Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Department of Public Safety:

An Inventory of Department of Public Safety Records at the Texas State Archives, 1930-1931, 1934-2000, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas. Dept. of Public Safety.
Title: Department of Public Safety records
Dates: 1930-1931, 1934-2000, undated
Abstract: The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. These records document the functions of DPS in crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. Types of records include correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, reports, clippings, testimony, affidavits, warrants and orders, indictments, audio recordings, photographs, films, press releases, statistics, manuals, rosters, minutes, notices, speeches, publications, newsletters, printed material, organizational charts, memorabilia, and a scrapbook. Records date 1930-1931, 1934-2000, and undated. Included are Public Safety Commission minutes, central files of the senior ranger captains of the Texas Rangers headquartered in Austin, Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, training records, files of the Legal Services Section, records of the Public Information Office, and Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records.
Quantity: 203 cubic ft.
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

In 1935, the 44th Legislature (Senate Bill 146, Regular Session), responding to recommendations made in 1933 by the Joint Legislative Committee on Organization and Economy, created the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) for the purpose of placing under a single jurisdiction the state's functions in crime prevention and traffic control programs. The original Department was composed of the Texas Rangers, removed from the Adjutant General's Department; the State Highway Patrol, taken from the State Highway Department; and the Headquarters Division, composed of the Bureau of Identification and Records, the Bureau of Intelligence, the Bureau of Communications, the Bureau of Education, and various administrative and service units. Other divisions were added in later years, as needed (see divisional descriptions). A Certificate of Title Division was created in 1939 (House Bill 407, 46th Legislature, Regular Session) and administered by DPS until its transfer to the Highway Department in 1941.

By 1956, the Department had reconstituted the Headquarters Division into a number of major divisions and had added several new divisions to create a total of fourteen, each of which was headed by a Chief who answered to the Director. To alleviate this unwieldy structure, the 55th Legislature authorized the reorganization of DPS (House Bill 325, Regular Session, 1957). The Department then created six regional commands, each headed by a senior officer who was placed in command of the region's Highway Patrol, License and Weight program, Motor Vehicle Inspection program, Drivers License program, Communications, and Safety Education Service. Each Regional Headquarters also contained a limited crime laboratory. The Texas Rangers were assigned to six companies, each headed by a captain, with the same boundaries as the regional commands. The Narcotics and Intelligence Sections operated state-wide out of the Austin headquarters. Supporting headquarters divisions, sections and bureaus were consolidated into four divisions: Identification and Criminal Records; Personnel and Staff Services; Driver and Vehicle Records; and the Inspection and Planning Division.

By this time DPS had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fell into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. To meet these responsibilities, the Department's divisions operated the following programs: crime control, police traffic supervision, driver licensing, vehicle inspection, safety responsibility, accident records, safety education, disaster and emergency services, and police training. It enforced criminal laws in cooperation with local, federal, and other state law enforcement agencies.

As of 1970, the Department was again expanding, raising the number of major divisions to six, and controlling all of them from the headquarters in Austin. The regional plan for the field services, such as the Rangers, the Highway Patrol, etc. continued to be used.

In 1991, DPS assumed responsibility for security in the Austin Capitol Complex from the State Purchasing and General Services Commission.

By 1996, DPS had reverted back to a four division command structure, not including the Director's Staff. As of February 2000, it had five major divisions: Administrative, Criminal Law Enforcement, Drivers License, Texas Ranger, and Traffic Law Enforcement.

The policy making body of DPS is the three member Texas Public Safety Commission, appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate for overlapping six year terms. The positions are non-salaried and the governor appoints the chair. All members must have knowledge of the law, experience in law enforcement, honesty, integrity, education, and executive ability. The Commission appoints a Public Safety Director to serve as the executive officer of DPS.

Funding for the Department derives from the Operators and Chauffeurs License Fund, the Motor Vehicle Inspection Fund, and the State Highway Fund.

Related agencies and boards on which DPS officials have served include the Texas Traffic Safety Council, the State Defense and Disaster Relief Council, the Crime and Narcotics Advisory Commission, and the Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education.

Divisional Histories : (Dates after headings refer to the date at which the body was first created; most continue to the present day.)

The Texas Rangers, 1823(?) - The Texas Rangers began operating in roughly 1823 as a type of commissioned officer, neither police nor military, authorized to keep order throughout the state. Rangers typically operated against Indian and Mexican raiders, outlaws, feudists, rustlers, and rioters. The force was first given legal status in 1835, during the Texas Revolution, and it has existed under slightly varying laws ever since. In 1935 (Senate Bill 146, 44th Legislature, Regular Session), the Texas Rangers were removed from the oversight of the Adjutant General and incorporated into the Texas Department of Public Safety. Until at least the mid-1950s, the Rangers were listed under the Headquarters/Main Division in legislative appropriation bills, but later were split out as an independent division. For a period of time between 1968 and the 1990s, the Rangers were placed in the Criminal Law Enforcement Division. Rangers are specifically charged with protecting life and property, suppressing riots and insurrections, apprehending fugitives, and investigating major crimes. The Texas Ranger Division, thus, investigates major felony offenses (such as murder, robbery, and burglary), assists in the investigation of white-collar crime, oil-field equipment thefts, other major crimes, and assists in suppressing violent civil disturbances. Rangers usually enter investigations at the behest of local law enforcement agencies, usually in understaffed areas or in matters requiring statewide or inter-county cooperation.

The Texas Highway Patrol, 1929 - In 1927 the Legislature (House Bill 2, 40th Legislature, Regular Session), due to increasing problems with truck traffic, provided an appropriation for the Texas Highway Department to employ 20 license and weight inspectors and one chief inspector to enforce trucking regulations. In 1929, the Legislature expanded this group to 50, changed their name to the State Highway Patrol, and charged them with enforcing all laws relating to vehicles and their use on public highways. In 1931 the force was increased to 120. The 44th Legislature (Senate Bill 146, Regular Session, 1935) transferred the Patrol to the newly created Texas Department of Public Safety. The Patrol formed an independent division, though later it was moved into the Traffic Law Enforcement Division. The Texas Highway Patrol investigates rural traffic accidents, recovers stolen vehicle property, arrests wanted individuals, helps motorists in distress, interdicts illegal drugs on the state's highway system, and assists authorities during states of emergency. Though its primary responsibility is to enforce traffic regulations, patrol officers are authorized to make arrests for any violation of criminal statutes.

Headquarters/Main Division, 1935 - The Headquarters Division was created by the Legislature in 1935 (Senate Bill 146, 44th Legislature, Regular Session). The legislation mandated that it be composed of the Bureaus of Identification and Records, Communications, Intelligence, and Education. This division generally acted as an umbrella containing the Director's staff, the bureaus of Intelligence and Identification and Records, Accounting (formed in 1937), Communications, Narcotics, and Internal Security. The Bureau of Education, though technically assigned to this division, often appeared under the jurisdiction of the Highway Patrol Division in legislative appropriation bills. By 1950, Headquarters included: the Accounting Division with its four sections: Accounting, Multilith, Mimeograph and Vari-Type, and Stockroom; the Statistical Division; the bureaus of Identification and Records, Intelligence, Communications, and Education (with a Safety Section); and the License and Weight Division. Following the 1957 reorganization, the Headquarters Division was split apart. Some of these sections were recombined into the Personnel and Staff Services Division, while others were split out to form separate divisions. Headquarters may have been partially reconstituted as the Administrative Division by the 1990s.

Bureau of Identification and Records, 1935 - The chief of the Bureau of Identification and Records was to be appointed by the director with the advice and consent of the Public Safety Commission. The purpose of the Bureau was to procure and file all pertinent information on felons and habitual criminals. It also collected data on the number and nature of offenses, the legal steps taken in each instance, and all other relevant information. Additionally, it was responsible for the performance of ballistic and chemical tests on evidence. The University of Texas was to assist in the performance of these tests as needed. It was not until 1937 that a chemical laboratory, a photographic section, and a questioned documents section were created. The first polygraph machine was purchased in 1944, but a full-time examiner was not hired to operate it until 1949. This bureau worked closely with the Bureau of Intelligence.

Until 1957 the Bureau appears to have operated under the Headquarters/Main Division. Shortly after, however, it was either transferred to or became the foundation of the Identification and Criminal Records Division. This division incorporated: the fingerprint files; the records section; the modus operandi section (a filtering agency for all criminal intelligence available locally, statewide, and from the Federal Bureau of Investigation); the latent fingerprint section; the chemical laboratory; the polygraph section; the photography section; and the firearms (ballistics) section. By 1970, toxicology and tool-mark identification had been added. During 1967-1968 a terminal was set up in this division connecting it to the National Crime Information Center, a computer center at the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington D.C. By 1972, the Division contained separate Modus Operandi and Fingerprints and Records Bureaus.

After the mid-1970s, the Division was broken into various parts. The Crime Records Service, that maintained the fingerprint and criminal record files, operated the Texas Crime Information Center, coordinated the statewide Uniform Crime Reporting Program, and administered the concealed handgun license program, was transferred to the Administrative Division. Two other sections, the Polygraph Service and the Crime Laboratory Service, became incorporated into the Criminal Law Enforcement Division.

Bureau of Communications, 1935 - The Bureau of Communications was originally led by the Chief of the Highway Motor Patrol, though the 1937 Legislature mandated that the Chief be appointed by the Director (House Bill 774, 45th Legislature, Regular Session). It was to install and operate a police radio broadcasting system, to establish and operate a state roads blockade system, and to cooperate in the exchange of information with other federal and local law enforcement organizations. Appropriations were not made to this bureau until September of 1947. The 1957 reorganization seems to have left Communications as an independent bureau, maintaining 24-hour-a-day communication links between DPS headquarters and the field commands. The Bureau also provided the statewide communications system mandated by the Civil Protection Act of 1951 (House Bill 784, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session), operating in conjunction with the Office of Civil and Defense Mobilization to provide warnings in case of enemy attack, and in cases of natural disaster. By 1996, the Bureau had been incorporated into the Emergency Management Service, which itself fell under the Administrative Division.

Bureau of Intelligence, 1935 - The Bureau of Intelligence was led by the Senior Captain of the Texas Rangers (though the 1937 Legislature mandated that the chief be appointed by the Director (House Bill 774, 45th Legislature, Regular Session)). The Bureau's purpose was to accumulate and analyze information of crime activities in the state and to make that information available to the DPS and local police and law enforcement agencies. This bureau worked closely with the Bureau of Identification and Records.

Internal Security, a related, independent section, was created in 1951 to meet the enforcement clause of the Texas Communist Control Law requiring all Communists to register with DPS. The law was later found to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. In 1957, the name of the unit was changed to the Intelligence Section, it was attached to the Director's Staff, and its jurisdiction was expanded to include criminal intelligence and special investigations. (The section either was absorbed by or took the place of the Intelligence Bureau.) The Section was specifically charged with informing the director of any and all matters directly or indirectly affecting the present and future welfare of the state and nation. Particular emphasis was placed on subversive activities, organized crime, and vice. The service also maintained records and acted as liaison with local, state, and federal law enforcement authorities. By 1996 it was known as the Criminal Intelligence Service and was responsible for investigating organized crime, criminal violations, and horse and dog racetracks, and running the Missing Persons Clearinghouse. As of February 2000 it was placed within the Criminal Law Enforcement Division.

Bureau of Education, 1935 - The Bureau of Education was led by the Assistant Director of DPS (though the 1937 Legislature mandated that the Chief be appointed by the Director (House Bill 774, 45th Legislature, Regular Session)). The Bureau was to organize training facilities and teach schools for the members of the Department and for other peace officers, to instruct them in the duties and functions of the Department. The Bureau was also to teach selected county and municipal peace officers and to educate citizens in matters of public safety and crime prevention and detection. The Adjutant General was to provide the buildings, land, and equipment in Camp Mabry. The University of Texas was to assist in the organization and instruction of classes as needed. In spite of its nominal placement under the Headquarters Division, legislative appropriation bills listed the Bureau under the Highway Patrol for many years. By 1996 this bureau seems to have been incorporated into Staff Support Service under the Administrative Division.

