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TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Historical Sketch

Scope and Contents

Arrangement

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Detailed Description of the Collection

Woodson Research Center, Rice University

Guide to the Civil War-era letter from S.M. McAshan to T. W. House, July 18, 1864



Descriptive Summary

Title: Civil War-era letter from S.M. McAshan to T. W. House
Dates: July 18, 1864
Abstract: S. M. McAshan wrote this letter to T. W. House in Houston, Texas on July 18, 1864. The letter written during the Civil War concerns two items. First, McAshan asks about correspondence for J. M. Putnam in Eagle Pass. Secondly, he asks about a transaction regarding bagging rope and trim for cotton for Lt. Col. Hutchins. The letter consists of a single sheet of paper, with the handwritten correspondence on one side and the handwritten address on the backside. Affixed near the address is a Confederate States of America 10 cent postage stamp.
Identification: MS 034
Quantity: 1 (one) letter (8 inches by 10 inches)
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, Texas.

Historical Sketch

Thomas William House, businessman, was born in the village of Stoke St. Gregory, Somersetshire, England, on March 4, 1814 and died January 17, 1880, in San Antonio. In May 1835 House landed in New York. In 1838 the firm of House and Loveridge, bakers and confectioners, opened in Houston, Texas. The next year House formed a partnership with Charles Shearn, who was later chief justice of Harris County. In 1840 House married his partner's daughter, Mary Elizabeth Shearn; and it was in this year that he began accepting bank deposits. Alone in business for a time, he produced and sold the first ice cream in Houston. He restricted his confections to one side of the store and filled the other with dry goods, developing an extensive wholesale trade with the interior.

After a second association with his father-in-law, in 1853 House bought out the large jobbing business of James H. Stevensqv and Company, dealers in dry goods and groceries. The $40,000 he paid for it was the largest sum of money to change hands in Houston up to that time. The firm name became "T. W. House and Company," the company being Edward Mather, who had been in House's employ since 1841. The firm was then the largest wholesaler in the state; it accepted cotton in payment for goods and set up cotton factoring as a separate department. In 1862 Mather withdrew, leaving his partner alone again. Ox wagons were accustomed to waiting half a day at the T. W. House Plantation Commissary and Wholesale Grocery for their turn to be loaded. House once remarked that a keg of his nails could be found in every church in Texas. As a commission merchant, wholesale grocer, cotton and wool factor, and hardware and dry goods dealer, he handled commodities including hides, whiskey, syrup, guns, axes, chains, and blacksmith's supplies. His great private bank grew out of cotton factoring.

In 1851 House helped organize the Houston and Galveston Navigation Company "to navigate steamboats between Houston and Galveston and on other streams tributary to Galveston Bay," carrying passengers, freight, and United States mail. He also worked with the Texas Transportation Company, the Houston Direct Navigation Company, and the Buffalo Bayou Ship Channel Company, all of which contributed to the development of Houston. House served a term as mayor of Houston in 1862. He was active in organizing the first street railway, the Board of Trade and Cotton Exchange, and the Houston and Texas Central and other railroads. Gen. John Bankhead Magruder had a high regard for House's services in the Confederacy. His cotton wagons made their slow way to the Mexican border and returned with loads of vital supplies. From the cupola of his pillared home in Galveston, on stormy nights House would study with a glass the blockading United States fleet. Early the next morning he would survey the hostile vessels again. If any were missing from their stations, they were chasing his blockade runners.

Historical sketch excerpted from text courtesy of Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. , http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/HH/fho68.html (accessed April 30, 2007).

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Scope and Contents

S. M. McAshan wrote this letter to T. W. House in Houston, Texas on July 18, 1864. The letter written during the Civil War concerns two items. First, McAshan asks about correspondence for J. M. Putnam in Eagle Pass. Secondly, he asks about a transaction regarding bagging rope and trim for cotton for Lt. Col. Hutchins. The letter consists of a single sheet of paper, with the handwritten correspondence on one side and the handwritten address on the backside. Affixed near the address is a Confederate States of America 10 cent postage stamp.

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Arrangement

One letter.

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

This material is open for research.

Use Restrictions

Permission to publish from the Civil War-era letter from S.M. McAshan to T. W. House must be obtained from the Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.

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Index Terms

Subjects (Persons)
Putnam, J. M.
House, Thomas William
McAshan, Samuel Marurice
Subjects (Organizations)
City of Houston -- correspondence.
Eagle Pass -- correspondence.
Subjects (Places)
Texas.
Formats
Correspondence.

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Civil War-era letter from S.M. McAshan to T. W. House, July 18, 1864, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.

Acquisition Information

Maurice McAshan Adams donated this letter to Rice University on April 10, 2007.

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Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Letter from S. M. McAshan to T. W. House, July 18, 1864

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