Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Texas Department of Insurance, State Fire Marshal:

An Inventory of Department of Insurance state Fire Marshal Key Rate City Files at the Texas State Archives, Part IV (City Files, Group Two), 1893, 1904-1999, undated, bulk 1930-1997



Overview

Creator: Texas. State Fire Marshal.
Title: Department of Insurance State Fire Marshal key rate city files: Part IV (city files, group two)
Dates: 1893, 1904-1999, undated
Dates: bulk 1930-1997
Abstract: The Texas State Fire Marshal conducted inspections of local fire department facilities as part of a process to establish key rates - rates that were part of a formula used to determine fire insurance rates for individual properties in cities and towns. Records consist of key rate analyses, reports, correspondence, maps, proposed key rate schedules, city ordinances, city codes (electrical, fire, etc.), operational or engineering reports on water distribution systems, water and waste water master plans, inspection reports of fire fighting equipment, certificates of inspection for pumpers or other fire department apparatus, manufacturer's record of construction details, reports of city fire departments, training reports of city and rural fire departments, etc., concerning the key rating of cities and towns in Texas for fire protection and insurance purposes. Dates covered are 1893, 1904-1999, undated, bulk 1930-1997. These files were used to determine and document the key rates of cities and towns in Texas for use in establishing fire insurance rates.
Quantity: 166 cubic ft., 1347 maps
Language: These materials are written predominately in English with scattered Spanish throughout.
Repository: Texas State Archives

Texas Department of Insurance Agency History

The Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) regulates the Texas insurance industry. The Department seeks quality insurance products for all Texans at reasonable prices and under reasonable terms and strives to protect consumers' insurance assets. TDI enforces solvency standards and promotes competition in the industry while protecting consumers from fraud, misrepresentation and unfair practices. TDI educates the public about insurance so that Texans can make informed choices and works to protect the lives and property of the citizens of Texas from fire and fire-related hazards.

The history of state regulation of insurance in Texas dates from 1874, when the 14th Legislature passed a law regulating the life and health insurance business in the areas of company formation, activities and coverage (Chapter CXLV, Regular Session). This Act also gave the State Comptroller of Public Accounts supervisory authority over insurance (as there was not a state insurance department in existence), including issuing yearly renewal of certificates to companies. In the early days of statehood, practically all insurance business in Texas was written by companies organized in other states and foreign countries. According to State Comptroller's records, out of 61 companies doing business in Texas in 1874, only four were domestic. Until the 1876 State Constitution was adopted, Texas insurance corporations were created by special acts of the legislature. These domestic companies ventured into the business -- mostly fire and marine insurance -- in competition with financially stronger and more experienced out-of-state companies. As a result, most of them either went bankrupt or had to be reinsured and taken over by their out-of-state counterparts.

The Texas 1876 Constitution authorized the Legislature to create the office of Insurance Commissioner. Later that year the 15th Legislature passed a bill creating the Texas Department of Insurance, Statistics and History (Chapter CXXXIII, Regular Session). The Department had the responsibility to file and maintain insurance company charters; determine net value of all insurance companies in the state annually, to see that companies maintained an amount equal to their net value in safe, legal securities; calculate re-insurance reserves for unexpired fire risks; and suspend or close the operation of companies in non-compliance with insurance regulations. Insurance companies had to furnish a certificate to the Insurance Commissioner on the valuation of the company. If the Commissioner determined the net value was below the state-determined safety net, he was to notify the company to cease doing business and suspend or close their operations. The Commissioner had access to all books and papers of companies and could revoke or modify certificates of authority, call witnesses to testify, and initiate suits and prosecutions. In addition to his insurance-related duties, the commissioner was charged with keeping information and statistics on the state's population, wealth and general resources. He also served briefly as the state historian, the state librarian and superintendent of public grounds and buildings.

In 1887, the Department's authority was expanded by adding agriculture regulation to the Department's regulatory functions (House Bill 355, 20th Legislature, Regular Session). It was renamed the Texas Department of Agriculture, Insurance, Statistics and History. In 1905 (Senate Bill 6, 29th Legislature, Regular Session) banking supervision and regulation were added to the agency. In 1907, a separate office was created for agriculture, and the agency became the Texas Department of Insurance and Banking (House Bill 274, 30th Legislature, Regular Session). The history and statistics functions were absorbed by the State Librarian.

