Texas Archival Resources Online

TABLE OF CONTENTS


Descriptive Summary

Biographical Note

Scope and Contents

Arrangement

Restrictions

Index Terms

Administrative Information

Description of Series

Series I: Early Letter and Documents, 1821-1828

Series II: Military Affairs, 1835-1842

Series III: Republic of Texas Indian Affairs, 1836-1843

Series IV: Relations of State of Texas and U.S. Government, 1842-1845

Series V: Colonists, 1835-1844

Series VI: Bills for General Houston, 1836-1859

SeriesVII: Family Letters, 1829-1863

SeriesVIII: Partially identified Sam Houston letters and fragment, 1836-1842

Series IX: Meeting Invitations, 1848-1855

Series X: General Correspondence, 1830's

Series XI: General Correspondence, 1840's

Series XII: General Correspondence, 1850's

Series XIII: Communications from Citizens' Groups regarding moving Texan seat of government, 1842

Series XIV: Notes, Essay, Newsclippings, Correspondence, 1842

Series XV: Photocopies of Family Letters, 1824-1857

Woodson Research Center, Rice University

Guide to the Sam Houston papers, 1821-1863



Descriptive Summary

Creator: Houston, Samuel, 1793-1863
Title Sam Houston papers
Dates: 1821-1863
Abstract: Sam Houston was the leader of the Battle of San Jacinto which won Texan independence from Mexico, the first regularly elected president of the Republic of Texas, U.S. Senator from state of Texas, and later Governor of Texas. This collection of letters contains government letters and documents written by Houston, letters to Houston from other government officials, and people seeking favors, and personal materials such as letters to and from family members, and bills. Government and military correspondents include Col. James W. Fannin, James Bowie, Anson Jones, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, James A. Hamilton, Gen. Memucan Hunt, Gen. Albert S. Johnston, Cherokee Chief Bowles, Edward Burleson, Gen. George W. Terrell, John C. Calhoun, Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels (founder of New Braunfels), U.S. Sec. of War George W. Hockley, U.S. Sec. of State Daniel Webster, U.S. Sec. of State, James Buchanan (later Pres. of U.S.) and others.
ID MS 049
Extent 1 box originals, 1 box use copies (1 lin. ft. total)
Language Materials are in English.
Repository: Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University, Houston, TX

Biographical Note

Sam Houston, one of the most illustrious political figures of Texas, was born on March 2, 1793, the fifth child (and fifth son) of Samuel and Elizabeth (Paxton) Houston, on their plantation in Rockbridge County, Virginia. When he was thirteen years old, his father died; some months later, in the spring of 1807, he emigrated with his mother, five brothers, and three sisters to Blount County in Eastern Tennessee, where the family established a farm near Maryville.

Rebelling at his older brothers' attempts to make him work on the farm and in the family's store in Maryville, Houston ran away from home as an adolescent in 1809 to dwell among the Cherokees, who lived across the Tennessee River. Between intermittent visits to Maryville, he sojourned for three years with the band of Chief Oolooteka, who adopted him and gave him the Indian name Colonneh, or "the Raven." Houston viewed Oolooteka as his "Indian Father" and the Cherokees much as a surrogate family. He henceforth maintained great sympathy toward Indians.

At age eighteen he left the Cherokees to set up a school, so that he could earn money to repay debts. After war broke out with the British, he joined the United States Army as a 20 year-old private, on March 24, 1813. As part of Andrew Jackson's army, he fought at the battle of Horseshoe Bend, where he received three near-fatal wounds, but won the attention of General Jackson. Jackson thereafter became his benefactor and in return, Houston became a staunch Jacksonian Democrat.

Following his difficulties with Secretary of War John C. Calhoun, Houston resigned from the army on March 1, 1818. That year, Houston began practicing law in Lebanon, Tennessee. With Jackson's endorsement, he became adjutant general of the state militia through appointment by Governor Joseph McMinn. In late 1818, Houston was elected attorney general of the District of Nashville, where he took up residence. After returning to private practice in Nashville by late 1821, he was elected major general of the state militia by his fellow officers.

Houston's rapid rise in public office continued in 1823, when, as a member of Jackson's political circle, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives from the Ninth Tennessee District. As a member of Congress, he worked mightily, though unsuccessfully, for the election of Andrew Jackson to the presidency in 1824. In 1825, he returned to Congress for a second and final term. In 1827, Houston was elected governor of Tennessee at the age of 34.

On January 22, 1829, he married nineteen-year-old Eliza Allen of Gallatin, Tennessee and soon after, announced his bid for re-election to the governorship. After eleven weeks and amid much mystery, the marriage ended. Extremely distraught, Houston abruptly resigned from his office on April 16 and fled west across the Mississippi River to Indian Territory, bringing an end to Houston's Tennessee phase and possibly, an eventual run at the presidency of the United States.

He made his way to the lodge of Oolooteka in what is now day Oklahoma to live once again in self-imposed exile among the Cherokees, this time for three years. Among the Indians, he initially drank heavily and secluded himself from contacts with white society. He quickly became active in Indian affairs, was granted Cherokee citizenship, and under Cherokee law, married Diana Rogers Gentry, an Indian woman of mixed blood.

Gradually reinvolving himself in the white world, he made various trips East. On the evening of April 13, 1832, on the streets of Washington, Houston thrashed William Stanbery, United States representative from Ohio, with a hickory cane. The assault resulted from a perceived insult by Stanbery over an Indian rations contract. Houston was soon arrested and tried before the House of Representatives. The month-long proceedings ended in an official reprimand and a fine, but the affair catapulted Houston back into the political arena. Leaving Diana and his life among the Indians, Houston crossed the Red River into Mexican Texas on December 2, 1832, and began perhaps the most important phase of his career.