Drivers License Division, 1936 - The original drivers license law took effect on February 14, 1936 (Senate Bill 15, 44th Legislature, Second Called Session, 1935), requiring each driver to possess a license issued by the Department or by the County Tax Collector. In 1937 (House Bill 16, 45th Legislature, Regular Session) DPS took full responsibility for all the functions concerning the licensing of drivers. By 1950, the Drivers License Division gave tests to applicants for original licenses, examined those with suspended licenses, issued renewals, and analyzed records of careless/reckless drivers as a basis for suspension or cancellation. The Division maintained an examining service in each of the 254 county seats, and in the larger cities. After the 1957 reorganization, the Division's name was changed to Drivers License Service. As of February 2000 the Division oversaw the issuance of Texas driver's licenses and identification cards, maintained driver record files, administered all driving examinations, and coordinates services related to driver improvement, safety responsibility, and customer service. Prior to 1970, the Division was placed under the Traffic Law Enforcement Division, where it remained until the late 1990s, when it was again made an independent division.

The Accident Records Section of the Drivers License Division was expanded and made a separate entity in 1941, to meet the requirements of the compulsory accident reporting law enacted by the Legislature (House Bill 20, 47th Legislature, Regular Session, 1941). This was replaced by the Statistical Division, created in 1946, which was responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information on traffic accidents and causes, remaining compliant with accident reporting laws and collecting statistics for all other DPS functions. After 1957, this division was incorporated into the Personnel and Staff Services Division.

Driver and Vehicle Records Division, post-1957 - After the 1957 reorganization (certainly by 1962-1963) a separate division for driver record-keeping seems to have been created. It was divided into four bureaus: License Issuance and Driver Records; Driver Improvement and Control; Safety Responsibility; and Motor Vehicle Inspection Records. By 1970, a fifth bureau, Driver Training Records, had been added, though it was renamed the Vehicle Inspection and Driver Training Records Bureau by 1972. By 1996, the service had become known as the Drivers Licensing and Control Service, and was placed under the Administrative Division, though by 1999 it seems to have been reincorporated into the once again independent Drivers License Division.

Motor Vehicle Inspection, 1951 - The Motor Vehicle Inspection Act (House Bill 223, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session, 1951) went into effect on September 7, 1951 and DPS was charged with administering the program. DPS was to set up state-appointed inspection stations to inspect all vehicles to be registered in Texas and to establish vehicle safety standards in the hope of preventing accidents. It appears to have been an independent division until the 1957 reorganization, when it (or at least its record-keeping function) was incorporated into the Driver and Vehicle Records Division. Prior to 1970, this service was moved to the Traffic Law Enforcement Division.

Safety Responsibility, 1952 - The Safety Responsibility Act (House Bill 219, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session, 1951), requiring owners and operators of motor vehicles to be financially able to pay for damages to others, took effect on January 1, 1952. The program was administered by DPS as a separate division until the 1957 reorganization, when it was incorporated into the Driver and Vehicle Records Division.

Narcotics Section, 1937 - Personnel began to be assigned to enforce narcotics laws in September 1937 to comply with the Uniform Narcotic Drug Act (House Bill 440, 45th Legislature, Regular Session, 1937). Narcotics consisted of a supervisory agent, seven regular agents, and was charged with the discovery and control of narcotics traffic and drug addicts. The section was not heavily used until 1953, at which point it had only three agents and one supervisor. By 1959, it had an Agent-in-Charge, three supervisors, and nine agents. The Section worked against both the supply and demand for illegal drugs, largely through undercover operations with local authorities. It also conducted educational programs and schools for peace officers. By 1996, Narcotics had been placed under the Criminal Law Enforcement Division. It continued to combat illegal drug trafficking and abuse by gathering information, making arrests, and seizing illegal drugs, and to offer specialized drug training schools to state and local law enforcement officers. It also registered licensed practitioners and pharmacies authorized to handle controlled substances, managed the state's Triplicate Prescription Program, and served as the coordinator for the Texas Narcotics Information System.

License and Weight Division, 1939 - By 1939, the License and Weight Division appears to have been an independent division. Its primary function was, and remains, to check all commercial vehicle traffic to ensure compliance with the provisions of laws regulating weight, registration, and the transportation of persons or property for hire. Personnel of the division have joint responsibility with the Highway Patrol to enforce traffic laws on commercial vehicle traffic and on all other vehicular traffic when necessary. Prior to 1970, this Division was placed under the Traffic Law Enforcement Division.

The Motor Carrier Lease Section, mandated by the 1953 law requiring any lease, memorandum, or agreement concerning the operation of commercial motor vehicles to be filed with DPS, was originally placed under the License and Weight Division. Following the 1957 reorganization, the Section was made an independent section, located at Headquarters and operating under the supervision of an agent-in-charge. The independent section bore the responsibility of both administering the lease law in regard to motor vehicles and truck tractors and processing and recording all the license and weight reports regarding the regulations governing the transportation of persons or property for hire. The Section acted as a liaison between DPS, the Attorney General, the Motor Carrier Division of the Railroad Commission, and the Highway Department. By 1996, if the service still existed, it was no longer independently discussed.

Office of Defense and Disaster Relief/Civil Defense and Disaster Relief/Division of Defense and Disaster Relief, 1951 - The passage of the Civil Protection Act of 1951 (House Bill 784, 52nd Texas Legislature, Regular Session) authorized the Governor to appoint a defense and disaster relief council, on which the Director of the DPS served. The work of the Council was carried out by the Office of Defense and Disaster Relief, a branch of the Governor's Executive Office. In 1963 the Governor appointed the Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety to head the Division of Defense and Disaster Relief, established in DPS to carry out the work of this council. In addition to a central office in Austin, sixteen defense and disaster relief district organizations were maintained, with headquarters in regional Highway Patrol offices, to manage relief efforts locally. Operational activities originated with local officials who called upon successively higher levels as needed, up to the inter-state level. A State Disaster Control Center was in the Department of Public Safety Building in Austin and operated 24 hours a day when a disaster struck. The Division was also involved with national defense matters coming to the attention of the Governor, training and education, and administering financial assistance programs to state agencies and local governments on a grant or matching fund basis. By 1970, the Division was also responsible, under the State Emergency Operations Plan, for police service, communications, and emergency public information. The Disaster Control Center seems to have been renamed the State Emergency Operating Center. In 1973 the Texas Disaster Act (Senate Bill 786, 63rd Texas Legislature, Regular Session) broadened the Division's functions, and the Governor again appointed the DPS Director to head the Division of Disaster Emergency Services. By 1983, the division had been renamed the Division of Emergency Management

By 1996, this division had evolved into the Emergency Management Service, located in the State Emergency Operating Center to coordinate relief and recovery operations for all disasters. The staff leads the State Comprehensive Emergency Management Program and operates the DPS Communications Bureau. The Service was placed in the Administrative Division.

Personnel and Staff Services Division, 1957 - Created following the 1957 reorganization, the Division contained five Bureaus: Personnel and Training, managing personnel and conducting training and education programs for DPS and local officers; Statistical Services (formerly the Statistical Division), compiling data on crimes, accidents, and departmental activities; General Office Services; Fleet Operations; and the Physical Plant. By 1964, the Division administered all of DPS's personnel and training programs at the Department's Law Enforcement Academy in Austin. The composition of this division remained fairly stable through the 1970s, but was dismantled, with its elements incorporated into other branches, by 1996.

Inspection and Planning Division, 1957 - Inspection and Planning was charged with developing and inspecting all programs carried on by DPS and ensuring that DPS activities were executed in compliance with established policies and approved methods. It served as a special staff to the Director. During the 1958-1960 biennium, members of the division advised and assisted field commanders, taught in training courses, made addresses, revised the reports of all field services, developed performance standards/measures for field program activities, made plans for modifications at major radio installations, developed future projections, assisted in developing Civil Defense organizations and operating procedures, and planned and executed numerous pilot studies. By 1964, the division maintained a safety education library and coordinated the fleet safety program. This division was incorporated into the Administrative Division by 1996.

Safety Education Service, pre-1957? - The Service was established to carry out the specific provisions of the DPS founding legislation, which made DPS responsible for the education of citizens in matters of public safety. Personnel acted as liaisons between the DPS and public schools, government agencies, and industrial and civic programs in coordinating public safety programs. Additionally, staff took part in general DPS activities such as providing assistance, issuing warnings, and making arrests. By 1964, the Service provided statewide programs of public education relating to traffic accidents, crime, and preparation for civil defense, disaster relief, and rehabilitation. Prior to 1970, this service was placed under the Traffic Law Enforcement Division.

Data Processing Division, 1968 - The Division was created in 1968 to provide for the design, procurement, installation, operation and administration of a computer system. Initial activities involved the computerization of drivers' records maintained by the Driver and Vehicle Records Division, with similar plans in the works for criminal records, stolen property files, and modus operandi files. By 1996 it had been incorporated into the Administrative Division. By 1999 the Division was renamed the Information Management Service.

Traffic Law Enforcement Division, pre-1970 - Prior to 1970, DPS field services were divided into two divisions: Traffic Law Enforcement and Criminal Law Enforcement. Traffic Law Enforcement operated through the six regional offices to enforce federal, state, and county traffic laws on rural Texas highways. Originally, this division contained the Texas Highway Patrol, the License and Weight Service, the Motor Vehicle Inspection Service, the Drivers License Service, and the Safety Education Service. By 1999, the composition of the unit had not changed.

Criminal Law Enforcement Division, 1968 - Prior to 1970, DPS field services were divided into two divisions: Criminal Law Enforcement (created in 1968) and Traffic Law Enforcement. Criminal Law Enforcement was created to direct and coordinate the operations of the State's crime control forces. The Division encouraged closer liaisons with municipal and county officials, and made plans in conjunction with local authorities in areas where rioting and other disturbances were considered likely. It originally contained the Texas Rangers (with their 6 regional divisions), the Intelligence Section, and the Narcotics Section. As of February 2000 the division was responsible for conducting criminal investigations and cooperating with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. It incorporates the Crime Laboratory Service, the Motor Vehicle Theft Service, the Narcotics Service, the Polygraph Service, and the Special Crimes Service (renamed from the Intelligence Section). By 1999, the Texas Rangers again had been made an independent division.

Administrative Division, 1970s - This division first appeared sometime after the mid-1970s. By 1996, it incorporated Crime Records, Data Processing, the Driver Licensing and Control Service, the Inspection and Planning Service, the Emergency Management Service, and the Staff Support Service. As of February 2000 it incorporated the Crime Records Service, the Emergency Management Service, the Information Management Service (probably renamed from Data Processing), the Inspection and Planning Service, and the Staff Support Service.

Director's Staff - By 1964, the Director's Staff, a type of overarching administrative umbrella which seems to have been referred to as a separate unit since perhaps the 1957 reorganization, consisted of the Assistant Director, the chiefs of the headquarters divisions and sections, the Administrative Assistant, the Public Information Officer, the Accounting and Budget Control Officer, the Communications Control Officer, and the Agents-In-Charge of the Intelligence, Narcotics, and Motor-Carrier-Lease Sections. Though the composition of the Staff changed over time as the DPS reorganized, it continued to contain the upper administrative staff. By the 1990s, it also included Internal Affairs, Internal Audit, Legal Services, and the Aircraft Section.


Scope and Contents of the Records

These records document the functions of the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) in crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities; to meet these responsibilities, the Department's divisions operated the following programs: crime control, police traffic supervision, driver licensing, vehicle inspection, safety responsibility, accident records, safety education, disaster and emergency services, and police training. Types of records include correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, reports, news clippings, testimony, statements, affidavits, arrest warrants, copies of court orders, audio cassette tapes, photographs, indictments, telephone logs, press releases, subpoenas, inquest reports, investigation reports, criminal offense reports, progress reports, statistics, instructional manuals, rosters, class records, grades, evaluations, medical records, counseling records, field assignments, reports, yearbooks, graduation materials, recording discs, films, minutes, notices of public hearings, speeches, DPS publications, copies of bills, transcripts, newsletters, printed material, organizational charts, memorabilia, and a scrapbook. Materials date 1930-1931, 1934-2000, and undated. Included are Public Safety Commission minutes, central files of the senior ranger captains of the Texas Rangers headquartered in Austin, Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, training records, files of the Legal Services Section, records of the Public Information Office, and Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records.

