Texas State Library and Archives Commission

Railroad Commission of Texas:

An Overview of Railroad Commission Records at the Texas State Archives, 1836-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-2006, bulk 1891-1996



Overview

Creator: Railroad Commission of Texas.
Title: Railroad Commission records
Dates: 1836-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-2006
Dates: bulk 1891-1996
Abstract: The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Its statutory role is to prevent waste of the state's natural resources, to protect the correlative rights of different interest owners, to prevent pollution, and to provide safety in matters such as hydrogen sulfide. Records consist of minutes, correspondence, original orders, docket files, hearing files, reports, tariffs, oil and gas statistics, maps and plats, surveys, photographs, and other records. Dates covered are 1836-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-2006, the bulk dating 1891-1996. Files are present from most of the divisions of the Railroad Commission of Texas, including the old Main and Transportation Division, which eventually became the Rail Division; the Oil and Gas Division; and the Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilities Division); the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division; and the Motor Transportation Division, now a part of the Texas Department of Transportation. Topics covered in these files include regulation and operation of railroads, including railroad companies annual operations, rail company mergers, rail construction, and freight and passenger rates; oil and gas activities, including the issuance of orders governing the drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields; oil and gas conservation and safety, including spacing of wells; disposal of oil and gas waste and pollution cleanup efforts; natural gas issues, include rate hearings, deregulation, and odorization of natural gas; reclamation of abandoned mine lands; and issuance of permits or certificates of convenience to operate commercial motor vehicles on public highways.
Quantity: 1228.05 cubic ft., 398 microfilm rolls, 119 microfiche, processed;
Quantity: 89.15 cubic ft., 6 microfilm rolls, unprocessed
Location: Please note that the oversize exhibits in the Special permits and Rule 37 case files are stored at the Texas State Records Center. Records requested before 10:00 a.m. will usually be available by 4:00 p.m. the same day. Records requested after 10:00 a.m. and before 3:00 p.m will usually be available by noon the next day.
Location: Some of the microfilm (several series) is on master negative microfilm stored offsite at the State Records Center. This film is unique and fragile and requires that a duplicate use copy be made of any reel that a researcher wishes to view. A duplicate use copy can be made at the researcher's expense. Arrangements for duplication and prepayment need to be made with the State and Local Records Management Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.
Language: These materials are written in English.
Repository:

Agency History

The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. Its statutory role is to prevent waste of the state's natural resources, to protect the correlative rights of different interest owners, to prevent pollution, and to provide safety in matters such as hydrogen sulfide. It oversees hazardous materials pipelines and natural gas pipelines and distribution systems as well as propane, butane, compressed natural gas, and liquefied natural gas. It works to make sure a continuous, safe supply of natural gas is available to Texas consumers at the lowest reasonable price. Additionally, the Commission regulates surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel, and conducts a program for reclaiming lands that were mined and abandoned before 1975.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had its origin in the demands of the shipping public in the late 1880s that insisted that railroads be subject to regulation based on public interest. An advocate for governmental regulation, Attorney General James Stephen Hogg ran for Governor in 1890 with the issue of railroad regulation as the focal point of the campaign. Hogg was elected Governor in the general election and the voters also approved an amendment to Article X, Section 2 of the Texas Constitution that empowered the Legislature to enact statutes creating regulatory agencies. These elections paved the way for the Legislature to enact on April 3, 1891 "An Act to Establish a Railroad Commission of the State of Texas," that later was placed in the Texas Revised Civil Statutes under article 6444 et seq. (House Bills 1, 3, and 58, 22nd Texas Legislature, Regular Session).

The Commission originally consisted of three members appointed by the Governor for three-year terms. Governor Hogg appointed the first three Commissioners in 1891 including John H. Reagan, who resigned as U.S. Senator from Texas to serve as the first Chairman. The Texas Constitution, Article XIX, Section 30 was amended in 1894 to provide for elective six-year overlapping terms for the Commissioners. That same year John H. Reagan was elected and served until his retirement in 1903.

The Texas Railroad Commission was the first regulatory agency created in the State of Texas and originally had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The legal focus was on intrastate passenger and freight activities. Interstate jurisdiction fell under the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. For the first twenty-five years of its existence, the Railroad Commission was largely concerned with regulating railroads, setting rates, receiving complaints, and making investigations. As other controversies arose where the Legislature deemed that the public interest could best be served by regulation, additional duties were assigned to the Railroad Commission.

The Railroad Commission's authority was broadened beginning in 1917 with the passage of the Pipeline Petroleum Law (Senate Bill 68, 35th Legislature, Regular Session) that declared pipelines to be common carriers like railroads and placed them under the Commission's jurisdiction. This was the first act to designate the Railroad Commission as the agency to administer conservation laws relating to oil and gas. The Commission's regulatory and enforcement powers in oil and gas were increased by the Oil and Gas Conservation Law (Senate Bill 350 of the 36th Legislature, Regular Session), effective June 18, 1919. This act gave the Railroad Commission jurisdiction to regulate the production of oil and gas. Acting upon this legislation, the Commission adopted in 1919 the first statewide rules regulating the oil and gas industry to promote conservation and safety, including Rule 37. This rule requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights.

The Gas Utilities Act of 1920 (House Bill 11, 36th Legislature, 3rd Called Session) gave the Commission regulatory and rate authority over individuals and businesses producing, transporting, or distributing natural gas in Texas. In 1937, following a large natural gas explosion in a school in New London, Texas, the 45th Legislature passed legislation giving the Railroad Commission the authority to adopt rules and regulations pertaining to the odorization of natural gas or liquefied petroleum gases (House Bill 1017, Regular Session).

The passage of the Public Regulatory Act of 1975 (PURA) (House Bill 819, 64th Legislature, Regular Session) required certain state regulatory agencies, including the Commission, to set the overall revenues of a utility based on its "cost of service." Regulation of liquefied petroleum was added to the Commission's responsibilities in 1939 by the 46th Legislature (House Bill 792, Regular Session). The legislation authorized the Commission to adopt and enforce safety rules and standards in the storage, handling, transportation, and odorization of butane or LP-gases. Regulation of compressed natural gas was added to the Railroad Commission's responsibilities in 1983 (Senate Bill 617, 68th Legislature, Regular Session).

The Motor Bus Law of 1927, House Bill 50, 40th Legislature, Regular Session, and the Motor Carrier Law of 1929, House Bill 654, 41st Legislature, Regular Session, extended the Commission's regulatory powers to commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways. In 1995, following federal deregulation of motor carriers, the 74th Legislature eliminated the agency's authority to regulate commercial carriers involved in intrastate transport and transferred the remaining responsibilities related to commercial carriers (motor carrier registration, insurance verification, and safety) to the Texas Department of Transportation (Senate Bill 971, Regular Session), and the Department of Public Safety (Senate Bill 3, Regular Session).

The Texas Surface Mining and Reclamation Act of 1975, Senate Bill 55, 64th Legislature, Regular Session, authorized the Commission to regulate the exploration for and surface mining of coal, lignite, and uranium within the state and to oversee the reclamation of lands disturbed by surface mining operations. In 1991, the 72nd Legislature, Regular Session, passed House Bill 451, the Texas Aggregate Quarry and Pit Safety Act, that authorized the Commission to regulate quarry and pit operations.

Railroad regulation was initially overseen by the Main Office, later the Main and Transportation Division, then the Transportation Division and finally the Rail Division. This division was responsible for checking equipment and track, railroad and signal operations, and hazardous material handling; conducting investigations of accidents and complaints concerning railroads; and securing federal funds to improve branch lines and preserve rail service to rural areas. The Division enforced rules aimed at removing obstructions on railroad rights-of-way and operated a crossing safety education program. In 2005, the Rail Division and its remaining function, rail safety regulation, were transferred to the Texas Department of Transportation (House Bill 2702, 79th Legislature, Regular Session). The Railroad Commission no longer has any railroad-related functions.

The Oil and Gas Division works to prevent the waste of oil, gas, and geothermal resources and to prevent the pollution of fresh water from oil and gas operations. The division holds statewide hearings on market demand and provides for equitable production among operators by establishing monthly production allowables. It issues drilling permits, reviews and approves oil and gas well completions, collects data on oil and gas operations, and promotes public safety. It also protects underground drinking water through regulation of the underground injection of fluids in oil field operations, a program approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Federal Safe Drinking Water Act. It oversees well plugging operations, site remediation, underground hydrocarbon storage, hazardous waste management, and maintains a large amount of data on wells - their location, production, etc. The division also investigates complaints and conducts other investigations. This division maintains 10 district offices where field enforcement and support personnel monitor oil and gas operations. The commission does not have the authority to set oil and gas prices at the wellhead.

The Gas Services Division, formerly the Gas Utilities Division, works to ensure that a continuous safe supply of gas is available to Texas consumers at the lowest, reasonable rates. It establishes rates and services that are fair and reasonable for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. The division also focuses on regulatory policy and analysis, finding and eliminating natural gas transportation problems, and has oversight of intrastate gathering and storage services. Safety-related duties regarding natural gas and hazardous liquids were transferred to the Safety Division in recent years.

The Safety Division operates the Commission's Pipeline Safety program, which regulates the safety of intrastate natural gas pipelines and hazardous liquid pipelines in Texas. The Commission is a certified agent of the U.S. Department of Transportation for the enforcement of federal pipeline safety regulations for intrastate pipeline facilities pursuant to the federal Pipeline Safety Act.

The Surface Mining and Reclamation Division oversees the exploration of and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel and the reclamation of land disturbed by surface mining operations. It also conducts a program for reclaiming lands that were mined before 1975 and left unrestored. Companies must have a permit from the commission for each mining site operated in the state. Before permits are issued, the companies must submit a performance bond that will provide funds for reclamation if the company fails to do an adequate reclamation job. The division also studies mining sites to ensure the mining will not harm the quality or quantity of water in the area. It determines which abandoned mines pose the greatest threat to public health and safety and the environment, and designs a reclamation plan to address the greatest problems. Private contractors are used to do the reclamation.

The Office of the General Counsel is the agency's principal legal advisor. The Enforcement Section prosecutes individuals and companies charged with violating Commission rules and regulations. This section also works with the Office of the Attorney General on all lawsuits to which the Commission is a party. The Hearings Section conducts hearings in administrative contested cases involving oil and gas; gas utilities; pipeline safety; LPG, CNG, and LNG fuel safety; and surface mining matters. It also handles some rulemaking functions. The Special Counsel Section advises the Commission on compliance with state and federal laws regarding contracts, open records, records retention, personnel matters, ethics, and handles environmental legal issues related to the Commission's surface mining and oil and gas programs. It is also responsible for scheduling hearings; maintaining and updating hearings files; preparing notices of hearing and open meeting postings for the Secretary of State; and responding to inquiries regarding scheduling of hearings.

The Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division was created by the Legislature in 1991 and was charged with researching and educating the public about propane (LP-gas, LPG) as an environmentally and economically beneficial alternative fuel. The division also operates the Commission's licensing, examination, certification and training programs for propane company managers and technicians statewide.

Railroad Commission support divisions include the Government and Media Affairs Office, Personnel, Administration, Information Technology Services, and the Office of Internal Audit.

(Sources: Guide to Texas State Agencies, various editions; general laws and statutes; the Railroad Commission website ( http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/about/index.php ) , accessed on March 23, 2009; and the records themselves.)


Scope and Contents of the Records

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Its statutory role is to prevent waste of the state's natural resources, to protect the correlative rights of different interest owners, to prevent pollution, and to provide safety in matters such as hydrogen sulfide. Records consist of minutes, correspondence, original orders, docket files, hearing files, reports, tariffs, oil and gas statistics, maps and plats, surveys, photographs, and other records. Dates covered are 1836-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-2006, the bulk dating 1891-1996. Files are present from most of the divisions of the Railroad Commission of Texas, including the old Main and Transportation Division, which eventually became the Rail Division; the Oil and Gas Division; and the Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilities Division); the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division; as well as the Motor Transportation Division, now a part of the Texas Department of Transportation. Minutes are present for most of the agency's existence, detailing the regulatory and administrative actions of the commission. Annual reports of railroad companies and gas utility companies document the operations of these companies (railroads 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996; gas utilities 1920-2001, 2004-2006) giving a good overview of the history of these types of operations and their oversight by the Railroad Commission. Correspondence, reports, and similar files, generally pre-1950, document rail and commercial motor vehicle regulation activities of the Commission and regulation of the oil and gas industry including early conservation efforts by the commission. Dockets, original orders, and hearing files show actions by Commissioners regarding changes in or establishment of rules and regulations, and such records, along with the minutes, reflect Commissioners' decisions in disputes or their approval or disapproval of requests for exceptions to various Railroad Commission regulations, such as the Rule 37 regulation, which governs the spacing between wells within an oil field.

