864 241-260
Box
2-12/865 261-280
Box
2-12/866 281-300
Box
2-12/867 301-330
Box
2-12/868 331-360
Box
2-12/869 361-390
Box
2-12/870 391-420
Box
2-12/871 421-460
Box
2-12/872 461-490
Box
2-12/873 491-520
Box
2-12/874 521-540
Box
2-12/875 541-560
Box
2-12/876 561-590
Box
2-12/877 591-620
Box
2-12/878 621-650
Box
2-12/879 651-660
Box
2-12/880 661-680
Box
2-12/881 681-720
Box
2-12/882 721-750
Box
2-12/883 751-780
Box
2-12/884 781-810
Box
2-12/885 811-840
Box
2-12/886 841-870
Box
2-12/887 871-910
Box
2-12/888 911-940
Box
2-12/889 941-970
Box
2-12/890 971-1000
Box
2-12/891 1001-1030
Box
2-12/892 1031-1060
Box
2-12/893 1061-1090
Box
2-12/894 1091-1130
Box
2-12/895 1131-1160
Box
2-12/896 1161-1190
Box
2-12/897 1191-1220
Box
2-12/898 1221-1230
Box
2-12/899 1231-1260
Box
2-12/900 1261-1299
Box
2-12/901 1300-1330
Box
2-12/902 1331-1361
Box
2-12/903 1362-1399
Box
2-12/904 1400-1440
Box
2-12/905 1441-1481
Box
2-12/906 1482-1512
Box
2-12/907 1513-1553
Box
2-12/908 1554-1584
Box
2-12/909 1585-1599
Box
2-12/910 1600-1630
Box
2-12/911 1631-1660
Box
2-12/912 1661-1690
Box
2-12/913 1691-1720
Box
2-12/914 1721-1750
Box
2-12/915 1751-1780
Box
2-12/916 1781-1810
Box
2-12/917 1811-1840
Box
2-12/918 1841-1870
Box
2-12/919 1871-1901
Box
2-12/920 1902-1932
Box
2-12/921 1933-1963
Box
2-12/922 1964-1999
Box
2-12/923 2000-2030
Box
2-12/924 2031-2050
Box
2-12/925 2051-2080
Box
2-12/926 2081-2111
Box
2-12/927 2112-2142
Box
2-12/928 2143-2173
Box
2-12/929 2174-2204
Box
2-12/930 2205-2235
Box
2-12/931 2236-2256
Box
2-12/932 2257-2287
Box
2-12/933 2288-2318
Box
2-12/934 2319-2349
Box
2-12/935 2350-2381
Box
2-12/936 2382-2412
Box
2-12/937 2413-2443
Box
2-12/938 2444-2474
Box
2-12/939 2475-2505
Box
2-12/940 2506-2536
Box
2-12/941 2537-2567
Box
2-12/942 2568-2599
Box
2-12/943 2600-2630
Box
2-12/944 2631-2661
Box
2-12/945 2662-2692
Box
2-12/946 2693-2723
Box
2-12/947 2724-2754
Box
2-12/948 2755-2787



 

Confederate audited civil claims, 1861-1865,
24.44 cubic ft.

Like military claims, claims for payment for civil services rendered for the State of Texas during the Civil War were submitted to the Texas Comptroller's office for auditing and approval. This series includes vouchers, affidavits, powers-of-attorney, claim jackets, and associated correspondence, dating 1861-1865. Claimants included elected and appointed state and county officials, along with the numerous members of their staffs, and private citizens. Civil services varied from serving as a member of the legislature, to serving as a district judge, to serving as an assistant clerk in one of the various state departments. Payments for goods and supplies furnished state and county offices were included along with payments for actual civil service.
The index in a computer printout in the search room of the Texas State Archives matches the names of claimants with claim numbers. Because numbers were duplicated, the letter "A" precedes some voucher numbers in one group to avoid possible confusion. Entries in the index preceded by a dash (-) are missing. Entries that involved some question as to the correct spelling of a name or names are preceded by an asterisk (*).
(Researchers should please note that with these civil claims--unlike the military claims--the term "Confederate" may be incorrect and misleading, since these were claims against the government of the State of Texas.)
The claims jackets and accompanying supportive affidavits, vouchers, and powers-of-attorney provide such information as name of claimant, position held or service performed, length of service, and amount of payment. There are more names in the index than there were claims, because of the practice of several individuals frequently submitting joint claims.
Further documentation of payments for civil services performed during the Civil War can be found in other series, especially Warrant registers and Appropriation registers.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged--probably by the creator--numerically by claim number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate audited civil claims, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processed by
Archives staff, date unknown
Confederate audited civil claims
"Series I" vouchers:
Box
2-12/949 13272-13321
Box
2-12/950 13322-13371
Box
2-12/951 13372-13422
Box
2-12/952 13423-13474
Box
2-12/953 13475-13525
Box
2-12/954 13526-13575
Box
2-12/955 13576-13625
Box
2-12/956 13626-13675
Box
2-12/957 13676-13724
Box
2-12/958 13726-13774
Box
2-12/959 13776-13825
Box
2-12/960 13826-13875
Box
2-12/961 13876-13925
Box
2-12/962 13926-13975
Box
2-12/963 13976-14025
Box
2-12/964 14026-14075
Box
2-12/965 14076-14125
Box
2-12/966 14126-14168
"Series II" vouchers:
Box
2-12/967 1-50
Box
2-12/968 51-100
Box
2-12/969 101-150
Box
2-12/970 151-200
Box
2-12/971 201-250
Box
2-12/972 251-285
"Series III" vouchers:
Box
2-10/948 1A-100A
Box
2-10/949 101A-200A
(folder 170A missing)
Box
2-10/950 201A-285A
(no voucher #277A)
286-300
Box
2-10/951 301-400
Box
2-10/952 401-500
(no voucher #423 or 497)
Box
2-10/953 501-600
(no voucher #574)
Box
2-10/954 601-700
(no vouchers #623 or 639)
Box
2-10/955 701-800
Box
2-10/956 801-900
Box
2-10/957 901-1000
(no vouchers #958 or 981)
Box
2-10/958 1001-1100
(no vouchers #1024-1027, 1036-1040, or 1086-1093)
Box
2-10/959 1101-1200
Box
2-10/960 1201-1300
Box
2-10/961 1301-1400
Box
2-10/962 1401-1500
Box
2-10/963 1501-1600
Box
2-10/964 1601-1700
(no vouchers #1627 or 1649-1650)
Box
2-10/965 1701-1800
Box
2-10/966 1801-1900
(no voucher #1891)
Box
2-10/967 1901-2000
(no voucher #1999)
Box
2-10/968 2001-2100
(no voucher #2020)
Box
2-10/969 2101-2200
(no voucher #2156)
Box
2-10/970 2201-2300
Box
2-10/971 2301-2400
(no voucher #2359)
Box
2-10/972 2401-2500
Box
2-10/973 2501-2600
(no vouchers #2587-2588)
Box
2-10/974 2601-2700
(no vouchers #2621 or 2664)
Box
2-10/975 2701-2721



 

Confederate indigent families lists, 1863-1865,
0.94 cubic ft.