Houston saw Texas as his "land of promise", a place for bold enterprise, rife with political and financial opportunity. He quickly became embroiled in the Anglo-Texans' politics of rebellion. He served as a delegate from Nacogdoches at the Convention of 1833 in San Felipe and in September 1835, he chaired a mass meeting in Nacogdoches to consider the possibility of convening a consultation. By October, Houston had expressed his belief that war between Texas and the central government was inevitable and on March 2, 1836, Texas adopted its Declaration of Independence. Two days later, Houston received the appointment of major general of the Texas army, with instructions to organize the Republic's military forces. Despite problems with infantry discipline, Houston and his men defeated the Mexican forces of Gen. Antonio López de Santa Anna at the decisive battle of San Jacinto on the afternoon of April 21, 1836. At San Jacinto, Sam Houston became forever enshrined as a member of the pantheon of Texas heroes and a symbol for the age.

Riding the wave of popularity as "Old Sam Jacinto," Houston became the first regularly elected president of the Republic of Texas, defeating Stephen F. Austin. His first term lasted from October 22, 1836, to December 10, 1838, during which the town of Houston served as the capital of the Republic. During this term, Houston sought to demilitarize Texas and avoid trouble between white settlers and Indians. In late 1836, Houston sent Santa Anna, then a prisoner of war, to Washington to seek the annexation of Texas to the United States. Although Houston favored annexation, his initial efforts to bring Texas into the Union proved futile, and he formally withdrew the offer by the end of his first term. After leaving office because the Constitution of the Republic of Texas barred a president from succeeding himself, Houston served in the Texas House of Representatives as a congressman from San Augustine from 1839 to 1841.

On May 9, 1840, Houston married twenty-one-year-old Margaret Moffette Lea of Marion, Alabama. A strict Baptist, Margaret served as a restraining influence on her husband and especially bridled his drinking. They had eight children: Sam Houston, Jr., (1843), Nancy Elizabeth (1846), Margaret (1848), Mary William (1850), Antoinette Power (1852), Andrew Jackson Houston (1854), William Rogers (1858), and Temple Lea Houston (1860).

Houston succeeded Mirabeau B. Lamar to a second term as president from December 12, 1841, to December 9, 1844. During this administration, Houston stressed financial austerity and drastically reduced government offices and salaries. Although many Texans clamored for action, President Houston deftly managed to avoid war with Mexico after the two Mexican invasions of 1842. After the first incursion, Houston directed that the government archives be moved from Austin, an order that ultimately resulted in the "Archive War," in which residents of Austin forcibly prevented removal of the files.

Following his succession to the presidency by Anson Jones, Houston became one of Texas's two United States senators, along with Thomas Jefferson Rusk. Houston served in the Senate from February 21, 1846, until March 4, 1859. As senator, Houston emerged as an ardent Unionist, true to his association with Andrew Jackson, a stand that made him an increasingly controversial figure. He stridently opposed the rising sectionalism of the antebellum period and delivered eloquent speeches on the issue. His career in the Senate was effectively ended when, in 1855, the Texas legislature officially condemned his position on the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which he opposed because it allowed the status of slavery to be determined by popular sovereignty, a concept he saw as potentially destabilizing to the nation.

As a lame-duck senator, Houston ran for governor of Texas in 1857, but was defeated by the state Democratic party's official nominee, Hardin R. Runnels. Predictably, the state legislature did not reelect Houston to the Senate; instead, in late 1857, it replaced him with John Hemphill. Out of the Senate, Houston ran a second time for governor in 1859. Because of his name recognition, a temporary lull in the sectional conflict, and other factors, he defeated the incumbent, Runnels, and assumed office on December 21.

When Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the United States, the clamor of discontent in Texas prompted Houston to call a special session of the state legislature. Despite his adamant opposition to slavery, Texas withdrew from the Union, a move Houston acquiesced in order to avoid bringing civil strife and bloodshed to his beloved state. But when he refused to take the oath of loyalty to the newly formed Confederate States of America, the Texas convention removed him from office on March 16 and replaced him with Lieutenant Governor Edward Clark.

After leaving the Governor's Mansion, Houston at least verbally supported the Southern cause. Against his father's advice, Sam, Jr., eagerly joined the Confederate Army and was wounded at the battle of Shiloh. Houston moved his wife and other children in the fall of 1862 to Huntsville, where they rented a two-story residence known as the Steamboat House, so called because it resembled a riverboat. On July 26, 1863, after being ill for several weeks, he died in the downstairs bedroom of the Steamboat House, succumbing to pneumonia at age 70. Dressed in Masonic ceremonial trappings, he was buried in Oakwood Cemetery at Huntsville.

Excerpted from: "HOUSTON, SAMUEL." The Handbook of Texas Online. <http://www.tsha.utexas.edu/handbook/online/articles/view/HH/fho73.html> [Accessed Thu May 20 10:48:47 US/Central 2004 ].

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Scope and Contents

This collection contains government letters and documents written by Sam Houston, letters to Sam Houston from other government officials, and people seeking favors, and personal materials such as letters to and from family members, and bills. Government and military correspondents include Col. James W. Fannin, James Bowie, Anson Jones, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, James A. Hamilton, Gen. Memucan Hunt, Gen. Albert S. Johnston, Cherokee Chief Bowles, Edward Burleson, Gen. George W. Terrell, John C. Calhoun, Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels (founder of New Braunfels), U.S. Sec. of War George W. Hockley, U.S. Sec. of State Daniel Webster, U.S. Sec. of State, James Buchanan (later Pres. of U.S.), Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels (founder of New Braunfels), and others.

While still in private hands, some of these letters were published in Marquis James' The Raven, published 1929, and in Eugene C. Barker's eight-volume set entitled The Writings of Sam Houston, first volume of eight published in 1938. Where possible, it has been noted in this guide where letters appear in Barker's publication. Many items remain unpublished as of 2004, particularly those of Anson Jones and Thomas Jefferson Rusk.

