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Texas Archival Resources Online

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Overview

Agency History

Scope and Contents of the Records

Organization

Restrictions

Index Terms

Related Material

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Republic of Texas military rolls, 1835-1846, undated,

Civil War military rolls, 1860-1865,

Reconstruction military rolls, 1865-1866, 1870-1877, undated (bulk 1870-1874),

Ranger military rolls, 1846-1861, 1874-1910, 1913-1914, undated,

Texas Volunteer Guard military rolls, 1880-1903, undated,

Spanish-American War military rolls, 1898-1899, 1901, undated,

Texas National Guard military rolls, 1902-1913, 1915, 1917, 1935, undated,

Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Adjutant General's Department:

An Introduction to Military Rolls at the Texas State Archives, 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated



Overview

Creator: Texas. Adjutant General's Dept.
Title: Military rolls
Dates: 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated
Abstract: These records consist of muster rolls, muster-in rolls, muster-out rolls, muster and payrolls, payrolls, receipt rolls, and lists of officers and/or men, for the various military and para-military organizations (primarily Rangers and Militia units), of both the Republic and the State of Texas. They date 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, and undated. Except for some of the Republic rolls which were drawn up after the fact, these military rolls were compiled at the time, usually by the company commanders. The information contained on the rolls varies considerably, ranging from mere lists of names to detailed physical descriptions.
Quantity: 131.25 cubic ft.
Language English.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Agency History

On November 13, 1835, the Consultation created the office of Adjutant General, as one of five heads of departments under the Commander-in-Chief of the Texian Army (the other offices being Inspector General, Quartermaster General, Surgeon General, and Paymaster General). On December 20, 1836, the 1st Congress passed "an Act to organize and fix the Military establishment of the Republic of Texas," which in addition to the aforementioned bureaus, created a Commissary General of Subsistence, a Commissary General of Purchases, and a Colonel of Ordnance, all of whom answered to the Secretary of War. On December 18, 1837, Congress passed--and later passed again over President Sam Houston's veto--an act making the Adjutant General a position elected by the Congress; the first man so elected was Hugh McLeod. This arrangement lasted less than two years, however, with subsequent Adjutant Generals--beginning with McLeod on January 30, 1839--being appointed by the President. Congress combined the offices of Adjutant General and Inspector General on January 28, 1840, and technically abolished this position on January 18, 1841. Yet Peter Hansborough Bell served as Adjutant General of Militia soon thereafter; and in legislation of February 1842, there is a reference to an Acting Adjutant General.

The Texas Navy at first operated under a separate Secretary of the Navy, appointed by the President as authorized by an act of Congress approved October 25, 1836. On January 18, 1841, Congress abolished this office and created a Naval Bureau under the Secretary of War and Marines. Of course, the end of the Republic in 1846 meant the end of the Texas Navy as well.

Whereas under the Republic the Adjutant General was subservient to the Secretary of War, under statehood the position was elevated to that of head of all military departments. After annexation, the 1st Legislature provided for an Adjutant General to be appointed by the Governor, in "an Act to organize the Militia of the State of Texas" (April 21, 1846). The duties which fell to the Adjutant General included the issuance of all military orders; the maintenance of records of appointments, promotions, resignations, deaths, commissions, etc.; the receipt of monthly and annual returns, and muster rolls from the various military units; the keeping of the records of general courts martial; recruitment and enrollment of Rangers and militiamen; and now, the issuing of all bounty and donation land warrants on the basis of military service to the Republic. This last duty was assumed by the Commissioner of Claims, pursuant to an Act of the legislature passed August 1, 1856; the office of the Adjutant General had been the victim of apparent arson in October 1855, allegedly by persons engaged in land certificate fraud. The position of Adjutant General was itself reestablished by the Militia Law of February 14, 1860, by which act he also assumed the duties of Quartermaster General and Ordnance Officer of the State.

With the Civil War came the reorganization of the office, an act of December 25, 1861 creating an Adjutant and Inspector General, who would also serve as Quartermaster and Commissary General, and Ordnance Officer. Oversight of the 33 Brigades of the Texas State Troops plus the Frontier Regiment fell to this office, just as later Adjutant Generals would split their time between the Militia and the Rangers (whatever the prevailing terminology). The demands of the Confederate States Army, often conflicting with the needs and desires of the State of Texas, would affect the entire period of the War.

