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Celebrating the Life

Brokeback Mountain [videorecording] / Focus Features and River Road Entertainment ; directed by Ang Lee ; screenplay by Larry McMurtry

[Longhorn Review] Brokeback Mountain [videorecording] / Focus Features and River Road Entertainment ; directed by Ang Lee ; screenplay by Larry McMurtry

Material Type: All, Movies — Tags: romantic, staff pick, valentine's day recommendation — Posted on February 10, 2012, 3:42 pm

By: Ang Lee

This masterful adaptation by Ang Lee of the Annie Proulx short story is a landmark in the cinematic depiction of love between men. Two impoverished ranch hands in 1963 Wyoming meet while sharing work and initiate an intimate relationship that informs the rest of their lives. An unlikely love transcends the circumstances of a repressive, homophobic society, even as the characters' lives are ruined by the societal hatred surrounding them. A beautiful, unforgettable cinematic achievement.

Reviewer: Barry Moore

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Rebecca / Daphne du Maurier.

[Longhorn Review] Rebecca / Daphne du Maurier.

Material Type: All, Books — Tags: romantic, staff pick — Posted on February 10, 2012, 3:39 pm

By: Daphne du Maurier

“Last Night I dreamt I went to Manderley again.” So begins du Maurier’s 1938 romantic novel, Rebecca. The line also begins the Alfred Hitchcock film version, which was named Best Picture for 1940. This work is usually described as Gothic fiction, but as really good Gothic fiction. Critics credit du Maurier’s storytelling skills. Romantics-at-heart should expect to find a good read (or a film of note) in the surprising adventures of the second Mrs. de Winter.

Reviewer: Larayne Dallas

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Rock 'n' roll party [sound recording] : honoring Les Paul / Jeff Beck.

[Longhorn Review] Rock 'n' roll party [sound recording] : honoring Les Paul / Jeff Beck.

Material Type: All, Music — Tags: falstaffpicks — Posted on February 7, 2012, 4:32 pm

By: Jeff Beck

Jeff Beck is a legend and for good reason…he is one of the few true innovators of the electric guitar. His touch and tone are always breathtaking, and his phrasing is inimitable. Beck’s tribute to the music of Les Paul and Mary Ford is much more than a waltz through some of the duo’s finest work, it is an historical account of Beck’s formative years. Scottish diva Imelda May shines throughout the concert, turning in consistently fabulous performances including an intoxicating version of the Shangri-Las classic “Walking in the Sand”. 72 yr. old Gary U.S. Bonds absolutely brings the roof down with a crackling rendition of his 1960 hit “New Orleans”. Brian Setzer’s walk on performance of the Eddie Cochran classic “Twenty Flight Rock” is just awesome! However, throughout the recording the star is Beck’s powerful yet understated playing, filled with elegance and passion for his own Rockabilly roots.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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Harold and Maude [videorecording] / Paramount Pictures presents ; produced by Colin Higgins and Charles B. Mulvehill ; written by Colin Higgins ; directed by Hal Ashby.

[Longhorn Review] Harold and Maude

Material Type: All, Movies — Tags: valentine's day recommendation — Posted on February 3, 2012, 12:30 pm

By: Hal Ashby

If you’ve always hoped to meet that special someone who is the peanut butter to your jelly no matter how eccentric you are, you might enjoy watching Harold and Maude this Valentine’s Day. Harold, who stages fake suicides for his mother’s benefit and is obsessed with death, is caught off-guard when he meets carefree Maude at a funeral, eventually falling in love. Nevermind that she’s 79.

Reviewer: Anna Fidgeon

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A Satyr against Mankind - Rochester

[Longhorn Review] A Satyr against Mankind - Rochester

Material Type: All, all — Posted on December 6, 2011, 4:29 pm

By: Earl of Rochester (1647-80)

Aj R587 +679s copy 1 contains the rare misprints at line 46 'Baud' for 'Band',
and at line 100 'distinguishes which' for 'distinguishes by'; other copies are at
the Bodleian, Oxford; Boston Public Library and Houghton, Harvard, making the HRC
copy a rarity.

Reviewer: Nicholas Fisher

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Mathematical principles of mental philosophy

[Longhorn Review] Mathematical principles of mental philosophy

Material Type: All, Books — Tags: Mathematics, Nonesuch, Philosophy, Psychology — Posted on December 6, 2011, 4:25 pm

By: Sadao Shibahara.

An attempt to use topology and other mathematical tools, to model human thought.

The prose is dry, presumptious, and overwritten, in the turgid para-academic style favored by pseudointellectuals seemingly the world over. But the book is one of those “almost made it” works that simply must be produced every so often.

It could be studied by a psychologist, statistician, philosopher, mathematician, or even a mystic, and provide numerous tangential ideas or “rabbits” to chase down strange holes of thought.

The author has a few interesting ideas, and a great many uninteresting ones gussied up in this pseudo-academic prose. The author shows _great_ endurance elaborating both kinds of them in occasionally agonizing detail. His approach is organized and methodical overall, even though the prose is far worse than Spencer-Brown’s Laws of Form, most of R. Buckminster Fuller’s work, or anything by Marshall McLuhan, for instance. Like the preceding three authors, if anyone extracts a useful set of concepts or practices from this book, it isn’t the author’s fault….

Shibahara promised a completed work in three volumes. This volume 1 was printed in a run of 500 copies, and one of them somehow finding its way to Texas. This weird book has found a home in Austin.

I am going to skim this strange volume deeply, and I hope he publishes the whole thing some day. Good Luck to him, he’s 87 at this writing.

essdee

Reviewer: Steve Devine

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The City and The City

[Longhorn Review] The City and The City

Material Type: All, Books — Posted on November 15, 2011, 10:21 am

By: mIEVILLE, cHINA

So you are reading along in this noirish meta-police procedural, indebted to
Bruno Schulz and Italo Calvino and maybe Raymond Chandler, with its surreal
atmosphere of quantum physics, and suddenly you slip down into it. You are trying to
read the story, but the decontextualized puzzles and jokes are getting in the way.
You try to unsee them, but sometimes you just can't and you lose the thread. You
breach - the streets look familiar, the dialog is the same, but there is something
else going on. Elegant, witty, not as elaborate as "The Name of the Rose", but sly,
like P.I. Taibo.

Reviewer: dennis trombatore

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Dragon's fire

[Longhorn Review] Dragon's fire

Material Type: All, books — Tags: Dragonriders of Pern, Dragons, fiction, Pern — Posted on November 7, 2011, 9:44 pm

By: Anne McCaffrey

If you read the 3 books in this arc (Dragon's Kin, Dragon's Fire, & Dragon's Blood) you will
find a lot of repetition and there are parts that just plain bore you. But I could see the point of
doing it this way because of the different views on life on Pern these three books give. With each
you get to see a different side to Pern all taking place at during the same time span sometimes
touching the same events that is where it gets repetitive and that gets old. This book was definately
not your typical "Dragonriders of Pern" style book in that It does not look to dragonriders as the
main characters. Although they are important characters, McCaffrey sheds light on other aspects of
Pernese life such as how firestone was mined, how people were judged and how they became holdless or
Shunned, as well as the friction between holders, whers and crafts.

Reviewer: Minnie Rangel

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