Highlights include letters to Bowie and Fannin in December 1830 giving orders which were ignored, letters from Indian scouts and from Cherokee Chief John Jolly (aka Oo-la-te-ka, Houston's adopted Indian father) regarding Houston's career and the land needs of the Cherokees, and the 1861 letter from Houston to his wife urging that she let their son Sam go on to war ("God can shield him as he has me,"), and Houston's own account of Andrew Jackson's death as related to James Buchanan, U.S. Sec. of State.

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Arrangement

The Houston letters have been arranged in 15 series which mainly represent chronological groupings.
Series I: Early Letter and Documents, 1821-1828
Series II: Military Affairs, 1835-1842
Series III: Series III: Republic of Texas Indian Affairs, 1836-1843
Series IV: Relations of Texas and U.S. Government, 1842-1845
Series V: Colonists, 1835-1844
Series VI: Bills for General Houston, 1836-1859
SeriesVII: Family Letters, 1829-1863
SeriesVIII: Partially identified Sam Houston letters and fragment, 1836-1842
Series IX: Meeting Invitations, 1848-1855
Series X: General Correspondence, 1830's
Series XI: General Correspondence, 1840's
Series XII: General Correspondence, 1850's
Series XIII: Series XIII: Communications from Citizens' Groups regarding moving Texan seat of government, 1842
Series XIV: Notes, Essay, Newsclippings, Correspondence, 1842
Series XV: Photocopies of Family Letters, 1824-1857

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Restrictions

Access Restrictions

There are no restrictions on access to these papers, although patrons will use photocopies of these materials unless access to the fragile originals is essential.

Use Restrictions

Permission to publish material from Sam Houston papers must be obtained from the Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.

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Index Terms

Subjects (Persons)
Houston, Samuel, 1793-1863 -- correspondence
Bowie, James -- correspondence
Buchanan, James (U.S. President) -- correspondence
Fannin, James W. -- correspondence
Rusk, Thomas Jefferson -- correspondence
Jones, Anson -- correspondence
Hamilton, James A. -- correspondence
Hunt, Memucan -- correspondence
Johnston, Albert S. -- correspondence
Chief Bowles (Cherokee) -- correspondence
Burleson, Edward -- correspondence
Terrell, George W. -- correspondence
Calhoun, John C. -- correspondence
Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels -- correspondence
Hockley, George W. -- correspondence
Webster, Daniel -- correspondence
Houston family -- correspondence
Subjects (Places)
Texas--Politics and government.
Texas--history.
Subjects
Cherokee Indians -- government relations
Cherokee Indians -- history
Cherokee Indians -- correspondence

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Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Sam Houston papers, MS 049, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University

Acquisition Information

This collection was donated in 1992 by Charlotte Williams Darby, great-granddaughter of Houston, daughter of Franklin Weston Williams.

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Detailed Description of the Collection

 

Series I: Early Letter and Documents, 1821-1828

box folder
1 1 Sam Houston's commission as a Major General in the Militia of Tennessee, signed by William Carroll, Governor of Tenneessee, dated Dec. 14, 1821.
1 Letter from Sam Houston to Hon. John MacLean, dated May 10, 1826.
1 Letter from Sam Houston concerning the duel with General White, dated Sept. 12, 1826.
1 Letter from Sam Houston to Colonel Martin, dated Oct. 10, 1828.

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Series II: Military Affairs, 1835-1842

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1 2 Letter from Sam Houston to Col. James Bowie concerning the expedition into Mexico which Houston opposed, dated Dec. 17, 1835. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. I, p. 322-323)
2 Letter from Sam Houston to Col. James W. Fannin ordering that all volunteers should proceed to Copano to encamp, dated Dec. 30, 1835. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 15)
2 Letter from Gen. Thomas J. Rusk to Sam Houston thanking him for suggesting that he run for President of Texas, but declining, dated Aug. 9, 1836.
2 Letter from Sam Houston to Col. P. A. Sublette, Capt. Burdett, & Col. Jacob Garrett ordering to enroll the troops at San Augustine and have the election of officers, dated Sept. 1, 1836. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 24)
2 Letter from Gen. James A. Hamilton declining the offer by the Texas Congress to command the army of Texas, dated Feb. 16, 1837.
2 Notes from Sam Houston for a secretary, one of which concerns the certification of property taken by Col. Seguin, dated April 4, 1837.
2 Letter from Sam Houston to S. Rhodes (sic)Fisher, Sec. of the Navy, telling him to proceed to Velasco to see if there is a Mexican naval force off the south of the "Brasos", dated April 5, 1837. Correct spelling of names is Rhoads. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 28-29)
2 Letter from Richard Pollard, Charge d'Affaires of the United States to the Republic of Chile, to Sam Houston congratulating him on his accomplishments and calling for justice in the murder of his son at the hands of Lt. Hoath, dated April 21, 1837.
2 Letter from Sam Houston to Col. Alexander Horton ordering him to use caution in his power to sustain the Civil Authorities in the County of San Augustine, dated July 15, 1837. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. II, p. 133)
2 Letter from Capt. B. Jones to Sam Houston asking that his bond be paid and saying that it cannot without Houston's permission, dated Sept. 22, 1837.
2 Letter from Sam Houston to Bernard A. Bee, Sec. of War, stating, "The troops yet remaining at Bernard must have supplies...", dated Feb. 25, 1838.
2 Letter from Bernard A. Bee to Sam Houston stating his resignation as Secretary of War, dated May 23, 1838.
2 Broadside written by Sam Houston ordering for the proper and humane treatment of civilians by the army and soldiers of the Republic, dated Aug. 11, 1838.
2 Letter from Albert Emanuel to Sam Houston concerning the possibility of a Mexican invasion, dated Jan. 1842.
2 Letter from George W. Hockley to Sam Houston assuring him that he does not keep copies of documents marked "private" and informing him of the conditions on the frontier, dated Feb. 16, 1842.
2 Letter from George W. Hockley, Sec. of War, to James Bourland informing him of the travel route of Gen. Armijo and calling for his interception and capture in retaliation for the injuries inflicted upon the citizens at Santa Fe, dated July 22, 1842.
2 Letter from Gen. Memucan Hunt to Sam Houston asking if he will veto or sign the War Bill, dated July 21, 1842.
2 Letter from William H. Jack to Sam Houston asking for his views on an intended secret mission to send a confidential agent to Yucatan, dated July 22, 1842.
2 Letter from Jefferson Wright to Sam Houston stating his frustration over regimental orders, dated Nov. 2, 1842.