During the Congressional phase of Reconstruction, the military affairs of the State of Texas, and many aspects of civil government, were controlled by the commander of the District of Texas (1866-1868), or of the 5th Military District (1868-1870). Within months of Texas' readmission to the Union under Radical Republican Governor Edmund J. Davis (1870), the Legislature created the Frontier Forces (June 13), the State Guard and Reserve Militia (June 24), and the State Police (July 1), all of which were commanded by a newly restored state Adjutant General. On November 25, 1871, the Legislature added a fifth organization, the Minute Men. The first Adjutant General so appointed, James Davidson, absconded with over $37,000 of state funds in 1872. The State Guard and Reserve Militia were merged into a simple state militia on March 19, 1873, and the State Police force was abolished April 22, 1873.

The place of the Frontier Forces was taken in 1873 and 1874 by the Rangers and the Frontier Men, and finally by the Frontier Battalion, organized by an act passed April 10, 1874. At about the same time one can date the evolution of the Texas Volunteer Guard as the definitive militia organization for the state. On July 22, 1876, "an Act to suppress lawlessness and crime in certain parts of the state" authorized the creation of the Special State Troops, commanded first by Captain Leander McNelly and subsequently by Captain J. L. Hall. In the last year of the operation of this Special Force (1880-1881), it was commanded by Captain Thomas L. Oglesby.

The Spanish-American War (1898) saw the nationalization of the Texas Volunteer Guard, which was organized into four regiments of infantry and one of cavalry, and designated the Texas Volunteers. After the war they were de-nationalized, and reorganized on April 1, 1903 as the Texas National Guard. On August 5, 1917, the Texas National Guard was drafted into federal service, forming the 36th Division, which was to be mobilized during World War II as well.

The Frontier Battalion was reorganized as the Ranger Force by an act of the Legislature on March 29, 1901. From time to time this regular force was supplemented by specially commissioned Special Rangers, Railroad Rangers, Cattlemen's Association Rangers, and Loyalty Rangers. Finally, on August 10, 1935, the Ranger Force was transferred to the Texas Department of Public Safety.

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Scope and Contents of the Records

These records consist of muster rolls, muster-in rolls, muster-out rolls, muster and payrolls, payrolls, receipt rolls, and lists of officers and/or men, for the various military and para-military organizations (primarily Rangers and Militia units), of both the Republic and the State of Texas. They date 1835-1915, 1917, 1935, and undated. Except for some of the Republic rolls which were drawn up after the fact, these military rolls were compiled at the time, usually by the company commanders. The information contained on the rolls varies considerably, ranging from mere lists of names to detailed physical descriptions. Most of the rolls are in the form of oversize single sheets, and are housed in oversized boxes or drawers; twentieth century rolls tend to be stapled or sewn booklets. There are also some bound volumes, for official copies of Union troops in Texas during the Civil War, and for Spanish-American War muster-out rolls. The Texas State Archives retains approximately 7,972 individual military rolls: approximately 664 of these date from the Republic, approximately 1,500 from the Civil War, and approximately 5,808 from statehood (excluding the Civil War).

Note: Occasionally a researcher knows the name of a company commander, but does not know which military unit (Ranger or militia or otherwise) he commanded, or where to search for the appropriate military roll. Researchers using the finding aid electronically may search for names of captains. For researchers using a print copy, an alphabetical list of captains is provided in the Texas State Archives search room, matching the captain with the military organization. All of the non-Civil War military rolls (muster rolls, payrolls, etc.) held in the Texas State Archives are included in this index. To repeat, this index of company commanders does NOT include Civil War units except for Union troops, listed as Army of the United States (1860-1861, 1864-1865). For non-Union Civil War rolls, there is a set of index cards in the Archives search room listing these military rolls by captain and by organization.

