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Celebrating the Life

Public Memory

[Longhorn Review] Public Memory

Material Type: All, movies — Tags: falstaffpicks — Posted on March 1, 2007, 10:06 am

By: Amy Gerber

Discusses the design, meaning and purpose of public memorials built to
commemorate wars and tragedies. This documentary asks: why do some memorials move
us, why are others forgettable, what do they really mean, and a re memorials still
relevant today? The program covers a specific group of memorials, including: the
Oklahoma City National Memorial, the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail, the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, the Pan Am Flight 103 Memorial Cairn, the Vietnam
Veterans Memorial, and plans for the first African-American lynching monument (the
Clayton Jackson McGhie Memorial), among others. Examines what we can learn from
controversial memorials and the many complex issues involved in memorializing the
victims of crimes against humanity and terrorism. Great example of Performance as
Public Practice.

Reviewer: Beth

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Glitter and Doom: German Portraits from the 1920s

[Longhorn Review] Glitter and Doom: German Portraits from the 1920s

Material Type: All, books — Tags: falstaffpicks — Posted on March 1, 2007, 10:03 am

By: Rewald, Sabine

I saw this exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and was blown away. The
images are so real, so creepy. Through the portraits you get a true glimpse into the
mindset, attitudes and experience of Germany during the '20s. Otto Dix, Max
Beckmann, and George Grosz are just a few of the artists featured. If you did not
get to New York to see this show, you must see this exhibition catalogue.

Reviewer: Laura

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Perfect Lives: An Opera for Television in Seven Episodes

[Longhorn Review] Perfect Lives: An Opera for Television in Seven Episodes

Material Type: All, movies — Tags: falstaffpicks, opera — Posted on March 1, 2007, 10:00 am

By: Ashley, Robert

People have called this self-proclaimed "Opera For Television" the first
distinctly American opera. John Cage said expressed his favor in an over-the-top
fashion, "Who needs the Bible? We have Perfect Lives." In either case, the sentiment
of an enlightening and utterly singular experience is well-placed. You won't see any
of the classical influence here except in its grand scope and ambition. Despite its
low video production values, Perfect Lives truly shows a great potential for
television accommodating high art, if it isn't already a perfect fit.

Reviewer: Tommy

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