Public Safety Commission minutes document discussions and actions taken at the meetings of the three-member policy-making body of the Texas Department of Public Safety. Ranger records are largely company files in which captains stationed throughout the state in six companies (A through F) made reports back to the senior ranger captain, and investigation files containing records generated in the course of investigations undertaken by ranger companies. Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files document the functions of DPS in crime investigation, as well as crime suppression and control. Training records document two kinds of training: all field service recruit schools, lasting two to five months; and also some of the classes, generally lasting from three days to a week but occasionally having a duration of several months, that were offered by DPS as a type of continuing education for Texas peace officers, other Texas state agencies with a law enforcement or investigatory arm, and several groups of foreign police officers. Public hearing files and publication files provide information on portions of the activities of the Legal Services Section. Public Information Office files document the public relations efforts of the agency, from traffic and criminal law enforcement issues to the celebration of the Bicentennial and Sesquicentennial and the acceptance of the gift of an airplane. Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records document the plans and actions of the DPS in preparing for natural and man-made disasters, and coordinating relief efforts in those emergencies. Photographic and film media produced by or related to the Texas Department of Public Safety is partly described in this finding aid, and partly in a separate finding aid.

The inventories for the Training Academy records are in separate finding aids due to electronic file size limitations imposed by TARO. If you are reading this electronically, click on the links Texas Department of Public Safety, Training Academy records, Training Academy recruit training records and Texas Department of Public Safety, Training Academy records, Training Academy in-service and recertification training records to go to the full finding aids. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aids are found at separate dividers within the binder.

A large part of the photographic and film media have been described in a separate finding aid. If you are reading this electronically, click on the link Texas Department of Public Safety, Photographs, 1937-1959, undated, 16 cubic ft. to go to the full finding aid . If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at at separate divider within the binder.

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.


 

Organization of the Records

These records have been organized by State Archives staff into nine series and seventeen subseries:
Texas Public Safety Commission minutes, 1962-1967, 1979-2000, 2 cubic ft.
Texas Ranger Division records, 1963-1995, 13.75 cubic ft.
  • Company files, 1968-1991, 9 cubic ft.
  • Investigation files, 1969-1995, 2.5 cubic ft.
  • Report files, 1968-1995, 1 cubic ft.
  • Senior ranger captain general files, 1963-1978, 1 cubic ft.
  • Forensic hypnosis course files, 1994, 0.25 cubic ft.
Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, 1934-1990, 19 cubic ft.
Training Academy records, 1930-1931, 1935-1999, bulk 1980-1999, 143.5 cubic ft.
  • Training Academy recruit training records, 1930-1931, 1935-1999, bulk 1980-1999, 78 cubic ft.
  • Training Academy in-service and recertification training records, 1942-1950, 1957-1970, 1994-1999, bulk 1994-1999, 65.5 cubic ft.
Director's Staff: Legal Services Section files, 1958-1986, 5 cubic ft.
  • Public hearing files, 1971-1986, 1 cubic ft.
  • Publication files, 1958-1986, 4 cubic ft.
Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, 1937, 1941, 1944-1997, undated, 1.75 cubic ft.
  • Press releases, 1950-1997, 0.25 cubic ft.
  • Speeches and public information, 1941, 1966, 1968-1990, undated, 1 cubic ft.
  • Newsletters, 1960-1961, 1975-1979, 1985-1992, 0.3 cubic ft.
  • Bicentennial/Sesquicentennial material, 1975-1976, 1981-1986, undated, fractional
  • Scrapbook, 1964-1965, fractional
  • Brochures, 1952, 1954, 1961, 1986, undated, fractional
  • Statistical reports, 1937, 1944-1950, undated, fractional
  • Organization charts, 1944, 1949, fractional
Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records, 1949-1950, 1953-1956, 1966, 1974-1975, 1977, 1980, 1983-1994, 0.5 cubic ft
Photographic and film media, 1937-1971, undated, 17 cubic ft.
Clippings, 1935-1936, 0.5 cubic ft.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, information relating to law enforcement officers and complaints against law enforcement officers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.108); names of juvenile offenders (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.101 and V.T.C.A. Family Code, Section 58.005); medical records (V.T.C.A., Occupations Code, Section 159.002(d)); social security numbers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.147 and United States Code, Title 42, Section 405(c)(2)(C)); drivers license numbers, (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130); certain addresses, telephone numbers, and personal family information (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117 or Section 552.1175); account numbers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.136); and records prepared by the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 508.313), an archivist must review Texas Ranger Division records, Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, and DPS Training Academy records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail (Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P. O. Box 12927, Austin, TX 78711), fax (512-463-5436), email (Dir_Lib@tsl.state.tx.us), or see our web page (http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/agency/customer/pia.html).Include enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.

To listen to the audio recordings, or to view the videotape, please contact the Archives' Preservation Officer. Audio cassettes and the videotape require playback equipment provided by the Archives' Preservation Officer. The audio discs in Training Academy in-service and recertification training records are thinner than normal vinyl phonograph records, and may require equipment that the Texas State Archives cannot access. Researcher access to film is dependent upon first arranging to transfer that outdated media to more contemporary media, at the researcher's expense; the Preservation Officer can explain the options.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Personal Names:
Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963--Assassination.
Oswald, Lee Harvey.
Ruby, Jack.
Tippit, J. D.
Whitman, Charles Joseph, 1941-1966.
Corporate Names:
Texas Rangers.
Texas. Dept. of Public Safety. Legal Services Section.
Texas. Dept. of Public Safety. Public Information Office.
Subjects:
Law enforcement--Texas.
Governmental investigations--Texas.
Law enforcement--Study and training.
Criminal investigations--Texas.
Traffic regulations--Texas.
Traffic Safety--Texas.
Places:
Texas--Centennial celebrations, etc.
United States--Centennial celebrations, etc.
Document Types:
Reports--Texas--Assassination--1963-1964.
Affidavits--Texas--Assassination--1963-1964.
Correspondence--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Memorandums--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Telegrams--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Reports--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Clippings--Texas--Law enforcement--1934-1995.
Testimony--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Affidavits--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Warrants--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Legal documents--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Audiotapes--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Photographs--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Logs (records) --Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Press releases--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1997.
Subpoenas--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Statistics--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Manuals--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Rosters--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Minutes--Texas--Law enforcement--1962-1967, 1979-2000.
Speeches--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Publications--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Bills (legislative records)--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Transcripts--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Newsletters--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Memorabilia--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Scrapbook--Texas--Law enforcement--1935-1995.
Organization charts--Texas--Law enforcement--1944, 1949.
Functions:
Enforcing laws.
Investigating.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Department of Public Safety, Photographs, 1937-1959, undated, 16 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Ranger records, 1839-1975, undated, bulk 1854-1918, 40.94 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Military rolls, 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated, 131.25 cubic ft. [see separate series on Republic of Texas, Civil War, Reconstruction, and Ranger military rolls]
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Service records, 1836-1845, 1854-1865, 1870-1935, 179.07 cubic ft. [and follow the links to the online index]
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Civil War records, 1855, 1860-1866, undated, 16.94 cubic ft. [see Ranger records, in Texas State Troops]
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Departmental correspondence, 1846-1943, bulk 1861-1933, 121.62 cubic ft.
Texas Comptroller's Office, Claims records: Texas Ranger pensions, 1917, 1928, 1931, 1936, 1938, 1959-1990, bulk 1959-1990, 0.94 cubic ft.
Texas Legislature, Joint Committee of the House and Senate in the Investigation the Texas Ranger Force [Canales investigation], Transcript of proceedings, 1919, 0.74 cubic ft.
Texas Legislature, House Committee on Public Safety, Records of Representative Keith Oakley as Chair, 1991-1998, bulk 1994-1998, 14 cubic ft. [restricted]
Texas Attorney General's Office, John F. Kennedy assassination investigation files, 1959, 1963-1964, bulk 1963-1964, 7.65 cubic ft.
Texas Private Security Board, Minutes, 1969-2007, 2.25 cubic ft.
Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education, Records, 1965-2001, 1.42 cubic ft.
Texas State Archives Manuscript Collections
Retired Texas Rangers, videocassette, June 10, 1989
Retired Texas Rangers, Color group photo portrait, June 10, 1989
Green, Sherri, [Interview with Mary Nell Garrison, widow of former Texas Department of Public Safety Director Homer B. Garrison, Jr.], 1996 [1997/085]
Hagler (Charles H.) Texas Ranger Material, 1895-1963 [2-22/606]
Texas Rangers and Stations, 1855-1935, fractional [2-23/1055]
McGill (William) Papers, 1943-1958, undated, 10 linear ft. [2-23/150 thru 153, 155 thru 167, 169 thru 174, 583]
National Defense in Texas Collection, ca. 1943 [2-23/1076]
Kaiser (Frank C.) literary effort (Reminiscences of a Texas Ranger), 1967 [2-22/603]

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1963/113, 1963/195, 1976/008, 1976/180, 1976/198, 1978/023, 1980/240, 1983/112, 1988/003, 1992/013, 1992/052, 1992/105, 1992/290, 1993/007, 1995/017, 1996/132, 1998/097, 1998/103, 1998/182, 2000/080, 2005/029, 2005/128, 2006/166, 2006/291, 2007/142, 2008/054, 2012/113

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Department of Public Safety on February 17, 1964; May 22, 1964; 1975; February 11, 1976; October 12, 1977; June 16, 1978; July 15, 1980; March 3, 1983; October 10, 1991; January 9, April 15, July 1, September 21, 1992; October 19, 1994; April 8, April 28, April 29, 1998; December 22, 1999; and November 6, 2007; by the DPS Training Academy on February 25, 2005; by The Cronkite Ward Company, via Claudia Cummings in 1996; by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on March 27, 2002 (reaccessioned on February 3, 2012); September 20, 2004; January 26, 2006; and March 21, 2007; and unknown.

Processing Information

Tonia Carlisle, May 1993

Paul Beck, October 1994

Tonia Wood, April 1995

Lisa M. Hendricks, May 1998, July 1998

Nancy Enneking, January 2000

Tony Black, November 2004, September 2005, June 2007, March 2008

Aditi Worcester, October 2013

Other Formats for the Records

The Texas Department of Public Safety periodically mounts the recent minutes and agenda of the Texas Public Safety Commission in pdf format on the agency web site (http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/calendar/index.htm). As of March 2008, this includes minutes from Commission meetings dating January 2003-January 2008, and agenda dating January 2003-March 2008.

Location of Originals

The record copies of minutes and agenda are maintained by the Texas Department of Public Safety.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Texas Public Safety Commission minutes, 1962-1967, 1979-2000,
2 cubic ft.