In 1909, Senate Bill 291 (31st Legislature, Regular Session) required insurance companies to file financial and other information with the new Commissioner of Insurance and Banking. Also in 1909, Senate Bill 25 was passed by the 31st Legislature, 3rd Called Session, which created the Fire Insurance Rating Board, with the Commissioner of Insurance and Banking as the chair. The main duty of this board was to prevent discrimination in fire insurance rates. The Commissioner of Insurance and Banking also became the supervisor of all building and loan associations in Texas.

The 31st Legislature created the State Insurance Board in 1910 (Senate Bill 7, 4th Called Session), which replaced the fire rating board. The Commissioner of Insurance and Banking served as the chair, the governor appointed two other members, with the advice and consent of the Senate. One Board member was also designated as the Fire Marshal of the Insurance Board. The board was to supervise, control and regulate fire rates. Duties of the board included to make and prescribe general schedules for insurance, together with rules and regulations for determining maximum specific rates therefrom, and to furnish each insurance company doing business within the state a copy of the rate schedule. The board had the authority to alter or amend insurance rate schedules. The board was also to ascertain the annual fire loss to the state, to collect data in order to classify the fire losses, causes thereof, and amount paid thereon in such a manner as to be of assistance in determining equitable insurance rates, methods of reducing fire losses, and reducing insurance rates of the state. In 1913 the State Insurance Board's name was changed to the State Fire Insurance Commission and its authority broadened (Senate Bill 387, Regular Session). Additional duties included the ability to prescribe, fix, determine, and promulgate the rates of premiums to be charged and collected by fire insurance companies. The board had the authority to alter and amend premium rates.

In 1923 the Commissioner of Insurance was separated from the Commission of Insurance and Banking (Senate Bill 29, 38th Legislature, 3rd Called Session). The agency now became the Texas Department of Insurance. In 1927, the Commissioner of Insurance was consolidated with the Fire Insurance Commissioner to create the Texas Board of Insurance Commissioners (Senate Bill 253, 40th Legislature, Regular Session). It consisted of three commissioners - the Life Insurance Commissioner, who served as chair, the Fire Insurance Commissioner, and a Casualty Insurance Commissioner. In addition to past insurance functions, the Board now had the authority to approve and disapprove auto insurance rates and to promulgate uniform policy reforms.

Major changes were made in insurance laws in the 1950s. In 1951 insurance laws were codified into the Texas Insurance Code (Senate Bill 236, 52nd Legislature, Regular Session). Due to a number of insolvency scandals (23 domestic companies were placed into receivership between 1954 and 1958) the legislatures of the period passed at least 16 insurance related bills, including strengthening examination laws, increasing minimum capital and surplus requirements, and giving the Board more control over issuing certificates of authority.

The Board of Insurance Commissioners was abolished in 1957 and replaced with the Texas State Board of Insurance (Senate Bill 222, 55th Legislature, Regular Session). The State Board of Insurance was composed of three members, appointed by the Governor with Senate approval. Members served six-year overlapping terms. The Board was governed by the Texas Insurance Code. From 1957 to 1991, the term "State Board of Insurance" was sometimes used to refer to the agency and all of its employees. At other times, it was used to designate only the three-member Board. The Board had initial jurisdiction over policies, rules, and rates, and over appeals from the Commissioner of Insurance. The Board appointed, with the consent of the Senate, the Commissioner of Insurance, who acted as the executive and administrative officer for the agency. The Commissioner also served as State Fire Marshal until 1975, when the 64th Legislature passed the Fire Alarm System Act, which created the Office of the State Fire Marshal. The marshal was now appointed by the chair of the State Board of Insurance and was directly responsible to the board.

In 1991, the 72nd Legislature created the Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP) by combining two agencies, the Texas Commission on Fire Protection Personnel Standards and Education, and the Texas Fire Department Emergency Board (Senate Bill 383, Regular Session). It also transferred certain duties from the Texas State Board of Insurance, including oversight of the State Fire Marshal and the key rate municipal inspections. Also in 1991, the 72nd Legislature revised the regulation of insurance and changed the agency's name to the Texas Department of Insurance (House Bill 2, Regular Session and House Bill 62, 2nd Called Session). The three-member State Board of Insurance was abolished by the 73rd Legislature in 1993 (House Bill 1461, Regular Session). The management and regulatory duties of the Board became the responsibility of the Commissioner of Insurance as of September 1, 1994. The Commissioner is the overall authority in the enforcement of the Insurance Code and the regulation of the insurance industry in Texas.