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Series III: Republic of Texas Indian Affairs, 1836-1843

box folder
1 3 Letter from Sam Houston to William Goyens, Indian agent, dated Nov. 15, 1836.
3 Notes from Sam Houston directing a secretary to write to the Indian Commissioners; to William Goyens, the Secret Agent to the Cherokees; and to the Comanche chiefs, dated Dec. 6, 1836. (This letter is shown as being dated Dec. 3, 1936 in Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. VII, p. 4-5.)
3 Letter from Sam Houston to Gen. Albert S. Johnston informing him about the precariousness of the Texas situation in 1837, dated Feb. 7, 1837.
3 Letter from Sam Houston to Gen. Thomas J. Rusk expressing his frustration over what he believes was a disobedience of orders, resulting in a Houston massacre, dated Feb. 13, 1837.
3 Letter from W. S. McDonald to Sam Houston concerning misinformation about the massacre in Houston, dated Feb. 14, 1837.
3 Letter from Gen. Albert S. Johnston to Sam Houston informing him about a friendly meeting with the Comanches and urging him to use the opportunity to make peace with the tribe, dated March 5, 1838.
3 Letter from John Jolly, Houston's Cherokee foster father, to Sam Houston informing him that he has kept with the news and asking if the Cherokees can have a "country" set aside and have their rights respected, dated March 27, 1838.
3 Letter from Bowles, Cherokee Chief, to "all my White friends" asking for their patience and forebearance in the death of Col. Sparks, dated May 2, 1838.
3 Letter from Edward Burleson to Sam Houston expressing his willingness to go bond for King and Glasscock as traders with the Comanches, dated June 9, 1838.
3 Letter from Thomas W. Ward to Sam Houston reporting of high water, difficulty in getting horses, Indian hostility, and the taking of a buried chest by Col. Cazneau, dated Oct. 30, 1842.
3 Letter from L. B. Franks to Sam Houston informing him that the prospects of a treaty with the Indians are favorable, dated Nov. 12, 1842.
3 Letter from John S. Black to Sam Houston informing him that no Indians are present as of yet in the Waco Village, dated Nov. 6, 1842.
3 Letter from Sam Houston to Gen. George W. Terrell regarding the possibility of having a treaty with the Indians at Waco Village, dated Feb. 13, 1843. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 160-162.)

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Series IV: Relations of State of Texas and U.S. Government, 1842-1845

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1 4 Letter from Daniel Webster, Sec. of State, to Nathaniel Amory, acting Charge d'Affaires of Texas, acknowledging receipt of note concerning the "Eagle" and the "Liberty" seized at New York, dated Jan. 19, 1842.
4 Lettter from Isaac Van Zandt to Sam Houston tendering his resignation as member of the Sixth Congress of the Republic of Texas from the County of Harrison, dated July 23, 1842.
4 Letter from Zachary Taylor to Sam Houston saying that a Mexican invasion of Texas should not be taken seriously, but if it were to happen, San Jacinto would undoubtedly be repeated, dated Aug. 13, 1844. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. V, p. 93.)
4 Letter from John C. Calhoun, Sec. of State, to Isaac Van Zandt promising to give orders to have two boys reported stolen by the Wichita Indians returned if found in U.S. territory, dated Aug. 17, 1844.
4 Letter from John C. Calhoun, Sec. of State, to the Hon. C. H. Raymond regarding the unknown fate of the two boys presumably taken by the Wichita Indians, dated Jan. 22, 1845.
4 Letter from James Buchanan, Sec. of State, to C. H. Raymond saying that he will gladly receive him with his credentials as Charge d'Affaires for the Republic of Texas, dated March 10, 1845.
4 Letter from Sam Houston to the Hon. James Buchanan informing him on the death of Gen. Jackson and introducing Col. Joseph Eldredge as being of the Department of State of Texas, dated June 8, 1845. (see similar letter in Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 424-425.)
4 Letter from Andrew Jackson Donelson to Sam Houston saying how much he values the stick which was to be given to Gen. Jackson and letting him know how valuable he has been to the U. S. for securing annexation, dated June 16, 1845.
4 Letter from Sec. of the Treasury to Daniel Webster, Sec. of State, regarding the refund of duties by John W. Dough to the party of John A. Rodgers, dated March 2, 1842.
4 (illegible item)

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Series V: Colonists, 1835-1844

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1 5 Letter from Jesse Carter Ferrar to Sam Houston asking about emigrating to Texas and wanting information concerning land and laws before the independence of Texas, dated Jan. 2, 1835.
5 Letter from Henry Swartz to Sam Houston inquiring about Texas, dated July 26, 1836. (copy only - missing original)
5 Letter from Henri Castro to Sam Houston writing about bringing French colonists to Texas, dated Nov. 1, 1842.
5 Letter from Henri Castro to Sam Houston writing about a communication with Anson Jones, Sec. of State for Texas, dated Nov. 15, 1842.
5 Letters from Lt. Techow to Sam Houston writing about his desire to leave the army post in Berlin to seek his fortune in Texas, dated Nov. 6, 1842.
5 Letter from Prince Carl of Solms-Braunfels at Antonio de Bexar to Sam Houston thanking him for sending a copy of the laws of Texas and saying that he wants good land for his proposed colonists, dated Aug. 11, 1844.

