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Celebrating the Life

Filtered by Material Type: Books

Introduction to Stochastic Programming [Electronic Resource]

[Longhorn Review] Introduction to Stochastic Programming [Electronic Resource]

Material Type: All, books — Tags: ebook, stochastic optimization — Posted on August 30, 2008, 9:33 am

By: John R. Birge and Francois Louveaux

This is the textbook of our graduate course. It's very good.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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Pakistan’s Strategic Culture and Foreign Policy Making: A Study of Pakistan’s Post 9/11 Afghan Policy Change

[Longhorn Review] Pakistan’s Strategic Culture and Foreign Policy Making: A Study of Pakistan’s Post 9/11 Afghan Policy Change

Material Type: All, books — Tags: Afghanistan, FATA, Islamic Extremism, Pakistan, Pashtuns, Terrorism — Posted on August 29, 2008, 8:15 am

By: Ijaz Khan

A clear and simple analysis of the Pakistan's Foreign Policy after 9/11, helping
in understanding Pakistani predicaments in pursuing its role in the 'War against
Terrorism' in accordance with the satisfaction of the International Community. The
book also helps in understanding the problem of Pakistani State and gives good
historical and contextual overview. It also discusses and introduces the reader to
Pakistan's Pashtun ethnic issues and politics as well as the the situation of
Pakistan's Western borderlands known as FATA.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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Historia del estado Zulia

[Longhorn Review] Historia del estado Zulia

Material Type: All, books — Tags: history, Venezuela — Posted on August 9, 2008, 9:56 am

By: Juan Besson

Traditional, though still very useful, history of this important western
Venezuelan state. The approach is chronological, and each volume includes
interesting and useful transcriptions of primary documents, without, however,
providing information about their sources.

Reviewer: Peter S. Linder

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Little Scarlet

[Longhorn Review] Little Scarlet

Material Type: All, Books — Tags: Easy Rawlins, mystery, Watts riot — Posted on August 5, 2008, 10:25 am

By: Walter Mosley

Easy Rawlins is rough, self-assured, mature, street smart, definitely a man’s
man. A businessman who loves family and respects women, he is the amateur
investigator featured in 10 books by Walter Mosley.

It’s the 60’s – a violent time
in our history. An violence is the vehicle that Mosley uses to drive this story.

Watts 1965. For those who don’t know what went down, go Wiki it for the full 411.
But here’s a snapshot… Watts, is a black neighborhood in South Central Los Angeles,
California, that erupted violently in August 1965 after a white highway patrol
office stopped a black driver. Blacks in the neighborhood, like Blacks all over the
country during the 60’s were fed up with injustice. And more so with non-violent
protest. They gathered, observing this unusual traffic stop. They began throwing
rocks at the police. This escalated into five days of burning, looting, and
bloodshed. Blacks attached white people, fought police and shot at firefighters. It
took 15,000 National Guard troops to squash the rebellion.

Sounds familiar. Riots.
LA. 1992. Rodney King. Baby, there ain’t nothing new under the sun.

Watts, Los
Angeles, August 1965, five days after the riots began is where the story Little
Scarlet kicks off.

Ezekiel Rawlins, as the white folks called him, fronts as the
head custodian at Sojourner Truth High School while keeping a private investigator
business on the down low. You know the brother doesn’t have a PI license, but that
doesn’t stop him for helping folks in his community. Easy ain’t no push over, but
deep down he can’t get over his southern gentleman roots. Roots that lead back to
Louisiana and Texas. He enlists the help of several interesting characters including
his, shoot first and never ask questions, “ace boon coon”, Raymond Alexander, better
known as “Mouse”

In the aftermath of the riots 34 people are killed. Although the
news only reports 33, the 34th is a young black woman who the police suspects was
killed by a white man. They need Easy’s assistance in solving the crime, because
they would get nowhere with white cops investigating the murder of a black woman by
a white man. That would be just the spark needed to rekindle the riots.

Mosley, one
of the best-selling mystery writers, has weaved a story that is real, compelling,
engaging,…and puts the issue of black – white relations on blast. He does it in a
very easy and subtle way, which is contrasted with the way Easy moves through the
story.

Yes, the story takes place in the aftermath of the Watts Riots…black-white
tension;

Yes, Easy is a black man who doesn’t trust the white police…black-white
tension;

Yes, there is the murder of a black woman by a white man – black-white
tension;

This tension explodes when Easy discovers who the murderer is and the fiery
rage that consumes him. Once the murderer is revealed, you will not be able to put
the book down. These are just a few of the many parallels that exist in the story.

You will definitely want to know what Easy and his friend Mouse gets into next.
There is a film in the works starring Jeffery Wright and Mos Def.

Reviewer: G. Perrin

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Looking beyond the highway : Dixie roads and culture

[Longhorn Review] Looking beyond the highway : Dixie roads and culture

Material Type: All, books — Tags: roadside architecture, society for commercial archeology — Posted on August 4, 2008, 8:03 am

By: Claudette Stager and Martha Carver

This is a well researched work- a good choice for historians interested in
roadside architecture and American culture. For more on this subject see the Society
for Commercial Archeology.