In 1935, the 44th Legislature created the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) for the purpose of placing under a single jurisdiction the state's functions in crime prevention and traffic control programs. The original Department was composed of the Texas Rangers, the State Highway Patrol, and the Headquarters Division. By 1957 DPS had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fell into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. The policy making body of DPS is the three member Texas Public Safety Commission, whose activities are documented by these records. These records consist of copies of the minutes of meetings of the Texas Public Safety Commission, dating 1962-1967, and 1979-2000. These minutes discuss, in a fairly summary fashion, the actions of the Commission, typically divided into personnel matters (including consideration of applications for reinstatement to position of patrolman, of applications for commissions as Special Texas Rangers, of appointments as Texas Rangers), budget matters (including consideration of budget transfer authorizations and submission of budget requests), pending litigation, and miscellaneous and unfinished business (including consideration of proposed rules and regulations). Attachments are not very voluminous, but include such items as press releases, commission orders/agreed orders, resolutions, memoranda, correspondence, monthly summaries of activities, reports, legislation, and lists of Special Rangers (retirees, cattle raisers association Special Rangers, railroad company Special Rangers, and National Automobile Theft Bureau Special Rangers).
The policy making body of DPS is the three member Texas Public Safety Commission, appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the Senate for overlapping six year terms. The positions are non-salaried and the governor appoints the chair. All members must have knowledge of the law, experience in law enforcement, honesty, integrity, education, and executive ability. The Commission appoints a Public Safety Director to serve as the executive officer of DPS.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by State Archives staff chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Texas Public Safety Commission minutes, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1998/182, 2005/029, 2007/142
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on June 22, 1998; September 20, 2004; and March 21, 2007.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Tony Black, November 2004, June 2007
Box
1998/182-1 Minutes, 1962-1967:
May 1962
November 1962
February 1963
June 1963
December 1963
April 1964
May 1964
[missing November 1964]
March 1965
August 1965
October 1965
March 1966
June 1966
July 1966
August 1966
December 16, 1966
December 22, 1966
January 1967
Minutes, 1979-1997:
September 1979
October 1979
(2 meetings)
November 1979
December 1979
January 1980
February 1980
March 1980
April 1980
May 1980
June 1980
September 1980
December 1980
February 1981
May 1981
July 1981
August 1981
November 1981
February 1982
March 1982
May 1982
July 1982
August 1982
October 1982
December 1982
January 1983
March 1983
April 1983
June 1983
August 1983
October 1983
November 1983
December 1983
January 1984
February 1984
March 1984
May 1984
(2 meetings)
June 1984
(2 meetings)
August 1984
(2 meetings)
October 1984
November 1984
January 1985
February 1985
April 1985
May 1985
June 1985
July 1985
August 1985
September 1985
October 1985
November 1985
December 1985
January 1986
February 1986
March 1986
April 1986
May 1986
June 1986
July 1986
September 1986
October 1986
November 1986
Box
1998/182-2 January 1987
February 1987
March 1987
April 1987
May 1987
(2 meetings)
June 1987
August 1987
September 1987
October 1987
December 1987
January 1988
February 1988
March 1988
April 1988
May 1988
June 1988
(2 meetings)
July 1988
September 1988
October 1988
December 1988
January 1989
February 1989
March 1989
May 1989
June 1989
July 1989
September 1989
October 1989
December 1989
(2 meetings)
January 1990
February 1990
March 1990
May 1990
June 1990
July 1990
October 1990
November 1990
February 1991
March 1991
April 1991
May 1991
August 1991
September 1991
October 1991
December 1991
January 1992
March 1992
May 1992
July 1992
September 1992
November 1992
December 1992
January 1993
February 1993
March 1993
April 1993
May 1993
July 1993
August 1993
September 1993
December 1993
January 1994
February 1994
April 1994
June 1994
August 1994
September 1994
October 1994
December 1994
January 1995
April 1995
May 1995
June 1995
July 1995
August 1995
September 1995
Box
1998/182-3 October 1995
November 1995
December 1995
January 1996
February 1996
April 1996
(2 meetings)
May 1996
June 1996
July 1996
August 1996
September 1996
(2 meetings)
October 1996
November 1996
February 1997
March 1997
April 1997
May 1997
June 1997
July 1997
August 1997
September 1997
October 1997
November 1997
Box
2007/142-1 January 1998 thru May 2000
Box
2007/142-2 June 2000
July 2000
August 2000
October 2000
November 2000



 

Texas Ranger Division records, 1963-1995,
13.75 cubic ft.