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Series VI: Bills for General Houston, 1836-1859

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1 6 Receipt for Sam Houston signed by Niles F. Smith, agent of City Sabine, for $1808.32, dated March 20, 1836.
6 Bill signed by Sam Houston to be paid to N. G. Cooke for $98.38, dated Aug. 23, 1837.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Geo. Allen Heo, for an order of sugar, flour, and coffee, dated Nov. 26, 1842.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Vernal B. Lea to be paid to D. H. McDonald for $35, dated July 6, 1843.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. B. Miller to be paid to K. L. Anderson for $250.00, dated Jan. 24, 1844.
6 Hon. Sam Houston per diem account with a remaining balance of $1,341.00, dated Dec. 15, 1849 - Sept. 30, 1850.
6 Received payment by Charles M. Nichol from Sam Houston for $34.20, dated April 18, 1850.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. C. & S. R. Smith for $527.69, dated June 24 - Nov. 19, 1856.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. C. & S. R. Smith for $47.50, dated Jan. 1 - Oct. 21, 1857.
6 Bills for Sam Houston signed by J. C. & S. R. Smith for $31.89, dated Dec. 2, 1853.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. C. & S. R. Smith for $453.28, dated Jan 24 - Nov. 9, 1857.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Jack W. Terrell for $100.00, dated Oct. 16, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. C. & S. R. Smith for $3,161.96, dated Nov. 23, 1857 - Nov. 20, 1858.
6 Bill stating Mr. S. Morgan took a load of [illegible material, probably agricultural] in quanitity of 1000 feet, accepted by Thom. [illegible], dated Nov. 22, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Baker & Markham for $11.25, dated July 23, 1857 - Nov. 22, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Silas Morgan to be paid for the amount of freight over to Newman, dated Nov. 22, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by M. & L. C. Roundtree for $15.85, dated Nov. 22, 1858.
6 List of nine bills due to various people for varying amounts, dated 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by T. & S. Gibbs and received payment for $200.00, dated Aug. 4 - Nov. 23, 1858 (2 leaves).
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by T. & S. Gibbs for $384.84, dated Jan. 12 - Aug. 4, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by Randolph & Son and received payment for $23.25, dated Jan. 20 - Nov. 18, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by J. R. & E. E. Smither and received payment for $26.27, dated Dec. 1, 1856 - Nov. 14, 1859.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by H. Garnett to be paid to J. W. Terrell for $100.00, dated Oct. 16, 1858.
6 Bill for Sam Houston signed by T. & S. Gibbs for $30.80, dated Dec. 31, 1857 - Jan. 12, 1858.

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SeriesVII: Family Letters, 1829-1863

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1 7 Criss-cross style letter from Sam Houston to Margaret Houston concerning his trip and worry about Sister's (Vernal Lee's widow) having gained so much weight, dated Aug. 16, 1861.
7 Letter from R. G. Houston to Sam Houston, concerning a letter Sam had sent him about the health of a beloved one, dated July 17, 1829.
7 Letter from Mary Wallace to Sam Houston, regarding the prospect of Texans obtaining liberty, Sam getting wounded, and the health of family members, dated June 4, 1836.
7 Letter from Eliza A. Moore to Sam Houston, regarding the recent birth of her daughter, her concerns for him in battle, and the well-being of family and friends, dated Aug. 14, 1836.
7 Letter from Eliza A. Moore to Sam Houston, regarding the recent deaths of her two children who were afflicted with scarlett fever and inflamation of the throat, dated May 21, 1838.
7 Letter from R. H. McEwen to Sam Houston, regarding a letter Sam had sent him about getting $500 to his sister through Mr. McEwen of Kingston, Aug. 29, 1838.
7 Letter from Sam Houston to William Bledsoe regarding Houston's financial investments in Texas, dated Sept. 21, 1840.
7 Letter from Sam Houston to Nancy Lee, stating what a pleasure and privilege it is to be writing her and recounting a dream he recently had, dated Jan. 28, 1844.
7 Letter from H. Stevenson to Sam Houston, regarding family matters, dated Feb. 15, 1847.
7 Letter from Margaret Trimble to Sam Houston, explaining that she had not written him because she was unaware of his whereabouts, dated Nov. 27, 1845.
7 Two letters to Sam Houston, one from his cousin, N. B. Hamilton, dated May 27, 1850, and one from his sister, Margaret Houston, dated May 30, 1850.
7 Letter from Margaret Houston to Sam Houston, concerning a lost letter she had sent him, dated May 13, 1857.
7 Letter from Margaret Houston to Sam Houston, regarding a loan she had asked for, dated June 9, 1851.
7 Letter from H. Houston to Sam Houston, concerning a certain correspondence that appeared in the New York Herald on the 22nd of August, dated Sept. 17, 1851.
7 Letter from N. Houston to Sam Houston, regarding family matters, dated Aug. 21, 1858.
7 Letter from Sam Houston to a "dear sir" acknowlegding that he has received his letter, dated June 1, 1860.
7 Letter from Sam Houston to Nancy Lee, concerning family matters and his writing to Bledsoe and Antoinette, not dated.
7 Letter from Priscilla Houston to Sam Houston, stating how she sees him as an uncle and concerning a letter from Mr. Kinsey, dated June 3, 1863.