The Texas Legislature pledged and appropriated monetary relief for the support of indigent families of Texas Civil War soldiers. This series consists of lists submitted by the counties and maintained by the Texas Comptroller's Office, of indigent soldiers eligible for relief from the State of Texas during the Civil War, 1863-1865. The information given in these lists varies somewhat from county to county. While the number of dependents is always given, additional information may include some of the following: name of the soldier; whether currently in service; whether disabled or killed in service; the military unit; and/or the acting head of the household.
An index of the names of the soldiers is in a computer printout in the Texas State Archives search room, and is also available online ( http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/cif/index.html). This is an index only; transcriptions of the records have been published by Linda Mearse. Please note that lists are not extant for every county. There is a remote possibility that additional lists may be found in Comptroller's Office unprocessed records.
(Researchers should please note that the term "Confederate" may be incorrect and misleading, since there was no contribution from the government of the Confederate States of America. Also, soldiers enlisted in State military units as well as Confederate units qualified for this relief. The term "Confederate" has been used for so long, however, that to rename it might add to the confusion.)
Historical Sketch
On November 24, 1863, the 10th Texas Legislature (Regular Session) passed a Joint Resolution stating that the government pledged "support and maintenance of (the soldiers') families during their absence from home." In accordance with this Resolution, an "Act to Support the Families and Dependents of Texas Soldiers" passed on December 15, 1863. The Act set aside $1,000,000 annually to be paid to the "families, widows, and dependents of soldiers currently serving in State or Confederate forces, or of soldiers killed or disabled in service." Chief Justices of the counties, on or before March 1 in 1864 and 1865, submitted lists of servicemen and the number of their dependents eligible for relief. The County Clerk administered the money distributed to the county for this purpose.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by county.
Related Material
The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.
Publications
Confederate Indigent Families Lists of Texas, 1863-1865, by Linda Mearse, San Marcos, Texas, 1995
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate indigent families lists, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: unknown
Accession records are too incomplete to determine when these records were transferred.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
In order to help preserve the original records, researchers are requested to use the transcriptions prepared by Linda Mearse. This publication may be requested through interlibrary loan; please contact your local library for further details.
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Archives staff, date unknown
Box
304-1 Anderson thru Hunt Counties, 1863-1865
Box
304-2 Jackson thru Wood Counties, 1863-1865



 

Confederate pension application records, 1899-1979,
652.71 cubic ft.

Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. The Confederate pension applications records provide detailed documentation of these persons, as well as the process. This series consists of the following records maintained by the Texas Comptroller's office: Confederate pension applications, 1899-1979; miscellaneous material relating to Confederate pensions, 1904-1934; plus 16 volumes that document applications for Confederate pensions. These volumes include 12 indexes, 3 registers, and a volume of affidavits of Confederate military service.
An alphabetical union name index is available in the Texas State Archives search room, containing the following elements: pension number if accepted, "Rej" if rejected, or "Home" if a Confederate Home pension application; name of the pensioner; county of residence at the time of the application; name of husband if a widow, and husband's pension number if applicable. Researchers should request each pension application by number or (for rejected and Home pension applications) by name of applicant. Archives staff routinely check listings in the index for mail or phone requests, and will copy the records in the files. The Confederate pension application index is also available online at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/index.html.
Historical Sketch
On May 12, 1899, the 26th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, passed the Confederate Pension Law, carrying into effect a Constitutional amendment to grant aid to disabled and dependent Confederate soldiers, sailors and their widows. To qualify for a pension, an applicant had to meet the following requirements, which were modified over the years:
  1. Residency: The applicant must have lived in Texas since 1880 if they (or their husband, if a widow) had enlisted in the Confederate military from a state other than Texas, or since 1899 if they had originally enlisted in Texas. Subsequent legislation gradually lowered the required length of continuous residence for all pensioners (regardless of where they enlisted): thus applicants must have moved to Texas prior to 1900 (1913), prior to 1910 (1925), prior to 1920 (1929), ten years prior to approval (1930), and prior to 1928 (1931). The applicant must have been a resident of the county where he or she made application, for at least six months. Leaving the state for more than six months would disqualify a pensioner.
  2. Age: Male applicants had to be at least 60 years old, unless totally disabled as a direct result of an injury sustained in actual service. (Between 1899 and 1909, soldiers' applications included affidavits of physicians; by 1909, soldiers applying would presumably have met the age requirement.) As of 1913, a widow must have been born prior to 1861 (i.e., she had to be at least 52 years old). As of 1929, she must have been born prior to 1873.
  3. Military service: The soldier must have served at least three months in the Confederate States Army or Navy, and never deserted. In 1913, legislation extended eligibility to those who served at least six months of the Civil War in the Texas militia (Texas State Troops or Home Guard) or in an organization for the protection of the frontier. Proof of service involved the testimonies of two witnesses, and/or a copy of the soldier's service record on file in the War Department in Washington, D.C., and/or other documentation, such as discharge papers.
  4. Indigence: Applicants had to prove that they were unable to support themselves, "in actual want and destitute of property and means of subsistence." In 1909, indigence was more precisely defined, as follows. Applicants' annual income could not exceed $150 (raised to $300 in 1913). They must not have received any pension or land grant from the federal government (until this provision was dropped in 1927), or from any state government. They could own no real or personal property exceeding $1,000; after 1923, real or personal property could not be worth more than $1000 exclusive of the homestead, and the assessed value exclusive of household goods could not exceed $2000. (Between 1909 and 1930, tax assessors' certificates were required for proof.) At first, they could not be a resident of the Confederate Home or any other state-supported institution. (Beginning in 1921, residents of either of the Confederate Homes would receive one-half the normal pension.)
  5. Widow's Marital Status: Widows originally had to have been married to an eligible Confederate soldier at least by 1866. In subsequent years this requirement was gradually relaxed, from 1866 to 1880 (in 1909), to 1900 (in 1913), to 1910 (in 1925), to 1912 (in 1929), and to 1921 (in 1931, if they had been married at least ten years before his death). She could not have been separated, divorced, or remarried; in 1925, however, remarried widows were made eligible.
The procedure for applying for a Confederate pension in Texas involved appearing before the county judge, who (with the commissioners' court) made an initial ruling and forwarded applications deemed acceptable to the Comptroller's office, where the Pension Clerk or (after 1909) the Commissioner of Pensions made a final ruling. If accepted, the application would be assigned a unique (and consecutive) number. Rejected pension applications were retained in the Comptroller's (or the Pension Commissioner's) Office, and many who were rejected later reapplied and were accepted if their circumstances (or the law) had changed.
Pensioners were initially entitled to a maximum of $24 each quarter, with totally disabled pensioners being paid first, and the rest paid a portion of the appropriated total (not to exceed the allotted maximum, always less in reality). After 1917, every pensioner was given an equal portion of the appropriated money, with those on the Totally Disabled roll classed with other pensioners. Due to the large number of pensioners at first, the initial quarterly payment in 1899 was only $6.81; not until 1920 did the actual payment reach the maximum. During the 1920s, the quarterly payment steadily increased. In 1929, pensions began to be paid monthly, amounting to $25 per month for unmarried soldiers and widows, and $50 per month for married soldiers.
Effective April 1, 1917, mortuary warrants began to be issued, originally not to exceed $30, to help cover burial expenses of deceased pensioners. In 1923 this allotment was raised to $65, in 1929 to $100, and in 1947 to $200. Applications for mortuary warrants had to be received within 40 days of the pensioner's death, and the pension warrant for the quarter in which the death occurred had to be returned unpaid.
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into five subseries:
Confederate pension applications, 1899-1979, 646.74 cubic ft.
Miscellaneous material relating to Confederate pension applications, 1903-1934, 2.12 cubic ft.
Confederate pension indexes, 1899-1967, 2.36 cubic ft. (12 volumes)
Confederate pension registers, 1899-1909, 1915-1917, 1.15 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
Affidavits of Confederate military service, 1909-1917, 0.34 cubic ft. (one volume)
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1933/003, 1933/007, 1960/003, 1961/006, 1961/046, 1962/218, 1963/030, 1964/029, 1965/042, 1968/072, 1969/002, 1970/044, 1977/080, 1980/302, 1990/069, unknown
Confederate pension applications were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office in numerous accessions: on February 21 and 24, 1934; during the September 1, 1960-August 31, 1962 biennium (from the Confederate Pension Division); on October 31, 1961 (Confederate Pension Division); November 29, 1965; December 7, 1967; September 5, 1968; November 13, 1969 (via the Records Division of the Texas State Library); February 9, 1977; August 18, 1980; and January 17, 1990.
The Texas Comptroller's office transferred the following to the Texas State Archives: the index to pensioners who were inmates of Confederate Homes, and a list of living Confederate widows drawing pensions, on October 18, 1963; and the index of totally disabled pensioners on October 21, 1964.
25 boxes of Confederate pension affidavits (1919-1931) were apparently transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office (via the Records Management Division of the Texas State Library) on September 6, 1962.
Dates of the other accessions are uncertain.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processed by
Laura K. Saegert, September 1983
Tony Black, March 1994, October 1994
Confederate pension applications, 1899-1979,
646.74 cubic ft.