Reviewer: Longhorn Reviewer

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The Miracle at Speedy Motors

[Longhorn Review] The Miracle at Speedy Motors

Material Type: All, books — Tags: Botswana, detective fiction, mystery — Posted on August 1, 2008, 9:15 am

By: Alexander McCall Smith

Mma Ramotswe's good humor and good will continue to shine, and Alexander McCall
Smith continues to find engaging, non-life-threatening mysteries for her to solve in
this ninth book of the series (No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency) set in Botswana. This
novel particularly touches on telling the truth (and how to react when people don't)
and deciding what to believe is the truth. Look for Jilly from Philly as Precious
Ramotswe in the forthcoming BBC adaptation of the series.

Reviewer: tonstant weader

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The Feminine Face of God: The Unfolding of the Sacred in Women

[Longhorn Review] The Feminine Face of God: The Unfolding of the Sacred in Women

Material Type: All, books — Tags: faith, religion, spirituality, women — Posted on July 16, 2008, 10:38 am

By: Sherry Ruth Anderson

This book is a diverse examination of the uniquely feminine aspects of faith in
God. The authors interviewed a variety of women, including a Seneca elder, an
ex-nun, a rabbi, a social worker and a Jungian analyst. Each woman shares her story
about how the traditional patriarchal models of religion lack relevance for her
life. Instead they speak of how they’ve redefined their spiritual beliefs and
practices to embrace their experiences as women. The book follows the unfolding of
life from childhood to adult experiences of creativity, love, family, sexuality and
community. I had a lot of “a ha” moments when I read this book. The experiences
described and feelings expressed by the interviewees articulated many of my own
thoughts and feelings about faith in ways I had not been able to articulate them
myself. I recommend this book for any woman who has ever found more spiritual truth
in her own personal experiences than in the traditional beliefs and practices of
patriarchal religion.

Reviewer: Cindy Lennartson

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The Millstone

[Longhorn Review] The Millstone

Material Type: All, books — Tags: 1960s, british fiction, fiction, motherhood, women — Posted on July 15, 2008, 4:12 pm

By: Margaret Drabble

Written and set in Swinging London in the mid-1960s, The Millstone is a story of
a common predicament, told in an uncommon manner. Rosamund Stacey - attractive,
intellectual, conscientious, and self-sufficient - is intimidated by the idea of
sex, and has successfully managed to avoid it altogether until her late twenties.
When her first sexual encounter leaves her pregnant, her life contracts and expands
in unforeseeable ways, as her perceptions are heightened and her preconceptions
softened. Structured as a coming-of-age novel, but slightly inverted, The Millstone
presents the true awakening of a young woman who had already considered herself
enlightened. Drabble's sensitive, humane portrait of the 1960s sexual revolution in
Britain is as fresh and relevant as if it came off the presses today.

Reviewer: Missy Nelson

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Empire Falls

[Longhorn Review] Empire Falls

Material Type: All, books — Tags: divorce, family, fiction, New England, pulitzer prize — Posted on July 15, 2008, 4:07 pm

By: Richard Russo

I am really recommending any of Richard Russo’s works. All of them are great and
you can follow a rise in the quality of his writing as you read newer and newer
works. The basic premise seems to be the same in each of his novels (at least the 4
of his 5 which I have read): they’re all set in a small town in the American
Northeast and full of wacky characters -- some in dire situations, some suffering
for caring about those in dire situations, and some suffering at the hands of those
in dire situations. Either way, the characters are what are great about Russo’s
writing. He makes you believe that these unreal folk are real and he makes you
suffer along with them, while at the same time you often want to give them a
smack-in-the-head wake-up call. This title won Russo the Pulitzer Prize in fiction
for 2002. Basically, it is a chilling commentary on Columbine, but the plot, as in
his other works, is almost incidental to how the characters react to what is
occurring. Russo is always funny and often at the same time heart-wrenching. His
books are quick reads and all wonderfully realized.

Reviewer: Beth Kerr

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Liars and Saints

[Longhorn Review] Liars and Saints

Material Type: All, books — Tags: Catholic, drama, family, fiction — Posted on July 15, 2008, 3:59 pm

By: Maile Meloy

In beautiful stark prose, Maile Meloy tells the story of the Santerre family,
following the complex relationships among four generations from World War II and the
family's arrival in California to the present. As the story shifts from one
generation to the next and one decade to the next, Meloy competently shifts the tone
of the novel to match the tone of each era and provides insight into the effects of
social change through time on the structure of the family. While it dabbles in the
realm of literary soap opera and has its moment of melodrama, the characters and the
family secrets they share provide an engaging and compelling story of heartbreak,
Catholic guilt, and sexual temptation.

Reviewer: Meghan Sitar

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