Correspondents include Commissioners and agency staff, railroad companies, oil and gas companies and operators, natural gas companies, commercial motor vehicle companies and operators, public utilities, businesses, state and federal officials and agencies, and the general public. Topics covered in these files include regulation and operation of railroads, including railroad companies' annual operations, rail company mergers, rail construction, and freight and passenger rates; oil and gas activities, including the issuance of orders governing drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields; oil and gas conservation and safety, including spacing of wells; disposal of oil and gas waste and pollution cleanup efforts; natural gas issues, include rate hearings, deregulation, and odorization of natural gas; reclamation of abandoned mine lands; and issuance of permits or certificates of convenience to operate commercial motor vehicles on public highways.

Also present are the files of two early commissioners, Allison Mayfield (served 1897-1923) and Ernest O. Thompson (served 1933-1965). Mayfield's files consist of outgoing business and personal correspondence, including efforts to get reelected to the Commission in 1922. Thompson's files consist of correspondence, speeches, printed materials and other items which document his role as a Commission spokesman on oil and gas conservation.

The records also include files, largely reports, from a joint federal-state committee, the Arkansas-White-Red River Basins Interagency Committee, formed to conduct water and resource development studies of the Arkansas, White, and Red River basins in the 1950s.

The Railroad Commission’s scanned versions of the East Texas historical oil and gas hearing files are available online. The RRC plans to transfer the originals to the State Archives in the fall of 2011.

This finding aid serves as an overview for the records of the Railroad Commission of Texas. Most series have their own detailed finding aids, partly due to the electronic file size limitations imposed by the online finding aid web site (TARO). A few series are unprocessed; most of these have a basic description of the records but no folder inventory.


 

Organization of the Records

These records are organized into 60 series by State Archives staff.
Administrative records
  • Minutes, 1891-2004, 20.85 cubic ft. and 150 microfilm reels
  • Docket book, 1891-1898, 0.22 cubic ft.
  • Commissioners' records, 1898-1901, 1906-1908, 1916, 1920-1966, bulk about 1930-about 1960, 10.3 cubic ft
  • Commissioner Matthews records, 1997-2005, 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Commissioners speeches, 1930s-1950s, 1963-1967, 1978-1980, 3 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Press releases and miscellaneous records, 1952-1983, 1985-2004, 2.25 cubic ft.
Railroad regulation
  • Rail Division incoming correspondence, 1872-1955, bulk 1891-early 1920s, 52 cubic ft.
  • Rail Division outgoing correspondence, 1891-1933, 34.38 cubic ft. in 255 volumes
  • Transportation Division correspondence and reports, 1888-1948, bulk 1894-about 1935, 8.7 cubic ft.
  • Rail Division annual reports of railroad companies, 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996, 380.24 cubic ft.
  • Transportation Division express companies annual reports, 1908-1949, 7 cubic ft.
  • Rail Division tariffs, 1890-1985, bulk 1914-1984, 44.8 cubic ft.
  • Transportation Division special authority orders, 1894-1935, 12.22 cubic ft.
  • Transportation Division application files, 1891-1971, 15.05 cubic ft.
  • Transportation Division Interstate Commerce Commission financial dockets, 1920-1952, 33.84 cubic ft.
  • Interstate Commerce Commission valuation reports, 1926-1927, 0.57 cubic ft.
  • Rate hearing # 1573 transcripts and exhibits, 1915, 2 cubic ft.
  • Doubleheader hearing, about 1900, 0.47 cubic ft.
  • Rail Division railroad history files, 1836-1996, undated, bulk 1850-1960, 5 cubic ft.
Oil and gas regulation
  • Oil and Gas Division correspondence and reports, 1890-1943, bulk 1919-1935, 39.2 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division original orders, 1928-1977, 49 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division special permits and Rule 37 case files, 1926-2000, bulk 1926-1936, approximately 395.24 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division oil and gas potential files, East Texas Field, 1930-1985, 23 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division hazardous waste questionnaires, 1991, approximately 5 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division pollution/water well contamination files, 1966-2001, 18 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division State Tender Board transcripts of testimony, 1939-1943, 1.4 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division Interstate Oil Compact Commission transcripts of proceeding, 1936-1941, 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division miscellaneous records, 1932-1933, 1940, 1947, 0.48 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division correspondence and reports (remnants), about 1932-about 1940, 0.25 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division correspondence re: East Texas Field, 1943-1960, approximately 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division oil and gas plats, about 1930-1960, bulk 1941-1954, 29 cubic ft.
  • Oil and Gas Division Rodessa Field files, 1936-1944, approximately 1.5 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division Panhandle reports, 1930-1939, approximately 2 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division hearing files, exceptions to Statewide Rule 21, about 1938, approximately 3 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division hearing files, Yates and Diamond "M" Unit, 1936-1938, 1954-1957, approximately 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division miscellaneous hearing files, after 1933, 1935, 1938-1943, 1946-1948, 1952, 1979, approximately 1.4 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division hearing files, Panhandle Field, prior to 1940, approximately 2 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division statewide hearing summary, 1937, approximately 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division survey of salt water disposal, 1957, approximately 16 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division monthly operator reports, gas wells, 1924-1925, approximately 2 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Oil and Gas Division vacuum hearing files, 1932-1948, approximately 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
Motor transportation regulation
  • Motor Transportation Division correspondence, 1923-1954, bulk 1929-1942, approximately 14 cubic ft.
  • Motor Transportation Division transcripts of application hearings, 1926-1956, bulk 1930-1939, approximately 31 cubic ft.
  • Motor Transportation Division enforcement and regulation records, 1929-1955, bulk 1936-1942, approximately 23 cubic ft.
  • Motor Transportation Division motor transportation transcripts, about 1922-about 1925, approximately 0.5 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Motor Transportation Division motor carrier dockets, about 1939-1958, approximately 1 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Motor Transportation Division motor freight dockets, about 1930-1937, approximately 4.5 cubic ft. [unprocessed]
  • Motor Transportation Division motor carrier annual reports, 1987-1988, 6 microfilm reels [unprocessed]
  • Motor Transportation Division specialized motor carrier operating reports, 1975-1981, 4 microfilm reels [only on a master neg. at SRC; listed as Gas Utilities/Transportation Division] [unprocessed]
Natural gas regulation
  • Gas Services Division gas utility company annual financial reports, 1920-2001, 2004-2006, 189 microfilm reels and 13.5 cubic ft. (paper)
  • Gas Utilities Division docket case files, 1920-1973, 25 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division director's general correspondence, 1935-1946, 1972-1979, bulk 1972-1979, 5 microfilm reels [Restricted]
  • Gas Utilities Division stockholders annual reports, 1963-1978, 3 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division special orders, 1952-1974, 4 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division audit files, 1974-1979, 8 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division permits screened, 1972-1979, 2 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division safety affidavits and reports, 1971-1978, 4 microfilm reels
  • Gas Utilities Division odorization reports, 1973-1978, 4 microfilm reels
Mining regulation
  • Surface Mining and Reclamation Division abandoned mine lands files, 1980-1992, 119 microfiche
Arkansas-White-Red River Basins Inter-Agency records, 1954-1956, bulk 1955, 2 cubic ft.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

Because of the possibility that a portion of these records, Railroad Commission Gas Utilities Division Directors' general correspondence, fall under Public Information Act exceptions including, but not limited to, home addresses, phone numbers, social security numbers, and personal family information of government employees and officials (V.C.T.A., Government Code, Section 552.117), an archivist must review these records before they can be accessed for research. The records may be requested for research under the provisions of the Public Information Act (V.T.C.A., Government Code, Chapter 552). The researcher may request an interview with an archivist or submit a request by mail, fax, or email including enough description and detail about the information requested to enable the archivist to accurately identify and locate the information requested. If our review reveals information that may be excepted by the Public Information Act, we are obligated to seek an open records decision from the Attorney General on whether the records can be released. The Public Information Act allows the Archives ten working days after receiving a request to make this determination. The Attorney General has 45 working days to render a decision. Alternately, the Archives can inform you of the nature of the potentially excepted information and if you agree, that information can be redacted or removed and you can access the remainder of the records.

Most of the Gas utility company annual financial reports, the Motor carrier annual reports, the Specialized motor carrier operating reports, and some of the Minutes are present only on master negative microfilm, stored offisite at the State Records Center. This film is unique and fragile and requires that a duplicate use copy be made of any reel that a researcher wishes to view. A duplicate use copy can be made at the researcher's expense. Arrangements for duplication and prepayment need to be made with the State and Local Records Management Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Materials housed in the State Archives do not circulate, but may be used in the State Archives search room. Materials will be retrieved from and returned to storage areas by staff members.

Restrictions on Use

Most records created by Texas state agencies are not copyrighted and may be freely used in any way. State records also include materials received by, not created by, state agencies. Copyright remains with the creator. The researcher is responsible for complying with U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17 U.S.C.).

Technical Requirements

Letter press copybooks are extremely fragile and need to be handled with care.

Researchers are required to wear gloves provided by the Archives when reviewing photographic materials.

Some items, including maps and oversize Rule 37 exhibit materials, are too large to photocopy.

Microfilm readers are available in the State Library and Archives building, ask the reference staff for their location.


Index Terms

The terms listed here were used to catalog the records. The terms can be used to find similar or related records.
Corporate Names:
Railroad Commission of Texas. Gas Utilities Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Gas Services Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Oil and Gas Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Surface Mining and Reclamation Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Rail Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Motor Transportation Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Transportation Division.
Railroad Commission of Texas. Main Office and Transportation Division.
Subjects:
Railroad companies--Texas.
Railroads and state--Texas.
Gas companies--Texas.
Gas companies--Texas--Rates.
Railroads--Texas--Rates.
Natural gas--Texas.
Petroleum industry and trade--Texas.
Gas industry--Texas.
Commercial vehicles--Texas.
Freight and freightage--Texas.
Mining--Texas.
Document Types:
Correspondence--Texas--Railroads--1872-1955.
Correspondence--Texas--Gas industry--1919-1942, 1972-1979.
Correspondence--Texas--Petroleum industry and trade--1919-1935.
Correspondence--Texas--Commercial vehicles--1923-1954.
Correspondence--Texas--Mining--1980-1992.
Annual reports--Texas--Railroads--1859-1996.
Annual reports--Texas--Gas industry--1920-2001, 2004-2006.
Reports--Texas--Commerical vehicles--1929-1955.
Reports--Texas--Gas industry--1919-1943, 1963-2006.
Reports--Texas--Petroleum industry and trade--1919-1943, 1963-2001.
Dockets--Texas--Railroads--Rates--1891-1898.
Dockets--Texas--Gas industry--1920-1973.
Orders--Texas--Petroleum industry and trade, 1919-1936.
Orders--Texas--Gas industry--1926-1977.
Orders--Texas--Railroads--1894-1935.
Minutes--Texas--Railroads and state--1891-2004.
Minutes--Texas--Gas industry--about 1917-2004.
Minutes--Texas--Petroleum industry and trade--about 1917-2004.
Minutes--Texas--Commercial vehicles--about 1930-1995.
Letterpress copybooks--Texas--Railroads and state--1898-1922.
Press releases--Texas--Railroads and state--1952-1983, 1985-2004.
Press releases--Texas--Gas industry--1952-1983, 1985-2004.
Press releases--Texas--Petroleum industry and trade--1952-1983, 1985-2004.
Press releases--Texas--Commerical vehicles--1952-1983, 1985-1995.
Functions:
Regulating railroads.
Regulating the gas industry.
Regulating the petroleum industry.
Regulating commercial vehicles.
Regulating mining.

Related Material

The following materials are offered as possible sources of further information on the agencies and subjects covered by the records. The listing is not exhaustive.