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. The Confederate pension applications files provide detailed documentation of these persons, as well as the process. This subseries consists of more than 54,600 Confederate pension applications files created by the Texas Comptroller's office, dating 1899-1979. Each file contains an application to the State of Texas for a Confederate pension, plus supporting documents. Accepted applications comprise roughly 89 percent of the total; rejected applications comprise roughly 11 percent of the total; and there are 62 Confederate Home applications.
The contents of each file varies, but nearly always includes a four-page application containing the basic information listed below, plus affidavits of witnesses to the military service, an affidavit of a physician as to disabilities if applicable (especially prior to 1909), certificates of the county judge and county commissioners who approved the application at its initial level, and (between 1909 and 1930) a certificate of the state and county assessor as to the value of any property. Also usually included in the file is a request from the Comptroller or Commissioner of Pensions to the U.S. War Department (Adjutant General's office) for proof and details of military service, accompanied by the official reply. Beginning in 1917, most files also contain a mortuary warrant application and a copy of the warrant for payment. Other materials may include: additional affidavits and interrogatories relating to any of the requirements for eligibility; correspondence between the Comptroller or Commissioner of Pensions and the applicant, relatives, or friends; original discharges; death certificates; printed material, including newspaper clippings; etc.
The information provided by the pension application varies over time, but at one time or another includes the following, for veteran's pension applications: name of veteran, age, where born, length of residence in Texas, county where residing and length of residence there, post office address, whether previously rejected for a pension (when and where), occupation, physical condition, disability, state in which enlisted, length of service, date and place of discharge, military unit designation (letter of company and number of regiment, battalion, or battery), name of command and length of service if transferred, branch in which enlisted (infantry, cavalry, artillery, or navy), whether recipient of another pension and/or veteran's land certificate, real and personal property and its value, property sold within the previous two years and its value, income, and estate of wife and its value.
The widow's pension applications provide the following: name of widow, widow's age, birthplace, length of residence in Texas, county of residence, length of time in the county, post office address, occupation, physical condition, name of her husband, date and place of marriage, date of husband's death, county and state where he died, whether divorced or remarried (and if so, whether widowed again), state in which the husband enlisted, length of his service (enlistment and discharge dates when known), name of unit in which the husband served, name of command and date if transferred, branch of service, whether previously rejected for a pension (when and where), whether recipient of another pension and/or veteran's land certificate, real and personal property and its value, property sold within the previous two years, income, property outside of the county, and number of husband's pension if any.
The Confederate mortuary warrant applications (beginning in 1917) provide the following information on the veteran or the widow: date of death, city or county of death, where death occurred (in home, hospital, etc.), relation of person (s) in whose home the pensioner died, relationship of the petitioner to the pensioner, petitioner's post office address, physician's certification (including ailments of pensioner), and undertaker's certification.
A number of application files are known to be missing (based on information from the Confederate pension indexes and registers); these are marked with an asterisk in the pension index in the State Archives search room.
An alphabetical union name index is available in the Texas State Archives search room, containing the following elements: pension number if accepted, "Rej" if rejected, or "Home" if a Confederate Home pension application; name of the pensioner; county of residence at the time of the application; name of husband if a widow, and husband's pension number if applicable. Researchers should request each pension application by number or (for rejected and Home pension applications) by name of applicant. Archives staff routinely check listings in the index for mail or phone requests, and will copy the records in the files. The Confederate pension application index is also available online at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/pensions/index.html.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff numerically by pension number (which is also chronologically) for accepted pension applications, and alphabetically by name of applicant for rejected pension applications, as well as for Confederate Home pension applications. This arrangement was probably the same used by the creator of the records.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate pension applications, Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1933/003, 1933/007, 1960/003, 1961/006, 1965/042, 1968/072, 1969/002, 1970/044, 1977/080, 1980/302
Confederate pension applications were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office in numerous accessions: on February 21 and 24, 1934; during the September 1, 1960-August 31, 1962 biennium (from the Confederate Pension Division); on October 31, 1961 (Confederate Pension Division); November 29, 1965; December 7, 1967; September 5, 1968; November 13, 1969 (via the Records Division of the Texas State Library); February 9, 1977; and August 18, 1980.
Approved Confederate pension applications:
#00001 thru #52094, #99999
Confederate Home pension applications:
Aiken, W.C. thru Wright, R.S.
Rejected Confederate pension applications:
Abernathy, T.C. thru Zuniga, Felipa Flores de
Miscellaneous material relating to Confederate pension applications, 1903-1934,
2.12 cubic ft.
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This subseries consists of records maintained by the Texas Comptroller's Office which pertain to Texas Confederate pension applications, but which for various reasons cannot be assigned to a particular Confederate pension application file. Types of records include military service records, physician's statements, witness affidavits, mortuary warrant applications, and related correspondence, dating 1903-1934.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by name of applicant.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Miscellaneous material relating to Confederate pension applications, Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
304-3 Adams, Edgar Sheppard (Nacogdoches County)
Adams, Robert S.
Adams, S. S. (Limestone County)
Adamson, J. Q.
Adamson, J. Q.
Aiken, J. D.
Ainsworth, Spencer Montague
Alexander, H. T.
Allen, G. W.
Altum, Newton R. (Bell County)
Alvis, G. W.
Anderson, Archibald T.
Anderson, Marcella J. (Potter County)
Arnett, N. C.
Arnold, William B.
Autrey, A. B.
Bagby, Arthur P.
Bailey, J. W. (Hill County)
Bailey, W. H.
Ballard, Milton Neal (Shelby County)
Barrett, J. D. (Tarrant County)
Barrett, W. B.
Bass, T. (Smith County)
Bateman, N. M.
Battles, Anderson
Beasley, J. R.
Bell, John L.
Blackstone, James H. (Upshur County)
Blake, John A.
Bourer, S. (Caldwell County)
Bowers, Joe
Bramlett, H. M.
Bridges, William
Brooks, John R. (Tarrant County)
Brown, H. W. (Mrs.) (Harris County)
Brown, J. A.
Brown, J. A.
Brown, John
Brown, W. M.
Bryan, Sydney B.
Burchard, J. Everett
Butler, Benjamin F.
Cage, R. W. (Milam County)
Capman, A. J.
Carlisle, T. R.
Carter, Jake
Catteron, J. B.
Chapmore, G. W. (Hood County)
Clardy, M. J.
Clark, C. C.
Clark, W. J.
Clements, T. W. (Erath County)
Cleveland, J. W. (Shelby County)
Clifton,? (Wood County)
Conaway, John
Cooley, S. A. (Limestone County)
Corker, M. H. (San Saba County)
Crabtree, Isic Newton
Craddock, Erasmus D. (Burnet County)
Crawford, William A.
Cronk, Joseph L.
Crow, Rufus J.
Box
304-4 Davis, F. M.
Davis, Henry H.
Davis, Susan (Tarrant County)
Davis, W. G.
Dean, E. A.
Dearen, Hampton
Depew, J. N.
Draper, G. W. (Travis County)
Duncan, J. P.
Edwards, T. J. (Comanche County)
Eubank, Carter H.
Evans, Samuel
Everitt, Joseph R.
Ewing, E. M.
Ferguson, Plea F.
Fleming, J. S.
Forrest, Calvin J.
Foster, John C. (Parker County)
Fox, W. H.
Freeman, Jesse M.
Gantier, G. R.
Gentry, George W.
Gentry, George W.
Gilbert, J. F. (Mrs.) (Limestone County)
Gillion, E. M.
Glenn, Thomas B.
Grace, James
Graham, W. B.
Graves, Robert Lewis
Green, John F.
Gresham, Henry M.
Guinn, Andy
Guitry, Virginia (Travis County)
Gullin, H. H. (Cooke County)
Hail, Lewis (Hunt County)