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Organization

These records are organized into seven subgroups containing a total of twenty-six series:
Republic of Texas military rolls, 1835-1846, undated, 9.45 cubic ft. (seven series)
  1. Texas Revolution military rolls, 1835-1836, 0.27 cubic ft.
  2. United States Volunteers military rolls, 1835-1837, 1842 (bulk 1842), 0.41 cubic ft.
  3. Army of the Republic military rolls, 1836-1842 (bulk 1839-1841), 1.8 cubic ft.
  4. Republic of Texas Militia military rolls, 1836-1845 (bulk 1838-1839), 4.01 cubic ft.
  5. Republic of Texas Minute Men military rolls, 1841-1842, 0.83 cubic ft.
  6. Campaigns of 1842 military rolls, 1842, 0.27 cubic ft.
  7. Republic of Texas Navy military rolls, 1835-1846, 1.86 cubic ft.
Civil War military rolls, 1860-1865, 54.06 cubic ft. (two series)
  1. "Confederate" military rolls, 1861-1865, 52.76 cubic ft.
  2. Army of the United States military rolls, 1860-1861, 1864-1865, 1.3 cubic ft.
Reconstruction military rolls, 1865-1866, 1870-1877, undated (bulk 1870-1874), 20.25 cubic ft. (nine series)
  1. Minute Men military rolls, 1865-1866, 0.14 cubic ft.
  2. State Police military rolls, 1870-1873, undated (bulk 1870-1871), 1.26 cubic ft.
  3. State Guard military rolls, 1870-1873, undated (bulk 1870-1871), 2.07 cubic ft.
  4. Reserve Militia military rolls, 1870-1873, undated (bulk 1870-1871), 11.62 cubic ft.
  5. Provisional State Troops military rolls, 1871, fractional
  6. Frontier Forces military rolls, 1870-1873, undated (bulk 1870-1871), 0.97 cubic ft.
  7. Minute Men military rolls, 1872-1877 (bulk 1872-1874), 3.36 cubic ft.
  8. Texas Ranger military rolls, 1873-1874, 0.69 cubic ft.
  9. Militia military rolls, 1874-1877, 0.14 cubic ft.
Ranger military rolls, 1846-1861, 1874-1910, 1913-1914, undated, 15.71 cubic ft. (five series)
  1. Texas Ranger (pre-Civil War) military rolls, 1846-1861, 4.57 cubic ft.
  2. Frontier Battalion military rolls, 1874-1901, 8.76 cubic ft.
  3. Special State Troops military rolls, 1876-1880, 0.14 cubic ft.
  4. Special Force military rolls, 1880-1881, fractional
  5. Ranger Force military rolls, 1901-1910, 1913-1914, undated, 2.24 cubic ft.
Texas Volunteer Guard military rolls, 1880-1903, undated, 16.91 cubic ft.
Spanish-American War military rolls, 1898-1899, 1901, undated, 5.66 cubic ft. (four subseries)
Texas National Guard military rolls, 1902-1913, 1915, 1917, 1935, undated, 9.21 cubic ft. (three subseries)

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Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Some Civil War military rolls have been determined too fragile for retrieval, and the numbers of those do not appear in the inventory for that series. No other restrictions on access.

Restrictions on Use

Civil War military rolls are very fragile. The names on almost all of the Civil War rolls have been abstracted onto 3-by-5 inch index cards in the Texas State Archives' search room, giving all of the information that is found on the roll itself for that individual. Researchers are encouraged to use the abstracts, and/or to request copies of the abstracts, in lieu of the actual military rolls themselves. The photocopying of rolls may also be restricted by their physical condition.

Since the Civil War rolls are often too fragile to photocopy, copies of the index cards have always been accepted as proof of service by organizations such as the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Some of the military rolls in other series may also be too large and/or too fragile for photocopying.

Technical Requirements

None.

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Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Texas Rangers.
Texas. Militia.
Document Types:
Muster rolls--Texas--1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated.
Payrolls--Texas--Military records--1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated.
Rosters--Texas--Military records--1835-1915, 1917, 1935, undated.

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Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
General Land Office, Muster roll book, 1835-1836, 0.48 cubic ft. [photographic copies of holdings of the General Land Office of Texas; alphabetical name index is located in the Texas State Archives search room]
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Departmental correspondence, 1846-1943 (bulk 1861-1933), 121.62 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Army papers, 1835-1846, 16.28 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Navy papers, 1835-1847, 1852, 1855 (bulk 1836-1846), 17.24 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Service records, 1836-1845, 1854-1865, 1870-1935, 179.07 cubic ft. [searchable online index at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/service/index.html]
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Civil War records, 1855, 1860-1866, undated (bulk 1861-1865), 16.94 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Reconstruction records, 1865-1873, undated, 7.87 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Texas Volunteer Guard records, 1874-1904, undated, 19.34 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Texas Volunteers (Spanish-American War) records, 1898-1904 (bulk 1898-1901), 3.97 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Texas National Guard records, 1902-1931, 1939, 1941-1945, 1950, undated (bulk 1903-1911), 39.47 cubic ft.
Texas Adjutant General's Department, Ranger records, 1839-1975, undated (bulk 1854-1918), 40.94 cubic ft.
Publications
Defenders of the Republic of Texas, compiled for the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, Karen R. Thompson (ed.), 1989
Muster Rolls of the Texas Revolution, compiled for the Daughters of the Republic of Texas, 1986

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Military rolls, Texas Adjutant General's Department. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1933/001, 1933/003, 1937/004, 1976/048, 1988/130, and unknown others

