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The Texas After Violence Project (TAVP) is an independent, Austin-based, nonprofit organization. TAVP’s oral history archive documents the effects of murder and capital punishment in Texas and aims to serve as a resource for public dialogue on alternative ways to prevent and respond to violence. The TAVP collection includes video testimonies and transcripts from survivors of violence; religious actors; law enforcement officials; legal actors; media witnesses; and activists and scholars.

Language: English
Date:
2008-present


Tom C. Clark served as a U.S. Supreme Court justice from 1949-1967, presiding over some of the most well-known cases decided during the Warren Court period. The collection highlights court documents on desegregation, the constitutionality of school prayer, the Miranda rights, the expansion of 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure, and other key civil rights decisions. Materials in the collection include case files, bench memorandum, briefs, and slip opinions from these cases, as well as personal correspondence and speeches by Justice Clark.

Language: English
Date:
ca. 1910-1977, (bulk: 1949-1977)
Contributing Library: Tarlton Law Library


The Transcription Centre began its brief but significant life in February 1962 under the direction of Dennis Duerden (1927-2006), producing and distributing radio programs for and about Africa. The organization was created with funding provided initially by the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF) to foster non-totalitarian cultural values in sub-Saharan Africa in implicit opposition to Soviet-encouraged committed political attitudes among African writers and artists. The records of the Transcription Centre comprise scripts and manuscripts, correspondence, legal documents, business records, ephemera, photographs, and clippings. Particularly noteworthy is a large file of scripts and script fragments arranged topically as a broadcast and publishing resource, including material not represented elsewhere in the papers. Making up about a quarter of the papers, the correspondence series contains significant evidence of the Transcription Centre's efforts on behalf of African art, writing, and scholarship through broadcasting, conferences, and cultural festivals. The correspondence files include artists (Jimo Akolo, Julian Bienart) and writers (Chinua Achebe, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Rajat Neogy, David Rubadiri), as well as academics and other scholars (Ulli Beier, Sillaty K. Dabo, Gerhard Kubik, Margaret Laurence, Ivan van Sertima). The extensive body of correspondence with Wole Soyinka is especially noteworthy.

Date:
1979-1983, (bulk: 1960-1977)
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center


The U.S. Latino and Latina WWII Oral History Project Collection is the product of an initiative that began in 1999 to document the experiences of Mexican Americans during WWII. The project is a joint initiative between the Center for Mexican American Studies and the UT School of Journalism designed to highlight the contributions of Mexican Americans that are not always recognized in traditional histories of the war. Individuals interviewed served in the U.S. armed forces during the conflict, whether as soldiers, nurses, technicians, or members of the civil service. The project may also be accessed through its own web page (http://www.lib.utexas.edu/ww2latinos/index.html) for additional information. The collection contains 400+ oral history interviews, including audio and video tapes and DVDs, transcripts, indexes to the interviews, narrative stories produced from the interviews, photographs, correspondence, and other documents from the U.S. Latino and Latina WWII Oral History Project.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1999-present
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Juanita Craft was a member of NAACP leadership in the Dallas area from 1935 until her retirement, working as a state field organizer and the Dallas Youth Advisor. As leader of the Youth Council, Craft helped to end segregation of lunch counters and restaurants, the Texas State Fair and North Texas State University through non-violent protest. In 1967, she received an additional award for exposing fraudulent trade schools that preyed on young people around the state. Her persistent work on behalf of civil rights concerns has earned her repeated awards for civic leadership, including national recognition. Her collection includes materials dating back to her early work with the Dallas Youth Council, including a scrap book documenting the Council's work. Printed materials include copies of the NAACP publication, The Crisis, correspondence and documentation of NAACP work more generally, and pamphlets from related organizations.

Language: English
Date:
1939-1983
Contributing Library: Briscoe Center for American History


Mexican American civil rights advocate, educator, sociologist and anthropologist Dr. Julian Samora is considered to be the first Mexican American to receive a Ph.D. in Sociology and Anthropology. His research interests included the delivery of health services, rural populations in urban settings and the rural poor, Mexican immigration and the movement of Mexican Americans along the U.S.-Mexico border, population studies, and the educational status of youth and adults. He was co-founder, along with Ernesto Galarza and Herman Gallegos, of the Southwest Council of La Raza, now the National Council of La Raza. He served on boards or as a consultant to many organizations including, among others, the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Commission, the Indiana Civil Rights Commission, the Mexican American Legal Defense ' Education Fund, the National Assessment of Educational Progress, the President's Commission on Rural Poverty, the President's Commission on Income Maintenance Programs, the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and the United Way. The collection is comprised of correspondence, written works, personal and biographical materials, organization records, photographs, audiovisual materials, and Samora’s personal library.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1934-1989
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) was founded in Corpus Christi, Texas, in 1929 with the mission to advance the economic condition, educational attainment, political influence, housing, health and civil rights of the Hispanic population of the United States. Today, LULAC advocates powerfully for legislation that benefits the interests of all Latin Americans in the U.S. as individuals and members of larger Latin American communities. This three part collection stems from the "Presidential Papers Initiative" established to collect the papers of each LULAC president from 1929 to the present; however, actual preservation in this collection is limited to sixteen presidents over the 80 year history of the organization. Materials range from administrative documents to subject files on a wide range of civil, economic and social rights.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1929-present
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Political leader from La Joya, Texas, and advocate for the poor, Leo James Leo championed many Mexican American causes. He was involved in both local and statewide politics and served on the boards of directors of many Great Society poverty programs, such as the Associated City and County Economic Corporation, helping the poor with food, job assistance, housing, and medical aid. He was often involved in controversy because of his forthright defense of these programs. In 1960, Leo and other Mexican -American political leaders organized the Political Association of Spanish Speaking Organizations (PASSO). Leo chaired the 1,000 member Hidalgo chapter of PASSO, the largest in the state. He also formed the Hidalgo County Political League, an association of liberal Anglo American and Mexican American Democrats, in the late 1960s. In addition, he assisted with summer youth programs and helped file citizenship papers for many Mexican immigrants. The collection contains materials from La Joya political activities and statements; the Guillermo Flores Elementary School dedication; personal and family history; and posthumous dedications and tributes.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
ca. 1960-1985
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Photographer and civil rights activist Manuel (Chaca) Ramírez (1947-present) documented Mexican American barrios, civil rights activities, (including the Texas Farmworkers' march of 1977 and the East Austin Boat Race controversy), and Chicano arts and artists. In the 1980s, he recorded the work of Mexican American artists Amado Maurilio Peña, Jr. and Consuelo (Chelo) Gonzalez Amezcua. The collection consists of 875 images that document activities and environs of Mexican Americans in Texas. Photographs of Laredo, Texas, in the 1970's show people of Laredo in their surroundings and the contrasts between poverty and luxury in the city. Slides document the Texas Farmworkers' march of 1977 for reform of labor laws in Texas and the United States, protest marches against police brutality, neighborhood activism in Austin, Texas, and a mural project by the League of United Chicano Artists (LUChA) in East Austin.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1964-1982
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


María G. Flores was a photographer, teacher and social activist best known for her work with the Texas Farm Workers Union from 1975-1979. The collection is primarily composed of documents related to her work with farm workers and the Chicano rights movements. Materials include program files, speeches and photo-documentary work on the lives of farm workers and events in support of their rights.

Language: English
Date:
1966-1983
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


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