[Sources: Guide to Texas State Agencies, various editions; laws and statutes of Texas; agency's webpage ( http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/webinfo/vision.html, accessed January 8, 2007) and documents found within the State Fire Marshal's records.]


State Fire Marshal Agency History

The Texas State Fire Marshal is a division of the Texas Department of Insurance. The Marshal's Office conducts fire and arson investigations; performs fire safety inspections; regulates the storage, handling, and use of flammable liquids at retail service stations; and issues permits for the display and sale of fireworks. The office also licenses and regulates the installation and maintenance of fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and automatic fire sprinkler systems. And, it oversees inspection activities by ISO, a private organization contracted to perform inspections conducted in cities and communities to determine fire suppression rates.

The State Fire Marshal position was created in 1910 as part of the State Insurance Board (Senate Bill 7, 31st Legislature, 4th Called Session) to conduct fire and arson investigations and provide technical support to municipal and rural fire departments. The State Fire Marshal investigated fires upon request of local officials or fire insurance companies and determined the cause, submitting a written report to the State Insurance Board. He was also to furnish in writing to the county or district attorney all information and evidence obtained during the investigation including a copy of all pertinent testimony obtained in the case. The State Fire Marshal had the authority to administer oaths, take testimony, compel the attendance of witnesses and the production of documents, and to enter the building where the fire occurred or adjacent structures as needed during the investigation. He also conducted inspections of local fire department facilities as part of a process to establish key rates - rates that were part of a formula used to determine fire insurance rates for individual properties in cities and towns. Beginning in 1957 the Commissioner of Insurance served as the State Fire Marshal until 1975, when a separate State Fire Marshal Office was established in the State Board of Insurance, with the fire marshal appointed by the Chair of the Insurance Board.

In 1991, the 72nd Legislature created the Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP) by combining two agencies, the Texas Commission on Fire Protection Personnel Standards and Education, and the Texas Fire Department Emergency Board (Senate Bill 383, Regular Session). It also transferred certain duties from the Texas State Board of Insurance, including oversight of the State Fire Marshal and the key rate municipal inspections. In September 1997 the 75th Legislature returned the State Fire Marshal's Office to the Texas Department of Insurance (Senate Bill 371, Regular Session).

[Sources: Guide to Texas State Agencies, various editions; laws and statutes of Texas; webpage of the State Fire Marshal ( http://www.tdi.state.tx.us/fire/fmhistoy.html, accessed January 8, 2007); and documents found within the State Fire Marshal's records.]


History of the key rate process

In the late 1800s, due to large, catastrophic losses as a result of major fires, the insurance industry began to formally evaluate the fire defenses of communities. In 1916, an industry standard was produced, Standard Grading Schedule of Grading Cities and Towns. Texas adopted an evaluation process in 1918, based on the 1916 standards, to establish a methodology for establishing fire insurance rates for individual properties and communities, known as key rates. These rates were part of a formula used to determine fire insurance rates. Items evaluated to determine the key rates included the fire department's method for receiving and handling of fire alarms, the capability of the fire department to fight fires, and the capability of the community's existing water supply to fight fires. The more proficient a community was judged in fighting fires, the lower the key rate, resulting in lower fire insurance rates for the individual properties within that community.

Until 1991, key rate inspections were conducted by the State Board of Insurance and its predecessors. In 1991, the inspection duty was transferred to the Texas Commission on Fire Protection (TCFP). It conducted key rate inspections and recommended a key rate to the State Board of Insurance for the board's final approval. If the rate was not approved, the Board of Insurance would inform TCFP of the reason and recommend another rate. Effective January 1, 1997, all existing key rates for cities were frozen. In 1998, the Department of Insurance switched to a Fire Suppression Rating Schedule, the system used in all other states, which grades fire protection on the basis of a city's actual fire exposure and water flow necessary to control fires wherever they occur. The detailed reports of inspections are now carried out by ISO, a private organization, overseen by the State Fire Marshal.