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SeriesVIII: Partially identified Sam Houston letters and fragment, 1836-1842

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1 8 Letter from A. W. Morris to B. F. Tankersley enclosed in a letter to B. F. Tankersley from Sam Houston saying that the letter had been picked up in Galveston with the seal broken and sent to him, dated July 1, 1842.
8 Letter from Sam Houston to Captain, authorizing him to buy beef, dated July 9, 1837.
8 Incomplete letter from Margaret Houston to Sam Houston regarding the improvement of his health, not dated.
8 Letter from Sam Houston to the Hon. B. J. Auchal acknowledging that he has received his note by the Hon. S. Rhodes Fisher, dated Nov. 17, 1838.
8 Letter from Sam Houston to Davis, acknowledging that he has received his letters, dated July 18, 1842.
8 Incomplete letter from Sam Houston concerning the letter of the honorable chairman of the secretary committee, dated Nov. 1836.

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Series IX: Meeting Invitations, 1848-1855

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1 9 Letter from B. S. Moore to Sam Houston, urging him to come to a meeting July 4th to help their cause and show a "live Texas", dated June 17, 1848.
9 Letter from Stephen D. Dellaye to Sam Houston inviting him to visit while he is in Syracuse to lecture before the Franklin Institute, dated Jan. 3, 1855.
9 Letter from the Committee of Invitations to Sam Houston inviting him to attend a convention of the American Party of Virginia, dated Aug. 20, 1855.
9 Letter from S. P. Hollingworth to Sam Houston inviting him to attend a mass meeting of the American Party in Rusk County, dated Sept. 14, 1855.
9 Letter from M. W. Armstrong to Sam Houston inviting him to speak on "Great American Principles" to Rusk Council #25, dated Sept. 18, 1855.
9 Letter from J. C. Smith to Sam Houston inviting Houston to attend a meeting of the American Party to "Counteract the Meeting of the Democrats", dated Sept. 28, 1855.
9 Letter from A. H. Davidson and John S. McDonald to Sam Houston inviting him to attend a meeting of the American Party in San Antonio, dated Oct. 15, 1855.

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Series X: General Correspondence, 1830's

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1 10 Letter from W. G. Anderson to Sam Houston, assuring him that he personally had checked the appropriate records and that the proper steps had been taken to insure the validity of Houston's divorce as granted by the Mexican government in 1833, dated April 8, 1837.
10 Letter from Sam Houston to T. F. McKinney, asking him to send a copy of S. Rhoads Fisher's order appointing McKinney "Prize Agent", dated Sept. 5, 1837. (see Writings of Sam Houston, Vol. IV, p. 26-27.)
10 Contract and agreement between Sam Houston and Hervey Whiting ordering the delivery of beef to Spillman's Island for the supply of Galveston, dated Feb. 11, 1838.
10 Letter from M. B. Lewis to Sam Houston acknowledging that he has received his letter directing him to take the place recently occupied by Mr. M. Gofifce, dated July 19, 1834.
10 Letter from A. M. Gall to Sam Houston letting him know it grieved him to see Houston in so sick of appearance, dated June 24, 1834.
10 Letter from John S. Taylor to Sam Houston asking for his permission to resettle on his land in Texas, dated Feb. 1837.

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Series XI: General Correspondence, 1840's

