Woodson Research Center, Rice University

Guide to the William Allen Haynes papers, 1901-1953



Collection Summary

Creator: Haynes, William Allen
Title: William Allen Haynes papers
Dates: 1901-1953
Abstract: Over one half of the collection documents cattle ranching, oil prospecting, and banking in Texas) as well as personal and family life during the Great Depression. The William Allen Haynes collection offers a view of living conditions of a prosperous Central Texas rancher and entrepreneur as well as providing information on conditions in Texas in the first part of the 19th century.
Identification: MS 117
Quantity: 1 lin. ft. (2 boxes)
Language: Materials are in English.
Repository: Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, TX

Biographical Sketch

William Allen Haynes (1873-1953?), a native of Bell County, Texas, came from ranching stock. He carried on the family tradition and by the turn of the century was an established rancher. As oil became increasingly lucrative adjunct to ranching, Haynes together with his brother Robert branched out into oil well drilling and leasing oil lands. Haynes, like most ranchers, suffered ups and downs of the cattle market, from difficulties with transporting his cattle, and from the vagaries of weather. Despite these problems, he managed to stay solvent and even make money during the 1920’s. One reason for his solvency was that he was never simply a rancher, but derived additional income from oil and investments in real estate. In 1928 Haynes was named a director of the struggling First National Bank of Killeen, and he became president of the bank just in time for the Great Depression. His Bank limped along through the early 1930’s as Haynes and the other officers and directors of the bank reduced capitalization and discussed possible liquidation. About 1935 Haynes left banking and focused his energies on ranching and land speculation.

As he grew older, the scope of his activities became increasingly limited, but he maintained an active interest in ranching well into his 70’s. Haynes’ life was not strictly business however. He was interested in politics and although never serving in an elected position, he often acted as an election judge in his precinct or campaigned for the Democratic Party. Among his political friends were Miriam and Jim Ferguson who both served as Governor of Texas. Parrie and Allen apparently did not have children, but they were very close to their nieces and nephews. Haynes also provided a guiding hand and monetary support for his brothers who were never quite the businessman he was. In later life, as Haynes suffered from sickness and various ailments his familial loyalty paid off, as his family took care of him in his weakened state. In 1952 his last letter was received and in 1959 his collection was donated to Rice University. His actual death occurred at some point between 1952 and 1959.


Scope and Contents

Over one half of the collection documents cattle ranching, oil prospecting, and banking in Texas) as well as personal and family life during the Great Depression . The William Allen Haynes collection offers a view of living conditions of a prosperous Central Texas rancher and entrepreneur as well as providing information on conditions in Texas in the first part of the 19th century. Haynes corresponds with his wife Parrie and family. Of additional interest are the letters which describe the Great Depression years and the letters commenting on politics or seeking Haynes’ endorsement. Among the most noteworthy of the political letters are those dealing with James and Miriam Ferguson who also appear in the business letters.


 

Arrangement

This material has been arranged in the following two series:
Series I. Business and Legal Documents, 1901-1949
Series II: Personal records, 1910-1952
Series III: Politics, n.d.

Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

This material is open for research.

Restrictions on Use

Permission to publish material from the Haynes papers must be obtained from the Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library.


Index Terms

Subjects (Persons)
Haynes, Parrie - correspondence
Haynes, William Allen - correspondence
Ferguson, Miriam - correspondence
Subjects
Cattle ranching - Texas - history
Banking - Texas - history
Oil business - Texas - history
Great Depression - Texas
Formats
Correspondence
Newsclippings

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

William Allen Haynes papers, 1901-1953, MS 286 Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.

Acquisition Information

Gift of Elizabeth White, 1959.


Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Series I. Business and Legal Documents, 1901-1949