Texas State Archives
Texas Secretary of State, Statutory Documents Section, Secretary of State railroad records, 1876-1993, 29.63 cubic ft., 2 reels of microfilm (originals), 7 reels of microfilm (duplicates)
Texas Governor James Stephen Hogg, Records, 1889-1894, undated, 17.17 cubic ft.
Texas Legislature, Joint Committee to Investigate the New London Tragedy, Records, 1937, fractional [There is no finding aid for these records. The call number is 2-10/846.]
Texas Legislature, Joint Committee to Investigate the Receivership of the International and Great Northern Railroad, Records, 1891, 5 inches [Restricted] [There is no finding aid for these records, the call number is 1988/61.]
Texas Legislature, House of Representatives, Committee to Investigate the Hot Oil Situation, Records, 1934-1936, 1.3 cubic ft. [Restricted] [There is no finding aid for these records. The call numbers are 2-10/843 through 845.]
Texas Legislature, House of Representatives, Committee on Oil, Gas and Mining, Minutes and witness affirmations, 1953-1971, less than one cubic ft. [Restricted]
Texas Legislature, House of Representatives, Committee on Common Carriers, Minutes and witness affirmations, 1955-1969, less than one cubic ft. [Restricted]
Texas Legislature, Senate, Investigation Committee Appointed by Virtue of Senate Simple Resolution No. 96, 1935-1936, 0.3 cubic ft.
John H. Reagan Papers, 1846-1904, 12.5 linear in.
James C. Langdon Papers, 1944-1979, 19.5 linear ft.
James Harvey Holdeman Papers, 1879-1965 (bulk 1920-1950), 1.41 cubic ft., 578 maps, 3 photographs
Miscellaneous photographs removed from Railroad Commission records, 1922, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1942, 1948, fractional cubic ft.
Prints and Photograph Collection, Hornaday Collection [railroads, oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Troendle Collection [railroads]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Texas Scenes Collection [railroads]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Alfred E. Menn Collection [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Burkburnett oil field photographs [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, James Orbeck Collection [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Texas Cities Postcards Collection [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Picture Book of Texas Cities Collection [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Prints and Photograph Collection, Department of Public Safety Collection [oil and gas industry - fields, wells, etc.]
Records Relating to Railroads, 1836-1950, bulk about 1880-about 1910, 9.4 cubic ft.
The History Center, Diboll.
Texas Southeastern Railroad records and records of the Lufkin, Hemphill and Gulf Railroad
Temple Railroad and Heritage Museum, Temple, Texas
Railroad companies papers and records, including engineering drawings, are present in several collections. An index is present on the Archives home page.
DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
Railroad companies records and papers are present in several collections, including the Muskogee Collection; the Everette Lee DeGolyer, Jr. Railroad Photographs; and the Baldwin Locomotive Collection. This link will take you the collections home page.
Southwest Collection, Texas Tech University, Lubbock.
Railroad companies records and papers, including the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company records; and the Roscoe, Synder, and Pacific Railway Company papers. This link will take you the Southwest Collection's manuscripts page.
Special Collections Division, University of Texas at Arlington Libraries, Arlington.
Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Records, 1889-1991, 7.17 linear ft.
Publications
Texas. Supplement Senate Journal, Forty-fifth Legislature, Regular Session, January 25, 1937 [the supplement is tipped inside Copy 1 of the Journal of the Senate of the State of Texas, Regular Session of the Forty-fifth Legislature.] [1937?]. [report on a Senate investigation of the Railroad Commission in 1935-1936.]
Texas Legislature. Report of the Joint Committee to Investigate the Receivership of the International and Great Northern Railroad, Austin, 1892.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

(Identify the item and cite the series), Railroad Commission of Texas records. Archives and Information Services Division, Texas State Library and Archives Commission.

Accession Information

Accession numbers: 1936/002, 1941/007, 1961/005, 1961/046, 1962/218, 1963/173, 1970/025, 1971/152, 1971/165, 1978/152, 1981/120, 1982/328, 1982/358, 1983/055, 1983/108, 1990/097, 1990/141, 1991/008, 1993/026, 1993/132, 1995/129, 1996/034, 1998/093, 2000/078, 2000/139, 2001/025, 2001/059, 2001/143, 2002/002, 2002/003, 2002/008, 2002/098, 2003/038, 2003/117, 2003/161, 2003/168, 2003/176, 2005/009, 2005/185, 2006/054, 2006/126, 2006/266, 2006/391, 2007/073, 2008/008, 2008/009, 2008/135, 2008/161, 2009/104, 2012/112, and unknown

These records were transferred to the Archives and Information Services Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission by the Governor's Office on October 8, 1936; by the Comptroller's Office on March 19, 1942; by the Railroad Commission of Texas in October 1961; on May 9, 1962; July 19, 1963; in May 1964; on October 7, 1969; August 6 and 23, 1971; August 16, 1978; February 12, 1981; June 23, August 9, and November 17, 1982; February 17, 1983; March 6, May 24, September 20, and October 22, 1990; March 9, 1993; June 15 and December 18, 1995; April 3, 1998; December 16, 1999; April 13, October 9, and November 15, 2000; August 6, September 5 and 18, 2001; January 31 and October 18, 2002; February 4, May 21, June 19, and July 1, 2003; September 23, 2004; January 25, March 6, August 10 and December 15, 2006; April 28 and June 28, 2008; and March 3, 2009; and unknown dates; and by the Legislative Reference Library on March 27, 2002 (reaccessioned on February 3, 2012), October 18, 2002; November 8, 2005; and September 11, 2007.

Processing Information

Numerous archivists have processed various series of the Railroad Commission records, with most of the known work being done by Laura Saegert and Paul Beck.

unknown Archives staff, pre-1980

Several series processed and additions to existing series by Laura K. Saegert, April 1981 and March 1985

Surveyed by Paul Beck from 1985 to 1987

Series processed by Paul Beck, July and September 1986, March 1987

Several series processed by Laura K. Saegert, August 1990

Series processed by Tony Black, October 1990

Series processed and additions to existing series by Laura K. Saegert, October 1990, April 1991

Several series processed by Paul Beck, March 1993, March 1994

Series processed by Tonia Wood, June 1995

Series processed by Lisa Hendricks, June 1998

Appraised by Laura K. Saegert, March 2001

Several series processed and additions to existing series by Laura K. Saegert, October 2001, February 2002, December 2003, January 2004

Additions to several series and DACS compliance for the finding aid by Laura K. Saegert, March 2009

Addition to scope and content note by Laura K. Saegert, June 2011

Update to accession information by Rebecca Romanchuk, February 2012

Appraisal Information

The records of the Railroad Commission were appraised by the appraisal staff of the Texas State Archives on March 16, 2001. Fifty-two current record series at the agency were determined to be archival, 20 series of non-current and unscheduled records were determined to be archival and were transferred to the Archives. The appraisal report can be found in the search room of the State Archives. The online version of the report for this series is available at http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/appraisal/rrc1.html (part I) and http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/arc/appraisal/rrc2.html (part II).

Other Formats for the Records

Some of the minutes are also available on microfilm. Some of the gas company utility reports are also available on paper.

The Railroad Commission’s scanned versions of the East Texas historical oil and gas hearing files are available online. The RRC plans to transfer the originals to the State Archives in the fall of 2011.


Detailed Description of the Records

 

Minutes, 1891-2004,
20.85 cubic ft. and 150 microfilm reels

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Its statutory role is to prevent waste of the state's natural resources, to protect the correlative rights of different interest owners, to prevent pollution, and to provide safety in matters such as hydrogen sulfide. These minutes are the official record of the meetings of the Railroad Commission of Texas and document the actions and orders of the commissioners, covering the years 1891-2004. Other items include notices of hearings, orders, circulars, and special notices. Matters before the Commission documented in the minutes include the establishment of and changes in railroad freight and passenger rates, train schedules, tariff classifications, requests to discontinue passenger stations, amendments to rules, complaints, and other railroad issues; contested oil and gas cases, complaints on violated Commission oil and gas rules (e.g. operator not in compliance with plugging rules), changes in policies and procedures, amendments to rules, resolution of complaints filed against the Commission, and other related matters concerning oil and gas regulation (production/permitting, oil field clean up, site remediation, compliance, etc.); issues concerning the operation of motor vehicles; gas utility regulation; liquefied petroleum gas and other gas services issues; regulation of pipelines; and surface mining and reclamation issues. Minutes from 1891 to the end of the 1910s are primarily concerned with railroad rates and regulations.
Beginning in 1917 with pipeline regulation, the minutes begin to record the Commission's activities in other areas. The establishment of the Oil and Gas Division, the Gas Utilities (later Gas Services) Division, and the Motor Transportation Division expanded greatly the Commission's jurisdiction and the minutes reflect these changes. The activities of the divisions added large dockets of cases, hearings and orders to the minutes. These divisions came to dominate the meetings of the Commission and the minutes as railroad regulation decreased and other areas of regulation became more complex.
Topics covered in the minutes include regulation and operation of railroads, including railroad companies' annual operations, rail construction, and setting freight and passenger rates; oil and gas activities, including the issuance of orders governing drilling of oil and gas wells and the operation of the fields; oil and gas conservation and safety, including spacing of wells; disposal of oil and gas waste and pollution cleanup efforts; natural gas issues, include rate hearings, deregulation, and odorization of natural gas; and issuance of permits or certificates of convenience to operate commercial motor vehicles on public highways.
The minutes from 1891 to 1972 are in bound volumes and from 1973 to 2004 on microfilm. During the microfilming process Reel 81 was skipped. The microfilm through 1996 exists only as master negatives and is stored offsite, so paper use copies of the minutes have been retained for 1979-1995. The microfilm reels for 1997-2004 are use copies stored at the Archives building and are available for research use. Each of the pre-1920 volumes of minutes have a brief subject index in the front of the volume. The post-1920 volumes, the microfilm, and the paper sets of minutes do not have indexes. Orders, circulars and other attachments are only found in the microfilm copies of the minutes. Agendas and minutes from 1998 to the present are posted on the Railroad Commission's website, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/meetings/conferences/index.php
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas Minutes. Some restrictions apply to this series, see the full finding aid for more information.



 

Docket book, 1891-1898,
0.22 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The records consist of a single docket book of the Railroad Commission of Texas with entries dating from 1891 to 1898. The book lists forty formal compaints concerning railroad service or tariffs filed in that period. The complaints are in chronological order and each one lists an assigned docket number, the date, the plaintiff and defendant, the nature of the complaint, and a brief statement on the outcome. The complaint was considered closed if a satisfactory explanation had been given by the railroad agency or if no further complaint was received. If a judgment was against the railroad or if no further action was to be taken by the Railroad Commission then a full description was given in the Commission's minutes. A cite from the docket book to the individual page in the minutes provides access to the description of the Railroad Commission's decision. After 1898, though the nature of the complaints remained the same, they became part of the minutes.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas docket book.



 

Commissioners' records, 1898-1901, 1906-1908, 1916, 1920-1966, bulk about 1930-about 1960,
10.3 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. The records include correspondence, speeches, press releases, newspaper clippings, magazine articles and reprints, maps, photographs, reports, legislation, and pamphlets of two commissioners of the Railroad Commission of Texas. The records date 1898-1901, 1906-1908, 1916, 1920-1966, bulk about 1930-about 1960. The records of Allison Mayfield (1860-1923) consist of four letterpress copybooks of outgoing correspondence. Most of the letters in the first two volumes are personal family or business correspondence and date 1898-1901, 1906-1908. The third and fourth volumes concentrate on Mayfield's reelection efforts to the Railroad Commission in 1898, 1916 and 1922. The records of Texas Railroad Commissioner Ernest O. Thompson (1892-1966) include correspondence, speeches, press releases, newspaper clippings, magazine articles and reprints, and pamphlets that especially document his role as Commission spokesperson on oil and gas conservation. The records cover the period 1920-1966, bulk about 1930-about 1960.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas commissioners' records



 

Commissioner Matthews' records, 1997-2005,
1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Records are calendars and schedules of Railroad Commissioner Charles R. Matthews for 1997-2005 and administrative correspondence for 2002-2005. Commissioner Matthews served as a member of the Texas Railroad Commission from January 3, 1995 to January 31, 2005.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2007/073. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Commissioners speeches, 1930s-1950s, 1963-1967, 1978-1980,
3 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) initially had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. Today the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Records are speeches of three former commissioners of the Railroad Commission of Texas, Ernest Thompson (1930s-1950s), John Langdon (1963-1967), and John Poerner (1978-1980). Ernest Thompson has the longest tenure of any Railroad Commissioner, serving from January 1, 1933 through January 8, 1965. John Langdon served on the commission from January 28, 1963 to December 31, 1977. John H. Poerner served from January 2, 1978 to January 1, 1981.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2008/009 (Thompson) and 2008/135 (Landgon and Poerner) A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Press releases,
Dates: 1952-1983, 1985-2004,
0.94 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas and surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel. Its statutory role is to prevent waste of the state's natural resources, to protect the correlative rights of different interest owners, to prevent pollution, and to provide safety in matters such as hydrogen sulfide. The records are news or press releases, other materials present include statements, laws, and maps, dating 1952-1983, 1985-2004. These items are prepared by the Public Information Office of the Railroad Commission of Texas at the request of an individual commissioner or prepared in the commissioner's office and released upon the instruction of the Commission. The releases are used to inform the media and public about Commission policies, hearings, decisions, actions, and programs. These materials cover the full range of commission activities, with most concerning the oil and gas industry. Issues covered include rail activities, oil and gas regulation, environmental concerns, motor transportation, natural gas safety and natural gas pipelines, surface mining and reclamation issues (primarily coal mining), and the use of alternative fuels. The releases for 1952-1983 and 1985-1991 are bound. There are loose, or unbound releases from 1983 and 1986-2004. And, press releases from 1985 to 1999 can also be found on microfiche. Following the releases are a few items filed with the releases but not in the chronological sequence - oil and gas production reports, maps, and laws.
Press releases beginning in 2007 can be found on the website of the agency at http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/pressreleases/index.php
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas press releases.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Rail Division incoming correspondence, 1872-1955, bulk 1891-early 1920s,
52 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These records of the Rail Division (formerly the Main Office, then the Mail and Transportation Division and then the Transportation Division) of the Railroad Commission include incoming letters, telegrams, petitions, newspaper clippings, affidavits, depositions, transcripts of hearings, maps, blueprints, pamphlets, circulars, tariffs, copies of legislative bills, mortgage contracts, and merger agreements. Also present are various printed items such as railroad tickets, free railroad passes, labor union contracts with railroads, railroad passenger tax receipts, and copies of railroad valuation statements. The bulk of the correspondence dates from 1891 until the early 1920s with some materials from 1872 to 1955. The correspondence can be roughly grouped into four categories: general public, business, railroads, and government.
Correspondents from the general public included passengers, farmers, lawyers, labor unions, chambers of commerce, and other citizens who wrote to the Commission on such topics as complaints about passenger facilities and rates, free passes, jobs with the Railroad Commission, requests for racially segregated depots, and petitions for more frequent train service.
Correspondence from businesses was overwhelmingly concerned with freight rates on commodities and with such shipping problems as overcharges, lost cars, demurrage costs for delays or damages, and the classification of commodities. Other business topics included cotton compress regulations, rebates, tariffs, taxation, and weight limits of freight shipments.
The same preponderance of concern over rates was also evident in the correspondence from the railroads and their freight agents. Other correspondence from railroads concern reports filed by railroads to comply with legislation regulations. These include the annual reports and the valuation statements each railroad had to file with the Railroad Commission and the frequent corrections and addenda. More correspondence was generated by the examination of railroad capital stock records by the Railroad Commission, the issuance of railroad stocks and bonds, the costs of construction, and general questions on Railroad Commission policy and form requirements.
The fourth category of correspondents with the Railroad Commission were government officials from the local, state, and federal levels. This included county attorneys, Texas governors and attorney generals, governors and railroad commissioners from other states, Texas representatives and senators on the state and federal levels, and the federal Interstate Commerce Commission.
The overriding concern reflected throughout the incoming correspondence is the subject of rates, both passenger and freight, with the most attention given to freight rates and the costs for the many different commodities. Businesses, farmers, and other shippers complained about high rates and sought relief from the Railroad Commission; railroads defended their rates and asked for increases through the Commission; the Commission held rate hearings, received mail from both sides lobbying their respective positions, then made rulings, issued rate orders, and published tariffs and circulars announcing the new rates.
These records document the reactions of the railroads and railroad users to the policies and actions of the Commission. The incoming correspondence reflects the nature of the Commission's outgoing correspondence, from routine form letters to the predominant subject of rates.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Rail Division incoming correspondence.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Rail Division outgoing correspondence, 1891-1933,
34.38 cubic ft. in 255 volumes

