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Celebrating the Life

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  • The tutorial is tailored to working with women's human rights archival collections at the University of Texas, but can be useful for anyone doing archival research. The tutorial walks you through finding an archival collection, preparing for research, viewing archival collections, conducting archival research, and emotional and ethical engagement with archival material.

    English
    present
  • This annotated guide identifies and describes 2636 ephemeral publications which are part of the Taracena Flores Collection. Most of the publications cited in this guide can be termed street literature, since they were intended to be read or distributed widely and/or posted in public places, and they represent a broad range of organizations and interest groups.

    These publications came to the Benson Collection as part of the collection of Arturo Taracena Flores, a Guatemalan bibliophile who spent a lifetime gathering printed and other materials about his country. The Taracena Flores Collection, purchased by the University of Texas at Austin in two installments (1963 and 1970), consisted of some 7,000 books and pamphlets, more than 5,000 broadsides, several hundred periodical and newspaper titles, newspaper clippings, maps, and miscellaneous items on all subjects. The dates of publication for most of the items were between 1821 and 1963. All of the major issues that concerned Guatemalans during this period (except for the Belize question) are reflected in the materials cited in these materials: agrarian reform, freedom of speech, voting rights for illiterates, communism, anticommunism, the labor movement, rural development, the role of the Church in political affairs, and foreign intervention in Guatemala's internal politics are among them. Also well represented are important events related to these issues--elections, strikes, demonstrations, political conventions, May Day celebrations, presidential inaugurations, political assassinations, and student events with political overtones, such as the Huelga de Dolores.

    This guide is Part One of three total for the guide Revolution and Counterrevolution in Guatemala, 1944-1963.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1944-1949
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) is a national organization founded in 1980 by American activists to fight against U.S. military intervention in the Salvadoran civil war. CISPES and other organizations advocated for U.S. non-intervention in this and other Central American conflicts and the right of undocumented refugees to sanctuary in the U.S. CISPES is best known for the series of law suits it brought against the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the late 1980s following FBI infiltration and surveillance of the organization. This collection includes materials from the Dallas branch of CISPES that operated from approximately 1981 to 1990 and it documents the FBI infiltration and subsequent law suits, the CISPES sanctuary work in the Dallas area, and Holy Cross community initiatives for the urban poor in Dallas.

    English, Spanish
    1968-1990
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) was a government security agency created in 1947 during the presidency of Miguel Alemán. Organizationally part of the Secretaria de Gobernación, the DFS was assigned the duty of preserving the internal stability of Mexico against all forms of subversion and terrorist threats. During Mexico's Guerra Sucia (c. 1960s-1980s), the security forces were implicated in the Tlateloco Massacre and the El Halconazo attack on peaceful student protesters in 1971. The group was disbanded in 1985 after decades of monitoring and collecting intelligence on leftist organizations, students and university faculty. The collection includes the Dirección's daily reports to the president from 1970 to 1977. The reports detail the proceedings of meetings and activities in Mexico City and other regions of Mexico, as well as information regarding abductions and killings of organization leaders.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1970-1977
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • From 1983 to 1999 the Central America Resource Center (CARC) compiled a collection of news articles on the current events in the U.S. and Central America. A similar project was undertaken for Mexico, the Mexico Newspak, from 1993-1999. The articles documented human rights violations in Central America that immigration attorneys used in political asylum petitions on their clients’ behalf. In 1992, CARC changed its name to the Human Rights Documentation Exchange (HRDE) and expanded its mission to collect documentation for asylum cases worldwide.

