University of Texas at Austin
Libraries Home | Mobile | My Account | Renew Items | Sitemap | Help |
support us
University of Texas Libraries
Celebrating the Life

Liars and Saints

[Longhorn Review] Liars and Saints

Material Type: All, books — Tags: Catholic, drama, family, fiction — Posted on July 15, 2008, 3:59 pm

By: Maile Meloy

In beautiful stark prose, Maile Meloy tells the story of the Santerre family,
following the complex relationships among four generations from World War II and the
family's arrival in California to the present. As the story shifts from one
generation to the next and one decade to the next, Meloy competently shifts the tone
of the novel to match the tone of each era and provides insight into the effects of
social change through time on the structure of the family. While it dabbles in the
realm of literary soap opera and has its moment of melodrama, the characters and the
family secrets they share provide an engaging and compelling story of heartbreak,
Catholic guilt, and sexual temptation.

Reviewer: Meghan Sitar

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America

[Longhorn Review] Born in Blood and Fire: A Concise History of Latin America

Material Type: All, books — Tags: history, latin america — Posted on July 15, 2008, 3:29 pm

By: John Charles Chasteen

If you are interested in a compelling and easy-to-read overview of the history of
Latin America, this is the book for you. Instead of trying to relate the events that
took place throughout Latin America over five centuries, Chasteen looks at larger
themes and movements shared by countries throughout Latin America. These themes
include the first indigenous encounters with Spaniards, colonialism, independence,
neocolonialism (America’s policy of influencing Latin America), national movements,
and neoliberalism, among others. Each chapter is broken into a theme, and Chasteen
effectively demonstrates how that theme affected and directed the energies of
countries throughout the hemisphere. The book is enjoyable to read, and perfect if
you need to know the high points of Latin American history but would also like a
more in-depth insight into its complexities. If you are traveling in Latin America,
doing business there, interested in the relationship between the U.S. and Latin
America, or just interested in history, this is the book for you.

Reviewer: AJ Johnson

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

A Fan’s Notes: A Fictional Memoir

[Longhorn Review] A Fan’s Notes: A Fictional Memoir

Material Type: All, books — Tags: alcoholism, memoir, mental illness, NY Giants — Posted on July 14, 2008, 11:57 am

By: Frederick Exley

This book, a cult classic written in 1968, is an honest and intelligent account
of the life of a lonely, mentally ill, alcoholic obsessed with football and Frank
Gifford, the NY Giants running back. While this may sound like Charles Bukowski, it
is more thoughtful and human. The book is at times hilarious, at times angry and
always deeply sad. But somehow it manages to avoid being depressing. You may be
surprised at how much you have to learn from someone in Exley's shoes.

Reviewer: Michele Ostrow

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

The $12 million stuffed shark : the curious economics of contemporary art and auction houses

[Longhorn Review] The $12 million stuffed shark : the curious economics of contemporary art and auction houses

Material Type: All, books — Tags: art, falstaffpicks — Posted on July 3, 2008, 8:36 am

By: Don Thompson

For an eye-opening study of the market for art and why some artists are paid
millions and others starve, this is a fascinating read.  Full of gory detail about
how dealers, auction houses, collectors and artists operate.

Reviewer: David

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

Persian electronic music: yesterday and today

[Longhorn Review] Persian electronic music: yesterday and today

Material Type: All, music — Tags: electronic music, falstaffpicks — Posted on July 3, 2008, 8:33 am

By: Alireza Mashayekhi, Ata Ebtekar

Some very fine electronic music from Persia.  A compilation spanning 40
years.