Although accession records are sketchy, military rolls were probably the earliest records transferred from the Texas Adjutant General's office to the Texas State Archives. The earliest transfer recorded (in the Reports of the Commissioner of Agriculture, Insurance, Statistics, and History) was in 1905, of Republic muster rolls dated 1842. In 1920, approximately 800 muster rolls and payrolls, dating 1860-1886, were transferred by the Texas Adjutant General's office to the Texas State Archives. On February 21, 1934, the following groups of military rolls were transferred: "miscellaneous" rolls from 1835-1844 and 1848; Civil War; Frontier Regiment; State Police; State Guard; Reserve Militia; Frontier Forces; Frontier Battalion; Special State Troops; Texas Volunteer Guard; Spanish-American War; and Texas National Guard. On February 27, 1934 eight muster rolls for Captains Tobin, A. C. Hill, Littleton, and Harrison (1859-1861) were transferred to the Texas State Archives by the Bureau of Records, Board of Control. On February 28, 1938, the Texas Secretary of State's office transferred the volume of Official Copies from the War Department of Texas Troops in the Rebellion. On December 4, 1975, the Texas Adjutant General transferred payrolls for three captains in the Ranger Force, 1913-1914.

Twenty-eight rolls, all of Lt. Henry Schwethelm's company from Kerr County, dated November 1874 through 1877 (the only rolls dating after mid-1874), were donated to the Texas State Archives on October 22, 1920 by Mr. August Fischer, a former member of that company. All bear the stamp "U. S. Pension Office, October 26, 1920." A second accession document lists the Texas Adjutant General's Office as transferring these same rolls back to the Archives on March 8, 1921. These were assigned accession number 1988/130 for purposes of control.

Processing Information

Tony Black, July 1986, April 1988, September 1988

Other Formats for the Records

The names on almost all of the Civil War rolls have been abstracted onto 3-by-5 inch index cards in the Texas State Archives' search room, giving all of the information that is found on the roll itself. Many of the other military rolls (e.g. Ranger rolls) have also been abstracted onto 3-by-5 inch index cards, with varying degrees of detail as to the other information on the roll.

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Detailed Description of the Records

 

Republic of Texas military rolls, 1835-1846, undated,
9.45 cubic ft.

These records consist of muster rolls, payrolls, receipt rolls, and lists of officers and/or men, for the various military and para-military organizations of the Republic of Texas. They date 1835-1846, and undated. Except for some of the Republic rolls which were drawn up after the fact, these military rolls were compiled at the time, usually by the company commanders. The information contained on the rolls varies considerably. Most of the rolls are in the form of oversize single sheets. There are also some bound volumes.
There are Texas Revolution muster rolls, of the companies of eight captains at the seige of Bexar of 1835, plus Colonel Fannin's division, plus the men at San Jacinto under General Houston, 1836. Although the information dates 1835-1836, these lists were compiled sometime after the fact. Information on each soldier includes name, rank, and remarks. The researcher should be aware that most of the rolls for the Revolution were destroyed in the 1855 fire which swept through the Adjutant General's office.
There are United States Volunteers muster rolls, of 11 captains, commanding volunteers from Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, and Tennessee, who were recruited for service to the Republic of Texas, dating 1835-1837 and 1842 (mostly in 1842).
There are muster rolls and receipt rolls (payrolls), of Companies A through I, 1st Regiment, Infantry, plus two cavalry companies, plus various detachments, of the Army of the Republic of Texas (or regular army). They date 1836-1842 (mostly 1839-1841). They are usually recorded on pre-printed forms. The receipt rolls do not include officers, but include the signature of each soldier.
There are muster rolls and receipt rolls, of Republic of Texas Militia companies commanded by approximately 145 captains, dating 1836-1845 (the bulk of them 1838-1839). This series had previously been arranged into "Militia,""Rangers," and "Volunteers," distinctions which were artificial. Lines of organization and chains of command were extremely fluid during the Republic; "ranger" captains apparently reported to militia colonels. Furthermore, terminology was fairly loose: the terms "rangers,""mounted volunteers,""mounted gunmen,""mounted riflemen," and "spies," were apparently synonymous. The item inventory to these rolls has retained the designation(s) used on each particular roll, including the county whenever cited.
There are 96 muster rolls and receipt rolls for units specifically called "Minute Men," commanded by 13 captains, dating 1841-1842. They include units from the following counties: Fannin, Gonzales, Milam, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Paschal, Red River, Refugio, Robertson, San Patricio, and Travis counties.
There are eight lists compiled sometime after the fact, for the companies of 15 captains during the various campaigns of 1842. These include the Vasquez Campaign, prisoners of General Woll taken at San Antonio de Bexar, Dawson's Massacre, the Somervell Expedition, and the Mier Expedition, all dated 1842.
There are 45 muster rolls and payrolls, dating 1836-1846, for officers and seamen of 11 ships of the Republic of Texas Navy ( Austin, Brutus, Colorado, Invincible, Lafitte, Potomac, San Antonio, San Bernard, San Jacinto, Wharton, and Zavala), plus the Marine Corps and the Navy Yard in Galveston; in addition, there are three lists of officers (1839, 1842-1844) and a continuous list of officers and men, by ship (1836-1843, 1846). There is also a volume which is a general muster book of the Texas Ship of War Austin listing 250 persons assigned to that ship between October 1, 1842 and July 26, 1843. Finally, there is one volume which contains a roster of Texas Navy personnel, 1835-1845.
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Republic of Texas military rolls)

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Civil War military rolls, 1860-1865,
54.06 cubic ft.