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. There are 255 letterpress volumes of outgoing correspondence from the Railroad Commission of Texas, dating 1891-1933. The correspondence can be roughly grouped into four categories: general public, business, railroads, and government.
Letters to the general public usually respond to requests by Confederate veterans for free passes, complaints from passengers about poor service, demands for new or improved passenger depots, requests for employment at the Railroad Commission, and petitions that trains stop at particular stations.
Letters to businesses usually answer questions and complaints about tariff rates. Part of the cost of freight shipment was determined by the tariff rate and this was based on the commodity, how it was packaged, how full the carload was, and what routes were used to ship the freight between points in Texas. The classification of commodities, applications for tariff changes, and accusations of overcharges are detailed in this correspondence.
Letters to the railroads and their freight agents cover many topics, including tariff rate questions, tracking down missing freight cars, requests for annual financial reports and corrections to those reports, complaints about high passenger fares, questions about track mileages including spur tracks and switching yards, and demurrage charges for shipments delayed or damaged. Before the establishment of the Oil and Gas Division in 1919, the Railroad Commission sent out circulars informing railroads of the requirements of the new oil and gas conservation laws. This correspondence tells companies what forms to use to comply with the law, how to file, and acknowledges forms received.
Correspondence with other government agencies includes discussions with the state attorney general's office and with the federal Interstate Commerce Commission.
An inventory of the records was conducted to provide a brief description of the contents of each box, including the dates and types of materials, and a notation of any filing arrangement that may be present.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Rail Division outgoing correspondence.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Transportation Division correspondence and reports, 1888-1948, bulk 1894-about 1935,
8.7 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. This series consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence of the Railroad Commission Rail Division (formerly the Main and Transportation Division), dating from 1888 to 1948, primarily between 1894 and the mid-1930s. Other materials present include applications; orders of the Commission; finance dockets; engineers' reports; reports and resolutions of railroad company directors or stockholders; lists of stockholders; petitions; deeds and leases; construction contracts; copies of bylaws, charters, and mortgages; newspaper clippings; and a few plats and maps of railroad property and railway lines. Most letters are between the Railroad Commission and officials of various railroad companies (directors, engineers, and others). Topics include the registration and issuance of bonds, extensions of track and other construction, property valuations, and the consolidation or merger of railroad companies. Many of the older documents (pre-1920s), are copies used as documentation in applications of one kind or another.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Transportation Division correspondence and reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Rail Division annual reports of railroad companies, 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996,
380.24 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These are annual reports of railroad companies. Dates covered are 1859-1867, 1873-1885, 1890-1996. Railroad companies operating in the State of Texas were required by law to prepare annual reports concerning their activities beginning in 1853. Legislation approved February 7, 1853, entitled, 'An Act to Regulate Railroad Companies,' designated the Comptroller of Public Accounts as the receiver of such reports. Railroad companies continued to file annual reports with the Comptroller until 1894. The act creating the Railroad Commission in 1891 gave the Commission authority to elicit information in the form of a report. Comprehensive annual reports encompassing a wide range of subjects were soon required of all companies operating lines within the State. The first reports filed with the Railroad Commission, known as the Circular Number 22 reports, were filed in 1891.
Each report details the company's organization, operation, and financial condition. Data present may include the names of officers, directors, and stockholders; incorporation and organizational structure; capital stock; funded debt; property owned or leased; cost of road, equipment, and permanent improvements; operating expenses; income account; stocks and bonds owned; earnings from operations; rentals received; employees and salaries; number of passengers; amount of freight transported; mileage of track operated; and injuries to persons or other accidents. Most of the reports cover the company's operations for the calendar year. A few of the earlier reports cover partial year operations.
In later years, the large Class I railroads began submitting copies of their reports prepared for the Interstate Commerce Commission to the Railroad Commission to fulfill the reporting requirements. These ICC reports generally include a separate statistical report compiled by the company for the Railroad Commission, titled State Statistics. The smaller (Classes II and III) railroads annual reports were prepared primarily on RRC forms, though some companies used the ICC reporting forms instead. Recent changes in federal law removed the requirement that rail companies file the annual reports with the Railroad Commission. Staff at the Railroad Commission believe the larger companies will continue to file reports.
These records have been appraised and processed. A list of the railroad company reports is in a database accessible through the website of the Library and Archives Commission, Index to Annual Reports of Railroad Companies . A printed list in alphabetical order and one in chronological order is also available in the search room of the Archives and Information Services Division.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Rail Division annual reports of railroad companies.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Transportation Division express companies annual reports, 1908-1949,
7 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. This series consists of the annual reports of the express companies operating in Texas between 1908 and 1949. The reports of each company include such information as history, organization, officers, routes of operation, capital stock, value of express property in Texas, value of and expenditures for real property and equipment, current assets and liabilities, income account, operating revenues, operating expenses, employees and salaries, important changes during the year, and gross receipts for transportation. Between 1908 and 1916, the reporting year ended on June 30; thereafter, it ended on December 31.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Transportation Division express companies annual reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Rail Division tariffs, 1890-1985, bulk 1914-1984,
44.8 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These records are tariffs issued by the Railroad Commission of Texas, dating 1890-1985, bulk dating 1914-1984. Tariffs are publications of rates, rules and regulations that concern common carriers, in this case railroads. The 1891 act that created the Railroad Commission empowered it to adopt the necessary rates, regulations, and charges in connection with railroad freight and passengers. The Railroad Commission promulgated the tariffs for intrastate commerce on railroads but did not itself publish them. The Commission required railroad companies to publish and submit the companies' proposed general and specific tariffs. The Commission would then issue the approved tariffs and keep copies of the proposed general and specific tariffs as reference tools. Each type of merchandise or commodity was classified by the Railroad Commission and had its own shipping rate. The more important commodities, such as cotton, had their own tariffs published and issued. Other commodities were grouped as categories: vegetables, lumber products, etc. The cost of shipping was usually figured for every 100 pounds of merchandise. Sometimes a railroad or express company issued tariffs just for the stations on their routes, other times in conjunction with other carriers. Division sheets then listed the cost for shipping part way on one line, up to the division point, and the rest of the way on another line.
This series includes loose intrastate tariffs and accompanying division sheets issued directly by the Railroad Commission, 1890-1929, and several bound volumes of tariffs issued by the Railroad Commission, including Railroad freight circulars, 1901-1984; Texas Lines tariffs (later became Texas-Louisiana Lines tariffs, then Southwestern Freight Bureau), 1913-1985; Western classification tariffs, 1918-1962; and Texas-Louisiana Lines routing circulars, 1937-1953. While the bound volumes consist mostly of intrastate tariffs issued by the Railroad Commission, some include interstate tariffs issued by the federal government.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Rail Division tarriffs.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Transportation Division special authority orders, 1894-1935,
12.22 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These records are files of the Transportation Division (formerly the Main and Transportation Division, later the Rail Division) and consist of the special authority orders issued by the Railroad Commission, correspondence between the Commission and railroad companies concerning requested changes, and internal memos discussing the requested changes, dating 1894-1935. Most railway lines operating in Texas during this time period (1894-1935) are represented.
Special authority orders were issued by the Railroad Commission generally in response to requests from railway companies for a change in rates or regulations. The Commission established rates and regulations for the railroad companies and announced the rates, etc. through printed circulars (known as tariffs), sometimes writing particular companies if the situation warranted it. Railroad companies often requested a change in rates or regulations for special circumstances by applying directly to the Railroad Commission for a special order which would grant their requests. Situations which led to such requests included transporting circuses and other such shows between towns, a change in the economy of a particular region, or a sudden increase in the usage and needed transportation of a particular product, such as transporting granite from Granite Mountain in Central Texas to Beaumont for use in building jetties at Sabine Pass. The Railroad Commission, if it approved the requested change, would issue a special authority order announcing the rate or regulation change, describing the situation in which the change was applicable.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Transportation Division special authority orders.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Transportation Division application files, 1891-1971,
15.05 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These records are files of the Transportation Division (formerly the Main and Transportation Division, later the Rail Division). Records are correspondence, telegrams, authority orders, tariffs, circulars, notes, and wrappers from the Railroad Commission of Texas, dating from 1891 to 1971. These are application files containing requests for special freight and passenger rates and the commission's response. Situations in which railroad companies applied for special freight rates include transportation of shows such as circuses and wild west shows, livestock and water during drought, and corn to be husked en route. Requests for special passenger rates include transportation of prisoners of war and high school and college football players and fans.
This portion of the Railroad Commission freight application files was apparently separated from the rest of the files before they were transferred to the State Archives. An earlier accession (1990/097) fills in gaps in the freight application files found in this accession.
The Railroad Commission established rates and regulations for the railroad companies and announced the rates, etc. through printed circulars (known as tariffs), sometimes writing particular companies if the situation warranted it. Railroad companies often requested a change in rates or regulations for special circumstances by applying directly to the Railroad Commission. If the commission granted the request, it would issue a special authority order describing the situation in which the change was applicable. The commission would also notify the railroad company of denied requests. By 1984, federal statutes had eliminated the Railroad Commission's role in economic regulation of the Texas rail industry.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Transportation Division application files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Transportation Division Interstate Commerce Commission financial dockets, 1920-1952,
33.84 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The Railroad Commission, at the request of the federal Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC), would often hear cases for the ICC (or jointly with the ICC) involving applications for certificates of public convenience and necessity and would recommend to the ICC whether or not to grant the application. The Railroad Commission interaction with the ICC was through the Main Office (later Main Office and Rate Division, then Main Office and Transportation Division, then the Transportation Division). These records consist of ICC finance docket files, generally consisting of applications; briefs, exhibits, questionnaires, and other items gathered for or presented during the hearing; the report of the ICC as to the outcome of the railroad company's application; and correspondence. Files are dated 1920-1952. The finance docket files concern applications for certificates of public convenience and necessity by rail companies. Docket topics include construction of new lines, extension of lines, acquisition of lines, abandonment of lines and/or operations, consolidation of railroad companies, recapture proceedings of excess income, extension of liens and mortgages, issuing and selling stocks and bonds, loans through the revolving track fund, and other topics. Most railway lines operating in Texas during this time period (1920-1952) are represented.
Supplementing the case documents are correspondence between the ICC Commissioner and the Governor or the Railroad Commission; correspondence between railroad companies and the Railroad Commission; some correspondence from city and county officials and others to the Railroad Commission concerning proposed changes of railroad companies; maps showing proposed extensions, track to be abandoned, lines in operation, right-of-way maps along railroad lines, general railroad maps of areas, and other railroad related topics; prospectus and charters of railroad companies; specimen sheets of stocks or bonds to be offered for sale; and some photographs used for exhibits, showing things such as railroad depots and the condition of tracks. A few docket files not titled as "finance dockets" are scattered through the files. These are filed by their date rather than the docket number.
Dates given on the folder reflect the dates of the dockets and the materials associated with it. In a few cases, the only items in the files are supplemental applications and associated materials which were often filed years after the initial case was heard. These particular cases are filed by the original date, in brackets, followed by the dates of the supplemental materials. Materials used as exhibits (maps, charts, etc.), may date back to the late 19th century or early 20th century. Dates of materials used as exhibits are not included in the folder titles.
Preceding the alphabetical files is a list of dockets, giving dates applications were filed and decided upon, for the years 1927-1936. At the end of the series is a Box of materials from docket 8448, Texas and Northern Pacific Railroad. These were originally housed with part of another series in the Railroad Commission records. Additional materials from this docket can also be found in the regular alphabetical listing.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Transportation Division Interstate Commerce Commission financial dockets.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Interstate Commerce Commission valuation reports, 1926-1927,
0.57 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. The Railroad Commission, at the request of the federal Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC), would often hear cases for the ICC (or jointly with the ICC) involving applications for certificates of public convenience and necessity and would recommend to the ICC whether or not to grant the application. The Railroad Commission interaction with the ICC was through the Main Office (later Main Office and Rate Division, then Main Office and Transportation Division, then the Transportation Division). These records are two sets of detailed valuation reports on the construction of railroad branch lines. The reports are from a Texas railroad, the Panhandle and Santa Fe, to the Interstate Commerce Commission's (ICC) Bureau of Valuation. The first report is for a branch line from Panhandle, Texas to Borger, Texas dated October 16, 1926. A year later, October 15, 1927, another valuation report was filed for a branch line from White Deer, Texas to Skellyton, Texas. Each report gives a brief history of the railroad company and of its application with the ICC to construct the line. These reports, labeled "Bureau of Valuation Form 588," then detail the construction costs of each line including the costs of labor, materials, transportation, equipment and all improvements such as bridges, track, stations, signals, and grading. Each different construction cost is assigned to an account and the accounts are arranged numerically.
An inventory of the records was conducted to provide a brief description of the contents of each box including the dates and types of materials and a notation of any filing arrangement that may be present.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Interstate Commerce Commission valuation reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Rate hearing # 1573 transcripts and exhibits, 1914-1915,
2 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. These records consist of transcripts and exhibits (including photographs) of railroad rate hearings held by the Railroad Commission of Texas from March to November 1915. The Commission issued Circular 4616 in August 1914 to announce that hearings would be held to consider a request by the major railroads in Texas for an increase in their revenues. The first hearings were held in Dallas in March 1915. The railroads asked for a 15% freight rate increase and submitted the necessary tariff changes and plans to the Commission for statewide distribution. The hearings were reconvened in June to hear the responses of shippers to the proposed freight increases. Hearings were held again in September and once more in October to get the reaction of the Commission staff "as to the reasonableness of the application and the proper action that should govern the Railroad Commission in the application." All of these hearings were designated as Rate Hearing #1573. Actual changes in tariffs and rates are a separate record and are reported in the minutes of the Railroad Commission beginning in January of 1916. (See Railroad Commission of Texas, Minutes, 1891-1996 series.)
There are nineteen bound volumes in this series. Transcripts of actual testimony from the hearings number fifteen. This is almost a complete set of transcripts. Volume 1 from October 1915 is missing.
The four remaining volumes were compiled by Railroad Commission staff as exhibits. Two volumes are valuations of the property of the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe Railroad (G,C & SF) and the Houston & Texas Central Railroad (H & TC). One volume is on the value of equipment such as steam locomotives and other cars, with photographs of each type dating 1914-1915, and the second volume lists the real estate and track valuation.
The third exhibit volume contains an audit of nine railroads selected as representative of railroads operating in the state. The audit includes such facts as track mileage, capital stocks and bonds, net operating income, freight and passenger traffic, and abstracts of balance sheets. The figures are as of June 30, 1914. These three volumes were used as evidence in examining the financial status of principal Texas railroads in determining whether the railroads did deserve increased revenues.
The final exhibit volume condensed the June testimony of shippers into brief statements and organized it by commodity. This volume is not a legal brief but a series of testimonies on commodity rates and classifications.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas rate hearing # 1573 transcripts and exhibits.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