Scope and Content of the Records

The Texas State Fire Marshal conducted inspections of local fire department facilities as part of a process to establish key rates - rates that were part of a formula used to determine fire insurance rates for individual properties in cities and towns. Records consist of key rate analyses, reports, correspondence, maps, proposed key rate schedules, city ordinances, city codes (electrical, fire, etc.), operational or engineering reports on water distribution systems, water and waste water master plans, inspection reports of fire fighting equipment, certificates of inspection for pumpers or other fire department apparatus, manufacturer's record of construction details, reports of city fire departments, and training reports of city and rural fire departments, etc. Dates covered are 1893, 1904-1999, undated, bulk 1930-1997. These files were used to determine and document the key rates of cities and towns in Texas for use in establishing fire insurance rates.

A key rate analysis sheet is present for all cities, towns, and rural areas presented in these records. Information on the analysis includes the name of the city and county; population; and charges assessed for the existence for waterworks, fire departments, building laws, streets, alleys, fire marshal, and conflagration hazards, with a total for all charges given. A credit amount was given based on the city's fire protection capability, including factors such as methods of fire prevention and principles of fire insurance, the fire department's level, fire equipment, arson reward, and firemen training opportunities. The resultant amount (charges minus the credit) was the key rate. Rates ranged from 7 cents to $1.00. The higher the amount, the higher the fire insurance rates would be for individual properties within the community. Based on the 1991 figures, cities or communities with rates under 80 cents were listed as protected; those entities with rates 81 cents or higher, mostly very small towns, rural areas, and communities, were listed as unprotected.

The most comprehensive reports present in this series are inspection reports of cities and towns by the National Board of Fire Underwriters and/or the State Fire Insurance Commission. Each report gives an overview of the city and details of the fire department operations (organization, equipment, personnel), the water supply and water distribution network, water consumption, structural conditions and hazards, municipal building codes, building construction, electric services, and conflagration hazards; ending with recommended improvements. Each report generally contains a plat or street map, most showing streets, railroads, public areas, rivers and lakes, water pumping stations, water mains, water tanks, fire departments, and fire hydrants. For many cities, the reports were written every 10 years or so, and the later reports refer back to the earlier ones, noting changes or improvements made or still needed. These reports are not present for all cities or towns, just for the larger ones, with a few exceptions. Other reports present include re-inspection reports, either by the Texas Fire Insurance Department, the Texas State Board of Insurance, or the Texas Commission on Fire Protection. The re-inspection reports contain data about the city's fire fighting capabilities, in summary form (number and location of water pumps, fire hydrants, water mains; reservoir capacity, water flow tests and plumage test results; fire fighting apparatus available; city ordinances; building activity, etc.)

Also present is correspondence, mainly between the State Board of Insurance (or the predecessor agency handling this function), or the Texas Commission on Fire Protection, and city officials and engineers and/or the National Board of Fire Insurance Underwriters. Topics concern the fire fighting capabilities of the city, including equipment needed, changes to pumping stations, water main construction or repairs, building code issues, key rate issues, fire code compliance for buildings, and conflagration issues. Many letters in the late 1930s concern WPA projects undertaken and refer to attached blueprints, most of which are not present with these files. Memoranda between the Department of Insurance and the Commission on Fire Protection in the 1990s document the acceptance or non acceptance of recommended key rates, with reasons for nonacceptance of a rate given.

Housed separately are a large group of mostly original maps of water systems of cities and towns. These maps typically show streets and roads, rivers, lakes, water lines, fire hydrant locations, and other water system features. Most of the maps were done by the Engineering Division of the Department of Insurance or its predecessors (the State Board of Insurance, the Texas Fire Insurance Dept., or the State Fire Insurance Commission), with a few done by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection. Several hundred water system maps and related maps are folded and housed in the boxes with the records of the cities and towns, most being different editions of the city water system plats done by the various insurance agencies. Other maps include water system or water district maps by local governments, and street maps. During processing, original water system maps found in the boxes were removed and placed in the Historic Map Collection, along with maps housed separately from the city files. These maps are listed in the finding aid by map number following the name of the city in the group one city files.

This series is split into four separate finding aids due to the electronic file size limitations imposed by the online finding aid web site (TARO). If you are reading this electronically, click on the following link to access the finding aid for parts I, II, and III. Texas Department of Insurance, State Fire Marshal key rate city files: Part I (city group one, A-G); Texas Department of Insurance, State Fire Marshal key rate city files: Part II (city group one, H-N); and Texas Department of Insurance, State Fire Marshal key rate city files: Part III (city group one, O-Z). . If you are reading this in paper, Parts I, II and III of this series can be found in separate dividers within this binder.