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1 11 Letter from Gen. James A. Hamilton to Sam Houston advising him on how to manage the affairs of the Republic, dated Nov. 6, 1842.
11 Letter from Gail Borden Jr. to Sam Houston consisting of political and personal comments, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from Samuel May Williams (partner in Williams and McKinney law firm which previosuly loaned the Republic of Texas money) to Sam Houston telling him that at this point, he cannot lend any money to the Republic, but sends all good wishes and will send some supplies for the troops, dated Nov. 22, 1842.
11 Letter from John S. Ford to Sam Houston telling him that Gov. James P. Henderson will surely appoint Houston to the U. S. Senate from Texas and reporting a rumor that the Comanches had killed Col. L. H. Williams and their chief, Pahuaca, dated May 19, 1846.
11 Letter from Henry de Zavala to Sam Houston telling him that he had gone to Yucatan to investigate the conditions of the country from which his parents came, dated May 22, 1848.
11 Letter from Sam Houston to W. G. Cooke asking him to please give Mr. Clements a note or receipt he had left with care, dated Jan. 15, 1840.
11 Letter from Ben Fitzpatrick to Sam Houston regarding the resolutions unanimously approved by the General Assembly of the State of Alabama, dated Jan. 1842.
11 Letter from Sam Houston to Rawdon, Wright, Hatch, & Redsoa asking them to please deliver to Capt. J. S. Wright blank bills ordered for the government of Texas by the Hon. William Berry Dangersfield, Secretary of the Treasury of the Republic of Texas, dated April 30, 1842.
11 Letter from A. S. Johnston to Sam Houston regarding a proclamation Houston made that had appeared in the Civilian, dated May 1, 1842.
11 Letter from William Christy to Sam Houston regarding the unexpected departure of Macon and congratulating him on personal matters, dated July 8, 1842.
11 Letter from J. C. Eldredge to Sam Houston announcing that after an absence of two years, he has returned to Texas with renewed feelings of attachment, dated Nov. 1, 1842.
11 Letter from J. Morgan to Sam Houston regarding the disappearance of his previous letters, dated Nov. 5, 1842.
11 Letter from T. B. J. Hadley to Sam Houston regarding the resignation of Judge Jarvis, dated Nov. 3, 1842.
11 Letter from M. P. Woodhouse to Sam Houston informing him that the Treasury is now able to pay recent receipts due to offices of the government, dated Nov. 4, 1842.
11 Anonymous letter to Sam Houston warning him that he is in great personal danger, dated Nov. 10th, 1842.
11 Letter from Lewis J. Gist to Sam Houston stating that he embraces the opportunity offered by the return of Mr. Riley to Texas, dated Nov. 5, 1842.
11 Letter from W. B. Ochittree to Sam Houston informing him on his duty as a senator to nominate a district attorney to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of R. J. Wheeler, dated Nov. 7, 1842.
11 Letter from John Chenoweth to Sam Houston regretfully informing him that he was not able to perform the duties asked of him because he had received Houston's letters too late, dated Nov. 8, 1842.
11 Letter from S. Harrington to Sam Houston regarding the case of W. James D. Usher, dated Nov. 8, 1842.
11 Letter from Mrs. M. Hutchinson to Sam Houston concerning her various griefs, dated Nov. 10, 1842.
11 Letter from S. Holland to Sam Houston introducing to him Major Andrew Allen, dated Nov. 8, 1842.
11 [Illegible letter] dated Nov. 12, 1842.
11 Letter from Sam. M. Williams to Sam Houston advising him that it is not in the interest of Texas to war upon the borders while the inhabitants are struggling for a federal system, dated Nov. 12, 1842.
11 Letter from James Power to Sam Houston informing him about Mexican forces in the town of Malamones, dated Nov. 16, 1842.
11 Letter from R. D. Johnson to Sam Houston introducing to him Mr. E. L. Bearnard, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from James Morgan to Sam Houston informing him about a Mexican fleet seen off the Brazos, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from M. P. Woodhouse to Sam Houston seeking his approval on an account, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from William Henry Daingerfield to Sam Houston informing him of his arrival, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from William Henry Daingerfield to Sam Houston regarding an official note of his arrival, dated Nov. 17, 1842.
11 Letter from Joseph Eve to Sam Houston acknowledging that he has received his letter for Mr. Scott and regretting that his health will not allow him to visit Washington, dated Nov. 18, 1842.
11 Letter from N. G. Harding to Sam Houston telling him that he is in need of friends because of "peculiar embarassments", dated Nov. 18, 1842.
11 Letter from Stewart Newell from Sam Houston updating him on the formation of the Sabine City, dated Nov. 18, 1842.
11 Letter Tho. M. Bagby to Sam Houston writing on behalf of Maj. Andrew Allen, dated Nov. 19, 1842.
11 Letter from Albert H. Ely to Sam Houston volunteering his surgical services to the army of the Republic of Texas, dated Nov. 21, 1842.
11 Letter from George S. McIntosh to Sam Houston regarding the arrival of Dr. Carrol, a gentleman interested in the affairs of Texas, dated Nov. 22, 1842.
11 Letter from John W. Rols to Sam Houston regarding a letter that was opened by citizens hoping to "quiet the people and learn the truth", dated Nov. 22, 1842.
11 Letter from Thomas J. Smith to Sam Houston regarding a confidential verbal message that was to be communicated to him by way of Mr. Wills, dated Nov. 28, 1842.
11 Letter from William Anderson to Sam Houston regarding Dr. Daniel J. Carrol, dated Nov. 29, 1842.
11 Letter from M. P. Woodhouse to Sam Houston regarding Mr. Baldwin's $400 in Treasury warrants, dated Nov. 29, 1842.
11 Envelope from Charles Elliot to Sam Houston, dated Nov. 12, 1842.
11 Letter from Joseph Eve to Sam Houston informing him about a possible invasion of Texas by Mexican forces, dated Dec. 28, 1842.
11 Letter from William Riddle and Co. to Sam Houston introducing him to William and John Riddle, dated Nov. 30, 1842.
11 Letter from John H. Moon to Sam Houston respectfully declining the appointment for the collection of the various Indian prisoners, dated Jan. 28, 1843.
11 Letter from Edwin B. Settle to Isaac Vanzandt regarding an individual matter involving his late mother-in-law, Mrs. Gibbs, dated May 24, 1843.
11 Letter in Spanish from Gen. Adrian Woll to Sam Houston, dated Aug. 16, 1844.
11 Letter from Palmer Job Pillans to Sam Houston regarding a letter in which Mr. McCutchan was introduced, dated Nov. 27, 1843.
11 Letter from David S. Kaufman to Sam Houston thanking him for ELLEGIBLE, dated July 13, 1847.
11 Letter from Sam Williams to Sam Houston informing him on his intentions to meet up with Com. Moore, dated Nov. 25, 1842.

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Series XII: General Correspondence, 1850's