The Texas Rangers were under the Adjutant General's Department until 1935 when they were transferred to the Texas Department of Public Safety. The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses, such as murder, robbery, and burglary; it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are central files of the senior ranger captains of the Texas Rangers headquartered in Austin, and document these functions. They include correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, reports, news clippings, testimony, statements, affidavits, arrest warrants, copies of court orders, audio cassette tapes, photographs, indictments, telephone logs, press releases, subpoenas, inquest reports, investigation reports, criminal offense reports, progress reports, and statistics, dating 1963-1995. Records are largely company files in which captains stationed throughout the state in six companies (A-F) make reports back to the senior ranger captain, and investigation files containing records generated in the course of investigations undertaken by ranger companies. Investigation files deal, for example, with complaints against rangers or other officials, murders, suicides, allegations of civil rights violations or official misconduct, kidnappings, robberies, burglaries, and missing persons. Photographs are usually of crime scenes and homicide or suicide victims. Report files contain statistical reports of ranger activity and are arranged chronologically. In the company files, related records are usually stapled together and are arranged by company, then by year and are in roughly reverse chronological order within each year. Investigation files are foldered and labeled by individual investigation, but do not appear to be in any other order.
See also Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, 1934-1990, 19 cubic ft., also described in this finding aid.
The Texas Rangers began operating in roughly 1823 as a type of commissioned officer, neither police nor military, authorized to keep order throughout the state. Rangers typically operated against Indian and Mexican raiders, outlaws, feudists, rustlers, and rioters. The force was first given legal status in 1835, during the Texas Revolution, and it has existed under slightly varying laws ever since. In 1935 (Senate Bill 146, 44th Legislature, Regular Session), the Texas Rangers were removed from the oversight of the Adjutant General and incorporated into the Texas Department of Public Safety. Until at least the mid-1950s, the Rangers were listed under the Headquarters/Main Division in legislative appropriation bills, but later were split out as an independent division. For a period of time between 1968 and the 1990s, the Rangers were placed in the Criminal Law Enforcement Division. Rangers are specifically charged with protecting life and property, suppressing riots and insurrections, apprehending fugitives, and investigating major crimes. Rangers usually enter investigations at the behest of local law enforcement agencies, usually in understaffed areas or in matters requiring statewide or inter-county cooperation.
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into five subseries:
Company files, 1968-1991, 9 cubic ft.
Investigation files, 1969-1995, 2.5 cubic ft.
Report files, 1968-1995, 1 cubic ft.
Senior ranger captain general files, 1963-1978, 1 cubic ft.
Forensic hypnosis course files, 1994, 0.25 cubic ft.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1998/097
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Ranger Division of the Texas Department of Public Safety on April 8, 1998.
Restrictions on Access
Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, information relating to law enforcement officers and complaints against law enforcement officers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.108); and names of juvenile offenders (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.101 and V.T.C.A. Family Code, Section 58.005), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail (Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P. O. Box 12927, Austin, TX 78711), fax (512-463-5436), email (Dir_Lib@tsl.state.tx.us), or see our web page (http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/agency/customer/pia.html). Include enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.
Audio cassettes require playback equipment provided by the Archives' Preservation Officer.
Processed by
Lisa M. Hendricks, July 1998
Company files, 1968-1991,
9 cubic ft.
The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses (such as murder, robbery, and burglary); it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes, and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are company files in which captains stationed throughout the state in six companies (A-F) make reports back to the senior ranger captain headquartered in Austin; thus they document the Divison's functions. Types of records in this subseries include correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, news clippings, testimony, statements, affidavits, indictments, arrest warrants, copies of court orders, telephone logs, press releases, subpoenas, reports, and some photographs of crime scenes and victims. Records range in date from 1968 to 1991. The state is divided into different regions with ranger companies "A" through "F" responsible for those regions. Records reflect routine business as well as problems confronting the different regions ranging from labor union disputes, civil disturbances, the carrying of concealed weapons, missing persons, stolen vehicles, the provision of cargo or personnel security, serving subpoenas, suspected arson, and the investigations of homicides and suicides. Letters and memoranda are largely between the regional company captains and the senior ranger captain in Austin with related correspondence from attorneys, citizens, or other state officials. Related records are usually stapled or clipped together and arranged by company, captain, and year. Researchers should also see investigation files, report files, and senior ranger captain general files for possible related records.
Arrangement
Records were arranged by the creator by company, then by year, and are in roughly reverse chronological order within each year; they remain in order as received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Company files, Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/097-1 Memoranda to all ranger captains, 1974-1990:
1974-1977
1977-1981
1981-1983
1983-1985
1985-1987
1987-1990
Box
1998/097-2 Company A files
Captain James F. Rogers, 1971-1977
La Grange, "Chicken Ranch," 1972-1976
Hitchcock File, 1975-1976
Huntsville Texas Department of Corrections Jailbreak, 1974-1975
Expense Accounts - Company A, 1968-1974
Ranger Display Press Information, undated
Pop Festival at Lewisville, Texas, 1969
Captain Grady C. Sessums, Company A, 1978-1980
Gilmer Strike, 1980
Box
1998/097-8 Texas Southern University Robbery Investigation, 1981
Captains Grady Sessums and Dan North, 1981-1988
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain Bob G. Prince, 1989-1991
Box
1998/097-3 Company B files
Captain G. W. Burks, 1972-1980
Expense Accounts, Company B, 1968-1974
Box
1998/097-8 Captain G. W. Burks, 1981-1988
John Gregory Gerard file, 1978-1982
Box
1998/097-9 Captain G. W. Burks, 1983-1986
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain James A. Wright, 1989-1991
Box
1998/097-4 Company C files
Captain James F. Rundell, 1972-1973
Captain Walter A. Werner, 1974-1980
Pop Festival, Lubbock, 1970
Lubbock Tornado, List of Injured, 1970
Expense Accounts, 1968-1974
Box
1998/097-9 Captain Walter A. Werner, 1981
Captain Charles A. Moore, 1982-1987
Captain Bruce M. Casteel, 1988
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain Bruce M. Casteel, 1989-1991
Box
1998/097-4 Company D files
Captain John M. Wood, 1972-1978
Expense Accounts, 1968-1974
Gerald Mann file, 1977
Shiner photographs, undated
Captain Jack O. Dean, 1979-1980
Iranian crisis, 1979
Box
1998/097-9 Captain Jack O. Dean, 1981-1988
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain Jack O. Dean, 1989-1991
Company E files
Captain James E. Riddles, 1971-1974
[3 folders]
Investigation of Alleged Misconduct, 1973
Captain J.P. Lynch, 1975-1980
[7 folders]
Quarterly Reports, 1975-1976
Expense accounts, 1968-1974
Criminal Offense Report, 1977
Box
1998/097-6 Captains J. P. Lynch, Maurice C. Cook, G. E. Powell, 1981-1988
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain G. E. Powell, 1989-1991
Box
1998/097-7 Company F files
Captain E. G. Elbers, Jr., 1972-1973
Captain Robert K. Mitchell, 1974-1979
Expense Accounts, 1968-1974
Complaint from Elizabeth Carter, 1975
Questionable death - replies, 1976
Texas Antiquities Committee, 1975-1976
Box
1998/097-6 Captain R. K. Mitchell, 1980-1988
Box
1998/097-5 Correspondence files, Captain Robert K. Mitchell, 1989-1991
Investigation files, 1969-1995,
2.5 cubic ft.
The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses, such as murder, robbery, and burglary; it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are investigation files of the senior ranger captain of the Texas Rangers, containing records generated in the course of investigations undertaken by ranger companies. Types of records include correspondence, memoranda, news clippings, testimony, statements, witness affidavits, court orders, arrest records, investigation reports, criminal offense reports, progress reports, travel vouchers, statistics, photographs, and two audio cassette tapes. Records date 1969-1995. "Investigation files" appear to be working files with attachments and other records typically generated during the course of an investigation. "Significant investigation files" contain monthly synopses in narrative form, from company captains to the senior captain, of current investigations considered to be of particular importance. Investigations deal with complaints, homicides, suicides, allegations of official misconduct, allegations of civil rights violations, alleged governmental cover ups and corruption, misappropriation of public funds, auto thefts, robberies, burglaries, and missing persons. Correspondence is largely between the senior ranger captain and ranger company personnel. Photographs are of crime scenes and homicide or suicide victims. All files are labeled according to the relevant investigation. Researchers should also see company files, report files, and senior ranger captain general files for possible related records.
See also Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, 1934-1990, 19 cubic ft., also described in this finding aid.
Arrangement
Arrangement by the creator is by individual investigation, in the order received. Most files are arranged using a numbering system no longer understood by present employees of DPS Rangers (ex. TRS-5.7.1).
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Investigation files, Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/097-11 Investigation files
TRS-5.7.1 - Complaints on or by Ranger Personnel:
1981-1989
1973-1987
TRS-6 - Texas Ranger Civil Rights Complaints, 1970-1986
TRS-7 - Discharge of Firearm
[empty]
TRS-8 - Fleet Accidents
[empty]
TRS-9 - Miscellaneous Reports and Information
[empty]
TRS-9 - Voter Fraud Reports
[empty]
TRS-10.37 - Attempt on Billy Lambright to Solicit to Commit Capital Murder, 1980
TRS-10.38 - Investigation of Illicit Police Activity, Cleveland, Liberty County, 1978
TRS-10.40 - Indictments Against State, County and City Officials in Jim Wells County, 1978
TRS-10.45 - Charles Mathis Investigation, 1979
TRS-10.46 - Ronald Clayton Jones Incident, 1979
TRS-10.47 - U.S. District Judge John H. Wood Murder Case, 1979-1982
TRS-10.48 - Ellis County Investigation (Public Corruption), 1978-1979
TRS-10.49 - Felony Offenses Investigated in the Last Four Years, 1980
TRS-10.50 - Request for Investigation - Hemphill County Sheriff's Office, 1980-1981
TRS 10.51 - Frio County Special Investigation, 1980
TRS-10.52 - Alleged Misuse of County Equipment and/or Funds (Brazos County), 1980
TRS-10.53 - Special Investigation in Duval County, 1980-1982
TRS-10.54 - Oil Thefts in Webb and Duval Counties, 1981
TRS-10.55 - Complaint from William Sligh, 1981
TRS-10.56 - Investigation Report from Williamson County (Richard Bryant), 1981
TRS-10.57 - Fictitious Appointment of Houston Police Officer Steve Jett to Ranger Service, 1981
TRS-10.15 - James O. Phillips, 1985
TRS-10.16 - Allegations of Texas Department of Corrections Cover up - Executive Summary, 1985-1986
TRS-10.17 - Investigation of Fatal Shooting Involving Rangers Stanley Guffey and Johnny Aycock, 1987-1988
TRS-10.22 - Crystal City Investigation, 1970-1979
TRS-10.24 - Alleged Beating of Lonnie Franklin, Jr., at Rusk State Hospital, 1976-1978
TRS-10.35 - Captain Clint Peoples Investigation undated
[unlabelled audio cassette]
TRS-10.59 - Investigation of Chief of Police James Williams, of Abernathy, Texas, 1981
TRS-10.60 - Investigation of Constable J. B. Maynard, Brazoria County, 1981
TRS-10.61 - Winkler County Investigation, 1981
TRS-10.62 - Investigation of Sheriff J. B. Smith of Tyler, 1981
TRS-10.44 - Truck Strike Incidents, 1974-1979
TRS-10.2 - Investigation: Ted W. Bowlin, Trooper II, re: Vehicle Theft, 1977
Ted Bowlin Case, Special Investigation, 1977
TRS-10.3 - Investigation of T. Cullen Davis for Criminal Solicitation to Commit Capital Murder, 1978
TRS-10.4 - Investigation of Missing Money from Pamela J. Kimball, 1978
TRS-10.5 - Investigation of Hale County Sheriff's Office Deputy Charles Cypert in Shooting Death of Rosales, 1978
TRS-10.6 - Investigation of Chief of Police Wendell Gilmore, Hamilton, Texas, 1978
TRS-10.7 - Conflict Between Prairie View and Prairie View A&M Officials, 1978
TRS-10.8 - Investigation of Auto Theft Against Trooper Adam Gonzalez, 1978
TRS-10.9 - Investigation of Chief of Police, Clarksville, Texas, 1978
TRS-10.10 - Harassment of Debbie Shelton, Kingsville, Texas, 1978
TRS-10.11 - Vigilante Action on Mexican Border--Brown Beret and Ku Klux Klan, 1977
TRS-10.12 - Investigation of Gambling Promotion in Alice, Texas, 1977
TRS-10.13 - Investigation of Texas Surplus, Houston, Texas, 1977
TRS-10.14 - Travis County District Attorney, Ronnie Earle, 1984-1985
Interview, Donald Barry, Doyle Baker, 12:30 p.m., November 14, 1973
[audio cassette tape]
Clint Peoples Investigation, 1973-1975
Official misconduct, Investigation report, 1973-1977
Box
1998/097-12 TRS-10.63 - Attempted Capital Murder, Craig Matthews, Tyler, Smith Co., 1979-1982
TRS-10.58 - Investigation of Texas Southern University Robbery, 1981
TRS-10.18 - Jefferson County, 1988
Harper, Angela, questionable death, 1982
Caroline Harte Murder Case, 1969-1971
Senator Jim Bates' Trial, 1971-1972
Henry Marshall Case, Franklin, Texas, 1962
Criminal Offense Report, Nepotism, El Paso County and Attachments, 1979-1982
Mike Martin Case, 1981
Rape and Official Misconduct Investigation of Roger Gutierrez, Trooper II, Pecos, Texas, 1983
Box
1998/097-13 Ted Walters Case, Company B, 1971
Gary Fisher suicide, Company B, 1975
Murder Investigation Report, Company E, 1971
Special Investigation of Burglary near Kyle, Company F, 1969-1972
Texas Youth Council Investigation, 1971-1972
Investigation of Texas Youth Council, 1973
Investigation of Escape of Boys from Texas Youth Council, Mountain View State School, 1973
[Contains possibly excepted information: names of juvenile offenders (Texas Family Code, Section 58.005 and/or V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.101)]
Roadblock/Arrests - Brewster County, Company E, November 18-20, 1977
Investigation Reports, Company E, 1977-1978:
1977
1978
Significant investigation files
Significant investigations, 1991-1992
Department of Public Safety, Texas Rangers, Significant investigations, 1993-1995
[4 folders]
Report files, 1968-1995,
1 cubic ft.
The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses, such as murder, robbery, and burglary; it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are reports from Texas Ranger companies to the senior ranger captain in Austin, and from the senior ranger captain to the chief of the Criminal Law Enforcement Division of the Department of Public Safety (DPS). They include reports, statistics, and memoranda, dating 1968-1995. Reports detail and summarize such activities as the number and type of felony offenses investigated by the companies and the number of arrests and convictions involving felonies and misdemeanors. Reports also detail and summarize ranger activities such as training, riot duty, report writing, surveillance, court appearances, security, warrant service, and travel time. Semi-annual status reports from the senior ranger captain to the chief of the Criminal Law Enforcement Division of DPS address such issues as personnel morale and health, new appointments and duty stations, promotions, transfers, and resignations as well as a narrative account of investigative activity of the various ranger companies. Researchers should also see investigation files, company files, and senior ranger captain general files for possible related records.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by the creator in chronological order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Report files, Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/097-10 Texas Rangers Criminal Activity Reports, 1968-1973
State summary, September-November 1976
Periodical reports, Calendar Year 1979 (plus 6 month summaries)
Semi-annual status reports, 1984-1985
Quarterly reports, 1985-1986
Calendar year reports, 1985
Quarterly and semi-annual reports, 1990-1991
Monthly summaries of ranger activities, January-December 1994
Memos, 1994-1995
Senior ranger captain general files, 1963-1978,
1 cubic ft.
The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses, such as murder, robbery, and burglary; it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are general files of senior ranger captains Clint Peoples and William D. Wilson of the Texas Rangers. They include correspondence, memoranda, statements, and photographs, dating 1963-1978. Files reflect general topics and concerns ranging from personal correspondence to Texas Ranger duties associated with a southern governors' conference or the Democratic National Convention. Photographs are largely of crime scenes and victims of crime. Researchers should also see company files, investigation files, and report files for possible related records.
Arrangement
Records are not arranged by the creator in any apparent order, and remain in the order received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Senior ranger captain general files, Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/097-14 Captain Clint Peoples
Inventory File, 1973-1974
Information Requests and Authorizations, 1969
Eighth Highway Patrol Training School, Clint Peoples, 1974
Bonnie and Clyde (correspondence), 1963-1970
Tom Mix, 1966-1967
R.L. Trout - Reference missing photograph, 1971
Mrs. John Wayne, 1971
Captain William D. Wilson
Ranger Display, 1973
Joint Statement on Narcotics by Governor, Lt. Governor, Speaker of House, Attorney General, 1970
Trucking Strike, 1974
Old Southern Governors' Conference, 1973-1976
Democratic Convention, 1976
Federal Fund Program, 1973-1975
Personal Correspondence, Captain Wilson, 1973-1975:
1973-1974
1974-1975
Boy Scouts, 1974-1976
Golf Club Opening, 1974
Muscular Dystrophy, 1976
Governor's Itinerary, 1971-1978
Texas Rangers, Criminal Activity Reports, 1970-1973
Forensic hypnosis course files, 1994,
0.25 cubic ft.
The Ranger Division investigates major felony offenses, such as murder, robbery, and burglary; it also assists in investigation of white collar crime, oil field equipment thefts, and other major crimes and assists other DPS officers in suppressing violent civil disturbances. These records are handout materials for a forensic hypnosis course sponsored by the Department of Public Safety and dated 1994. Included in this material is testimony by experts, copies of hypnosis-related news articles and court cases, and other materials that examine the problems inherent in the use of hypnosis in forensic work. This material comes from the senior ranger captain's files in Austin at the Texas Ranger headquarters.
See also Training Academy in-service and recertification training records, 1942-1950, 1957-1970, 1994-1999, bulk 1994-1999, 65.5 cubic ft.
Arrangement
Material was arranged by the creator in 3-ring binders; State Archives staff removed the material from the binders and placed them in folders, in original order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Forensic hypnosis course files, Texas Ranger Division records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/097-15 Investigative hypnosis, undated
[3 folders]
Texas Department of Public Safety, Basic Forensic Hypnosis School, July 18-22, 1994
[3 folders]



 

Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, 1934-1990,
19 cubic ft.