This finding aid describes a single series of the State Fire Marshal records. If you are reading this electronically, click on the following link to access the additional series found in the overall finding aid, Texas Department of Insurance State Fire Marshal key rate files. If you are reading this in paper in the Archives search room, the finding aid is found in the first divider within the same binder.

To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.


 

The records are ordered into two groups of key rate files, then alphabetically within each group, as received from the agency. The largest and oldest group of files is group one. The materials are housed in wallets, folders, and envelopes, with just the city name as the folder title. In most cases, the first folder (often a wallet) contains the key rate analysis and re-inspection reports, done by either the Texas Fire Insurance Department, the Texas State Board of Insurance, or the Texas Commission of Fire Protection. The next folder is usually a folder of correspondence, followed by one or more wallets or envelopes of maps and other materials used by the State Board of Insurance to determine the key rate analysis, including original street maps by the State Board of Insurance or its predecessors showing water mains and fire hydrants, copies of maps by cities or private companies showing water systems or other water features, street maps, lists of water mains, survey of combustible roofs, ordinances, and building code publications. Some reports and loose maps are also present, usually filed in front of or just after the envelopes. Very small towns and communities may only have a folder of key rate analyses or also an inspection report or two.
The records are ordered into two groups of key rate files, then alphabetically within each group, as received from the agency. The largest and oldest group of files is group one. The materials are housed in wallets, folders, and envelopes, with just the city name as the folder title. In most cases, the first folder (often a wallet) contains the key rate analysis and re-inspection reports, done by either the Texas Fire Insurance Department, the Texas State Board of Insurance, or the Texas Commission of Fire Protection. The next folder is usually a folder of correspondence, followed by one or more wallets or envelopes of maps and other materials used by the State Board of Insurance to determine the key rate analysis, including original street maps by the State Board of Insurance or its predecessors showing water mains and fire hydrants, copies of maps by cities or private companies showing water systems or other water features, street maps, lists of water mains, survey of combustible roofs, ordinances, and building code publications. Some reports and loose maps are also present, usually filed in front or or just after the envelopes. Very small towns and communities may only have a folder of key rate analyses or also an inspection report or two.
The files in group two have only recent files, usually one folder per city or town, with the very largest cities having two or three folders.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Because of the possibility that portions of these records fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, home addresses, phone numbers, and social security numbers of government employees or officials (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.117); driver's license numbers (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Section 552.130), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail, fax, or email including enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information requested. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.

Materials do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room (Room 100). Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Most of the maps are too large to photocopy.

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Texas. State Board of Insurance.
Texas. Dept. of Insurance.
Texas Commission on Fire Protection.
Texas. Fire Insurance Dept.
Texas. State Fire Insurance Commission.
Subjects:
Insurance, Fire--Texas--Rates and tables.
Insurance, Fire--Texas.
Fire departments--Texas.
Insurance, Fire--Texas--State supervision.
Document Types:
Maps--Texas--1915-1999.
Reports--Insurance, Fire--Texas--1910-1997.
Reports--Fire departments--Texas--1910-1997.
Correspondence--Insurance, Fire--Texas--1910-1999.
Ordinances, Municipal--Texas--1912-1997.
Inspections--Fire departments--Texas--1910-1997.
Functions:
Regulating insurance.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Dept. of Insurance State Fire Marshal fire insurance maps, about 1925-1990, 68 volumes (This collection is unprocessed. An alphabetical index is available in the State Archives search room.)
Texas Commission on Fire Protection, Minutes, July 1991-October 1998, 0.25 cubic ft.
Publications
Key rate schedule for grading cities and towns of Texas with reference to their fire defenses and physical conditions, adopted and published by the State Board of Insurance, various editions, 1974, 1982
A list of cities and towns in Texas with key rate and fire record data, Texas State Board of Insurance, various editions, 1970s-1996.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item), Department of Insurance State Fire Marshal key rate city files. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession number: 2002/082

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the State Fire Marshal's Office of the Texas Department of Insurance on December 12, 2001.