William Allen Haynes was an inveterate collector, saving everything from cattle bulletins to the dietary cure for gonorrhea. From 1901-1917 Haynes was primarily interested in ranching, and his papers proved considerable information on range conditions in central Texas, the cattle markets in Ft. Worth, and his efforts to build up and maintain his ranch through the use of numerous loans and mortgages.
About 1918 Haynes obtained an interest in the Leon Valley Oil Company, and for the next few years he received extensive correspondence from his brother Robert on the ups and downs of the oil business. From 1919 to about 1935, Haynes’ business papers cover a much wider spectrum than in previous years. Besides ranching and oil, the papers deal with land speculation, litigation concerning land titles, and banking. Of special interest in the papers is the correspondence concerning Haynes’ efforts to keep the troubled First National Bank of Killeen open. From 1929 to 1935 Haynes served as the president of this bank, and corresponded with prominent Texas bankers as well as Governor Miriam and Jim Ferguson.
The papers for 1935 to 1952 show a decline in Haynes’ business activity. The primary importance of this segment of the collection is the information it gives on the cattle market in Fort Worth, Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Illinois. Besides business records the Haynes collection contains personal bank records, private correspondence and material pertaining to Bell County Politics from1914 to 1922.
Typical contents: Court Summons, Real Estate Advertisements, Bank Loan Application and General Correspondence, Receipts for Various Business Purchases, Bail Bonds, Jury Summons, Official Complaint Forms, Criminal Subpoena Forms, Livestock Manuals, Farmer’s Bulletins and Advertisements, Life Insurance Forms, Political Messages, Bank Deposit Slips, Tax Receipts, Warrant of Arrest Form.
box folder
1 1 1901-1915
Distinctive Documents: “Rid-O-Fat” weight loss supplement advertisement, Medicated Livestock Salt advertisement, Various automotive parts advertisements
2 1915
Distinctive Documents: Freight Bill for transportation of cattle, Receipt for the sale of cattle, Bank collection notice
3 1916
Distinctive Documents: Stock Company Correspondence, Temple Daily Telegram subscription notice, Livestock Contract, Mortgage Forms, Diamond Tire Advertisement with two steel nails to test puncture resistant tires
4 1917
5 1918
Distinctive Documents: Automobile Tire Caps Advertisements
6 1919
Distinctive Documents: Oil Stock and Land Advertisements
7 1920
Distinctive Documents: Cattle Registration Certificate, Army Auction Notice, Furniture Sale Notice,
8 1921
Distinctive Documents: Chiropractor’s Business Card, Membership Card to the United States Live Stock Association
9 1922
Distinctive Documents: Law Suit Correspondence, Holland’s Magazine of the South, Lumber Company Receipt, Shaving Cream Receipt, Cotton Price Index and History from 1829-1922
10 1923
Distinctive Documents: Cotton Price Index and History from 1829-1922, Tickets to Central Texas Fair
11 1924
Distinctive Documents: Campaign Letter For R.H. Buck for Chief Justice of Supreme Court of Texas, List of School Lands coming to Market as of September 1, 1924, Receipt for a Hat
12 1925
Distinctive Documents: Surgical Appliances Magazine, Warranty Deed
13 1926
Distinctive Documents: Information Booklet regarding Milk Goats and Goat Milk, Ray Montieth for County Clerk, Poultry and Stock Show
14 1927
Distinctive Documents: Poll Tax Receipt, Taxidermy Advertisement, Traveller’s Insurance Document, Scott and White Hospital Documents, Women’s Shoes Magazine
15 1928
Distinctive Documents: Rural Telephone Company Check, Political Discourse on Tariffs in a telegram
16 1929
17 1930
Distinctive Documents: Ford manual
18 1931
19 1932
Distinctive Documents: Poll Tax Receipt, Temperance Movement Document
20 1933
Distinctive Documents: Tax Redemption, Letter from Governor Miriam Ferguson regarding Banks buying relief bonds
21 1934
Distinctive Documents: Banker Lobbyist Group letter to W.A. Haynes, Letter from a Texas Congressman regarding Civil Service Exam
box folder
2 1-4 1936-1949
Distinctive Documents: Texas Banker’s Association official guest list.



 

Series II: Personal records, 1910-1952

The personal letters received by Haynes and his wife Parrie are among the most interesting portions of the collection. These letters from family and friends give an authentic account of the condition of rancher in Central Texas in the first half of the 19th century. Of particular interest are the letters which describe the Great Depression years and the letters commenting on politics or seeking Haynes’ endorsement. Among the most noteworthy of the political letters are those dealing with James and Miriam Ferguson who also appear in the business letters.
box folder
2 5-9 Personal banking records, 1910-1940
Contents: Personal Checks and other monetary records demonstrating his financial situation year to year. Haynes kept practically every canceled check, bank statement, and note payment receipt he ever received, and taken into consideration together give a fairly accurate gauge of his financial situation in any particular year.
10-14 Personal Correspondence 1910-1952
Contents: Marriage Invitations, Commencement Invitations, Postcards, Letter from Soldier, Personal Finance Records, Personal Letters regarding W.A. Haynes and Family



 

Series III: Politics, n.d.

box folder
2 15 Politics
Contents: Civil Vote Tally on the Prohibition of Beer, Civil Vote Tally on the Prohibition of Pool Halls, Civil Vote Tally on Prohibition of Alcohol, Farm Mortgages, Letters addressed to W.A. Haynes regarding his position as overseer of general and special election