"Doubleheader" hearing, about 1900,
0.47 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. This series consists of the transcript of a hearing, about 1900, before the Railroad Commission of Texas. The hearing concerned the use of "doubleheaders," which is the running of a train with two engines, on Texas railroads and focused on the safety issues of such a practice. Railroad employees objected to the use and were especially concerned over the safety of the crew in the second engine. Railroad companies defended the practice, citing the use of doubleheaders on many railroads outside Texas, denying that safety problems were any greater than on single engine trains, and pointing to the greater pulling power and increased efficiency of larger trains.
This was a formal hearing before the Railroad Commission with Chairman John H. Reagan (1891-1903) presiding. The typed transcript is over 500 pages long and consists entirely of witness testimony. The witnesses were sworn in and responded to questions under both direct and cross examination. The many witnesses included engineers, brakemen, conductors, officials of railroad unions, freight agents, and general superintendents and other officers of railroad companies.
Pages are missing from both the beginning and the end of the typed transcript. There is no formal title page, conclusion, or date.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas doubleheader hearing.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Title: Rail Division railroad history files,
Dates: 1836-1996, undated bulk 1850-1960,
5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) had jurisdiction over the rates and operations of railroads, terminals, wharves and express companies. This series contains correspondence, reports, charters, laws, agreements, clippings, articles, publications, photographs, maps, and other materials documenting the history of rail companies in Texas and the role of the Railroad Commission of Texas in railroad regulation and rail history. Dates covered are 1836-1996, and undated, most items dating 1850-1960. According to a RRC staff memo from 1982, the Rail Division staff was encouraged to create an archives of rail company records to preserve the history of the Commission's rail activities. Topics listed in the memo for consideration include when railroad lines were constructed and abandoned, when companies were chartered, a history of the Commission's rail activities, and a history of railroads in Texas. The files gathered in this series cover some of this information.
The bulk of the records are railroad company files prepared for all railroads created and/or chartered in Texas. These railroad company files have information about the line typed or handwritten on the file folder. The information varies from folder to folder with all having the name of the line and usually the date it was chartered or created. Additional data found on many folders includes documentation of name changes of the company, mergers, if/when the line was discontinued or bought out, or similar information. Some of these annotated folders have long paragraphs about the railroad line's history. Items found within the folders may include correspondence on topics such as the history of the line, line abandonment, bonds, operating expenses, audits, etc. Also present in some files are valuation statements, financial or audit statements, copies of charters or other laws, agreements, reports, maps, or Railroad Commission or Interstate Commerce Commission orders or circulars. Not all folders contain records, many just have typed information on the folders. (The railroad company folders were in poor condition and were replaced with new folders during processing. Each folder was photocopied to retain the information found on the original folder.) The first folder in each alphabetical set (A, B, etc.) contains a list of individuals or companies whose last corporate name begins with that letter. The list gives the name, railroad line associated with the name, and a date. Entries are ordered chronologically by date, with dates on the lists ranging from 1915 to 1964.
Following the railroad company files are a group of rail history-related files created by the Railroad Commission to document its rail activities and railroad history. In addition to created and gathered histories, there is correspondence, reports and other materials on topics such as auditor duties, valuation, laws pertaining to railroads, Jim Crow laws, land grants, destruction of rail company records, rail gauges, passenger trains, and Rail Division activities. One interesting single item to note is a resignation letter from the RRC engineer in 1908. Added to the letter are notes by all three RRC commissioners regreating his resignation but understanding why he was leaving (the wages for the state were low and there was little room for professional advancement). Also of interest is a large group of letters from the mid 1940s in the files titled "Jim Crow law" concerning the segregation or lack thereof of white and black passengers into separate compartments on trains and/or the provision of separate but equal facilities to each group.
Two large wallets labeled as "Historical data" or "Historical file "contain a variety of reports, letters, photographs, maps, and other materials relating to Texas rail history, Railroad Commission history, or specific rail companies. Also present are folders of photographs showing railway and freight yards, depots, stations, rail cars and engines, most marked as exhibits (used in either Railroad Commission or Interstate Commerce Commission hearings) and many with docket numbers. There are two photographs especially worth noting - both are circa 1900 views of engines and rail employees. A few maps are in the historical files showing specific rail company lines, track facilities, or county/regional maps showing rail lines within a particular county or region. Few of the maps are marked with exhibit or docket numbers. There is little, none in most cases, printed docket material present with either the maps or the photographs. A small number of railroad company files for newer companies or regarding hearings on issues for specific lines are filed at the end of the historical files. A set of 1988 annual railroad company reports was removed from this accession and transferred to the series Annual reports of railroad companies.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Rail Division railroad history files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Oil and Gas Division correspondence and reports, 1890-1943, bulk 1919-1935,
39.2 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. This series contains correspondence and reports of the Oil and Gas Division, covering the years 1890-1943, bulk 1919-1938. A small amount of materials from the Motor Transportation Division and the Gas Utilities Division of the Railroad Commission is present as well as correspondence and photos re: railroads.
Incoming letters are from a variety of sources including the general public, oil and gas companies, pipeline carriers, other private businesses, as well as internal correspondence from the Division's Conservation Agents in the field. Outgoing letters from the Division headquarters in Austin are generally brief acknowledgments on the arrival of forms and responses to requests for information. Telegrams, maps, contracts, photos, and reports on standardized forms are also present.
Reports and correspondence from the Division's field conservation agents date from 1919 when the Oil and Gas Division was formed and record the first attempts at on-site supervision. The field conservation agents were responsible for inspecting wells, preventing fires, stopping waste, and otherwise enforcing the State's conservation laws. Agents filed "Daily reports" for each of the wells they visited. These listed place, date, operator, address, well number, miles from the nearest town, miles traveled that day, and remarks about wells. Such remarks could include the depth of the well and any problems such as salt water in the well and whether or not it was dry.
There is also routine internal correspondence between the field agents and the Division headquarters in Austin dealing with requests for forms, stamps, repairs of old cars, purchase of new cars, invoices of supplies, inventory of office equipment, and newspaper subscriptions. Other correspondence of a more personal nature for the agents included living expenses in boom towns, their salary, and the hiring and firing of the agents.
These files give great insight into the everyday work, the working conditions, the policy making, and the environment around the field agent. Much of the personality of each agent is revealed as they struggle to enforce the conservation laws in the early oil fields. Such boom towns as Desdemona, Burkburnett, and Ranger were the initial assignments for the agents. Later, new fields in the Panhandle and East Texas required more agents. The bulk of the agent correspondence runs from 1919 to 1933.
Letters from oil and gas companies and pipeline carriers are either routine requests for information and forms from the Railroad Commission or cover letters sending the completed forms back to the Commission. Reports that the Commission required on each well included notifications of intention to drill, deepen, plug, or shoot a well; statements of condition before and after; the drilling record on each well; certificate showing compliance with conservation laws and rules; and application for pipeline severance or connection. Rarely, however, are the actual forms found in these records. Only the correspondence is present in the Archives and not the actual reports.
Much of this series is routine requests from the general public for brochures, forms, and general information from the Division on its procedures and the conservation laws it was empowered to regulate. The public concern over the implementation of the new conservation laws generated much of this correspondence. The Division's primary legislative mandate was for the conservation of natural resources and the prevention of waste. Public requests for contract analysis, dispute settlement of oil and gas leases, or lengthy research projects were considered to be outside its responsibility. Consequently, much of the outgoing correspondence to the public is either replies to the routine requests for information or refusals on subjects beyond the Division's parameters. Other public correspondence includes files on job seekers who submitted references and letters of recommendation in addition to the application form.
An inventory of the records was conducted to provide a brief description of the contents of each box including the dates and types of materials and a notation of any filing arrangement that may be present.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division correspondence and reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Oil and Gas Division original orders, 1928-1977,
49 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These records are original orders, notices of hearings, postponements of hearings, and special emergency rules of the Oil and Gas Division. The records date from 1928 to 1977.
Original orders were issued by the Division to govern the drilling, completion, and operation of wells in the field. They were issued under a general directive for the "conservation and prevention of waste of crude petroleum and natural gas."
The Division held hearings conducted by engineers and legal examiners concerning field rules, secondary recovery projects, and maximum efficient rates of production. These hearings, and the original orders that were issued as a result, established the minimum spacing and acreage requirements for an individual oil well and determined the size of a proration unit. The proration units determined the prorated, daily allowance for each oil well in production and set the daily total oil field allowable.
Other specific examples of original orders include plugging wells to prevent fresh water pollution, approval of a unitization agreement, adoping a net gas-oil ratio rule for the field, and permitting water flooding and injection operations in a reservoir. These types of original orders were concerned with conservation and prevention of waste and usually affected an entire reservoir or field.
Original orders are also listed in the minutes of the Railroad Commission under "Special Orders" (see Railroad Commission of Texas, Minutes,) but are in summary form and do not provide as much information as the actual order itself.
Original orders from 1978 forward are maintained by the Railroad Commission of Texas. The Commission also maintains hearing files.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division original orders.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Title: Oil and Gas Division special permits and Rule 37 case files,
Dates: 1926-2000, bulk 1926-1936,
approximately 395.24 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. Records present include permits for drilling, applications to drill, correspondence, memos, telegrams, transcripts from hearings and other legal documents, plats, maps, charts, graphs, and photographs. Dates covered are 1926-2000, the bulk dating 1926-1936. These are special permits issued by the Oil and Gas Division of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) as exceptions to the Division's drilling rules. The permits were intended usually for individual wells rather than an entire field or reservoir. Examples include drilling with compressed air and drilling to offset drainage by neighboring wells.
The majority of the records are hearing files concerning Rule 37, a rule that requires minimum distances between wells at drilling sites in order to protect field pressure and correlative rights. Rule 37 hearings are not regular hearings and they have their own unique docketing system. The files are individual applications by fee owners, leaseholders, and oil and gas companies for permits to drill on parcels of land too small to meet Rule 37's minimum distance requirements. An application to drill includes the following types of data - date, name of company or operator, name of lease, location of lease, field name, number of acres in lease, distance to nearest lease, depth of well, spacing pattern, density pattern, etc. The application to drill also notes if Rule 37 is involved, and if so, then the names and addresses of all offsetting operators or unleased mineral interest owners of each adjacent tract are provided, along with a plat. The correspondence is from the applicant to the RRC explaining why the exception should be granted. There can be waivers from adjacent property/lease holders of oil, gas or mineral rights, letters of objection from oil and gas companies, neighbors, etc. When there are serious objections, a hearing is held. Hearing transcripts may be present, along with permits to drill issued by the Railroad Commission.