These records consist of muster rolls, payrolls, muster roll/payrolls, rosters, returns, and election returns, of military units stationed in Texas on both sides of the Civil War, dating 1860-1865.
The "Confederate" military rolls consist of muster rolls, payrolls, rosters, returns, and election returns, of approximately 1,500 companies of both Texas State Troops (including Rangers) and the Confederate States Army, stationed in Texas during the Civil War, dating 1861-1865. The term "Confederate" is used in the title only to distinguish this series from the Union military rolls; the series includes Texas State Troops units, which are distinct from units of the Confederate States Army. Almost all of these rolls were abstracted (early in the 20th century) onto 3-by-5 inch index cards located in the Texas State Archives' search room, giving all of the information that is found on the roll itself. Based upon information contained in the abstracts, the rolls include the following information: name and rank of the soldier; name and rank of the commanding officer; designation of the organization (e.g., "Company A, Rangers for Frontier Protection, Texas State Troops;""Company A, Texas Volunteer Infantry, Col. O.M. Roberts commanding, CSA;""Reserved Company, Beat 3, Freestone County, 19th Brigade, Texas Militia"); enlistment data (date, place, and for what period); discharge data (usually pay information, including number of days, rate, and total); description (usually only age, if anything at all); and remarks. Remarks include: the number of officers and men on the roll (R&F: rank and file); name of enlisting officer; name of mustering officer; where and when stationed; arms issued; source of abstract information (e.g. 1 payroll dated February 1-June 1, 1864, 1 muster roll dated June 29, 1864).
The Army of the United States (or Union) military rolls consist of 29 rolls, from 24 captains plus 4 colonels, plus one volume of official copies from the U. S. War Department (1865), of Union troops stationed in or near Texas immediately before and during the Civil War, dating 1860-1861 and 1864-1865. The rolls from 1860-1861 and 1864 are mainly of the 2nd Regiment of Texas Cavalry; those from 1865 are from 1st Regiment of Texas Cavalry (San Antonio) and the 2nd Regiment of Texas Cavalry (Brownsville). The rolls, which are combination muster and payrolls on pre-printed forms, include the following information: name and rank; when, where, by whom, and for what period enlisted; by whom and to what time last paid; bounty paid and due; and remarks (1860-1861). The later rolls include, in addition, the following information: age, miles travelled to place and rendezvous and from place of discharge to home, amount alloted for clothing, accoutrements, forage, etc.; they also make a distinction between joining for service and mustering into service.
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Civil War military rolls)

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Reconstruction military rolls, 1865-1866, 1870-1877, undated (bulk 1870-1874),
20.25 cubic ft.

