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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Scope and Contents of the Records

Arrangement of the Records

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Organization charts, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Department of Human Services:

An Inventory of Organization Charts at the Texas State Archives, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000



Overview

Creator: Texas. Dept. of Human Services.
Title: Organization charts
Dates: 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000
Abstract: These records consist of organization charts showing the organizational structure of the Texas Department of Human Services and its predecessors (the Texas Department of Human Resources, and the Texas Department of Public Welfare), usually including the names of individual staff members down to the heads of each work unit, plus other useful annotations. They date 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, and 1993-2000.
Quantity: 0.24 cubic ft.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

The Public Welfare Act of 1939 (Senate Bill 36, 46th Legislature, Regular Session) created the Texas Department of Public Welfare. Previously, the Child Welfare Division of the Board of Control (established in 1931 but not funded until 1935), the Texas Relief Commission (1933-1934, later part of the Board of Control, 1934-1939), and the Old Age Assistance Commission (1936-1939) had performed parts of the new agency's functions. The Department of Public Welfare (DPW) became the Department of Human Resources (DHR) in 1977 (Senate Bill 1325, 65th Legislature, Regular Session), and the Department of Human Services (DHS) in 1985 (Senate Bill 351, 69th Legislature, Regular Session).

The department currently has the following broad functions. It administers state and federal programs serving low-income families with children, and elderly or disabled persons, including the following: temporary financial assistance for basic family needs; nutritional assistance; access to health care; nursing home and community-based care. It regulates long-term care facilities. It administers programs for survivors of family violence and victims of natural disasters.

More specifically, a variety of programs have been administered by DHS over the years, including the following examples.

Financial assistance programs (utilizing both federal and state funding sources) have included the following: Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), which is the current focus for DHS; Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC); Old Age Assistance (OAA); Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled (APTD); Aid to the Blind and Disabled (ABD); Food Stamp Program; Commodity Distribution Program; several Refugee Programs (the Office of Immigration and Refugee Affairs was transferred from the Governor's office in 1995); Repatriation of U.S. Citizens Program; Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP), and Temporary Emergency Relief Program (TERP) (transferred to the Department of Housing and Community Affairs in September 1992); and Disaster Assistance.

Medical assistance is (or has been) provided through the following: Medicaid, which is financed through a combination of federal and state funding, and is state-administered; purchased health, indigent health, and preventive health services, like Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment (EPSDT) (these programs were transferred to the Texas Department of Health in September 1993); and regulation (licensing and certification) of long-term care facilities (transferred from the Department of Health in September 1993).

Social services include (or have included) the following: Child Care Program, Job Training Work Experience Program, Refocus Pilot Project, Employment and Training Program, and the Work Incentive (WIN) Program (all transferred to the Texas Workforce Commission in June 1996); Child Protective Services (which includes adoption and foster care), Adult Protective Services, and Child-Care Licensing (transferred to the newly-created Department of Protective and Regulatory Services in September 1992); Services for Runaways and At-Risk Youth Program (transferred to Protective and Regulatory Services in September 1993); Child Support Enforcement (transferred to the Attorney General in 1985); and licensing and regulation of nursing home facility administrators (transferred to DHS in 1997 when the Texas Board of Nursing Facility Administrators was abolished).

The governing Board of Human Services (previously called Board of Human Resources and, before that, Board of Public Welfare) is composed of six members (expanded from three members in 1989), appointed by the governor with the advice and consent of the senate, for overlapping six-year terms. Board members must possess demonstrated interest in, and knowledge of, human services. The members elect a chair. The board appoints the chief administrative officer, called variously the Executive Director of Public Welfare, the Commissioner of Public Welfare (beginning in 1941), the Commissioner of Human Resources, or the Commissioner of Human Services.

Over the years the administrative structure of the Department has undergone significant and very frequent change. A consistent feature of the Department, however, has been the division of work between the State offices (which develop and coordinate programs) and the regional offices (which actually deliver the services). Texas is currently divided into 10 regions.

As of April 1999, the Department is organized into eleven offices. Six of them report directly to the Executive Deputy Commissioner: Deputy Commissioner, Management Information Systems; Deputy Commissioner, Program Integrity; Associate Commissioner, Long Term Care Regulatory; Deputy Commissioner, Regional Operations; Deputy Commissioner, Office of Programs; and Director, Executive Office of Planning, Evaluation, and Project Management. Four offices report directly to the Commissioner: Chief Financial Officer; Associate Commissioner, Government Relations; Associate Commissioner, Legal Services; and Deputy Commissioner, Support Services. One office, Internal Auditor, reports directly to the Board. The Department employed 15,841.5 full-time equivalent employees in 1999.

House Bill 2292 (78th Legislature, Regular Session, 2003) merged twelve state health and human services agencies into five, officially abolishing the Texas Department on Human Services, and dividing its functions into two state agencies: the newly created Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS), and the already existing Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC).