Processing Information

Laura K. Saegert, January 2007

Appraisal Information

These records were appraised as archival by the appraisal staff on November 1, 2001. The records and all maps were transferred to the State Archives shortly thereafter. The appraisal report can be found in the search room of the State Archives; it is also available online at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/appraisal/firemarshalkeyrate.html.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Department of Insurance State Fire Marshal key rate city files, Part IV (city files, group two), 1893, 1904-1999, undated, bulk 1930-1997,
166 cubic ft.
1347 maps

City files, group two
[These are files of inspections and reports done by the Texas Commission on Fire Protection, with some accompanying correspondence, city ordinances, and maps. Files in this group date generally from 1990 to 1996, with a few earlier files back to the mid 1980s and a few dating up to 1997. Because the date range is so small, dates were not added to these folders. The earlier documents are copies of inspections done by the State Board of Insurance in the 1980s. Unlike the previous group of files, most cities just have one large folder of documents, with a few having two folders or an envelope present. Unless otherwise noted, only one folder of documents is present for each city. Within these city files are a few topical files.]
Box
2002/082-139 Abernathy
Abilene
Addison
Agua Dulce
Alamo
Alamo Heights
Alba
Albany
Alice
Allen
Alpine
Alta Loma
Alto
Alvin
Amarillo
Amherst
[folder, envelope]
Anahuac
Box
2002/082-140 Andrews
Angleton
Anna
Anson
Anton
Aransas Pass
[folder, envelope]
Arp
Aspermont
Athens
Atlanta
[folder, envelope]
Avery
Ballinger
Bandera
Bartlett
Bastrop
Bay City
[folder, envelope]
Bayou Vista
[folder, 2 envelopes]
Box
2002/082-141 Bayou Vista, continued
[envelope]
Baytown
Beaumont
Beeville
Bellaire
Bellmead
Bells
Bellville
Benjamin
Benavides
Big Sandy
[folder, envelope]
Big Spring
Big Wells
Bishop
Blanco
Boerne
Bonham
[folder, envelope]
Booker
Borger
Bovina
Bowie
Buna
Box
2002/082-142 Brackettville
Brady
Brazoria
Breckenridge
Brenham
Briarcliff
Bronte
Brookshire
Brownfield
[folder, envelope]
Brownsville
[envelope]
Brownwood
Bryan
Buchanan
Buda
Buffalo
Burkburnett
[folder, envelope]
Burleson
[folder, report, loose papers, envelope]
Burnet
[folder, envelope]
Box
2002/082-143 Caddo Mills
Caldwell
Calvert
Cameron
Camp Wood
[folder, envelope]
Canadian
Canton
Canyon
Carrizo Springs
Carthage
Castroville
Cedar Hill
Cedar Park
[envelope]
Celeste
Celina
Centerville
Chandler
[folder, envelope]
Channelview
[envelope]
Chappell Hill
Charlotte
Childress
Chillicothe
Chilton
Cisco
Clarksville
Claude
Clear Lake City
[folder, envelope]
Clear Lake Shores
Box
2002/082-144 Cleburne
Cleveland
Clifton
Clute
Clyde
Coahoma
[folder, envelope]
Cockrell Hill
Coleman
College Station
Collinsville
Columbus
Comanche
Comfort
Commerce
Conroe
[folder, envelope, report]
Cooper
Copperas Cove
Box
2002/082-145 Coppell
Corpus Christi
[folder, envelope]
Corrigan
Corsicana
Cotulla
Crosby
Crosbyton
Cross Plains
Crowell
Crystal City
Cuero
[folder, envelope]
Daingerfield
Dalhart
DFW (Dallas-Fort Worth) Airport
Danbury
Darouzett
Dawson
Dayton
Decatur
Deer Park
De Kalb
De Leon
Del Rio
Denison
Denton
Box
2002/082-146 De Soto
Devers
Devine
Dickinson (Galveston W.C.I.D. No. 1)