    English, Spanish
    1985-1999
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Fannie Hurst (1889-1968) was an American short story writer and novelist who was also engaged with social and political issues such as racial equality, women's rights, Jewish causes, and anti-Fascism. The incoming correspondence series of her papers at the Ransom Center reflects these interests and contains correspondence from a variety of people and organizations, including: the American Birth Control League, the ACLU, the American Jewish Congress, Elizabeth Arden, Authors League of America, Lillian Becker, Albert Berg, B'nai B'rith, Books & Authors War Bond Rally, Theda Bara Brabin, Madeleine Borg, Pearl S. Buck, Jonathan Cape, Jacques Chambrun, the City Wide Citizens' Committee on Harlem, Alma Clayburgh, Louis Cohen, Cosmopolitan, Hume Cronyn, Curtis Brown, the Democratic National Party, Theodore Dreiser, Marie Dressler, Edna Ferber, Daniel Frohman, Zona Gale, Hadassah, Harpers, the Constance Hope Foundation, Zora Neale Hurston, Blanche Knopf, Fiorella H. La Guardia, Sinclair Lewis, NBC, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, the New York Times, Charles and Kathleen Norris, Ruth Bryan Owen, Paramount Pictures, PEN, RKO, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Charles Edward Russell, the Salvation Army, and Carl Van Vechten.

    English
    ca. 1910s-1965
    Harry Ransom Center
  • From 1940 to 1988, the Field Foundation provided support to organizations promoting human rights, civil rights, civil liberties, child welfare and social change, including the NAACP, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Children's Defense Fund. This collection includes correspondence, reports, legal documents, printed material, clippings, and photographs documenting the many movements and groups the foundation supported as well as the foundation's role as an active participant in social change.

    English
    1940-1990
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • George Lister was a career foreign service officer who held State Department posts in Moscow, Warsaw, Rome, and Bogota, and worked in the State Department's Bureau of Latin American Affairs. In the 1970s, he played a leadership role in the creation of the Bureau of Human Rights, Democracy, and Labor, and in 1974 Lister became the first Human Rights Officer in the State Department's Bureau of Inter-American Affairs. Because of his important behind-the-scenes work in making human rights an important consideration in diplomacy, he was labeled "Mr. Human Rights" by historian Arthur Schlesinger. The Lister Papers include Lister's writings, correspondence, audio-visual materials and his collected materials on a variety of his professional and personal interests.

    English
    1887-2004, (bulk: 1936-2003)
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The discovery of the National Police Historical Archive in 2005 opened an extensive and timely resource for the study of Guatemalan history and human rights in the region, spanning a broad array of topics from Guatemala's armed conflict between 1960 and 1996 to the sexually transmitted disease experiments performed at the behest of the United States government in the 1940s. This site currently includes over 10 million scanned images of documents from the National Police Historical Archive. This digital archive mirrors and extends the physical archive that remains preserved in Guatemala as an important historical patrimony of the Guatemalan people. To make best use of this resource, we suggest taking some time to read the tutorial and examples found on the About this Site page, learning the organizational structure of the National Police, and then patiently exploring the archive. This is not a full text search engine like Google, but rather the digital iteration of what you would encounter working in the massive paper archive in Guatemala. When you go to an archive, you will seldom find the exact document you are looking for right away. It will often take many hours of investigation to find relevant documents, if they exist at all. This Archive is arranged in accordance with the professional archival principles of provenance and original order to reflect the Guatemalan National Police administrative structure, and understanding that structure is a valuable way to start.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1870-1997
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • This photography collection consists of original materials from an exhibition excerpted from the book El Salvador: Work of Thirty Photographers, including 69 gelatin silver prints by various photographers, one large chromogenic color print of the image from the book's cover, 13 bilingual text panels written by Carolyn Forché, and the paper work and comments book from the original exhibition tour. The first section of the exhibition was made up of 67 images taken by 30 international photojournalists during the intensely brutal period of conflict between 1979 and 1983. Photographers Susan Meiselas and Harry Mattison gathered these images into a traveling exhibition and book in 1983 to raise global awareness about the conflict. At a time when the Reagan administration insisted that military aid to El Salvador's government was essential to stopping the spread of communism and that progress was being made on human rights, the photographs contributed to the debate by providing a contrary eyewitness account. The images are accompanied by texts written by poet Carolyn Forché.

    English, Spanish
    1979-1983
    Harry Ransom Center