This legislation consolidates community care and nursing home services programs of the Texas Department of Human Services, mental retardation and state school programs of the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, and aging services programs of the Texas Department on Aging into the new Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services. The new Department of Aging and Disability Services will begin consolidated (i.e., integrated) operations in spring/summer 2004.

The legislation also consolidates Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) policy, family violence services, refugee services, nutrition programs, and early childhood coordination programs under the already existing Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC). Medicaid and CHIP programs were consolidated under HHSC during the 2002-03 biennium. Integration of the remaining programs under HHSC will be completed by June 2004.

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Scope and Contents of the Records

These records consist of organization charts showing the organizational structure of the Texas Department of Human Services and its predecessors (the Texas Department of Human Resources, and the Texas Department of Public Welfare), usually including the names of individual staff members down to the heads of each work unit. They date 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, and 1993-2000. Organizational charts are created to indicate agency staff organization in a graphic format, to indicate office/division/section/program hierarchies, and to show changes of organization over time. Some charts are purely functional, some are purely supervisory, but most are both. Usually a solid line indicates a line of direct supervision, and a broken line indicates either functional review, guidance, and support, or coordination on related health matters. Other helpful annotations are found throughout the charts.

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Arrangement of the Records

These records are arranged chronologically.

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

None.

Restrictions on Use

None.

Technical Requirements

None.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Texas. State Board of Public Welfare.
Texas. Dept. of Human Resources.
Subjects:
Administrative agencies--Texas.
Public welfare administration--Texas.
Public welfare--Texas.
Human services--Texas.
Human services--Texas--Management.
Document Types:
Organizational charts--Texas--Human services--1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000.
Functions:
Administration of human services.
Administration of public welfare.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
[Note: The records of the Department of Human Services and its predecessors are too voluminous to list here. See the finding aids in the Texas State Archives' search room. In addition, many of the State Archives' holdings of these records are unprocessed at this time. A records appraisal report is available in the Archives search room that may help locate both processed and unprocessed records.]
Texas Department of Human Services, Meeting files, 1933-2003, 18.26 cubic ft.
Texas Department of Human Services, Administrative Services Division, Library records: administrative and vertical files, reports, organizational charts, manuals, grant applications, 1940-1995, 13 cubic ft. [These records are part of a backlog that has not been described in any Archives finding aid. A cursory examination suggests that the organizational charts in this accession date 1973-1976, 1984-1989, and 1992. Call numbers are 1995/153-1 thru 13.]
Publications
Legislative appropriations request for ..., , submitted to the Governor's Office of Budget and Planning and the Legislative Budget Board by Texas Department of Human Services. [Legislative appropriation requests (LARs) up to the early 1990s contained copies of the DHS organization chart.]
Agency strategic plan for the fiscal years ..., by the Texas Department of Human Services. [Strategic Plans usually contain truncated organization charts.]

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Organization charts, Texas Department of Human Services. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2001/107

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Texas Department of Human Services on March 1, 2001.

Processing Information

Tony Black, October 2003

Other Formats for the Records

The Texas Department of Human Services periodically mounts its current organization chart on the agency web site ( http://www.dhs.state.tx.us/about/staff.html).

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Detailed Description of the Records

 

Organization charts, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000,
0.24 cubic ft.

Texas Department of Public Welfare, 1967-1968, 1970, 1972-1977
Box
2001/107 September 1967
July 1968
Recommended, July 1970
"De facto," July 1970
October 1972
January-July 1973
Supervisory, September 1974
[2 folders]
Functional, September 1974
September 1974
[2 folders]
[names updated to February 1975]
September 1974
[2 folders]
[names updated to September 1975]
Supervisory, September 1974
[2 folders]
[names updated to February 1976]
Functional, September 1974
[names updated to February 1976]
September 1974
[names updated to August 1976]
September 1974
[names updated to September 1976]
Functional, September 1974
[names updated to November 1976]
September 1974
[names updated to April 1977]
Functional, September 1974
[2 folders]
[names updated to October 1977]
1975
September 1975
[names updated to May 1975] [sic]
September 1976
[2 folders]
[names updated to November 1976]
September 1976
[2 folders]
[names updated to April 1977]
Texas Department of Human Resources, 1977-1984
Box
2001/107 November 1977
[2 folders]
[updated to January 1979]
Supervisory, May 1978
[2 folders]
Functional, September 1978
[2 folders]
September 1980
[2 folders]
November 1980
[2 folders]
May 1981
[2 folders]
February 1982
[2 folders]
December 1983
[2 folders]
July 1984
Texas Department of Human Services, 1985-1987, 1989-1990, 1993-2000
Box
2001/107 October 1985
[2 folders]
December 1986
October 1987
March 1989
August 1990
June 1993
November 1993
March 1994
October 1994
December 1995
December 1996
January 1997
July 1997
October 1998
April 1999
July 1999
March 2000

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