The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Criminal Law Enforcement Division was created in 1968 and originally contained the Texas Rangers (with their six regional divisions), the Intelligence Section, and the Narcotics Section. (By 1999, the Texas Rangers again had been made an independent division.) These records constitute the investigation files of the Criminal Law Enforcement Division and its predecessor units. Types of records include reports (especially Criminal Offense Reports), correspondence, memoranda, telegrams, transcripts of testimony, affidavits, documentary evidence, lists, newspapers and newspaper clippings, magazines and magazine clippings, pamphlets, photographs, reel-to-reel audio tapes, and miscellaneous working files. The records document the functions of DPS in crime investigation, suppression, and control during the time period 1934-1990.
Especially well-documented in these files are serial killers Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Elwood Toole. Other subjects of particular interest are the 1966 University of Texas Tower shootings by Charles Whitman, and the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. In addition, there are files on over 30 murder cases, plus files on corruption, theft, gambling, and other notable crimes.
See also Texas Ranger Division records, Investigation files, 1969-1995, 2.5 cubic ft., also described in this finding aid.
Arrangement
These records are arranged as received from the creating agency: larger files are first, followed by smaller files arranged roughly alphabetically by folder title.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Criminal Law Enforcement Division investigation files, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 2008/054
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Department of Public Safety on November 6, 2007.
Restrictions on Access
Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, information relating to law enforcement officers and complaints against law enforcement officers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.108); names of juvenile offenders (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.101 and V.T.C.A. Family Code, Section 58.005), social security numbers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.147 and United States Code, Title 42, Section 405(c)(2)(C)); driver's license numbers, (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130); certain addresses, telephone numbers, and personal family information (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117 or Section 552.1175); medical records (V.T.C.A., Occupations Code, Section 159.002(d)); and records prepared by the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 508.313), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail (Texas State Library and Archives Commission, P. O. Box 12927, Austin, TX 78711), fax (512-463-5436), email (Dir_Lib@tsl.state.tx.us), or see our web page (http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/agency/customer/pia.html). Include enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.
Audio recordings require playback equipment provided by the Archives' Preservation Officer.
Processed by
Tony Black, February 2008
Addition of index terms, rehousing of Kennedy's Assassination files and revision of finding aid, Aditi Worcester, October 2013
Box
2008/054-1 Fraudulent securities and plates, 1982, undated
Intelligence pamphlets, 1958, undated:
Summary Mafia
Bookmaking, General Information
Applicant Investigations
Introduction to Criminal Investigation
Intelligence in Law Enforcement
Box
2008/054-2 Board of Pardons and Paroles (pardon cases), 1937-1950, undated:
Audit report (February 1, 1937-August 31, 1944), 1937-1944
Board of Pardons and Paroles (pardon cases), 1939-1945
Case history, 1937-1946
Duplicate documents, undated
Evidence and testimony of investigation, undated
Harold Locke case, 1946
Judge Haile's case, 1944-1945
Lloyd Rand case, 1947
Miscellaneous cases, 1946-1950
Pardon cases, 1946-1948
Pardon Senate, 1945-1946
Volume 1: Index and reports, 1946-1947
Volume 2: Audit reports, 1946
Volume 3: Statistics and House Bill, 1946
Volume 4: Selected cases, undated
Volume 5: Documentary evidence, 1946-1947
Volume 6: Transcripts of testimony, 1947
Volume 7: Newspaper clippings, 1947
Volume 8: Investigation of, 1947
Box
2008/054-3a Kennedy's Assassination, 1947-1964:
Investigation of the Assassination of the President, 1963-1964
[4 folders]
Lee Harvey Oswald, 1947-1951, 1956, 1963-1964
[2 folders]
Transcript of Dallas Police radio transmissions, 1963
[2 folders]
Box
2008/054-3b Mrs. Marguerite C. Oswald v. Liberty Insurance Company of Texas, final judgment 1959
Marguerite C. Oswald v. King Candy Company (Industrial Accident Board), 1959
Kennedy, John Fitzgerald: assassination (November 22, 1963) investigation by J.E. Bill Decker, Sheriff (Dallas County), 1963
Officer J.D. Tippit, 1952-1963
Dallas Police reports, 1959, 1963-1964
[2 folders]
Box
2008/054-4 University of Texas Tower shooting, Charles Whitman, 1964-1970, undated:
Diagrams of the U.T. Tower (Charles Whitman), 1966
Material pertaining to the Charles Whitman case, 1966
Original letters from FBI re: UT sniper Charles J. Whitman, 1966
Pictures of UT sniper, Charles J. Whitman, 1966
Sniper (August 1, 1966), Whitman--Tower, University of Texas, 1966
Charles J. Whitman, deceased, Austin, Texas, 1966
USMC-CIE Report on UT sniper, Charles J. Whitman, undated
Telegrams sent to Governor Connally by Secretary of State John Hill, 1966
Original copies of Austin Police Department, re: UT sniper, Charles J. Whitman, 1966
Extra copies of UT sniper Charles Whitman file information, 1964-1966
Interoffice memorandum to files from Don Overstreet, 1966-1970
Articles re: UT sniper, Charles J. Whitman, 1966-1970
Box
2008/054-5 Information, Charles Joseph Whitman, 1966:
Volume I
Volume II
Box
2008/054-6 Volume III
Volume IV
Box
2008/054-7 Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Elwood Toole, 1960-1990:
Time line from 1975 to 1984 of what, when, and where their activities took them, 1975-1984:
Volume I, 1975-1977
Volume II, 1978-1979
Volume III, 1980-1981
Volume IV, 1982-1984
Box
2008/054-8 Binders looking at years 1960 to 1984, 1960-1984
Time lines, news article, mug shots with fingerprints, and other information on subjects, 1983-1985
Box
2008/054-9 Victim information, 1970-1983
Box
2008/054-10 Articles and newspaper clippings, 1982-1990
Miscellaneous reports and information: Lucas/Toole, 1983-1988
Associates, 1984-1986
Summary of victims and Lucas/Toole travels, 1978-1983
Lucas FBI transcript, pictures and fingerprints, 1981
Toole accidents, motel registration (San Angelo)/Reports (Sutton County and Jacksonville, Florida), 1982-1984
Lucas marriage license, 1975
Lucas drivers license application, 1983
Blood bank information, 1983-1985
Traveler Aid, Delaware, 1981
Release date, Michigan pen, 1985
Weapons used by Lucas, undated
Vehicle info, 1982-1984
Lucas-Toole seminar, 1983
Personal history and family background, undated
Clayton Smith beginning reports, 1983
Phil Ryan beginning reports, 1983
Monroe, Louisiana conference, undated
Toole: FBI transcript, fingerprints, and Jacksonville arrest reports, 1977
Lucas/Toole Bulletin completed, 1985
Lucas/Toole Bulletin working copies completed, 1985
Cases Lucas/Toole claim they do not commit, 1984-1986
Georgetown information, 1984-1986
Miscellaneous notes and information, 1981
Box
2008/054-11 Lucas and Toole plates, undated
Oversized papers on Lucas and Toole, undated
Daily log activities of Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Elwood Toole, undated
Henry Lee Lucas/Ottis Elwood Toole investigation, 1985
Plates for the daily log activities of Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Elwood Toole, undated
Envelope with working copies of daily log activities of Henry Lee Lucas and Ottis Elwood Toole, 1984-1985
Box
2008/054-12 Index box with victim information, undated
Binder with Department of Public Safety interoffice memorandums, 1983-1985
Reports, 1980-1986, undated:
The Attorney General of Texas Lucas report, 1986
Special Bulletin, Crime Analysis Unit, Jacksonville Police, 1983
Lucas-Toole murder odyssey, undated
Commercial metal records, 1980-1981
Copy of report from the State of California Department of Justice, 1984
Paper report cover with reports on Lucas and Toole, undated
Paper report cover with reports on Lucas and Toole--Investigators report--Texas Department of Public Safety Crime Analysis Section Bulletin--Roster of officers attending the Henry Lucas seminar (December 7, 1983), 1983
Three workbooks on Lucas-Toole cast, 1985
Report cover with Department of Public Safety interoffice memorandums, 1983-1985
Miscellaneous paperwork on victims and time lines, undated
Box
2008/054-13 My correspondence, Lucas-Toole, 1983-1985
Work sheets, 1976-1980
Other sources information, 1983-1985
Correspondence from Georgia Bureau of Investigation, 1985
Miscellaneous information, 1984-1986
NCIC checks, 1984-1985
[Miscellaneous information], 1984-1986
Sacramento, California information, 1983
Loose information, undated to 1987
The Celebrezze Report: An information service for Ohio's law enforcement community (Attorney General's Office), 1985
Loose information, undates to 1983
Teletype messages, Lucas/Toole, 1983-1985
Int-8 inquiries, Lucas/Toole, 1983-1985
Conflicts, 1983-1985
Board of Adjustment minutes, 1986
Working papers on Lucas-Toole, undated
Booklet from Regional Organized Crime Information Center, undated
Copy of notes, undated
Box
2008/054-14 AWOL: Private Oleander A. Winchester/Private John C. Lowny, 1943
Adjutant General Department, 1943-1947
Time lines, news article, mug shots with fingerprints, and other information on subjects, 1983-1985
Assassination attempt of President Ronald Reagan by John Hinckley, 1979-1981
Assassination of Judge John Wood, 1979-1982
Assault to murder: A.E. Neal (Hale County), 1937-1938
Bonnie and Clyde (Clyde Barrow and Bonnie Parker), 1934-1962
Bribery: Paul R. Jones, 1951
The Brotherhood of Eternal Love, 1951
Burglary, Reads Department Store (Rusk County), 1937-1938
The case of Robert James Pitts, undated
Cattle theft: defendant J.D. Windham, 1943-1945
Christian-Patriots Defense League, 1980-1981
Coffey murder case: shooting of Elgin Police Chief Munford, 1966
Comanche Peak Life Force: James B. Schermbeck, 1978-1980
Conspiracy to rob bank (Tarrant County): Gene Paul Norris, James E. Papworth, William Carl Humphrey, 1957
Counterfeit engraving plates, 1962
Box
2008/054-15 County Commissioners, Jefferson County, 1940
[2 folders]
Dallas Deputy murders, February 1971
Davenport case, 1940s
Death of George Parr, March 31, 1975
Death of William H. King near Corpus Christi (February 7, 1941), 1941-1943
Deaths of Mrs. Nancy Reed Sykes, Mrs. Jessie Mae Sykes Blazer, Roy C. Blazer (son), 1948-1952
Duval County election, George Parr, 1954-1956
First wallet:
Election irregularities
Case #44823, Duval County elections
News clippings, Capt. Allee file
Second wallet: Case #44823
Duval County political misconduct, 1975-1977
[also Zavala County, Laredo, and McAllen]
[Contains possibly excepted information: social security numbers and drivers license numbers]
Box
2008/054-16 Elmer Wayne Henly, mass murderer, 1973-1974
Extortion attempt, Rosenberg State Bank, 1936
Fred Carrasco, 1974-1976
Galveston Maceo Syndicate, 1951
Gambling--Fort Worth, 1949
Gambling--Odessa, 1950
Gangland murders, Fort Worth, 1955-1957
General election, Jim Wells County, 1950
Hit-and-run death of Douglas H. Thompson by Glenn Ralph Gullick (Parker County), December 7, 1969
Interview with William Prescott Allen on "Corruption in Texas" (Webb County), 1956
[includes reel-to-reel audio tape]
Jim Wells County--political misconduct, 1975
[Contains possibly excepted information: drivers license numbers]
Kidnapping and assault of Hubert Harris (Dallas County), 1937
Land Office irregularities, 1938
Liquor syndicate, 1952
Mickey Cohen file, 1950-1951
Miscellaneous correspondence, 1939-1951
Box
2008/054-17 Mistreatment of Mexicans in Karnes City, Texas, 1943
Murder of Adrian Harden by James Earles (July 3, 1968), 1968
Murder of Babe Womack by Eddie Paul Hien and Charles Hague (Williamson County, April 3, 1936), 1936-1965
Murder of Benjamin J. Laton by Marvin Rayson (Palo Pinto County, January 14, 1953), 1953
Murder of Bernard Thomas Wooley by James Decator Reeves (Brazoria County, April 12, 1959), 1959-1962
Murder of Calvin and Conrad William by mother Ann (Harris County, February 22, 1955), 1955
Murder of Celestine Kyle by Texas Highway Patrolman Jerry Kyle (October 3, 1968), 1968
Murder of Deana Hinojosa (Austin, Texas), 1971-1972
Murder of DPS Narcotics Agent Patrick Randel, 1974-1978
Murder of Henry Poole and rape of several women by M/Sgt. Marion Washington (McLennan County), 1955-1956
Murder of Jacob S. Floyd by Nago Alaniz and Mario Sapet (Jim Wills County, September 9, 1952), 1952-1954
Murder of James Travis Scott by George Kean and Sidney John Foley (Tarrant County, January 31, 1957), 1957-1958
Murder of Jan David Broderick by Ronald Edward Menter, 1955-1957
Murder of John Albert White and Keitha Morris by Clyde Deerdin (January 8, 1969), 1969
Murder of John Earl Reese by Joe Regan Simpon (Rusk County, October 22, 1955), 1955-1956
Murder of Joyce M. White by Texas Highway Patrolman Alfred P. White, 1967-1968
Murder of Lee Branter by Lucian Millican (Calvert, Texas, September 27, 1936), 1936-1938
Murder of Leslie Ann Bowman and Mabel McCormick (Hardin County), 1972-1973
Murder of Leslie Douglas Ashley by Fred Tones (1961), 1961-1964
Murder of Lt. Franklin Bell Thompson III by Cyrus Audrey Jennings (Hays County, December 1, 1956), 1956
Murder of M. Armand Yramategui (Houston, Texas), 1970
Murder of Melvin Baates by Frankles Brown (Lubbock County, May 11, 1957), 1957
Murder of Minnie W.T. Fortner by Clark Red Parcell (Caldwell County, March 4, 1957), 1956-1957
Murder of Mr. and Mrs. William A. Pierson by son Howard (Austin, Texas, April 24, 1935), 1935-1964
Murder of Raymond Reed by Frederick Charles Loomis and Edna Florine Easley (Potter County, April 12, 1958), 1958
Murder of Ronald Thomas Dosier by Donald Eugene Moore (Aransas County, May 2, 1955), 1955-1957
Murder of Sam C. Degelia Jr. by Pete Thomas Scamardo, Jerry O'Brien Watkins, and Charles V. Harrelson (Hidalgo County, July 6, 1968), 1967-1968
Box
2008/054-18 Murder of Shirley Stark and Susan Rigsby by James Cross, 1967
[5 folders]
Murder of Texas Highway Patrolman Mark Frederick Willard Hauer and Darlene Hauer by Charles Herbert Long (Tarrant County, January 2, 1959), 1959-1961
Murder of Texas Highway Patrolman Mark Frederick, 1987
Murder of Willard Hauer and Darlene Hauer by Charles Herbert Long (Tarrant County, January 2, 1959), 1959-1961
Nut file: Dr. Lulu Henry, 1960
Oil Workers Union (Nueces County), 1948
Organization called "The Texas Historical Society," 1953
Panel study of cults, 1980
Box
2008/054-19 Sam Bass, 1958-1962
Slot machine, Bill Harris, County Rep. and Senate, 52nd Legislature, 1951
State Board of Barbers (August 31, 1948), 1945-1951
Suicide, Bernard Schwartz (Llano or San Saba County), 1955
Texas Department of Corrections, 50 prison employees fired, 1950
Texas A&M investigation, 1947
Texas Farm Workers Union, 1980
Tom Hickman, 1935
[3 folders]
Triple murder of banker Jack Kelley and family (Robertson County, May 18, 1972), 1972
Veteran Students Association mass meeting at Texas A&M College, 1947