[folder, envelope]
Dickinson
[folder, envelope]
Dilley
[folder, envelope]
Dimmitt
Donna
Driscoll
Dublin
Dumas
Duncanville
Eagle Lake
[folder, envelope]
Eagle Pass
Earth
East Bernard
[folder, envelope]
Eastland
Eclipse
Edcouch
Edinburg
Edgewood
Edna
[folder, envelope]
El Campo
Electra
[folder, envelope]
Box
2002/082-147 Elgin
El Paso
Elsa
[folder, envelope]
Emory
Ennis
Euless
Fair Oaks Ranch
[folder, envelope]
Farmer's Branch
Falfurrias
Farwell
Ferris
Flatonia
Fire facilities
Floresville
Flower Mound
[folder, envelope]
Floydada
Follett
Forney
Fort Bend Municipal Utility District (MUD) No. 5
Fort Hood
Fort Stockton
Franklin
Frankston
[folder, envelope]
Freer
Freeport
Friona
Box
2002/082-148 Friona, continued
Friendswood
[2 envelopes, folder]
Frisco
Fritch
Fulton
Fulshear
Gainesville
Galena Park
Galveston County
[envelope]
Ganado
Garland
Garwood
Georgetown
George West
Giddings
[folder, envelope]
Gilmer
Gladewater
Goldthwaite
[folder, envelope]
Goliad
Gonzales
Box
2002/082-149 Goree
Graham
Granbury
Grand Prairie
Grand Saline
Grapeland
Grapevine
[folder, envelope]
Grayson County Airport
Greenville
Grey Forest
Groom
Gun Barrel City
Groveton
Groves
Gruver
Hale Center
Halletsville
[report]
Hallsville
Haltom City
Hamilton
Hamlin
Happy
Harlingen
[2 folders]
Harris County MUD's
[folder, 2 envelopes]
Hart
Haskell
Box
2002/082-150 Hawkins
Hearne
Heath
Hebbronville
Hemphill
Hempstead
Hereford
[folder, envelope]
Hewitt
Hico
Hidalgo
Highland Park
Highlands
Hillsboro
Hitchcock
Hooks
Horizon City
[folder, envelope]
Horseshoe Bay
Hubbard
Hughes Springs
Humble
[folder, envelope]
Huntington
[folder, envelope]
Huntsville
Hurst
[folder, envelope]
Huntwick
Hutchins
Box
2002/082-151 Hydro-Sub Mote
Holland
Holliday
Hondo
Honey Grove
Houston
Iowa Park
Ingleside
[folder, envelope]
Ingleside on the Bay
[folder, envelope]
Iraan
Irving
Italy
Itasca
Jacinto City
Jacksboro
[folder, envelope]
Jacksonville
Jasper
Jayton
Jersey Village
Jewett
[folder, envelope]
Joaquin
Johnson City
Jourdanton
Karnes City
Katy
Box
2002/082-152 Kaufman
Keene
Keller
Kemah
Kemp
Kenedy
[folder, envelope]
Kerens
[folder, envelope]
Kermit
Kerrville
Kilgore
Killeen
[envelope, report]
Kingsland
Kingsville
Kirbyville
Knox City
Kountze
[folder, envelope]
Kyle
[folder, envelope]
Ladonia
[folder, envelope]
La Feria
La Grange
Lake Jackson
[folder, envelope]
Lake Kiowa
Box
2002/082-153 La Marque
[folder, envelope]
Lamar County Water Supply District
[envelope]
Lamesa
Lampasas
Lancaster
La Porte
Lavernia
[folder, envelope]
League City
[folder, envelope]
Leander
[folder, envelope]
Leonard
Levelland
Lewisville
[folder, envelope]
Liberty
Lindale
Linden
Littlefield
Livingston
[folder, envelope]
Llano
Lockhart
[folder, envelope]
Lockney
Lone Star
[folder, envelope]
Box
2002/082-154 Longview
[report]
Loraine
Lorenzo
Los Fresnos
[folder, envelope]
Lufkin
Luling
Lytle
Magnolia
Mabank
Madisonville
Malakoff
[folder, envelope]
Manor
Mansfield
Marble Falls
Marion
Marfa
Marlin
Marshall
Mart
[folder, envelope]
Mason
Matador
Mathis
Martin Lake
Maypearl
McAllen
Box
2002/082-155 McCamey
McGregor
McKinney
McLean
Meadow
Meadowlake
[envelope]
Memphis
Menard
Mercedes
Meridian
Merkel
Mesquite
Mexia
Miami
Midland
[folder, envelope]
Midlothian
Miles
Milford
Mineola
Mission
Missouri City
[folder, report with envelope]
Box
2002/082-156 Mont Belvieu
Moody
Moore
Morton
Moulton
Mount Pleasant