Reviewer: Tommy

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

My Road Trip to the Pretty Girl Capital of the World

[Longhorn Review] My Road Trip to the Pretty Girl Capital of the World

Material Type: All, books — Tags: austin, road trips, young adult fiction — Posted on June 25, 2008, 4:48 pm

By: Bryan Yansky

Simon hates his life – he doesn’t get along with his adopted parents, his
girlfriend just dumped him, he’s been in trouble with the police for possession of
(and selling) pot, and he hates school. In a fit of desperation, he finds the name
of his birth parents, steals his father’s car, and leaves Iowa in a cloud of smoke.
He hits the road in search of his dream “perfect” parents, picking up all manner of
interesting characters along the way. This book chronicles his travels and his
parent quest, which brings him here to Austin. We get a great picture of what Austin
was like in 1979, when the story takes place. On 6th street, for instance, Simon
encounters a street person who asks if Simon knows him. Simon shrugs. “I’m Jesus
Christ the Savior. I died for your sins. I can’t even afford a cup of coffee. Don’t
you think you could spare a couple of cents for the Savior? Don’t you think that’s
the least you can do?” . . . I reached in my pocket and gave him what I had. He made
a bugle sound by blowing through his closed hand. He turned to me. “May I be with
you,” he said. And yes, as you may have guessed, Austin is the pretty girl capital
of the world.

Reviewer: AJ Johnson

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

The Terra-cotta Dog

[Longhorn Review] The Terra-cotta Dog

Material Type: All, books — Tags: crime, mafia, murder, mystery, Sicily — Posted on June 25, 2008, 11:00 am

By: Camilleri, Andrea

Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano series now numbers six or seven titles, and this
is one of the best. Originally written in Italian and set in Sicily, there is no
shortage of great scenery, good food, sly politics, corruption, and fatal mistakes.
As a good Sicilian cop, Inspector Montalbano doesn't reveal much as the story
develops - to the reader, his colleagues, or his girlfriend. Yet he is always
conscious of the multiple layers of meaning in the actions and words of his
superiors and his suspects alike. In keeping with the setting, there are classical
themes at work - notably tragedy and fate. Good and bad people alike overreach,
suffer, and occasionally pay a terrible price, or make fools of
themselves.Camilleri's characters, always strongly described, also share a streak of
rough and ancient comedy. As one translation of Artistotle's Poetics puts it, "the
ludicrous being merely a subdivision of the ugly", there is plenty of ugliness in
Sicilian life, and Camilleri uses it for great comic effect. Readers of Donna Leon's
books set in and around Venice will find here the antipode of northern Italian life.
The only disappointing thing about this and all of the Inspector Montalbano books is
that they end too soon.

Reviewer: Dennis Trombatore

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

¡Caramba! A Tale Told in Turns of a Card

[Longhorn Review] ¡Caramba! A Tale Told in Turns of a Card

Material Type: All, books — Tags: fiction, hispanic-american fiction, latino fiction — Posted on June 25, 2008, 9:33 am

By: Nina Maria Martínez

Nina Maria Martínez’s meandering novel is a delight. It follows its two
twenty-something heroines and an assortment of wacky secondary characters through a
sleepy California town, Lava Landing, located at the base of an inactive volcano.
Natalie and Consuelo provide necessary relief for fans of women’s fiction who are
tired of chick lit. The girls sport Payless shoes instead of Manolo Blahniks, wear
K-mart not Versace and there’s not a glamorous media job to be found. The pace of
the novel, like that of its setting is slow. This is no page-turner, but a book to
spend time with. The hardcover version of the book is a work of art. It’s packed
with bonus features such as colored pages, Lava Landing themed Lotería cards and
artifacts such as menus, paper dolls and letters.

Reviewer: Pamela Mann

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

Czech Eden

[Longhorn Review] Czech Eden

Material Type: All, books — Tags: czech republic, falstaffpicks, photography — Posted on June 3, 2008, 8:39 am

By: Matthew Monteith

Matthew Monteith’s images of the people and the environment of the Czech Republic
are provocative.  They both pull you in and keep you out.  Some landscapes are
pastoral and others are industrial.  Portraits of individuals look right at you but
you have no idea what they are thinking.  I was mesmerized by the images in this
book.

Reviewer: Laura

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

The magical life of Long Tack Sam [videorecording]

[Longhorn Review] The magical life of Long Tack Sam [videorecording]

Material Type: All, movies — Tags: falstaffpicks, magicians — Posted on May 3, 2008, 8:45 am

By: Ann Marie Fleming

Interesting glimpse into the world during WWI-WWII and especially vaudeville life
during this time.  p.s. Great fashions and costumes!

Reviewer: Beth

View this item in the Library Catalog

Submit your own review of this item

Syndicate content