These records include muster rolls, muster/payrolls, rosters, and lists, dating 1865-1866, 1870-1877, and undated (bulk 1870-1874). They comprise the military rolls maintained by the Texas Adjutant General's Department, of the various units serving in Texas during the Reconstruction era, including Minute Men (1865-1866 and 1872-1877), State Police, Provisional State Troops, State Guard, Reserve Militia, Frontier Forces, and Militia. The amount of information listed for each man on each roll varies considerably depending on the unit and the type of roll.
There are muster rolls, muster/payrolls, and payrolls, for Texas minute men companies, dating 1865-1866. They represent five counties (Montague, Parker, Travis, Wise, and Young). Information given includes: name, rank, age, when and where enlisted, by whom enrolled, number of days served on regular scouts, number of days served on extra calls, total amount due, remarks, and (for Parker County only) signatures.
For the Texas State Police, there are rosters, muster rolls/payrolls and lists, dating 1870-1873 and undated. One undated roster for the State Police is arranged alphabetically under each rank. There are 12 combination muster and payrolls, for five captains of the State Police, arranged by district (1st through 4th District, plus a sub-district); and 19 rolls without designation of district. They date 1870-1871. The pre-printed forms contain the following information: name, rank, date of entry into service, station, by whom and to what time last paid, remarks, period of service, pay per month, amount of pay, and voucher number. Also included is one roll designated "Description List of State Police from Bexar County," under Sheriff H. D. Bonnet, giving office, name, station, age, color, and nationality; and one "Descriptive List of Galveston City Police Force," giving name, rank, height, age, complexion, eyes, hair, nativity, and race. Texas law had made all local law-enforcement officials ex-officio members of the State Police.
The Texas State Guard produced muster rolls for about 59 captains, commanding companies organized into 10 regiments, dating 1870-1872 (mostly 1870-1871). The mostly pre-printed forms usually contain simply name and rank; occasionally, age, color, occupation, post office, and remarks are also given.
The Texas Reserve Militia produced muster rolls for approximately 616 captains, commanding companies organized into 97 regiments of infantry and two companies of cavalry, dating 1870-1872 (mostly 1870-1871). Mostly pre-printed forms, the rolls normally give only name and rank, but sometimes add date of entry into service, station, age, color, residence, and occupation.
There are muster and payrolls for six companies of Texas Provisional State Troops called out for martial law duty in Limestone County during October and November of 1871. Information on these pre-printed forms includes number, name, rank, date of entry into service, station, remarks, period, pay per month, amount of pay, signature, and witness.
The Texas Frontier Forces are listed on muster rolls and muster/payrolls for about 19 captains, commanding companies A through P, dating 1870-1872 (mostly 1870-1871). The preprinted forms include the following information: name, rank, date of entry into service, station, and remarks; in addition, the muster/payrolls also include valuation of horses, number of cartridges due the state, by whom and to what time last paid.
In addition, there are two volumes. One, dating 1870-1873, lists officers of the State Guard, the Reserve Militia and the Frontier Forces, giving date of commission, name, rank, age, regiment and company to which assigned, date of acceptance, post office address (town and county), and remarks. The other is an undated index to the Roster of Reserve Militia, State Guard, and Frontier Forces, letters U through Z only.
There are muster/payrolls, for about 39 lieutenants of Texas Minute Men companies, dating 1872-1877 (bulk 1872-1874). The counties represented include: Bandera, Blanco, Brown, Burnet, Callahan, Coleman, Comanche, Cook, Edwards, Erath, Gillespie, Jack, Kendall, Kerr, Lampasas, Llano, Mason, Maverick, Medina, Montague, Palo Pinto, Parker, San Saba, and Wise. Information given includes: name, rank, dates from and to, pay per day, total pay, last paid to include (date), signatures (many of which are not the originals), and remarks. In addition, there is one volume entitled Roster of Minute Companies, organized by Company (A through Z), which gives the following information: county, number, name, and remarks (mostly blank). Most of the companies are listed as "organized January 4, 1872."
For Texas Rangers, there are muster/payrolls for eight captains of companies, plus muster/payrolls for 3 lieutenants (for units which were formed after the creation of the Frontier Battalion). They date 1873-1874. Often referred to as Frontier Men, these companies represented the following counties: Brown/San Saba, El Paso, Erath/Comanche, Jack, Montague, Palo Pinto, Parker, Webb, Wise, and Young, plus the region between the Nueces River and the Rio Grande. Some of the forms are pre-printed. They include name, rank, dates from and to, total pay, signatures, and remarks.
Finally, there are rolls for five captains of Texas Militia units dating 1874-1877. Most are for Captain McNelly's company from Washington County. In addition, there are two detachments used as escorts to a trial in Indianola County (September, 1874); plus two companies on duty quelling disturbances occasioned by removal of the county seat of Van Zandt County (1877). Including muster-in rolls, muster-out rolls, payrolls, and muster/payrolls, these rolls give name, rank, dates from and to, signatures, remarks, pay, plus various amounts alloted for travel and equipment. These rolls are included in this subgroup despite the fact that they date after the time that Reconstruction was considered complete in Texas.
The men listed in the rolls of four of these series have been included in the Texas State Archives' search room "Ranger Rolls" card index: Frontier Forces, Minute Men (1872-1877), most of the Texas Rangers (1873-1874), and Texas Militia (1874-1877).
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Reconstruction military rolls)

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Ranger military rolls, 1846-1861, 1874-1910, 1913-1914, undated,
15.71 cubic ft.