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1 12 Letter from J. J. Hanna to Sam Houston regarding an anecdote of Houston, dated Dec. 24, 1854.
12 Letter from Eliza W. Lanitta to Sam Houston praising him for his accomplishments, dated March 13.
12 Letter from Eve P. Avery (???) to Sam Houston offering information that "cannot be otherwise obtained", dated April 7, 1855.
12 Letter from C. Edwards Lester to Sam Houston concerning the publication of the "Life of Sam Houston", dated March 28, 1855.
12 Letter from R. R. le Howell to Sam Houston offering his services in Houston's removal to Texas, dated July 24, 1855.
12 Letter from Anne G. Forbes to Sam Houston regarding her wishes to go to Texas, dated Aug. 31, 1855.
12 Letter from Jason Wright Leminon (???) to Sam Houston thanking him for (???) of patents for 1853, dated Aug. 5, 1855.
12 Letter from Preston Starrell to Sam Houston regarding the "restoration of the principles of our fathers", dated Sept. 3, 1855.
12 Letter from J. W. McKnight to Sam Houston informing him that he has been unanimously selected as an honorary member of the Philosophian Society at Irving College, dated Sept. 4, 1855.
12 Letter from J. B. Kaufman to Sam Houston regarding the son of Mr. Dyr, who left Louisville to go to Texas and "be part of the revolutionary struggle", dated Sept. 7, 1855.
12 Letter from James H. Durst to Sam Houston regarding Houston's speech on the subject of "An Increase of the Army, the Indian Policy of the Government", dated Sept. 13, 1855.
12 Letter from John N. Pomeroy to Sam Houston writing in behalf of the Union of Societies to invite him to listen to the review of the associators in the state of New York, dated Sept. 15, 1855.
12 Letter from W. D. Miller to Sam Houston answering his request to send him a copy of the instructions to Henderson and Raugandt, dated Sept. 17, 1855.
12 Letter from ??? to Sam Houston thanking him for the receipt of the Congressional Globe and Appendix, dated Sept. 16, 1853.
12 Letter from Eden Walker regarding the recently published book entitled "A Voice to America", dated Sept. 17, 1853.
12 Letter from John M. Shreve to Sam Houston writing his former military commander about the revolution in Texas, dated Sept. 18, 1955.
12 Letter from J. W. Bradford to Sam Houston regarding some columns printed in the Congressional Globe, dated Sept. 18, 1855.
12 Letter from J. L. L. McGall to Sam Houston informing him that he represented Texas as a delegate in the American Convention, dated Sept. 21, 1855.
12 Letter from William A. Shaw to Sam Houston regarding his plans to leave for Texas, dated Sept. 22, 1855.
12 Letter from Paul G. Wheeler to Sam Houston regarding an amount of $252.50 subscribed in the town of Huntsville, dated Oct. 13, 1855.
12 Letter from J. B. Stiteler to Sam Houston asking for monetary contributions to Baylor University, dated Oct. 18, 1855.
12 Letter from E. N. Case to Sam Houston regarding the late response to a letter Houston had sent him, dated Oct. 16, 1855.
12 Letter from J. B. Stiteler to Sam Houston acknowledging that he received Houston's $20, his third annual installment of $100, dated Oct. 19, 1855.
12 Letter from James C. Jones to Sam Houston responding to a previous letter from Houston in which he informs him that Lexington has been flooded with Thomas Jefferson pamphlets in reply to Houston's speech in the U.S. Senate, dated Jan. 21, 1856.
12 Letter from G. M. Lawson to Sam Houston, dated Feb. 28, 1857.
12 Letter from E. N. Smith to Sam Houston thanking him for his interest in her, dated Oct. 9, 1858.
12 Letter from Davis Grigg to Sam Houston congratulating him on his election as governor of Texas, dated Sept. 1859.
12 Letter from N. Young to Sam Houston congratulating him on his election as governer of Texas, dated Aug. 24, 1859.
12 Letter from D. H. Oliver to Sam Houston regarding hisgreat speech at Nacogdoches, dated Sept. 2, 1859.
12 Letter from Thomas R. Gray to Sam Houston informing him about the object of the "National Guard of the Union" and asking for his support, dated Sept. 6, 1859.

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Series XIII: Communications from Citizens' Groups regarding moving Texan seat of government, 1842

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1 13 Document from the Citizens of Travis County protesting the ordered transfer of the Public Archives from the capital in Austin to Houston, unofficially dated March 1842.
13 Document from the "Manifesto of the Committee of Vigilance and Safety of Houston" supporting the ordered transfer of the Public Archives from the capital in Austin to Houston, dated March 14, 1842.
13 Document from the "Proceedings of Public Meeting at Galveston" in which the assembled citizens, because of the perilous situation with Mexico, wished to extend to the Executive prompt and united support of the President, dated April 26, 1842.

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Series XIV: Notes, Essay, Newsclippings, Correspondence, 1842

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1 14 Letter from Sam Houston to Mr. Harvey of the Louisville Democrat in which Houston takes issue with his opinions, dated Oct. 11, 1855.
14 Letter from ??? to ??? of the Convention regarding the forwarding of a copy of the Galveston News of June 11th, dated June 23, 1853.
14 Essay by Margaret Houston entitled, "Improvement of Time", not dated.
14 Letter from Dr. Fletcher to Margaret Houston prescribing her to take a few drops of Fowlers solution of arsenic, not dated.
14 Note from Nelson Griswald acknowledging that he has received a copy of Sam Houston's copy of the ??? to them for examination, dated April 2, 1856.
14 Letter from William Slade to Miss Forbes acknowledging that he has received her letter and advising her to go see Sam Houston to "get a good school", dated Aug. 6, 1855.
14 Letter from Aedie (???) A. Harris to Sam Houston expressing her joy for his fame, dated Jan. 16.
14 Letter from L. Lanee to Dr. Charles M. Hitchcock seeking to open a correspondence with him, not dated.
14 Letter from John M. Heriree to J. L. Roberts asking if it "would be best to land the sheriff after the horse", not dated.
14 Letter from William A. Shaw to Sam Houston acknowledging that he received his letter and hastened to reply, dated Sept. 6, 1855.
14 Letter from William A. Shaw to Sam Houston (???) regarding the future of the American Party, not dated.
14 Letter from ??? to ??? beginning, "The religious aspect of the question, I have not touched, except by distant allusion.", not dated.
14 Document from "The Gallery of Illustrious Americans", dated Jan. 1, 1850.
14 Letter in Spanish from San Jacinto, Mexico, not dated.
14 Letter in Spanish from Pangacinan, Mexico, not date.
14 Column letter from the San Augustine Committee inviting Sam Houston to a public dinner and his response, dated Aug. 27-28, 1840.
14 Column honoring Sam Houston's committment to temperance, not dated.
14 Column regarding the coverage Sam Houston's election as Governor of Texas by the Charleston Mercury, not date.

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Series XV: Photocopies of Family Letters, 1824-1857

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1 15 Letter from Sam Houston to his first cousin, William Houston Letcher, dated April 8, 1824.
15 Letter from Sam Houston to his first cousin, William Houston Letcher, dated Nov. 25, 1845.
15 Letter from Sam Houston to his first cousin, William Houston Letcher, dated July 19, 1857.

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