Records include a numerical list to the special permits and Rule 37 case files, produced by the Railroad Commission for cases # 1 to #8,999, listing the applicant, case number, well number, lease, county, and disposition of the request. Also present is an index on microfiche to the microfilmed Rule 37 cases or dockets, giving the docket number, microfilm reel, and frame on the reel where the docket appears. The first entry is case or docket # 8163, through # 247,949, with a few scattered cases listed after that.
In addition to the special permit and Rule 37 case files for 1926-1936 (file numbers 2980-16,348), the Archives also holds the oversize exhibits from the Rule 37 hearings, which include maps, photographs, graphs, charts, etc., dating 1935-2000 (file numbers 8163-223,980). Most of the Rule 37 case files, from 1921 until about 2000 are on microfilm at the Railroad Commission. Cases from 2000 onward are still in their original paper format at the Railroad Commission. The Rule 37 oversize exhibits were not filmed. Not all of the Rule 37 cases or dockets had oversize exhibits, so files are not present for all case numbers.
Hearing schedules are posted on the RRC site, see http://www.rrc.state.tx.us/meetings/hearings/index.php
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division special permits and Rule 37 case files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Oil and Gas Division oil and gas potential files, East Texas Field, 1930-1985,
23 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. The oil and gas potential files include completion reports, well logs, drilling permits, and plats. Dates are roughly 1930-1985. The information in each file gives the operator's name and address, location, field name, API (American Petroleum Institute) number, well-spacing pattern, depth and geological horizon of the production, current conditions and status of the well (fracturing efforts, plugging, etc.), description of the completion including casing, and test information on the wellbore. The drilling permits are accompanied by plats showing the location of the wells. The well potential file information assists in both a well-specific sense (whether a wellbore can be reentered, where drilling/production may be optimal, drilling and completion specifications to be anticipated, etc.) and for the entire reservoir (pressures, rates of decline, potential reserves). For example, well logs provide a sample or snapshot of a wellbore that indicates the physical characteristics and properties of the layers of the earth where the wellbore has been drilled. The well logs and related records are interpreted to determine the character of a reservoir. The files provide historical data about individual wells in conjunction with several series maintained at the Railroad Commision - Wildcat and suspense files, Oil and gas production reports, and Hearing files. Additionally, drilling permits are only good for two years. When companies reapply to drill, they can use data maintained in these files for the new permits. Some wells may be plugged for years, then opened back up for production.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2006/391-1 thru 23. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division hazardous waste questionnaires, 1991,
5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. Records are questionnaires sent out by the Commission in 1991 to oil and gas operaters to determine which companies were producing hazardous oil and gas waste. The files contain general information about the project and the questionnaires sent back by companies. Information on the form includes environmental data and the type of oil and gas waste generated by a company.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2001/143-1 thru 5. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division pollution/water well contamination files, 1966-2001,
18 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These files contain complaints, investigation reports, correspondence, photographs, plats, and other materials regarding the complaints and investigations of oil and/or gas polluted sites. Dates covered are 1966-2001. Incidents requiring cleanup include ground water or surface pollution from oil or gas leaks or spills, salt water pollution of ground water, etc. The Archives has files from two district offices - District 4 (Corpus Christi) and District 10 (Pampa).
District staff of the Railroad Commission investigate complaints filed regarding oil and gas pollution. They evaluate the site and determine what type of cleanup is needed. The operator or company sends the plans for the cleanup to the RRC for approval. Once approved, the cleanup begins and is usually undertaken in stages. Large cleanups can take years. The operator sends status or progress reports to the RRC. Large cleanups are handled directly through the state office, smaller cleanups are handled in the district offices. For cleanups undertaken directly by the state, the cleanup work may be handled by outside consultants in addition to RRC staff. The district RRC investigators file periodic reports documenting the cleanup process. Some of the district files are copied and sent to RRC headquarters in Austin, but not all parts of the district file are copied. The district offices maintain the record copy of the complaints and investigations, and of the smaller cleanups they handle.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2003/117-1 thru 6 and 2003/176-1 thru 12. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division State Tender Board transcripts of testimony, 1939-1943,
1.4 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These records consist of transcripts of testimony at hearings held by the State Tender Board, Oil and Gas Division, Railroad Commission of Texas. The records date from 1939 to 1943. The State Tender Board was part of the Oil and Gas Division's Pipe Line, Refining and Tender Section. This section was set up to control the movement of oil from the time it is produced until it is consumed in Texas, or until its export from Texas as crude oil or a refined product. These movements were checked by means of tender bids which were approved and numbered in the district offices. The section received various reports and made weekly reports of stocks of crude oil and petroleum products and monthly estimates of empty storage facilities for petroleum in Texas.
Most of these transcripts are from hearings held at Kilgore by the State Tender Board and concern the East Texas oil field. Subjects of the hearings include organization report of a company, name change of a company, change of officers in a company, request to operate a pipeline, to operate a treating plant, request to clean storage tanks, and special hearings to approve tender offers between companies for movement of oil.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division State Tender Board transcripts of testimony.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Interstate Oil Compact Commission transcripts of proceedings, 1936-1941,
1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are transcripts of hearings held before the Interstate Oil Compact Commission between 1936 and 1941. Texas was a founding member of this Commission.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2008/008. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division miscellaneous records, 1932-1933, 1940, 1947,
0.48 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These records consist of oil production statistics compiled by the Oil Accounting and Statistical Department in 1932 and 1933 for the East Texas field and in April 1940 for the entire state; testimony from a 1947 hearing on salt water disposal in the East Texas field; and a 1947 speech by the chairman of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission on its history and functions.
The oil production statistics were compiled by the Oil Accounting and Statistical Department of the Oil and Gas Division. The Railroad Commission set an allowable amount of production for each oil well in the state and the compilation of production figures was necessary to enforce the allowables. Each month, oil well operators reported their production, disposition, and storage of oil. In this series are the April 1940 monthly reports for the entire state. Also present in this series are four quarterly statements prepared by the Oil and Gas Division for the East Texas oil well operators, 1932-1933, that list each operator's lease, survey, number of wells, inventory, production, allowable, pipeline company, deliveries, and balance. These quarterly statements then summarize the individual data to give total figures for inventory, production, allowable, deliveries, and oil in storage for the East Texas area.
Next in this series are two statements on disposal of salt water produced by oil field operations in East Texas. The statements were given by officers of the East Texas Salt Water Disposal Company at a Railroad Commission hearing on April 17, 1947. The statements report the history of salt water production in the East Texas field, the problem of disposal, the organization of the East Texas Salt Water Disposal Company, its operations, and the technical aspects of the return of salt water underground. The two statements are typed and include charts and photographs.
Last in this series is a speech given by Hiram M. Dow, Chairman of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission, at the annual meeting of the Panhandle Producers and Royalty Association in Amarillo on June 18, 1947. Mr. Dow spoke on the history and future of the American oil industry and the history and function of the Interstate Oil Compact Commission. The Commission is an organization composed of oil producing states whose primany goals are to conserve and protect oil resources and prevent waste.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division miscellaneous records.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Oil and Gas Division correspondence and reports (remnants), about 1932-about 1940,
1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. This series contains correspondence and reports of the Oil and Gas Division, dating about 1932-about 1940. Correspondents are RRC staff, lessees, oil or gas producers, and oil companies. Topics include physical tests on wells and equipment, production allowables, pressure, etc. Also present are well production logs, reports on water wells, reports on oil fields, and miscellaneous statistics.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-69. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division correspondence re: East Texas Field, 1943-1960,
approximately 0.5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. This is incoming correspondence to the Railroad Commission concerning the East Texas Field, dating 1943-1960. Correspondents include land owners, operators, oil companies, and attorneys. Topics include hearings, wells, leases, equipment issues, requests granted by the RRC as rule exceptions, requests to the RRC for exceptions, well status, etc.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-43. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and gas plats, about 1930-1960, bulk 1941-1954,
29 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are plat maps of oil and gas leases or fields and survey maps. The maps and plats were submitted to the RRC by operators and maintained by the Commission because of information they contain about oil and gas wells in the state. Some maps are accompanied by correspondence about the leases, drilling operations, acreage assigned to specific wells or related topics; some have affidavits attached. Also present are notices of change in lease ownership or operators, and in a few files are potential test forms for wells. Dates covered are about 1930 to 1960, bulk 1941-1954. Correspondence is usually with oil and gas operators or drilling companies. Some of the plat maps are certified, giving the date the plat was drawn, the survey, field name, county, operator, acres shown, and number of acres in the lease. Items shown on the survey and other plat maps are generally oil, gas, and water well locations; oil/gas lease and field boundaries; land and/or lease owners; cities and towns; and rivers and creeks. The maps often contain notes about the wells. Most of the maps were drawn by local surveyors and cover specific leases or oil/gas fields. Size of the fields or leases vary, they could cover several counties or just a small part of one county. The bulk of the material in these records are maps, most being legal size or smaller, a few are larger. The plats/maps were not done by the Railroad Commission but were sent to them by operators with various other records, such as applications for drilling permits. The Commission retained these plats and maps as a source of well data and related information. This series contains files for district 8 (covering West Texas), district 10 (covering the Panhandle), and a few maps for district 4 (covering South Texas). Remaining plat files, if they still exist, are at the Railroad Commission. Drilling permits and applications are on file at the Railroad Commission, in the records section of the Oil and Gas Division.
This series is split into two separate finding aids due to the electronic file size limitations imposed by the online finding aid web site (TARO). For the full finding aids for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division oil and gas plats part I ((District Eight files, A-Pe) and Railroad Commission of Texas, Oil and Gas Division oil and gas plats part II ((District Eight files Ph-Y, District Ten files, and District Four maps).
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Oil and Gas Division oil and gas files, Rodessa Field, 1936-1944,
approximately 1.5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are reports, hearing files, orders, and correspondence of the Railroad Commission concerning oil and gas ratios in the Rodessa Field, dating 1936-1944. The Rodessa Field covers parts of Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas. On December 31, 1936, the Railroad Commission issued an order pertaining to oil and gas ratios in the Dees-Young Horizon of the Rodessa Field. There are monthly special orders, dating 1938-1944, increasing the allowable production for wells in response to operator requested increases. There is also a hearing file; correspondence with attorneys, the RRC, and oil and gas officials in Arkansas and Louisiana; a report re: field proration schedules; and a report re: gas withdrawal.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-45 and 46. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division Panhandle reports, 1930-1939,