These records include muster rolls, muster-in rolls, muster/payrolls, and payrolls for various Ranger organizations of the State of Texas, maintained by the Texas Adjutant General's Department. They date 1846-1861, 1874-1910, 1913-1914, and undated. These military rolls were compiled at the time, usually by the company commanders. The information contained on the rolls varies considerably. Most of the rolls are in the form of oversize single sheets; many of the rolls are in duplicate, triplicate, or even quadruplicate. They represent five organizational groups: Rangers of the pre-Civil War era, the Frontier Battalion, Special State Troops, the Special Force, and the Ranger Force. For the middle three organizations, there is a chronological overlap.
Texas Ranger (pre-Civil War) military rolls consists of muster rolls and payrolls, dating 1846-1861. The series combines Rangers, Mounted Volunteers, and Minute Men, as the terminology is interchangeable for the decade and a half before the Civil War. The county is included on the item inventory whenever it is known. Many of the payrolls do not indicate the name of the captain, and are therefore listed under the name of the lieutenant or sergeant.
Frontier Battalion military rolls date 1874-1901. Most are muster/payrolls, each covering a two- or three-month period. Approximately once a year the commanders compiled muster or muster-in rolls. Most members of the Frontier Battalion during the 1870s, and in most companies those during the early 1880s, have been included in the search room "Ranger Rolls" card index. In addition, there are two rolls listed at the end of this series, entitled "Roster of Secret Service Men," 1884-1886, attached to the various companies of the Frontier Battalion. Finally, there are two volumes. One is a roughly alphabetical index to both individuals and to companies, for a roster of the Frontier Battalion and the militia, dated 1874 (but possibly incorporating later dates as well). The other volume contains muster rolls for the Frontier Battalion, dated September 1, 1878, arranged by company (A through F).
Special State Troops military rolls consists of muster/payrolls for two captains of the Special State Troops, dating 1876-1880. Individuals in Captain McNelly's company are included in the search room "Ranger Rolls" card index.
Special Force military rolls consists of a muster-in roll and three muster/payrolls, for one captain of a Special Force company called out for special service in San Diego, Duval County, 1880-1881.
Ranger Force military rolls consists of payrolls for all four companies of the Ranger Force (A, B, C, and D), dating 1901-1910, 1913-1914, and undated. Each payroll reflects one month's service. In addition, there are four muster-in rolls, one for each company, dated July 8 or 9, 1903. These rolls are interfiled.
The military rolls of other Texas Ranger units are found in other finding aids, including: Republic of Texas military rolls (some companies in the Republic of Texas Militia were Ranger units), Civil War military rolls (Frontier Regiment), and Reconstruction military rolls (Frontier Forces, Texas Rangers, and Minute Men).
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Ranger military rolls)

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Texas Volunteer Guard military rolls, 1880-1903, undated,
16.91 cubic ft.

This series consists of approximately 1,320 muster rolls (1880-1903), approximately 100 muster/payrolls (1881-1903), and 11 muster-in rolls (1902-1903), all interfiled, maintained by the Texas Adjutant General's Department, of companies in the Texas Volunteer Guard. Overall dates are 1880-1903 and undated. The rolls are on pre-printed forms. Since the letter designation of a given company--and even the regiment to which it was assigned--was in a constant state of flux during the two decades of the Texas Volunteer Guard's existence, an organizational cross-reference chart is included below.
Information included in the muster rolls for 1881-1900 includes: name, rank, date of enlistment, occupation, nativity, age, color of eyes, hair, and complexion. In addition, the company commanders were required to fill in answers to detailed questions concerning the state of the company: e.g., Is the company uniformed? How often are they drilled? Are they proficient? What is the rental paid for the armory? Number of guns? etc. The muster rolls for 1901 through 1903, which are in stapled booklets, include name, rank; when, where, by whom, and for what period enlisted; names present, years of continuous service, and remarks.
The muster and payrolls include: name, rank, dates from and to, period, pay per month, amount of pay, signatures, remarks, amount of stoppages, and balance due.
The muster-in rolls (1902-1903) include: name, rank, age, height, complexion, eyes, hair, where born, occupation; when, where, by whom, and for what period enrolled; residence, signature to the oath, married or single, name and address of wife or (if single) parent or guardian, and remarks. These are in stapled booklets.
Except for 1900-1903, most of these rolls have been included in the card index to individual guardsmen in the Archives search room, labelled "Texas Volunteer Guard."
In addition, there is a roughly alphabetical index to a roster of the Frontier Battalion and the militia, dated 1874 (but possibly incorporating later dates as well). This index is to both individuals and to companies, with companies underlined in red ink.
There are a series of rosters of officers of the Texas Volunteer Guard, arranged chronologically, and internally by regiment and company. Five of these are unbound, and include the following information: for the Staff Corps, name, rank, department, residence, date of commission, on duty with, date qualified, and remarks; and for the line officers, letter of the company, name, rank, name of the company, date of commission, station, date organized, date qualified, and assignment (usually the General Order/Special Order number and date). Roster Number 1 is dated January 1, 1882. A piece of cardboard contains the following notation: "Roster No. 3 has disappeared. It covered the time from January 1, 1886-October 15, 1886 (9 months)...." Roster Number 4 covers October 15, 1886 through August 31, 1888. Roster Number 7 is dated December 1, 1891; Roster Number 8, March 1, 1893; and an undated roster [Number 9] appears to cover 1894-1895.
Finally, a bound volume contains a Roster of Officers for 1899-1903, including the following information: date of commission, name, rank, company to regiment to which assigned, date of oath of service, age, state where born, post office address (town and county), service in the Texas Volunteer Guard and the U.S. Volunteer Army, etc., and remarks.
This finding aid has been arbitrarily split into two parts due to electronic file size limitations imposed by TARO. If you are reading this electronically, click on the links to go to each portion of the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Texas Volunteer Guard military rolls (Part I: 1st thru 4th Regiment, Infantry) and (Part II: 5th Regiment, Infantry thru Rosters of Officers))