 

Training Academy records, 1930-1931, 1935-1999, bulk 1980-1999,
143.5 cubic ft.

The Training Academy within the Texas Department of Public Safety, Administrative Division, Staff Support Services Unit, Training Bureau provides basic, intermediate, and advanced training and education for the state's law enforcement officers according to the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officer Standards and Education (TCLEOSE) mandated curriculums, and also operates civilian training programs including administrative training for Department of Public Safety employees. Records include instructional manuals, class records, rosters, grades, evaluations, medical records, counseling records, field assignments, reports, statistics, correspondence, photographs, yearbooks, graduation materials, minutes, and recording discs dating 1930-1931, 1935-1999, bulk 1980-1999. Records from 1930-1931 are Texas Highway Department training records for the Texas Highway Patrol, which was transferred to the authority of the newly created Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) in 1935. All Field Service Recruit Training Schools (as they are currently designated) were originally two months long, but gradually increased to five months in duration. These Training Academy recruit training records date 1935-1999, bulk 1980-1999. Training Academy in-service and recertification training records, 1942-1950, 1957-1970, 1994-1999, bulk 1994-1999, document the training sessions that normally last three days to two weeks.
The inventories for the Training Academy records are in separate finding aids due to electronic file size limitations imposed by TARO. If you are reading this electronically, click on the links Texas Department of Public Safety, Training Academy records, Training Academy recruit training records and Texas Department of Public Safety, Training Academy records, Training Academy in-service and recertification training records to go to the full finding aids. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aids are found at separate dividers within the binder.



 

Director's Staff: Legal Services Section files, 1958-1986,
5 cubic ft.

By 1957 the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fell into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. To meet these responsibilities, the Department's divisions operated the following programs: crime control, police traffic supervision, driver licensing, vehicle inspection, safety responsibility, accident records, safety education, disaster and emergency services, and police training. It enforced criminal laws in cooperation with local, federal, and other state law enforcement agencies. The Legal Services section of the Director's Staff of the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS), as its name implies, handles legal matters associated with the functions. These records are public hearing files and publication files of the Legal Services section of the Director's Staff of DPS. Types of records include correspondence, memoranda, minutes, notices of public hearings, speeches, DPS publications, copies of bills, and news clippings, dating 1958-1986. Correspondence is with individuals and employees of other state agencies and pertains largely to public hearings and rules and regulations set forth by DPS. Publications are operations orders issued by the director of DPS relating to such topics as driver's license requirements, response to bomb threats, and various special announcements.
In addition to the four major divisions of the agency, the Director's Staff is under the direct supervision of the DPS director. The office includes the director, who holds the title of colonel; the assistant director; and Accounting and Budget Control, Internal Affairs, Internal Audit, Legal Services, and Public Information sections.
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into two subseries:
Public hearing files, 1971-1986, 1 cubic ft.
Publication files, 1958-1986, 4 cubic ft.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Director's Staff: Legal Services Section files, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1998/103
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Legal Services section of the Director's Staff of the Texas Department of Public Safety on April 28, 1998.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Lisa M. Hendricks, May 1998
Public hearing files, 1971-1986,
1 cubic ft.
By 1957 the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. These records are public hearing files of the DPS, and include correspondence, memoranda, minutes, notices of public hearings, and some news clippings and copies of bills, dating 1971-1986. Incoming letters are largely from individuals and employees of other state agencies such as the State Board of Insurance or the State Department of Highways and Public Transportation and pertain, for example, to plans for attendance at public hearings and comments regarding various DPS regulations. Form letters issued by DPS serve as notices to recipients of upcoming public hearings and serve to clarify regulations. Public hearings were held to cover such topics as defensive driving instructor training, rules and regulations regarding public safety at mass gatherings, and brake fluid standards and specifications.
Arrangement
These files are arranged by the creator in roughly reverse chronological order (by hearing date).
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Public hearing files, Director's Staff: Legal Services Section files, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/103-1 Commercial Driver Training Schools, February 4, 1980 [1979-1980]
Controlled Substances, November 15, 1973
Hazardous Material, September 20, 1973 [1969-1976]
Mass Gatherings, February 29, 1972 [1971-1972]
Brake Fluid, February 28, 1972 [1972-1988]
Rules of Procedure covering hearings before the Public Safety Commission, 1972-1981
Proposed rule - Vehicle Inspection Parameter Vehicle Emission Inspection and Maintenance Program, 1986
Publication files, 1958-1986,
4 cubic ft.
By 1957 the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. These publication files consist of operations orders issued by the Director of DPS, dated 1958-1986. Orders relate to such topics as driver's license requirements, emergency evacuation plans, responses to bomb threats, and special announcements regarding deaths and occasional staff holidays. Separate steno pads contain lists of the orders in numerical order, with brief decriptions of each; although not indexes, these serve as tables of contents, and are a useful point of access.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by the creator chronologically by year.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Publication files, Director's Staff: Legal Services Section files, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1998/103-2 Department Publications, 1958-1962:
September 1958 - January 1, 1959
January 1, 1959 - January 1, 1960
January 1, 1960 - January 1, 1961
January 1, 1961 - January 1, 1962
Operations Memoranda, Numbers 11-62, 1962
Office of Administrative Assistant, 1962-1966:
January 1, 1962 - January 1, 1963
January 1, 1963 - January 1, 1964
January 1, 1964 - January 1, 1965
January 1, 1965 - January 1, 1966
Legal Counsel, 1966-1969:
January 1, 1966 - January 1, 1967
January 1, 1967 - January 1, 1968
January 1, 1968 - January 1, 1969
Operations Manual (Administrative Order No. 5-68), 1968
Box
1998/103-3 Legal Counsel, 1969-1971:
January 1, 1969 - January 1, 1970
January 1, 1970 - January 1, 1971
General Counsel, 1971-1983:
January 1, 1971 - January 1, 1972
January 1, 1972 - January 1, 1973
January 1, 1973 - January 1, 1974
(Volumes 1 and 2)
January 1, 1974 - January 1, 1975
Box
1998/103-4 January 1, 1975 - January 1, 1976
January 1, 1976 - January 1, 1977
January 1, 1977 - January 1, 1978
January 1, 1978 - January 1, 1979
January 1, 1979 - January 1, 1980
January 1, 1980 - January 1, 1981
January 1, 1981 - January 1, 1982
Box
1998/103-5 January 1, 1982 - January 1, 1983
(Volumes I and II)
Legal Services, 1983-1986:
1983
1984
1985
1986



 

Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, 1937, 1941, 1944-1997, undated,
1.75 cubic ft.