approximately 2 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. Records are reports of the Railroad Commission that concern gas to oil ratio potential and rock pressure in the Panhandle Field. Dates covered are 1930-1939.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-43 thru 45. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division hearing files, exceptions to Statewide Rule 21, about 1938,
approximately 3 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. Materials present include applications, notes, exhibits (maps, lists of operators, production data, etc.), notices, and correspondence from Railroad Commission hearing files concerning conservation and fire prevention re: crude oil petroleum and natural gas, dating about 1938. Correspondence is usually between the Oil and Gas Division and applicants requesting exceptions. Most, if not all, of the applications are requesting exceptions to Statewide Rule 21. Statewide Rule 21 concerns fire prevention and swabbing (16 TAC, §3.21). These files are part of the series Hearing files, removed years ago for unknown reasons. The series, Hearing files, is still maintained at the Railroad Commission.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-32 thru 34. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division, Hearing files, Yates and Diamond "M" Unit, 1936-1938, 1954-1957,
approximately 1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC), through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These files are correspondence, exhibits and court documents used in a Railroad Commission hearing involving the Yates and Diamond "M" Unit, dating 1936-1938; and monthly reports from the Lion Diamond "M" Unit, dating 1954-1957. The Yates case concerns the prevention of waste in the Yates field in Pecos County and was filed in 1934. The RRC was considering whether or not existing rules, regulations, and orders adapted for the prevention of waste should be revoked, continued in full force, or amended for this case. A copy of the original filing was not located in these files. Types of documents present include exhibits, correspondence, memorandum, briefs, orders, testimony, well data, maps, minutes of a Yates Pool Engineers Committee meeting, tests on wells, and a report by the RRC's Oil and Gas Division to determine if the wells in the Yates Pool were being produced ratably. These files are part of the series Hearing files, removed years ago for unknown reasons. The series, Hearing files, is still maintained at the Railroad Commission.
The monthly reports dating 1954-1957 concern production in the Lion Diamond "M" Unit and contain production statistics, well tests, data re: water injection and gas injection systems, workover and remedial work, a well status map, etc.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-31. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division miscellaneous hearing files, 1935, 1938-1943, 1946-1948,
approximately 1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are Railroad Commission hearing files, containing briefs, correspondence, notices, RRC orders, court orders, affidavits, notes, memoranda, exhibits, maps, and judgements. Dates covered are 1935, 1938-1943, 1946-1948. Correspondents include RRC staff, Commissioners, litigants, and attorneys. Types of cases filed include transfer of oil to different refineries, release of frozen stock, and illegal crude oil production. These files are part of the series Hearing files, removed years ago for unknown reasons. The series, Hearing files, is still maintained at the Railroad Commission.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-49 thru 50. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division hearings, Panhandle Field, before 1940,
approximately 2 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are correspondence and exhibit files of Railroad Commission hearings involving the Panhandle Field, dating prior to 1940. These files are part of the series Hearing files, removed years ago for unknown reasons. The series, Hearing files, is still maintained at the Railroad Commission.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-47 and 48. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division statewide hearing summary, 1937,
approximately 1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. This is a typescript of a summary of a statewide hearing held before the Railroad Commission in 1937, in Austin, concerning oil production.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-35. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division survey of salt water disposal, 1957,
approximately 16 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are questionnaire responses from oil and gas operators re: salt water production and disposal on oil and gas leases, dating 1957, sent to the Railroad Commission. The questionnaires contain the RRC district number, county, field, company reports, lease name and number, total number of barrels of salt water produced by the lease, method of disposal of salt water, whether salt water was allowed to spill into water courses, and if so, which watershed received the salt water. A report summarizing this data was not located within these files or library catalogues. It is unknown if a summary report was produced.
The survey was undertaken by the Railroad Commission at the request of the Attorney General to determine how much salt water, through oil and gas production, was being discharged into the fresh waters of the state. Participation by all oil and gas operators in the state was mandatory.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-53 thru 69. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division monthly operator reports, gas wells, 1924-1925,
approximately 2 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These are monthly reports on gas wells submitted by operators to the Railroad Commission dating 1924-1925. The reports give the operator, name of the lease, well number, survey, county, test data, tubing, number of days the well was used, volume or potential capacity of the well, and amount of gas taken.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-51 and 52. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Oil and Gas Division vacuum hearing files, 1932-1948,
approximately 1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Oil and Gas Division, regulates the exploration, production, and transportation of oil and natural gas in Texas. These files contain correspondence, applications, and orders from hearings held on applications to install vacuums on leases by the Railroad Commission, dating 1932-1948. The files also contain either a letter or an order from the Commission stating whether or not the application was approved. A vacuum is used to secure a greater volume of gas to be used for recycling into the pay formation under pressure.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-42. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Motor Transportation Division correspondence, 1923-1954, bulk 1929-1942,
approximately 14 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These files contain applications for motor bus or motor truck certificates or permits (originally accompanied by a filing fee) stating certain facts required by law. Opposition to application requests, formally presented at the hearings by rival motor companies and by railroads, are also in these files. Some photos are included in the files. Dates covered are 1923-1954 with the majority of records dating 1929-1942. Correspondence files were kept by the Motor Transportation Division on commercial operators who applied for or were granted permits or certificates of convenience and necessity to operate on public highways. If authority to operate was granted, an applicant had to file acceptable insurance, secure a driver's license, and pay the required plate fees. Carriers and shippers were required to carry public liability insurance or put up a C.O.D. (cash on demand) bond and keep a file demonstrating such coverage with the Division. The correspondence files contain the original copies of these insurance policies or notarized sworn statements of the amount of bond. Outgoing correspondence from the Division is commonly notice of concellation of a certificate, usually due to failure to pay the license tax or to file the required amount of insurance.
Other types of correspondence to be found in a carrier's file include complaints by creditors and consumers. The outgoing replies from the Division explain that they could not settle shipping claims but did offer assistance by disclosing the amount of insurance coverage that the shipper had on file with the commission.
Access to most of the correspondence is by the name of the motor vehicle carrier. The inventory lists the folders containing correspondence, but they are not in alphabetical order. Researchers have to review the entire inventory if searching for a particular motor carrier.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Motor Transportation Division correspondence.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Motor Transportation Division transcripts of application hearings, 1926-1956, bulk 1930-1939,
approximately 31 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These records consist of the testimony at hearings held by the Motor Transportation Division to determine if certificates should be granted to allow applicants to operate commercial vehicles on public highways. Dating 1926-1956, the majority of the records are from 1930 to 1939. The testimony was a part of the application procedure necessary to obtain the required authorization to operate commercial vehicles on public highways. Hearings were held by Division examiners and testimony was taken in regard to the route and communities served, competition with existing service, traffic congestion, financial status of the applicant, and other considerations of convenience and necessity. The transcripts of these hearings reveal the status of transportation at a given time in specific areas of Texas. After the hearings, the examiner submitted the findings to the Commission for consideration and decision.
The Commission made its decision known in the official minutes (See Minutes and Motor Transportation Division, Motor carrier dockets and Motor Transportation Division, Motor freight dockets series). The various docket records in the minutes for the Motor Transportation Division were labeled Motor Bus Docket, Motor Bus Letter Order, Contract Motor Carrier Docket, and Motor Carrier Docket Number. Subject matter of these dockets in the minutes included sale and transfer of a certificate authorizing the operation of a motor bus or motor carrier between cities; application for approval of a change in schedule or the abandonment of a lease; or for an order granting authority to use state highways in Texas for hire or for commerce.
The majority of the transcripts are from the 1930s. The transcripts for any given year will be found in more than one box.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Motor Transportation Division transcripts of application hearings.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Motor Transportation Division enforcement and regulation records, 1929-1955, bulk 1936-1942,
approximately 23 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These records include inspection reports of motor carriers' certificates, inspections of railroad crossing warning equipment, valuation reports of the equipment of a carrier, monthly revenue and expense reports of carriers, reports on the amount of driving done during the month by each commercial driver, and reports of railroad accidents. Dates covered are 1929-1955, bulk 1936-1942. The Division inspected and maintained records to ensure adequate and safe transportation for the public.
The enforcement and regulation activities of the Motor Transportation Division include the maintenance of rate and time schedules, inspections and patrols for adequate and safe accomodations and all other requirements for public convenience, the receipt of complaints from the public and from companies, and participation in trials in proper courts. Internal records kept by the Division to enforce its regulations include inspection reports, interlocker reports, monthly drivers' registers, motor carrier operating reports, valuation reports, and accident reports.
Inspection reports list inspectors' findings of missing or expired licenses and certificates and violations of permits such as carrying too much weight or using the wrong route. Interlocker reports document inspections of the working order of warning equipment at railroad crossings. Motor carrier operating reports are forms sent to the Division by carriers that reported their monthly operating revenue and expenses. Monthly drivers' registers kept track of the amount of driving time commercial drivers put in each month. Valuation reports include the type, make, cost, and depreciation of each motor vehicle that a carrier operated. Accident reports list railroad accidents and not highway accidents unless it involved a collision between a train and a motor vehicle.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Motor Transportation Division enforcement and regulation records.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Motor Transportation Division motor transportation transcripts, about 1922-about 1925,
approximately 0.5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These are transcripts of testimony from motor transportation hearings held by the Railroad Commission, dating about 1922-about 1925.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-36. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Motor Transportation Division motor carrier dockets, about 1939-1958
approximately 1 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These are motor carrier docket files containing applications, motions, notices, and testimony, dating about 1939-1958. Types of dockets include applications for tender, requests to organize a company, and a request to rescind orders.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number is 2002/003-37. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Motor Transportation Commission motor freight dockets, about 1930-1937
approximately 4.5 cubic ft.