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Spanish-American War military rolls, 1898-1899, 1901, undated,
5.66 cubic ft.

These records consist of muster-in rolls, lists of recruits, muster-out rolls, and payrolls, dating 1898-1899, 1901, and undated, all for the Texas Volunteers for the Spanish-American War. These military rolls list all of the officers and enlisted men enrolled in each unit, plus additional information on each man which varies with the type of roll.
The muster-in rolls, in pre-printed sewn booklets, cover all companies in four regiments of infantry and one regiment of cavalry. Information in the muster-in rolls includes the following: name, rank, age, height, complexion, eyes, hair, where born (town or county, state or kingdom), occupation; when, where, by whom, and for what period joined for duty and enrolled; residence, number of miles from residence to place of rendezvous, valuation of horses and equipments (which is usually left blank), signature to the oath, whether married or single, name and address of parent or guardian (if single), and remarks. These troops were called into the service of the United States by proclamation of the President on April 23, 1898.
There are three sets of lists of recruits for the Texas Volunteers for the Spanish-American War, dating 1898.
There are five bound volumes of muster-out rolls/payrolls, one for each regiment of the Texas Volunteers for the Spanish-American War, dated 1898-1899. Information contained in these pre-printed volumes includes: name, rank; when, where, by whom, and for what period joined for duty and enrolled; when, where, and by whom mustered into service; by which paymaster last paid, and to what time; place of resident, place of discharge; number of days subsistence and forage furnished by themselves; valuation of horses and equipments; amount of money due U.S. and due soldier for clothing; amount of money due U.S. for arms and equipment, quartermaster stores, and equipage; and remarks. The pay account includes a place for signature, which is sometimes blank. At the end of each company is a "record of events which may be necessary or useful for future reference at the war department." Individuals on these rolls have been included in the Texas State Archives' search room "Spanish-American War" card index.
The payrolls were drawn up in 1901 for payment from the date of assembly at the rendezvous to the date of muster into United States service for the War with Spain. Information in these pre-printed, stapled booklets includes: name, address, rank, date of enrollment for the war, date of assembly at the rendezvous, date of muster into U.S. service, number of days, rate of pay per month, amount due, and remarks (a stamp of the date paid). Almost all of these payrolls include an affidavit of the commander; this is the date which is used in the item inventory, not the various dates of payment.
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Spanish-American War military rolls)

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Texas National Guard military rolls, 1902-1913, 1915, 1917, 1935, undated,
9.21 cubic ft.

These records comprise the muster-in rolls, muster rolls, muster/payrolls, payrolls, and rosters of officers of the Texas National Guard, dating 1902-1913, 1915, 1917, 1935, and undated. The majority of the rolls are sewn or stapled pre-printed booklets. These military rolls list all of the officers and enlisted men enrolled in each unit, plus additional information on each man which varies with the type of roll.
Information on the muster-in rolls includes: name, rank, age, height, complexion, eyes, hair, where born (town or county, state or kingdom), occupation; when, where, by whom, and for what period enrolled; residence, signature by the oath, whether married or single, name and address of wife (if married) or parent or guardian (if single), and remarks.
Information on the muster rolls, which normally cover six-month periods, includes: name, rank; when, where, by whom, and for what period enlisted; names present, years of continuous service, and remarks.
Information on the muster/payrolls includes: name, rank, dates from and to, period, pay per month, amount of pay, signatures, remarks, stoppages, and balance due.
Information on the payrolls includes: name, grade, date of present enlistment or (of officers) date of rank, dates of days for which pay is due, total days, pay per day (state rate), total pay due (state rate), pay per day (U.S. rate), total pay due (U.S. rate), amount paid, signature, and witness. The time periods covered on the payrolls are the one to two weeks during each summer, when camps of instruction were held.
Finally, there are several rosters of officers in the Texas National Guard.
If you are reading this electronically, click on the link to go to the full finding aid. If you are reading this in paper, the series finding aid is found at a separate divider within the binder. (Texas Adjutant General's Department, Texas National Guard military rolls)

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