Hale, J. W.
Hammack, James J.
Hammonds, J. W.
Hampton, W. H.
Hand, W. S.
Hanes, F. M. (Fannin County)
Hanscomb, W. H.
Hansen, J. C.
Hardin, A. R. (Uvalde County)
Hardin, G. E.
Hargrove, J. E.
Hawkins, E. H. (Erath County)
Heath, Levi
Henderson, C. M.
Hendrick, S. J.
Hendrick, Thomas H.
Henry, Thomas
Hickman, John M.
Hill, James W.
Hill, John
Hill, Richard D.
Hinard, Elija
Hodge, G. A.
Hodges, R. C.
Holder, Henry
Holmes, Seymour W.
Howard, John R.
Hubbard, C. G. (Waller County)
Hughes, R. H. L.
Hunter, Edward F.
Box
304-5 Ireson, A. B. (Nacogdoches County)
Jahn, Frank C. (Waller County)
Jeffries, R. D. (Mrs.)
Johnson, Asa
Johnson, R. J. (Eastland County)
Johnson, T.
Jones, Andrew T. (Lampasas County)
Jones, D. C. W.
Jones, J. C.
Jones, William
Joyner, Lawrence R.
Karnes, Gordon M. (Johnson County)
Killion, G. M.
Lambert, William E.
Landers, James W.
Latham, William (Houston County)
Lawrence, W. D.
Lealling, W. J. (Hunt County)
Lee, Isaac J.
Lee, T. T.
Lewis, Daniel
Lindsey, W. H. (Hunt County)
Locke, Mary F.
Lockhart, C. H.
Loving, J. P. (Fannin County)
Lowrimore or Larrimore, M.
McBride, Wade A.
McCall, Thomas P.
McCarr, H. M.
McDade, R. R. (Waller County)
McDonald, Thomas Benton
McDuffie, Martin A.
McFarland, J. S.
McKinney, William
McLeroy, Olive J. (Hopkins County)
McMahon, Sanders
Madden, James M.
Magee, Abe G. (Harris County)
Mahaffey, W. A. (Tyler County)
Majors, W. J. (Bonham, Fannin County))
Manning, F. M.
Marshall, R. F.
Martin, William J.
Marriott, John W.
Mayfield, George W.
Miller, David A.
Milner, T. F.
Mitchell, Jabez
Mitchell, William C.
Montgomery, J. M.
Moore, J. B.
Moore, J. F.
Moran, John H.
Morgan, William
Morris, A. J.
Munsch, Andrew J.
Box
304-6 Neel, J. C. (Anderson County)
Nichols, J. W.
Norris, A. N.
O'Banion, Peter
Odom, J. S.
O'Neal, Francis
Owens, J. W.
(see S. A. Owens, #34077)
Owings, William A.
Parker, Tom
Parks, Leroy (black)
Paschall, Ben F. (Denton County)
Patillo, John Z.
Patrick, John T.
Payne, M. P.
Perkins, Jeremiah W.
Peterson, John Q.
Phillips, Richard (Walker County)
Pier, Sam B. (Waller County)
Porter, J. C.
Post, Wiley G.
Pressler, C. W.
Previt, T. F.
Purviance, John S.
Raines, C. W.
Rains, W. A. (Walker County)
Reich, E. B.
Richardson, D. K.
Richey, A. F.
Riddle, N. B.
Roberts, William
Robinson, I. G. (Red River County)
Rogers, J. S.
Rogers, William T.
Roguemore, J. R.
Ross, Benjamin
Rutlege, J. A.
Sampson, Henry
Sanford, G. A.
Schmidt, Ed. W.
Scott, Robert
Sears, J. R.
Shappard, A. M.
Shay, Thomas
Shepherd, Samuel
Shugart, L. C.
Simmons, B. P. (Bastrop County)
Simmons, R. A.
Simmons, S. W.
Smith, J. A.
Smith, J. W.
Smith, John Henry
Smith, Lycurgus (Denton County)
Smith, Nicholas
Smith, W. C.
Smith, William H.
Smith, William R. (Bexar County)
Spring, Henry F.
Spruill, M. J. (Mrs.) (Travis County)
Stephens, G. W.
Stewart, D. A. (Navarro County)
Stoutz, August
Stovall, William J. (Denton County)
Strange, William C.
Strother, W. W. (Mrs.) (Sabine County)
Sutter, H. Marion
Box
304-7 Talley, P. T.
Temple, R. H.
Temple, T. F.
Thaveness, Joseph
Thomas, W. J.
Thompson, Thomas Franklin (Waller County)
Thompson, Warren T.
Tillman, Leroy
Toull, G. W.
Traweek, A. B.
Victor, W. O.
Walden, David M. (Concho County)
Walker, Mary A. (Harris County)
Walsh, J. G. (Fannin County)
Walton, George
Ward, Preston B.
Weaver, L. C.
Wells, Billie (Hopkins County)
Wells, John (Houston County)
West, Thomas Lee
White, E. J.
Williams, Mary (Ellis County)
Wills, W. J.
Willson, J. J.
Wilson, A. J. (Tarrant County)
Wilson, John R.
Wilson, T. A.
Wingose, Fannie (Harris County)
Wood, Thomas
Wooley, R. C.
Wright, J. W. (Somervell County)
Wyatt, John C. (Callahan County)
Young, Emanuel M.
Confederate pension indexes, 1899-1967,
2.36 cubic ft. (12 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This subseries consists of twelve indexes to Texas Confederate pension applications, covering the period 1899-1967.
Seven of the indexes are to Confederate pensioners, whose applications were accepted between 1899 and 1959. Information given in each index includes surname, Christian name, file number, county, and remarks (most commonly, "Dead," often followed by a date from approximately 1921 onward). At least in volumes 1 and 2, rejected ( "returned") applications are listed in the back, with the town or city substituted for the file number, and the remarks column indicating the date the application was returned. Indexes Numbers 4 and 6 contain only men, and Numbers 5 and 7 contain only widows; for the latter, the husband's name and number (if he drew a pension) were often added. Please note that the dates provided for each volume in the inventory below correspond to the dates of the applications; later notations, especially concerning deaths, would extend the date span for each volume, up to 1967, the date of the last death recorded.
Separate indexes cover totally disabled pensioners (through 1917), inmates of the Confederate Homes, and rejected applications (1899-1958). This latter index includes surname, Christian name, date, county, and remarks (usually giving reason for rejection: e.g., "no proof," or "too much property," or "not married 10 years," or "age," or "came to Texas in 1946," or "substitute," or "deserter," or "oath of allegiance," or "Georgia reserves," or "drawing (pension) in Arkansas.")
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically by groups of years during which applications were filed: 1899-1907, 1907-1913, 1913-1915, 1915-1928, and 1928-1948/1959. Within each volume, arrangement by the creator is alphabetical by surname, and within a given surname, numerical (i.e. chronological).
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate pension indexes, Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1963/030, 1964/029, unknown
The Texas Comptroller's office transferred the following to the Texas State Archives: the index to pensioners who were inmates of Confederate Homes, and a list of living Confederate widows drawing pensions, on October 18, 1963; and the index of totally disabled pensioners on October 21, 1964. Dates of the other accessions are uncertain.
Volume
304-2596 Index 1, Confederate pensioners, 1899-1907
Volume
304-2597 Index 2, Confederate pensioners, 1907-1913
Volume
304-2598 Index 3, Confederate pensioners, 1913-1915
Volume
304-2599 Index 4, Confederate pensioners, 1915-1928
Volume
304-2600 Index 5, Confederate widows, 1915-1928
Volume
304-2601 Index 6, Confederate pensioners, 1928-1948
Volume
304-2602 Index 7, Confederate widows, 1928-1959
Volume
304-2603 Index, inmates of Confederate homes
Volume
304-2604 Index, totally disabled pensioners, about 1899-1917
Volume
304-2605 Index, totally disabled pensioners, about1899-1915
Volume
304-2606 Index, rejected applications, 1899-1958
Volume
304-2607 Old rejected pension record, 1902-about 1917
(pp. 1-146)
Confederate pension registers, 1899-1909, 1915-1917,
1.15 cubic ft. (3 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This subseries consists of three registers of Texas Confederate pension applications, covering October 1, 1899-March 31, 1909, and March 1, 1915-December 4, 1917. Information provided includes name of applicant, post office (town or city), county, number of application, date filed (until #8203, September 18, 1901), widow of, service or command (beginning with #8204), disposition (and date, e.g. "approved," or "rejected," or "dead," or "later approved #___.") The number of the warrant is provided until November 14, 1899.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically. Two volumes are arranged by the creator numerically by application number, which is also chronologically. The third volume, covering May 1902-April 1903, is arranged by the creator alphabetically by county; but this volume is incomplete, not covering all the counties for the entire time span.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate pension registers, Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Confederate pension registers
Volume
304-2608 1899-1909
Volume
304-2609 1902-1903
(incomplete)
Volume
304-2607 1915-1917
(pp. 198-298)
Affidavits of Confederate military service, 1909-1917,
0.34 cubic ft. (one volume)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. One of the key requirements was proof of service in a military unit of the Confederate States of America. This subseries consists of one volume created by the Texas Comptroller's office, containing longhand and typescript transcripts of affidavits of Confederate military service, sworn to between 1909 and 1917. An index is at the front of the volume.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Affidavits of Confederate military service, Confederate pension application records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Volume
304-2610 Affidavits of Confederate military service, 1909-1917