Mount Vernon
Muenster
Muleshoe
Munday
Naples
Nash
Nassau Bay
[folder, envelope]
Navasota
[folder, envelope]
Nederland
Needville
New Braunfels
New Gulf
New London
[folder, envelope]
Nixon
Nacogdoches
Nocona
[folder, envelope]
Nocona Hills
Odem
[folder, envelope]
Odessa
O'Donnell
Box
2002/082-157 Olton
Omaha
Onalaska
Orange
[folder, envelope]
Orange Grove
Ore City
Overton
Ozona
Paducah
Palacious
Palestine
[folder, envelope]
Pampa
Panhandle
Pantego
Paris
Pasadena
Payne Springs
Pearland
Pearsall
Pecos
Pecan Plantation Action MUD
[envelope]
Penitas
Pflugerville
[folder, envelope]
Pharr
Pilot Point
Pineland
Box
2002/082-158 Pittsburg
Plainview
Pleasanton
Point Blank
[folder, envelope]
Point Comfort
Ponderosa
Port Aransas
Port Arthur
[report with envelope]
Port Isabel
Portland
[folder, envelope]
Port Lavaca
Port Neches
[folder, envelope]
Poteet
Poth
Prairie View
[folder, envelope]
Premont
Presidio
Price Sales
Princeton
Progreso City
[folder, envelope]
Quanah
Box
2002/082-159 Quinlan
Quitman
Ralls
Rancho Viejo
Randolph Field
Ranger
Rayburn Country
[folder, envelope]
Raymondville
Refugio
Reno
[folder, envelope]
Richmond
Rio Grande City
[folder, envelope]
Rising Star
River Oaks
Robert Lee
Robstown
Roby
Rockport
Rocksprings
Rockwall
Rogers
Roscoe
Rosebud
Rosenberg
Box
2002/082-160 Rotan
Round Mountain
[folder, envelope]
Round Rock
Rowlett
[folder, envelope]
Royse City
Rule
Runge
Rusk
Sabinal
Saginaw
Saint Jo
[folder, envelope]
San Angelo
[report]
San Antonio
[folder, envelope]
San Benito
[folder, report]
San Diego
[folder, envelope]
Box
2002/082-161 Sanger
San Juan
San Marcos
[folder, envelope]
San Saba
[2 folders]
Santa Anna
Santa Fe
[folder, envelope]
Schulenburg
Sea Isle
Seabrook
Seadrift
Seagoville
Sealy
Seguin
[loose reports and maps, envelope, folder, envelope]
Seminole
Seymour
Shallowater
Shamrock
Box
2002/082-162 Shepherd
Sherman
Shiner
Silsbee
Silverton
Sinton
Smithville
Snyder
Socorro
Somerville
Sonora
[folder, envelope]
Sour Lake
South Houston
[folder, envelope]
Southlake
[folder, envelope]
Southside Place
Spearman
Splendora
Springtown
[folder, envelope]
Spring Valley
Stamford
Stanton
Stephenville
[folder, envelope]
Sterling City
Stinnett
Stowell
Box
2002/082-163 Stratford
Strawn
Sudan
Sugar Land
Sulphur Springs
Sullivan City
Sundown
Sunray
Sunrise Beach
Sweeny
Sweetwater
Taft
Tahoka
Tatum
[folder, envelope]
Taylor
Teague
Temple
Tenaha
Terminal City
Terrell
Texarkana
[report, envelope]
Texas City
Texhoma
Box
2002/082-164 The Colony
The Woodlands, MUD's Metro Center
The Woodlands
[folder, 2 envelopes]
Thorndale
Three Rivers
Throckmorton
Timpson
Tomball
[folder, envelope]
Trenton
Trinidad
Trinity
Trophy Club
Troup
Tulia
Tyler
University Park
Uvalde
UL sheets (Underwriters Laboratories)
Valley Mills
Van Alstyne
Vega
Vernon
Box
2002/082-165 Victoria
Vidor
Waelder
Wake Village
[folder, envelope]
Waller
Wallis
Waskom
[folder, envelope]
Water detector
Waxahachie
Weatherford
Webster
Weimer
Wellington
Wellman
Weslaco
West
West Columbus
West University Place
Wharton
Wheeler
White Deer
Whiteface
Whitehouse
Box
2002/082-166 Whitewright
Whitesboro
Whitney
[folder, envelope]
Wichita Falls
[folder, envelope, report]
Williamson County
Wilmer
Wimberley
Wink
Winnie-Stowell
Winnsboro
Winters
Wolfe City
Wolfforth
[folder, envelope]
Woodcreek
Woodsboro
Woodville
Wortham
[2 folders]
Wylie
Yoakum
Yorktown
Zapata