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Celebrating the Life

The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

[Longhorn Review] The Snowball: Warren Buffett and the Business of Life

Material Type: All, Books — Tags: warren buffett — Posted on February 24, 2009, 2:36 pm

By: Schroeder, Alice

My Dad gave us three "kids" this book for Christmas; said it was "an important
book" for our times. I have now--2 months later--completed the book. All 800+ pages
of text plus some of the footnotes. Thanks Dad! While I agree Warren Buffett is an
important man, I must (respectfully, of course) disagree that *this* is an important
biography. For all but the most detail-minded, this book is skimmable or
excerptable. Dip in to a chapter here and a chapter there. My favorites and somewhat
representational of the whole would be: one from the early years, one of the
chapters on Buffett’s relationship with Kay Graham of the Washington Post, one on
Mrs. B. and one on Geicko, and one or two on Buffett’s ongoing relationship with
Bill Gates. Or browse the index for topics and, and read selectively. Then call it
done.

Why, you may ask? On p.478, the author--who had complete access to
Warren Buffett for years-- wrote: "Buffett had the energy and enthusiasm of a
restless teenager; he seemed to remember every fact and figure he had ever read…”
With few exceptions, the endless repetition of those details in the book, to the
point that it seems the author is reciting from Buffett’s calendar, do not make a
good biography. Telling us over and over, year by year, what Buffett had for lunch
at each meeting – or more annoyingly what he would NOT eat – or reciting entire
lists of attendees of each meeting and dinner, do not for the most part add to our
knowledge of Buffett as a person or how he thought and made decisions. It does not
make for interesting reading. In short, an important man, a skimmable and exhausting
book.

Reviewer: Shel

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Power and the Press: Controlling the Media and Information During Conflict

[Longhorn Review] Power and the Press: Controlling the Media and Information During Conflict

Material Type: All, books — Tags: media — Posted on February 16, 2009, 9:16 am

By: Davis, Caleb Andrew

A topical analysis juxtaposing various information strategies of WWII and
Vietnam. Masterfully written and crafted. Quick Read.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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The music of Joni Mitchell

[Longhorn Review] The music of Joni Mitchell

Material Type: All, books — Tags: criticism, falstaffpicks — Posted on February 13, 2009, 12:11 pm

By: Lloyd Whitesell

A good, perhaps overly detailed, analysis of Joni Mitchell's works, from the
beginning of her career through the most recent. Many of the descriptions of
specific songs reminded me of my first connections with them - um, a few years
ago!

Reviewer: Danny

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Subodh Gupta : Gandhi's three monkeys

[Longhorn Review] Subodh Gupta : Gandhi's three monkeys

Material Type: All, books — Tags: falstaffpicks, sculpture — Posted on February 13, 2009, 12:08 pm

By: Subodh Gupta

An amazing contemporary artist that sculpture enthusiasts should know
about…

Reviewer: Laura

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America

[Longhorn Review] America

Material Type: All, books — Tags: documentary photography, falstaffpicks — Posted on February 13, 2009, 12:05 pm

By: Zoe Strauss

Real, provocative, startling images.

Reviewer: Laura

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Andhra Culture: A Petal in Indian Lotus

[Longhorn Review] Andhra Culture: A Petal in Indian Lotus

Material Type: All, books — Tags: India — Posted on February 9, 2009, 8:51 am

By: Parthasarathy, R.

Awesome Book !!!!!! I had the chance to read this book on my recent visit to
India when one of my friends recommended it. I have lived in Andhra Pradesh for 23
years. This book gave me an insight into so many customs and traditions. Very
interesting read. The author has given a lot of thought and has researched into many
nuances and details of Andhra culture. This book is truly a gem. The book is a petal
to Indian literature lotus. A must read for anyone interested about Indian
culture.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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An Egyptian grammar with chrestomathy and glossary

[Longhorn Review] An Egyptian grammar with chrestomathy and glossary

Material Type: All, Books — Tags: ancient egyptian, egypt, egyptian, grammar, hieroglyphics, hieroglyphs — Posted on January 31, 2009, 9:11 am

By: Mercer, Samuel A. B.