 

Confederate pension payments volumes, 1899-1905, 1909-1910, 1915-1966,
8.65 cubic ft. (23 volumes)

Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This series consists of 23 volumes maintained by the Texas Comptroller's office, which document payments of Confederate pensions. Volumes include 5 quarterly Confederate pension records, 5 affidavit registers, 9 pension warrant registers or volumes of stubs, and 4 mortuary warrant registers, with overall dates of 1899-1905, 1909-1910, and 1915-1966.
Historical Sketch
On May 12, 1899, the 26th Texas Legislature, Regular Session, passed the Confederate Pension Law, carrying into effect a Constitutional amendment to grant aid to disabled and dependent Confederate soldiers, sailors and their widows. To qualify for a pension, an applicant had to meet the following requirements, which were modified over the years:
  1. Residency: The applicant must have lived in Texas since 1880 if they (or their husband, if a widow) had enlisted in the Confederate military from a state other than Texas, or since 1899 if they had originally enlisted in Texas. Subsequent legislation gradually lowered the required length of continuous residence for all pensioners (regardless of where they enlisted): thus applicants must have moved to Texas prior to 1900 (1913), prior to 1910 (1925), prior to 1920 (1929), ten years prior to approval (1930), and prior to 1928 (1931). The applicant must have been a resident of the county where he or she made application, for at least six months. Leaving the state for more than six months would disqualify a pensioner.
  2. Age: Male applicants had to be at least 60 years old, unless totally disabled as a direct result of an injury sustained in actual service. (Between 1899 and 1909, soldiers' applications included affidavits of physicians; by 1909, soldiers applying would presumably have met the age requirement.) As of 1913, a widow must have been born prior to 1861 (i.e., she had to be at least 52 years old). As of 1929, she must have been born prior to 1873.
  3. Military service: The soldier must have served at least three months in the Confederate States Army or Navy, and never deserted. In 1913, legislation extended eligibility to those who served at least six months of the Civil War in the Texas militia (Texas State Troops or Home Guard) or in an organization for the protection of the frontier. Proof of service involved the testimonies of two witnesses, and/or a copy of the soldier's service record on file in the War Department in Washington, D.C., and/or other documentation, such as discharge papers.
  4. Indigence: Applicants had to prove that they were unable to support themselves, “in actual want and destitute of property and means of subsistence.” In 1909, indigence was more precisely defined, as follows. Applicants' annual income could not exceed $150 (raised to $300 in 1913). They must not have received any pension or land grant from the federal government (until this provision was dropped in 1927), or from any state government. They could own no real or personal property exceeding $1,000; after 1923, real or personal property could not be worth more than $1000 exclusive of the homestead, and the assessed value exclusive of household goods could not exceed $2000. (Between 1909 and 1930, tax assessors' certificates were required for proof.) At first, they could not be a resident of the Confederate Home or any other state-supported institution. (Beginning in 1921, residents of either of the Confederate Homes would receive one-half the normal pension.)
  5. Widow's Marital Status: Widows originally had to have been married to an eligible Confederate soldier at least by 1866. In subsequent years this requirement was gradually relaxed, from 1866 to 1880 (in 1909), to 1900 (in 1913), to 1910 (in 1925), to 1912 (in 1929), and to 1921 (in 1931, if they had been married at least ten years before his death). She could not have been separated, divorced, or remarried; in 1925, however, remarried widows were made eligible.
The procedure for applying for a Confederate pension in Texas involved appearing before the county judge, who (with the commissioners' court) made an initial ruling and forwarded applications deemed acceptable to the Comptroller's office, where the Pension Clerk or (after 1909) the Commissioner of Pensions made a final ruling. If accepted, the application would be assigned a unique (and consecutive) number. Rejected pension applications were retained in the Comptroller's (or the Pension Commissioner's) Office, and many who were rejected later reapplied and were accepted if their circumstances (or the law) had changed.
Pensioners were initially entitled to a maximum of $24 each quarter, with totally disabled pensioners being paid first, and the rest paid a portion of the appropriated total (not to exceed the allotted maximum, always less in reality). After 1917, every pensioner was given an equal portion of the appropriated money, with those on the Totally Disabled roll classed with other pensioners. Due to the large number of pensioners at first, the initial quarterly payment in 1899 was only $6.81; not until 1920 did the actual payment reach the maximum. During the 1920s, the quarterly payment steadily increased. In 1929, pensions began to be paid monthly, amounting to $25 per month for unmarried soldiers and widows, and $50 per month for married soldiers.
Effective April 1, 1917, mortuary warrants began to be issued, originally not to exceed $30, to help cover burial expenses of deceased pensioners. In 1923 this allotment was raised to $65, in 1929 to $100, and in 1947 to $200. Applications for mortuary warrants had to be received within 40 days of the pensioner's death, and the pension warrant for the quarter in which the death occurred had to be returned unpaid.
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into four subseries:
Quarterly Confederate pension records, 1899-1905, 1915-1916, bulk 1899-1905, 2.71 cubic ft. (6 volumes)
Confederate pension affidavit registers, 1900-1901, 1917-1920, 2.02 cubic ft. (5 volumes)
Confederate pension warrant registers and stubs, 1900-1903, 1909-1910, 1950-1955, 2.49 cubic ft. (8 volumes)
Confederate mortuary warrant registers, 1917-1966, bulk 1917-1943, 1.43 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Confederate pension payments records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1963/030, 1969/002, unknown
These records were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on July 19, 1963; September 5, 1968; and unknown other transfers.
Two "indexes to mortuary warrants" (1917-1936) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on September 5, 1968.
An unknown quantity of Confederate pension warrants was transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on July 19, 1963.
Dates of the other accessions are uncertain.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processed by
Laura K. Saegert, September 1983
Tony Black, March 1994, October 1994
Quarterly Confederate pension records, 1899-1905, 1915-1916, bulk 1899-1905,
2.71 cubic ft. (6 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This subseries consists of six registers created by the Texas Comptroller's office: five labeled "Quarterly Confederate pension records," 1899-1905, plus one labeled "Record of pension warrants," 1915-1916, the bulk of the entries dating 1899-1905.
For each county, the first five registers give name of pensioner, number of application, amounts and numbers of warrants issued for each quarter, and memoranda (e.g., "Dead, mail no. 325, Feb. 18, 1902;" or "At Confederate Home, March 1902;" or "Cancelled, remarried in 1867--see mail no. 1631, Aug. 17, 1903.") The first register (covering October 1, 1899-September 30, 1901) also gives husband's name for widows, plus post office address (i.e. town or city). Since mortuary warrants were not issued until 1917, probably the most valuable use of these registers is to determine when pensions stopped for pensioners who died, moved from the state, or otherwise became ineligible between October 1, 1899 and September 30, 1905.