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These are motor freight docket files concerning various motor freight rules and related issues, dating about 1930-1937. Materials present include notices, petitions, opinions, orders, circulars, correspondence, memoranda, rule amendments, etc.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call numbers are 2002/003-37 thru 41. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Motor Transportation Division motor carrier annual reports, 1987-1988,
6 microfilm reels

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These are annual reports of motor carriers submitted to the Railroad Commission, daing 1987-1988. Some restrictions apply to this series, see the overall restriction statement for more information.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number for the microfilm is 1995/129. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Motor Transportation Division specialized motor carrier operating reports, 1975-1981,
4 microfilm reels

The Railroad Commission of Texas had regulatory power of the commercial transportation of persons and property on state highways during the period covered by these records. Motor transportation activities were handled by the Motor Transportation Division. These are specialized operating reports of motor carriers submitted to the Railroad Commission, dating 1975-1981. Some restrictions apply to this series, see the overall restriction statement for more information.
This series is not yet processed, so there is no finding aid. The call number for the microfilm is 1995/129. A link to the finding aid will be added when processing is completed.



 

Gas Services Division gas utility company annual financial reports, 1920-2001, 2004-2006,
189 reels microfilm and 13.5 cubic ft. (paper)

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. These are annual financial reports of intrastate and interstate gas utilities companies that do business in Texas. Dates of the reports are 1920-2001, 2004-2006. The reports provide financial and organizational data on these companies, including names of officers and their affiliates, tax information, operating revenue, balance sheets; and some production data, including volumes of gas purchased, gas plant production, and miles of pipeline used. Gas utilities are required to file an annual report with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). For some, an additional report is required by the RRC. Utilities that do not engage in intrastate sales or intrastate transport of gas can file a copy of their annual report to the FERC with the RRC. Some companies doing interstate business will also file a copy of their FERC reports. The FERC reports are maintained with the other annual reports. The FERC reports are similar but are more detailed and include company operations in other states.
Most of the annual reports of gas utility companies are on microfilm and are stored offsite at the State and Local Records Management Division of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission. Duplicate copies of some annual reports for the years 1974-1979 and 1999-2001 are present on microfilm located in the Texas State Archives. Missing reports are noted at the end of each year's reel. Reports for 2004 thru 2006 are on paper and housed in the Archives.
Annual reports of gas utilities are filed as required under 16 TAC, §7.40. Section 7.40 states that each gas utility operating in Texas file a general annual report with the Railroad Commission to enable the Commission to properly regulate natural gas utilities within the state.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Services Division gas utility company annual financial reports. Some restrictions apply to this series, see the full finding aid for more information.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division docket case files, 1920-1973,
25 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. These are docket case files of the Gas Utilities Division, dating 1920-1973. Types of records include incoming and outgoing correspondence, petitions, appeals, rate applications, notices of hearings, and hearing records, which include transcripts, legal briefs, testimony, exhibits, and actions taken by the Railroad Commission. The docket files contain records of hearings held by the Division to consider rate and service requests from natural gas utilities or their customers.
The Commission hears applications from gas utilities to abandon sections of gas pipeline, to remove meters from private premises, to discontinue service to certain customers, and, most frequently, to be allowed to change natural gas rates. The utilities often appeal the rates set by cities and apply to the Commission for a rate hearing. The Commission has appellate jurisdiction over gas utility rate applications originating in incorporated municipalities and original jurisdiction over those applications originating in unincorporated areas of Texas. Citizens also apply to the Commission to fix "fair and reasonable" rates, to petition for the installation of natural gas lines and to complain about such service matters as the removal of gas lines and the cost of connection charges. In response to such applications and hearings the Commission will promulgate rules and regulations, investigate the rates charged by gas companies, fix temporary trial rates, and make the final determination of the rates to be charged by gas companies.
The docket case files are on microfilm; the inventory does not list the dates for most of the dockets, however the dockets start with # 1 in 1920 and continue through 1973. A few dockets are missing. Between 1959 and 1963, some items within the dockets are listed individually on the inventory and dates are added. Prior to and after that period just the docket number is generally listed.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division docket case files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division directors' general correspondence, 1935-1946, 1972-1979, bulk 1972-1979,
5 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. These records are the general correspondence and research files of directors of the Gas Utilitities Division dating 1935-1946, 1972-1979. Most of the records are from the directorships of first Walter Wendladt and then Frank Youngblood in the 1970s. Only one reel of microfilm contains correspondence from 1935-1946.
There is much correspondence with federal and state government officials including Texas Railroad Commissioners, Texas Attorney General's office, Texas Office of State-Federal Relations, Federal Energy Administration, Congressional aides, and legislative committees. Other correspondents include the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), cities, electric power cooperatives, natural gas utilities and companies, solar energy companies, the Interstate Oil Compact Association, and private citizens.
Subjects covered include the federal deregulation of natural gas, the LoVaca Gas Gathering Company and Crystal City dispute of the early 1970s, energy conservation, natural gas rates, rate hike requests, the Alaska pipeline, and citizen complaints of gas utility service and rates.
Besides correspondence, other types of records include transcripts of testimony of Division directors before state and federal legislative committees, speeches by the directors, state and federal legislative bills, legal briefs, Texas Attorney General opinions, reports to the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, energy related publications, newsletters from universities, and newspaper clippings.
Also found are internal records of the Gas Utilities Division including travel vouchers and receipts of Division personnel, bids for surplus state property, insurance policies, personnel and employments records, and copies of Division newsletters. Some personal correspondence of the directors is also present.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division directors' general correspondence. Some restrictions apply to this series, see the full finding aid for more information.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division stockholders annual reports, 1963-1978,
3 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. These reports are copies of annual printed statements sent out by utility companies to their stockholders, dating 1963-1978. A copy was filed with the Gas Utilitities Division. Each report contains the names of officers and director of the utility and a great deal of financial information on recent operations of the utility, typically including balance sheet data, assets, liabilities and stockholder's equity, real property, plants and equipment, operating data which includes earnings and dividends per share, and a ten year chart showing past financial performance. These reports are not standarized so there are some differences in the data presented. In a few cases, a financial statement or an income tax return was filed in place of the longer annual report statement.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division stockholders annual reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division special orders, 1952-1974,
4 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. Special orders are issued by the Railroad Commission in response to a petition from a natural gas utility to make a rate adjustment or service change for its rural customers. These records are the case files of special orders issued by the Railroad Commission, including petitions, correspondence, memos, city ordinances, contracts, exhibits, natural gas rate schedules, and the special order if granted. Dates covered are 1952-1974. The company would send along data and documents to the Commission to justify the proposed changes; such records would typically include a chart showing present and proposed rates, a copy of the city ordinance that sets the rate for the nearby incorporated community, and a petition or application asking for the rate changes. The Gas Utilities Division would consider the docket, sometimes producing a preliminary docket report explaining the Commission's decision. If the change request was approved, a special order was issued setting the rates.
There are four microfilm reels of dockets, but two of the reels are duplicates, thus there are only two reels of distinct special orders. According to the index prepared by the Railroad Commission two reels are missing - the first containing dockets A-455 through A-935 (no company names given), the other with dockets A-936, Southern Union Gas through C-057, Lone Star Gas.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division special orders.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division audit files, 1974-1979,
8 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. These files contain gross receipts tax forms, audit field forms, and correspondence of the Gas Utilities Division. Dates covered are 1974-1979. Field audits of gas utilities were conducted to enforce the natural gas rates set by the Railroad Commission, to collect the gas utilities gross receipts tax, and to ensure utility compliance with all other statutory and regulatory requirements. The audit consisted of a visit to the gas utility by a GUD auditor who examined the companies' records to verify selected entries in the company's annual report. The audit file for each company is divided into three parts: gross receipts tax forms, audit field forms, and general correspondence. Frequently, only the gross receipts tax forms are present in a company's file since companies are not audited every year and no correspondence is necessary if there are not violations or problems.
The gross receipts tax was required of every utility that received revenue from its pipeline operations. The tax was paid quarterly and reported on form GU-3A. Also included is form T-4 - "Application for Permit to Operate Pipeline or Pipelines in Texas." This form determined which gas utilities were required to pay the tax and which were not.
The audit field forms were the paperwork filled out by the auditor when checking the figures in the utility's annual reports, the payment of the gross receipts tax, and for compliance with regulations. The auditor filled out separate forms for each of the following: gross receipts tax paid, natural gas purchase contract terms, quality of service, current monthly cost of service, gas operation revenues, purchased gas expense, unaccounted for gas distribution, and a summary field report.
The general correspondence between the utilities and the GUD, and the internal memos of the GUD concern the payment of the gross receipts tax, setting up visits by the auditor, the filing of annual reports, and requests for corrections of any violations found. Any violations were reported to the company via correspondence and the company was urged to comply. If compliance was not forthcoming, the matter was referred to the Railroad Commission's Legal Section.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division audit files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division permits screened, 1972-1979,
2 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilties Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. It also maintains safety standards for gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems; oversees intrastate gathering and storage services; and adopts and maintains adequate safety rules and standards in the handling, transportation, and odorization of LP-gases. This series consists of permit forms and correspondence, dating 1974-1979. The Gas Utilities Division screens a permit application to operate natural gas pipelines to determine if the operator is classified as a gas company or as a gas utility. This designation has important ramifications concerning safety regulation, rates, auditing, and taxes. A gas utility pays a gross receipts tax on its pipeline revenues, has its rates set by the Commission, must follow strict safety regulations, and is regularly audited by the GUD. A gas company is still held to minimum safety standards, such as odorization of gas, but in general, is not as strictly regulated as a gas utility and pays no gross receipts tax or has regular audits.
Natural gas operators filled out two forms to help the RRC determine their status; form T4, "Application for Permit to Operate Pipeline or Pipelines in Texas," submitted to the Administrative Services Division, and form PS-18, "Operations Information Form," submitted to the GUD. Based on the information in the forms, the GUD determined if a pipeline operation was subject to its rules and regulations.
Usually, both types of forms and some correspondence are in any one company's permit file, but sometimes one or both of the forms are missing. The correspondence in these records is routine. There are internal division memos discussing the status of individual companies, outgoing correspondence informing the company of its designation, and incoming correspondence asking questions and sometimes protesting the GUD's decision. If such a dispute became prolonged or formal the matter was transferred to the Legal Section.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division permits screened.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division safety affidavits and reports, 1971-1978,
4 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilities Division (GUD)) of the Railroad Commission of Texas regulates safety standards for the natural gas pipeline systems in Texas by inspecting, investigating and reporting on potential or actual hazards. Records include annual safety affidavits from pipeline companies that confirm compliance with all safety rules and regulations, federal Department of Transportation annual reports for gas pipeline systems, disposition and acquisition totals for gas systems, reports on pipeline leaks or failures, and accident field investigation reports, dating 1971-1979, bulk 1977-1979. Records in this series include annual safety affidavits from pipeline companies that confirm compliance with all safety rules and regulations, federal Department of Transportation annual reports for gas pipeline systems, disposition and acquisition totals for gas systems, reports on pipeline leaks or failures, and accident field investigation reports, dating 1971-1979.
Safety affidavits are notarized, annually sworn statements by gas pipeline companies and municipal systems that they are familiar with the safety rules and regulations of the GUD and that all operations are in compliance. The Texas Department of Transportation (DOT) forms are annual reports for gas gathering and transmission systems, copies of which the gas systems send to the Railroad Commission. The reports collect data on types of pipe in each gas system, mileage of pipe, number of leaks, and any injuries or property damage from leaks in the past year.
The gas systems report directly to the GUD on their total acquisition and disposition of gas in the preceding year. The report is made on a form numbered PS-3T and includes the total amounts in both volume and in dollars of gas sold, transported, exchanged, produced, put into or taken from storage, and imported into or exported from Texas.
Reports of gas leaks, pipeline failures or accidents are made to the GUD by telephone (at that time) with the information recorded on forms by GUD staff. The report forms include the location and details of the accident, the gas operator, and a general description of the circumstances of the accident. Accidents are also reported to the federal DOT on forms titled "Leak or Test Failure report - Transmission and Gathering Systems" but are informally known as the Twenty Day Reports. The form provides more information on the accident, including whether it was due to corrosion, damage by outside forces, construction defects, or material failure. Copies of this federal form were also sent to the Railroad Commission.
Field investigations made at the accident sites were reported directly to the Pipeline Safety Section of the GUD on a six page form. This report follows up the telephone report and examines in greater detail the cause and effect of the accident.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division safety affidavits and reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Gas Utilities Division odorization reports, 1973-1978,
4 microfilm reels

The Gas Services Division (formerly the Gas Utilities Division) of the Railroad Commission of Texas (RRC) establishes rates and services for gas utilities and their customers and enforces those rates. It also maintains safety standards for gas and hazardous liquids pipeline systems; oversees intrastate gathering and storage services; and adopts and maintains adequate safety rules and standards in the handling, transportation, and odorization of LP-gases. This series contains correspondence and various odorization reports, dating 1973-1978. Texas law requires natural gas companies to odorize the gas with a malodorant so as to indicate the presence of gas in case of a leak or rupture in the pipeline system. The Gas Utilities Division enforces this law by requiring regular tests and reports. The files contain routine correspondence between the GUD and gas suppliers concerning delinquent filings, changes in the forms, and other procedural matters. The odorization reports include several formats of quarterly reports, all containing the following information: the name of the malodorant, if diluted or concentrated, the amount of malodorant introduced in pounds and gallons, the rate of malodorant per thousand cubic feet of gas, and the amount of gas odorized. These reports are present for every reporting company.
Other odorization reports include a test report giving the date of the test, the test method, percentage of gas in air at detection, and name of tester; a service and maintenance schedule listing the type of malodorant, the inspection frequency and inspection procedures; and, finally, a worksheet showing the method and numbers used to figure out the malodorant concentration in rooms. Not all of these types of reports are present for every company.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Gas Utilities Division odorization reports.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Surface Mining and Reclamation Division abandoned mine lands files, 1972-1992, bulk 1980-1989,
119 microfiche

The Railroad Commission of Texas, through its Surface Mining and Reclamation Division, oversees surface mining for coal, uranium, and iron ore gravel; and land reclamation when mining is complete. These records document reclamation activities undertaken by the Railroad Commission on abandoned mine lands, as mandated under Title IV of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 and the Texas Administrative Code, 16 TAC, §12.8, and §11.151-154. Files consist of correspondence, memoranda, appraisals, liens, grant histories, public notices and comments, bid documents, invoices and bills, contracts, inspection reports, field reports, progress reports, compliance reports, lab analyses, photographs, maps, soil analyses, certificates of insurance, and environmental assessments and impact statements. Dates covered are 1972-1992, bulk dating 1980-1989. The files cover contracting (proposals, bids, eligibility determination, issuance of contracts), construction, right of entry, land ownership, payments, and environmental studies undertaken after the reclamation work is completed. The studies report whether the land is properly reclaimed. Mines covered in these records are the Terlingua mine, Darcos mine, Olmos mine, Study Butte mine, Parker mine, I.F. Brysche mine, and the Somerset mine. These files are microfiche, the paper copies no longer exist. The fiche have not been viewed by State Archives staff. Data about the contents was supplied by the agency on the fiche labels and by staff of the Surface Mining and Reclamation Division during the appraisal of the agency.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Surface Mining and Reclamation Division abandoned mine lands files.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.



 

Arkansas-White-Red River Basins Inter-Agency records, 1954-1956, bulk 1955,
2 cubic ft.

The Arkansas-White-Red Basins Inter-Agency Committee was created in 1950 at the request of the President of the United States to conduct water and resource development studies under the auspices of the federal Flood Control Act of 1950. The chief engineer of the Railroad Commission was a committee member. These are reports, drafts, collection data, and correspondence on water and other resources in the Arkansas, White, and Red River Basins, dating 1954-1956, bulk 1955. The river basins cover areas in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, New Mexico, and Texas. The reports in this series were produced by the Arkansas-White-Red Basins Inter-Agency Committee. The bulk of the materials consist of the published reports. A small amount of correspondence accompanies the reports, consisting of memorandum to work group members from John J. Ledbetter, who served as Governor Allan Shivers' representative on the Arkansas-White-Red Basins Inter-Agency Committee. Topics covered in the reports include mosquito control, oil and gas by-products, and water resources. Elements in the reports include descriptive data, summaries of research and data gathered, cost analysis, recommendations for programs to initiate, and maps. The title of this set of reports is Arkansas-White-Red River Basins : A Report on the Conservation and Development of the Water and Land Resources, 23 volumes.
Some preliminary reports and drafts of the Committee not found in this series can be found in the federal Documents Collection of the Library and Archives Commission or in the library at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Titles of all the reports produced by the Inter-Agency Committee are unknown. Minutes of the Inter-Agency Committee from 1955 to 1959 can be found in the federal Documents Collection. Transcripts of public hearings of the committee in 1950 are in the library at TCEQ.
For the full finding aid for this series see Railroad Commission of Texas, Arkansas-White-Red River Basins Inter-Agency records.
To prepare this inventory, the described materials were cursorily reviewed to delineate series, to confirm the accuracy of contents lists, to provide an estimate of dates covered, and to determine record types.