Be aware that this text is exactly what its title says it is: a grammar. The text
is terse and to the point - out of the book's 184 pages, only the first 86 actually
contain English text. The rest are the selection of Egyptian readings (or
"Chrestomathy" as he calls it) and the sign list.

Furthermore, the copies printed by
Ares are exact duplicates of the original edition (1926, London). When this was
written, it was still a fairly safe assumption that anyone reading it had already
studied Latin and probably Greek. As a result, you will find this rough going if
you're not already familiar with grammatical terms borrowed from Latin and Greek. I
had some Latin and Anglo-Saxon before I was assigned this book as an introductory
text. Most of my classmates did not have that background. I learned a good deal from
this book; they, mostly, did not.

In short, if you don't know what a "dual pronoun"
is, you need a newer, friendlier book. I have some recommendations.

For a
comprehensive introductory textbook aimed at those with a serious interest in
mastering Middle Egyptian, try "Middle Egyptian: an introduction to the language and
culture of hieroglyphs" by James P. Allen. If your interest is more casual, you may
find "How To Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs" by Mark Collier and Bill Manley helpful.
Both base their examples on texts found in museum pieces.

Alan Gardiner's "Egyptian
Grammar" is still fairly comprehensive, but decidedly dated. Avoid anything by
E.A.W. Budge - he published prolifically, but also sloppily. There are a great many
errors in Budge's work, which will cause you no end of headaches if you try and use
his texts as study guides.

Lastly, for a good dictionary try "A Concise Dictionary
of Middle Egyptian" by Raymond Faulkner. Note that this book is handwritten lecture
notes in published form, so it can be hard to read. The English index was published
as a separate volume, the "English-Egyptian index of Faulkner's Concise dictionary
of Middle Egyptian" by David Shennum. These two are expensive; refer to them at a
library if you can.

Reviewer: Will Martin

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Meet Kirsten, an American girl, 1854

[Longhorn Review] Meet Kirsten, an American girl, 1854

Material Type: All, books — Tags: American Girl — Posted on January 16, 2009, 12:30 pm

By: Shaw, Janet Beeler

I was introduced to the American Girl series a few years back when I got them for
my step daughter. I read hem and began to get more and more interested in their
stories. My office mate is a huge AG doll collector and I asked her to check on a
particular miniture doll for me; they come in two sizes. She did and I was able to
obtain my very firs american Girl Doll. Her name is Samantha. Every time anew movie
or book comes out I look forward, with much anticipation, to checking in out. I just
saw Crissa on DVD and she was great. Kristen is next on my list. Each girl
represents a different era in America's history.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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Race and the subject of masculinities

[Longhorn Review] Race and the subject of masculinities

Material Type: All, books — Tags: culture, gender, masculinity — Posted on January 5, 2009, 8:53 am

By: Harry Stecopoulos

This ground-breaking collection of essays brings together some of the best
scholarship on the cultural intersections of race and masculinity, understood as a
pluralistic concept. Future work in the areas of gender construction, masculinity,
and racial identity will continue to depend on this volume's intellectual
contribution.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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Judaism in biological perspective : biblical lore and Judaic practices

[Longhorn Review] Judaism in biological perspective : biblical lore and Judaic practices

Material Type: All, books — Tags: judaism, science — Posted on January 5, 2009, 8:49 am

By: Rick Goldberg

This book is an edited volume of science-based essays written by biological
anthropologists/psychologists and Judaic scholars. Can there be rational examples of
the compatibility between natural science and Judaism? This book offers a strikingly
novel perspective on traditional and contemporary Judaic practices. For those with
some Judaic knowledge, there are biological explanations in these chapters not seen
elsewhere. For those well-versed in evolutionary theory, the authors’ perspectives
suggest new approaches to the scientific study of religion. Topics include the
monistic tendency, biblical polygyny, biblical family conflict, circumcision and
proselytes, sacrificial-ritualistic mitzvot (obligations), periodic conjugal
separation, Judaic traditionalism, male and female reproductive strategies, and the
relationship between costly signaling and prestige.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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