The register which covers December 1, 1915-February 29, 1916 gives pensioner's name, original county, file number, warrant number, post office, and amount. This is the latest record of payment of Confederate pensions before the issuance of the first Mortuary warrants in 1917.
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff roughly chronologically. Therein, the records are arranged by the creator mostly alphabetically by county, then numerically (i.e. chronologically) within each county. The exception is the 1915-1916 register, which is arranged by the creator roughly alphabetically by name of pensioner (first by surname, then by given name), then alphabetically by county, then numerically by pension number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Quarterly Confederate pension records, Confederate pension payments records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Quarterly Confederate pension records, 1899-1905
Volume
304-2611 Anderson-Zavala County, 1899-1901
Volume
304-2612 Anderson-Knox County, 1901-1903
Volume
304-2613 Lamar-Zavala County, 1901-1903
Volume
304-2614 Anderson-Hopkins County, 1903-1905
Volume
304-2615 Houston-Zavala County, 1903-1905
Record of (Confederate) pension warrants, 1915-1916
Volume
304-2929 December 1, 1915-February 29, 1916
Confederate pension affidavit registers, 1900-1901, 1917-1920,
2.02 cubic ft. (5 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. Each pensioner was required to file a quarterly affidavit that conditions affecting his eligibility had not changed since the last payment. This subseries consists of five volumes documenting the filing of Texas Confederate pension affidavits, 1900-1901 and 1917-1920. The two volumes covering July 2, 1900-July 3, 1901 are registers. These give name of pensioner, number (of affidavit, NOT the number of the Confederate Pension Application), when received, when issued, and warrant number. The last two items of information are omitted after March 29, 1901. Occasional notations include "held up," or "rejected," or "returned." The three volumes covering June 1, 1917-March 1, 1920 give the following information: name of pensioner, number of application, and check marks under columns representing each of the eleven quarters covered. When appropriate, quarterly columns are stamped "Dead."
Historical Sketch
Section 7 of the original Pension Law of 1899 required each pensioner to file quarterly with the Comptroller an affidavit "that he is the identical person to whom a pension has been granted...and that the conditions...on which a pension was originally granted still exist."
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically. Then, the two earlier volumes are arranged by the creator numerically by affidavit number, which is also chronologically. The three later volumes are arranged by the creator alphabetically by county, and therein numerically by Confederate pension application number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate pension affidavit registers, Confederate pension payments records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Confederate pension affidavit registers, 1900-1901
Volume
304-2616 July 1900-April 1901
Volume
304-2617 April-July 1901
Quarterly affidavits of Confederate pensioners, 1917-1920
Volume
304-2927 Anderson-Hutchinson Counties, 1917-1920
Volume
304-2926 Irion-Pecos Counties, 1917-1920
Volume
304-2925 Rains-Zavala Counties, 1917-1920
Confederate Pension warrant registers and stubs, 1900-1903, 1909-1910, 1950-1955,
2.49 cubic ft. (8 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. This subseries consists of eight volumes which document the issuance of Confederate pension warrants by the State of Texas.
Three of the volumes contain the stubs of Confederate pension warrants for scattered quarters between July 1900 and April 1903. Each stub gives warrant number, amount, appropriation number, name of pensioner, quarter, application number, county, and date. The third volume includes blank stubs with blank warrants attached.
Five volumes are registers of Confederate pension warrants issued, December 1909-June 1910, December 1910, and September 1950-August 1955. Those for 1909-1910 give date of issue, warrant number, name to whom issued, and amount. Those for 1950-1955 also include pension number and address, and include mortuary warrants as well as pension warrants.
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff chronologically. Arrangement by the creator within each of the stubs volumes is numerical. Arrangement by the creator within each of the registers is chronological, i.e. numerical by warrant number.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate Pension warrant registers and stubs, Confederate pension payments records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Confederate pension warrant stubs, 1900-1903
Volume
304-2622 July 1900
Volume
304-2623 February 1901
Volume
304-2621 November 1901-May 1903
(includes blank warrants)
Registers of Confederate pension warrants, 1909-1910
Volume
304-2618 Number 1, December 1, 1909-June 1, 1910
Volume
304-2619 Number 2, December 1, 1910
Confederate Pension Fund: registers of warrants issued, 1950-1955
Volume
304-2624 1950-1951
Volume
304-2625 1951-1953
Volume
304-2626 1953-1955
Confederate mortuary warrant registers, 1917-1966, bulk 1917-1943,
1.43 cubic ft. (4 volumes)
Beginning in 1899, the Texas Legislature authorized pensions for eligible, indigent Confederate veterans residing in Texas, and their widows. Beginning in 1917, mortuary warrants began to be authorized to help cover burial expenses. This subseries consists of four volumes which document the issuance of Confederate mortuary warrants by the State of Texas between 1917 and 1966, bulk 1917-1943. Two of them (1917-1966) give the following information: date, mortuary warrant number, claimant, name of pensioner, pension application number, and amount. The other two volumes (1917-1943) are registers. The register covering May 1917-March 1931 gives number, payee, amount, and date paid; the register covering June 1933-August 1943 gives date of issue, unit amount ($100), month, to whom issued, and warrant number. Mortuary warrants issued beginning September 1943 were included in the registers of monthly pension warrants. (Those for 1950-1955 are listed separately, in the subseries Confederate pension affidavit registers.)
Historical Sketch
Effective April 1, 1917, mortuary warrants began to be issued, originally not to exceed $30, to help cover burial expenses of deceased Confederate pensioners. In 1923 this allotment was raised to $65, in 1929 to $100, and in 1947 to $200. Applications for mortuary warrants had to be received within 40 days of the pensioner's death, and the pension warrant for the quarter in which the death occurred had to be returned unpaid.
Arrangement
These volumes have been arranged by State Archives staff roughly chronologically. Two of the volumes are arranged by the creator alphabetically by county, and therein numerically (i.e. chronologically) within each county. The two registers are arranged by the creator numerically (and therefore roughly chronologically).
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Confederate mortuary warrant registers, Confederate pension payments records, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1969/002 and unknown
Two "indexes to mortuary warrants" (1917-1936) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Texas Comptroller's office on September 5, 1968.
Record of Confederate mortuary warrants (by county), 1917-1966
Volume
304-2628 1917-1936
Volume
304-2629 1936-1966
Registers of Confederate mortuary warrants issued (numerical), 1917-1931, 1933-1943
Volume
304-2620 1917-1931
Volume
304-2627 1933-1943