The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fall into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of press releases, speeches, transcripts, news clippings, newsletters, correspondence, brochures and other printed material, statistical reports, organization charts, memorabilia, and a scrapbook, dating 1937, 1941, 1944-1997, and undated. These materials document the public relations efforts of the agency, from traffic and criminal law enforcement issues to the celebration of the Bicentennial and Sesquicentennial and the acceptance of the gift of an airplane. Topics discussed through the various means of communication include Texas Rangers, traffic law enforcement (seat belt and speed limit laws) and criminal law enforcement (narcotics, theft, and pari-mutuel racing).
In addition to the four major divisions of the agency, the Director's Staff is under the direct supervision of the DPS director. The office includes the director, who holds the title of colonel; the assistant director; and Accounting and Budget Control, Internal Affairs, Internal Audit, Legal Services, and Public Information sections.
Organization
These records have been organized by State Archives staff into eight subseries:
Press releases, 1950-1997, 0.25 cubic ft.
Speeches and public information, 1941, 1964, 1966, 1968-1990, undated, 1 cubic ft.
Newsletters, 1960-1961, 1975-1979, 1985-1992, 0.3 cubic ft.
Bicentennial/Sesquicentennial material, 1975-1976, 1981-1986, undated, fractional
Scrapbook, 1964-1965, fractional
Brochures, 1952, 1954, 1961, 1986, undated, fractional
Statistical reports, 1937, 1944-1950, undated, fractional
Organization charts, 1944, 1949, fractional
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item and cite the subseries), Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1992/013, 1992/052, 1992/105, 1993/007, 1995/017, 2006/291, 2012/113
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by Mike Cox, Public Information Officer of the Texas Department of Public Safety, on October 10, 1991; January 9, 1992; April 15, 1992; September 21, 1992; and October 19, 1994; and by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on March 27, 2002 (reaccessioned on February 3, 2012); and January 26, 2006.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Tonia Carlisle, May 1993
Paul Beck, October 1994
Tonia Wood, April 1995
Tony Black, September 2005, March 2008
Press releases, 1950-1997,
0.25 cubic ft.
By the 1950s the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) had evolved into the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of copies of press releases, pamphlets, and other publications released by the Texas Department of Public Safety to inform the public, dating 1950-1997.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by the creator chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Press releases, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
2012/113 Press releases, 1950-1982
Press releases, 1982-1996
[bound volume]
Press releases, 1996-1997
Speeches and public information, 1941, 1964, 1966, 1968-1990, undated,
1 cubic ft.
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of copies of speeches given mostly by the directors of the Texas Department of Public Safety, transcripts of interviews of Colonel Jim Adams, news articles featuring opinions expressed by the directors, and two fact sheets prepared for public dissemination. Records date 1941, 1964, 1966, 1968-1990, and undated. Two speeches prepared for Governor Bill Clements are also included. Topics discussed include law enforcement and traffic regulations. Of special note is the radio address of Colonel Homer Garrison, Jr. dated December 22, 1941, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
Arrangement
These records are arranged by the creator alphabetically by director (Col. Adams, Col. Garrison, Col. Gossett, Col. Milner, and Col. Speir), and then in reverse chronological order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Speeches and public information, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1992/013-1 Colonel Jim Adams, 1980-1983, 1986
Box
2012/113 Colonel Homer Garrison, Jr., 1941, 1964, 1966:
Radio address, December 22, 1941
Statement before U.S. House Commerce Committee, May 4, 1966
Box
2006 Accessions Box 5 (2006/291) Texas Traffic Situation, February 6, 1964
Box
1992/013-1 Colonel Leo Gossett, 1968-1988, undated:
1968-1973
1974, 1977, 1979-1982, 1984
1987-1988, undated
Colonel Joe Milner, 1988-1990
Colonel Wilson Speir, 1969-1978:
August 1969-March 1970
April-December 1970
1971, undated
1972
1973, undated
1974
1975, undated
1976
1977
1978
Newsletters, 1960-1961, 1975-1979, 1985-1992,
0.3 cubic ft.
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of newsletters of the Texas Department of Public Safety, dating 1960-1961, 1975-1979, and 1985-1992, and titled Message from the Director, DPS Update: From the Director, and Chaparral. Chaparral is the quarterly employee publication of the Texas Department of Public Safety. The newsletter first began publication in 1948 and ceased in 1965, although a special issue was published in the fall of 1969. The Chaparral, edited by the Public Information Office, was revived in the fourth quarter of 1975, beginning with Volume 19, Number 1. These newsletters include two from 1960 and 1961 and from the Fourth Quarter, 1975 through April 1979 (Volume 21, Number 4). Message from the Director provided information to the employees on retirements, promotions, training classes, and highlights of events from around the state. Issues date from June 1985 to June 1987, when Colonel Jim Adams retired. DPS Update: From the Director is a continuation of the previous newsletter. Issues date from July 1987 when Leo E. Gossett served as director through June 1992 when James R. Wilson was serving as director. A few issues are missing for the newsletters from the directors.
Arrangement
Arrangement by the creator is in chronological or reverse chronological order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Newsletters, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1992/013-2 DPS Chaparral, 1960-1961, 1975-1979
Box
1993/007-1 Message from the Director, 1985-1987
DPS Update: From the Director, 1987-1992
Bicentennial/Sesquicentennial material, 1975-1976, 1981-1986, undated,
fractional
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of correspondence, memos, brochures, newsletters, memorabilia, notes, and a color slide, dating 1976-1986. These materials document preparation by the Department of Public Safety for celebrating the Bicentennial of the United States and the Sesquicentennial of Texas. Larry Todd, Public Information Officer, carried out plans in cooperation with the Texas 1986 Sesquicentennial Commission.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by the creator in no particular order.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Bicentennial/Sesquicentennial material, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1992/013-2 Bicentennial/Sesquicentennial material, 1975-1976, 1981-1986, undated
Scrapbook, 1964-1965,
fractional
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. This scrapbook commemorates the gift of a Lockheed Lodestar airplane which was presented to Colonel Homer Garrison, Jr., director of the Texas Department of Public Safety, by D.H. Byrd, Honorary Captain of the Texas Rangers, on November 26, 1964. The airplane was intended for use by the Texas Rangers. Included in the scrapbook are loose clippings from January 1965, photographs of the interior and exterior of the airplane, and a description of the plane's features.
Arrangement
Not applicable.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Scrapbook, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
1992/013-2 Scrapbook, 1964-1965
Brochures, 1952, 1954, 1961, 1986, undated,
fractional
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of brochures published by DPS, dealing primarily with automobile safety, but also with auto theft prevention, dating 1952, 1954, 1961, 1986, and undated.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by State Archives staff chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Brochures, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
2006 Accessions Box 5 (2006/291) Safety Responsibility Law, effective January 12, 1952
Watchwords of the Highways..., 1954
Texas Department of Public Safety, 1961
Are You Qualified...To Become a Texas State Trooper, 1986
The Texas Driver Improvement System, undated
Drugs and Driving, A Big Risk, undated
Auto Theft, A Major Criminal Problem, undated
Statistical reports, 1937, 1944-1950, undated,
fractional
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of statistical reports produced by the DPS, dealing with traffic accidents, crime rates, fingerprint arrests, and recovered automobiles. The records date 1937, 1944-1950, and undated.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by State Archives staff roughly chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Statistical reports, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
2006 Accessions Box 5 (2006/291) Traffic accident summary, June 1937
Fatal motor vehicle traffic accidents, 1945-1950
Comparison of crime rates from 1944 through 1949, January 1950
Fingerprint arrests, 1948-1950
DPS Bulletin: Recovered automobiles, cancellations, May 1949
A Survey on Police Manuals, undated
Organization charts, 1944, 1949,
fractional
The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. The Public Information Office is responsible for providing information on all aspects of the Texas Department of Public Safety to employees of the department and citizens of Texas through news media, speaking engagements, and publications. These records consist of organizational charts for the Department of Public Safety, dating 1944 and 1949.
Arrangement
Records are arranged by State Archives staff chronologically.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Organizational charts, Director's Staff: Public Information Office records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Box
2006 Accessions Box 5 (2006/291) Organizational chart, 1944
Organizational chart, 1949



 

Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records, 1949-1950, 1953-1956, 1966, 1974-1975, 1977, 1980, 1983-1994,
0.5 cubic ft.

The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fell into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. The third of these was handled by the Office of Defense and Disaster Relief, renamed the Division of Disaster Emergency Services in 1973, and finally the Division of Emergency Management by 1983. These records document the plans and actions of the DPS in preparing for natural and man-made disasters, and coordinating relief efforts in those emergencies. The records consist of materials on disasters in Texas, produced or maintained by or for the Office of Defense and Disaster Relief and its successor divisions, dating 1949-1950, 1953-1956, 1966, 1974-1975, 1977, 1980, and 1983-1994. Types of records include brochures, press releases, reports, and bulletins. Specific disasters documented include the Waco tornado of May 1953, and the Upper Rio Grande Valley flood of 1954.
The passage of the Civil Protection Act of 1951 (House Bill 784, 52nd Texas Legislature, Regular Session) authorized the Governor to appoint a defense and disaster relief council, on which the Director of the DPS served. The work of the Council was carried out by the Office of Defense and Disaster Relief, a branch of the Governor's Executive Office. In 1963 the Governor appointed the Director of the Texas Department of Public Safety to head the Division of Defense and Disaster Relief, established in DPS to carry out the work of this council. In addition to a central office in Austin, sixteen defense and disaster relief district organizations were maintained, with headquarters in regional Highway Patrol offices, to manage relief efforts locally. Operational activities originated with local officials who called upon successively higher levels as needed, up to the inter-state level. A State Disaster Control Center was in the Department of Public Safety Building in Austin and operated 24 hours a day when a disaster struck. The Division was also involved with national defense matters coming to the attention of the Governor, training and education, and administering financial assistance programs to state agencies and local governments on a grant or matching fund basis. By 1970, the Division was also responsible, under the State Emergency Operations Plan, for police service, communications, and emergency public information. The Disaster Control Center seems to have been renamed the State Emergency Operating Center. In 1973 the Texas Disaster Act (Senate Bill 786, 63rd Texas Legislature, Regular Session) broadened the Division's functions, and the Governor again appointed the DPS Director to head the Division of Disaster Emergency Services. By 1983, the division had been renamed the Division of Emergency Management.
Arrangement
The materials are arranged by the creator in the order as received, which is roughly chronological.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Office of Defense and Disaster Relief records, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1963/113, 1963/195, 2006/166
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by by Joe R. Humphrey, the Deputy Director of the Office of Defense and Disaster Relief of the Texas Department of Public Safety on February 14, 1964 and May 22, 1964; and by the Texas Legislative Reference Library on January 26, 2006.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Processed by
Tony Black, November 2004, February 2008
Box
2-23/843 Office of Defense and Disaster Relief, 1949-1950, 1953-1956, 1966
Waco-San Angelo Disaster Study, Preliminary Report (by Fred R. Crawford and Harry Estill Moore), July 1954
Civil Defense Planning Advisory Bulletins from the National Security Resources Board, 1949-1950
Box
2-23/1061 Waco Tornado collection, [May 11, 1953]
Tornado Warning Network file, 1954-1956
Box
2-23/1055 The Upper Rio Grande Valley Flood, June-July 1954
Box
2006 Accessions Box 3 (2006/166) The Blueprint for the State of Texas in Emergencies, 1966
Division of Disaster Emergency Services, 1974-1975, 1977, 1980
Annual report, September 1, 1974-August 31, 1975
Press releases, 1974, 1977, 1980
Division of Emergency Management, 1983-1994
Press releases and pamphlets, 1983-1994



 

Photographic and film media, 1937-1971, undated,
17 cubic ft.

In 1935, the 44th Legislature created the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) for the purpose of placing under a single jurisdiction the state's functions in crime prevention and traffic control programs. The original Department was composed of the Texas Rangers, the State Highway Patrol, and the Headquarters Division. DPS is the state police agency, charged with enforcing laws, preserving order, and protecting the rights, privileges, property, and well-being of Texas citizens. Its responsibilities fell into three major categories: crime suppression and control, motor vehicle highway transportation and management, and disaster and emergency activities. These records consist of photographic and film media, plus one videotape, produced by or related to the Texas Department of Public Safety, dating 1937-1971 and undated.
A large part of them have been described in a separate finding aid. If you are reading this electronically, click on the to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at at separate divider within the binder ( Texas Department of Public Safety, Photographs, 1937-1959, undated, 16 cubic ft.).
The remaining are unprocessed, and are listed and briefly described below. Note that the film footage has not been viewed by archives staff, thus the contents have not been verified.
Arrangement
The materials are arranged by the creator in the order received.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Photographic and film media, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession numbers: 1976/008, 1976/180, 1976/198, 1978/023, 1983/112, 1988/003, 1996/132
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Department of Public Safety in 1975; by Wallace Nelson, supervisor of Photography of the Texas Department of Public Safety on February 11, 1976; October 12, 1977; and March 3, 1983; by The Cronkite Ward Company, via Claudia Cummings in 1996; and unknown.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Technical Requirements
Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.
To view the videotape, please contact the Archives' Preservation Officer. Researcher access to film is dependent upon first arranging to transfer that outdated media to more contemporary media, at the researcher's expense; the Preservation Officer can explain the options.
Accession
1976/008 Photographic material, 1937-1961, bulk 1940-1941, 1961,
1,820 images
Main subjects are Governors W. L. O'Daniel and Price Daniel, their official and personal and family activities. Other governors and state officials and activities are pictured.
Images presumably made by DPS photography staff. Includes both negatives and prints, but often do not have both a negative and print for the same image, often one or the other.
Accession
1976/180 Photographs, 1937-1961,
350 prints
These are black-and-white prints apparently made at Library expense by photographer Bill Malone from negatives received in accession 1976/008. The Prints and Photographs finding aid says the prints were incorporated into 1976/008. [Prints and Photographs finding aid calls the prints "copy prints" but they are probably "modern prints" made from vintage negatives.]
Accession
1976/198 Photographic materials, 1939-1971,
504 images
Similar to accession 1976/008. Governors and family, state officials and activities for the date span.
Time period approximately 1939-1971. [Though at least one copy photo of 19th century image.]
Accession
1978/023 Photographic materials, 1937-1969,
663 images
Similar to above accessions. Subjects include Governors and state officials and activities. Also law enforcement and public safety subjects.
Time period of vintage images is approximately 1937-1969, though there are several copies of 19th and early 20th century images.
Accession
1988/003 Two copy photos of John Sparks
Accession
1996/132 Videotape of W. Lee O'Daniel inauguration as governor of Texas, ca. January 1941



 

Clippings, 1935-1936,
0.5 cubic ft.

The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) was created in 1935 to combine the state's functions in crime prevention and traffic control programs that previously had been carried out by the Texas Rangers and the State Highway Patrol. These materials consist of newspaper clippings, documenting the first two years of DPS activities, dating July 1935-June 1936. Records are unprocessed.
In 1935, the 44th Legislature (Senate Bill 146, Regular Session), responding to recommendations made in 1933 by the Joint Legislative Committee on Organization and Economy, created the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) for the purpose of placing under a single jurisdiction the state's functions in crime prevention and traffic control programs. The original Department was composed of the Texas Rangers, removed from the Adjutant General's Department; the State Highway Patrol, taken from the State Highway Department; and the Headquarters Division, composed of the Bureau of Identification and Records, the Bureau of Intelligence, the Bureau of Communications, the Bureau of Education, and various administrative and service units.
Arrangement
Unknown.
Preferred Citation
(Identify the item), Clippings, Texas Department of Public Safety records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Accession Information
Accession number: 1980/240
These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Department of Public Safety on July 15, 1980.
Restrictions on Access
Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.
Restrictions on Use
Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).
Box
1980/240 Clipping file, 1935-1936