 

Texas Ranger pensions, 1917, 1928, 1931, 1936, 1938, 1959-1990, bulk 1959-1990,
0.94 cubic ft.

Beginning in 1959, the Texas Legislature authorized the Comptroller's office to pay to qualified former Texas Rangers and their widows. These records document both the persons applying for these pensions, and the process itself. This series consists mostly of the pension files (applications and other documents) of deceased recipients of Texas Ranger pensions, 1959-1990. Also included are copies of U.S. Congressional legislation, 1917, and of Texas Attorney General opinions, 1928, 1931, 1936, and 1938. Information available from the pension application includes the name of the applicant and his/her spouse; death date of the ranger (if widow's pension); address; date and county of birth; county in which married; service record--Ranger companies served with, age at the time of service, and length of service; whether the applicant had worked for the state; and whether the applicant was eligible for the Employees Retirement System of Texas.
The pension applications may be accompanied by proof of service--oaths of service or copies of service records from the Archives Division or the Department of Public Safety; mortuary warrants, often accompanied by death certificates; affidavits certifying the identity of the pensioner; and routine correspondence--concerning the pension status, change of address, or notification of the death of the pensioner. Most files also contain a filing card used by the Comptroller's staff in their index, listing the pensioner's name, address, service record, and usually, date of death. In addition to the pension files are copies of legislation and Attorney General opinions concerning Confederate and Indian War pensions.
Historical Sketch
The 56th Texas Legislature passed legislation in 1959 (Senate Bill 53) which authorized pension payments for Texas Rangers or their widows. In order to be eligible for a pension, the ranger had to have served a minimum of two years as a regular Texas Ranger prior to September 1, 1947 (Special Ranger service was not counted); he could not be eligible for membership in the Employees Retirement System of Texas; he could not have been dismissed from the ranger service for incompetence, misconduct, or breach of duty; and he had to be at least sixty years old. Widow requirements were that she have been married to the ranger prior to January 1, 1957 and at the time of his death; and that her husband have fulfilled the above described requirements for a ranger pension.
The ranger pensions were issued through the Comptroller's office and paid out of the Confederate Pension Fund. The pensioner received $80 a month and a $200 mortuary warrant payment was available for burial expenses. In 1990 there were still a few pensioners receiving payments. Their files are maintained in the Claims Division of the Comptroller's office.
Arrangement
These records have been arranged by State Archives staff by type of record, with opinions/legislative materials filed first, followed by the pension files. Pension files have been arranged by State Archives staff alphabetically by last name of pensioner. (Entries preceded by "--" instead of a folder number are cross references only: a pension file is not present for that name.) The original arrangement by the creator was apparently numerical, which was probably also chronological by date of filing or of approval.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Ranger pensions, Texas Comptroller's Office claims records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1963/145, 1965/042, 1990/069, 1992/154
These records were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Comptroller's office (via the Records Division of the State Library) on April 6, 1964; November 29, 1965; January 17, 1990; and May 26, 1992.
Restrictions on Access
None.
Restrictions on Use
None.
Processed by
Tony Black, November 1987
Laura K. Saegert, July 1990
Tonia J. Wood, November 1995
Legislation
Box Folder
1990/069-1 1. Act to Pension Survivors of Indians, U.S. Congress, 1917
Attorney General opinions
Box Folder
1990/069-1 2. Attorney General Opinion regarding who is eligible for Confederate Pensions, 1931
3. Attorney General Opinion regarding rights of those who under Special Laws of Texas, during the Civil War served in organizations for the protection of the frontier, 1928
4. Attorney General Opinion as to the effect of repealing clause in Chapter 82, Acts Fifth called Session of the Forty-first Legislature, 1936
5. Attorney General Opinion regarding Confederate Pension warrants as non-negotiable instruments, 1938
Pension files
Box Folder
1990/069-1 6. State Ranger pension applications (lists), 1959-1961
7. Andrews, Walker William
8. Baker, Lena Sentenia (widow of Anderson Yancy Baker)
9. Baker, Lillian Estelle (widow of Alfred Randolph Baker)
10 Barker, Lillie (widow of D.S. Barker)
11. Barnhill, Luna Monroe (widow of Pinkney Barnhill)
12. Bates, Winfred Finas
13. Beach, Lila Alpha (widow of Walter Cleveland Beach)
14. Beach, Walter Cleveland
15. Bishop, Leo Henderson
16. Bishop, Ruby (widow of Leo Henderson Bishop)
17. Blackwell, Clell Miller
18. Blackwell, Lena Mae (widow of Clell Miller Blackwell)
19. Boyd, Abraham
20. Burell, Robert Louis
21. Burton, Marvin
22. Campbell, Kathryn Jo (widow of Zollie Koffer Campbell)
23. Cardwell, Annie Elizabeth (widow of Olive Deets Cardwell)
24. Carnes, Letha Lux (widow of Herff Alexander Carnes)
25. Chesshir, Fay Willie (widow of Ollie Burnet Chesshir)
26. Collins, Harry Warren
27. Collins, Ruth Hanks (widow of Harry Warren Collins)
28. Covington, Doney Ernest
29. Cox, Charlene C. (widow of Dwight W. Cox)
30. Cox, Dwight W.
31. Craighead, Ygnacia (Agnes) Garcia (widow of Charlie A. Craighead)
32. Craven, Margaret Garlington (widow of Franklin Asbury Craven)
33. Crawford, Majorie Ethel (widow of Pete Crawford)
34. Crow, Elleen McDonnell (widow of John F. Crow)
35. Cummings, Daisy (widow of Alfred Parrish Cummings)
36. Curry, Charles Boothe
37. Darlington, Claude
38. Delling, Minnie Havre (widow of Manoah George Delling)
39. Dial, William Angelo
40. Ezell, Clarence Marvin
41. Ezell, Roma Mae (widow of Clarence Marvin Ezell)
42. Franklin, Claude
43. Franks, Eva Rumsey (widow of Tom C. Franks)
44. Fuller, Nathan N.
45. Glasscock, Henry Doil
46. Glasscock, Melba M. (widow of Henry Doil Glasscock)
47. Gonzalez, Emilia Clarke (widow of Juan C. Gonzalez)
48. Gray, Jerry
49. Gray, Myrtle (widow of Jerry Gray)
50. Grimes, Nell Beall (widow of William Thomas Grimes)
51. Hall, Howard N.
52. Hall, Larry L.
53. Hall, Marguerite Elizabeth (widow of Howard N. Hall)
54. Hamer, Dennis Estill
55. Hamer, Gladys Johnson (widow of Frank A. Hamer)
56. Hamer, Harrison Lester
57. Hamm, Margaret Catherine (widow of Sebren Orville Hamm)
58. Hamm, Sebren Orville
59. Hawkins, Thelma Nona (widow of Richard C. Hawkins)
60. Hensley, Lyna Wright (widow of John Edward Hensley)
61. Hickman, Tina Martha (widow of Tom R. Hickman)
62. Hickman, Tom R.
63. Hoffer, Flora Jahns (widow of Frank W. Hoffer)
64. Holland, Fred Darwin
65. Holland, Mattie Mae (widow of Fred Darwin Holland)
66. Hudson, Martha Ila (widow of Robert M. Hudson)
67. Hunnicutt, Grigsby Lillie (widow of J.R. Hunnicutt)
68. Hunnicutt, J.R.
69. Johnson, Bertha Maud Natus (widow of Joe Natus)
70. Johnson, Ester Sexcelia (widow of George H. Johnson)
-- Jones, Arthur Hastings, see Gertrude Jones Lusk
Box Folder
1990/069-2 1. Jones, Gus T. “Buster”
2. Jones, Mary Ann (widow of Gus T. Jones)
3. Kelso, Sidney Nolan
4. Keene, Henry
5. Lamkin, Mattie Lee (widow of Lem Lamkin)
6. Latta, Oscar (Mrs.) (widow of Oscar Latta)
7. Lusk, Gertrude Jones (widow of Arthur Hastings Jones)
8. Lynch, Lilla Eugenia (widow of Don Lawson Lynch)
9. Magee, Lula Bessie (widow of Edgar Silivan Magee)
10. Martin, Oscar Thomas
11. Mayes, Violet Hilid (widow of Sam Cloud Mayes)
12. McCoy, Fannie Cloud (widow of James Edward McCoy)
13. McCoy, James Edward
14. McMahan, Elizabeth Helm (widow of Frank Donaldson McMahan)
15. McMurrey, Will
16. McWilliams, Ella Mae (widow of R.E. McWilliams)
-- Miller, J.A., see Erma Davenport Miller Smith
17. Mills, Frank William
18. Mills, Mabel E. (widow of Frank William Mills)
19. Moore, Alice Yarbro (widow of Harry Moore)
20. Mundricks, Lambert
21. Murchison, Ivan
-- Natus, Joe, see Bertha Maud Natus Johnson
22. Neal, Maid J. (widow of Edgar Thomas Neal)
23. Nichols, Nellie McKinnie (widow of Roy C. Nichols)
24. Nichols, Roy C.
25. Oliphant, Boone
26. Osoba, Millie Josephine (widow of Joseph Osoba)
27. Perkins, James C.
28. Perkins, Opal McCall (widow of James C. Perkins)
-- Pharies, Hugh J., see Marguerite Pharies Robey
29. Price, Carrie Ruth (widow of Charles Wesley Price)
-- Ransom, Henry Lee, see Anna Cooke Ransom Williams
30. Riggs, Mildred Rosiland (widow of Walter Everett Riggs)
31. Riggs, Walter Everett
32. Robey, Marguerite Earle Pharies (widow of Hugh J. Phaires)
33. Rogers, Bettie Chesher (widow of Curren Lee Rogers)
34-35. Rush, (Kelly) Willie Jo Farmer (widow of Carroll G. Rush)
36. Sanders, Ruth Branch (widow of Jesse Calvin Sanders)
37. Saulsbury, Ethel (widow of Lee Saulsbury)
38. Shelton, Nell Oveta (widow of Richard Swan Shelton)
39. Smith, Agnes Lister (widow of Henry B. Smith)
40. Smith, Erma Davenport Miller (widow of J.A. Miller)
41. Sterling, William Warren
42. Sterling, Zora Lee (widow of William Warren Sterling)
43. Stevens, Trixie Cross (widow of Charles Frances Stevens)
44. Taylor, Blanche Ertelah (widow of Thomas Creed Taylor)
45. Taylor, Thomas Creed
46. Townsend, Eliza Goff (widow of Asa Light Townsend)
47. Trejo, Martin Edward
48. Vivian, Otho Dee, Sr.
49. Wachtendorf, Cherry Bob (widow of Herbert Dick Wachtendorf)
50. Wachtendorf, Herbert Dick
51. Westbrook, Dan W.
52. White, Bessie Patterson (widow of Thomas Bruce White, Sr.)
53. White, James C.
54. White, Mary Bacon (widow of Goff White)
55. White, Rosa Selma (widow of John Dudley White)
56. White, Thomas Bruce, Sr.
57. Williams, Anna Cooke Ransom (widow of Henry Lee Ransom)
58. Woelber, Mary E. (widow of Albert Henry Woelber)
54. Young, Lula Moore (widow of William Early Young)
55. Young, Minnie Pauline (widow of Sharp L. Young)
56. Young, William Early