The Transcription Centre began its brief but significant life in February 1962 under the direction of Dennis Duerden (1927-2006), producing and distributing radio programs for and about Africa. The organization was created with funding provided initially by the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF) to foster non-totalitarian cultural values in sub-Saharan Africa in implicit opposition to Soviet-encouraged committed political attitudes among African writers and artists. The records of the Transcription Centre comprise scripts and manuscripts, correspondence, legal documents, business records, ephemera, photographs, and clippings. Particularly noteworthy is a large file of scripts and script fragments arranged topically as a broadcast and publishing resource, including material not represented elsewhere in the papers. Making up about a quarter of the papers, the correspondence series contains significant evidence of the Transcription Centre's efforts on behalf of African art, writing, and scholarship through broadcasting, conferences, and cultural festivals. The correspondence files include artists (Jimo Akolo, Julian Bienart) and writers (Chinua Achebe, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Rajat Neogy, David Rubadiri), as well as academics and other scholars (Ulli Beier, Sillaty K. Dabo, Gerhard Kubik, Margaret Laurence, Ivan van Sertima). The extensive body of correspondence with Wole Soyinka is especially noteworthy.

Date:
1979-1983, (bulk: 1960-1977)
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center


The Women's Caucus for Gender Justice's (WCGJ) documentary footage for If Hope Were Enough contains the documentary production in English, Spanish, and French as well as raw footage of panels for the Preparatory Commission of the International Criminal Court (ICC Prepcom) and interviews with survivors of gender-based violence conducted for the documentary. If Hope Were Enough documents the ways in which women have worked to bring accountability for crimes of sexual and gender violence in conflict and non-conflict situations around the world and the struggles of gender-based violence survivors in Korea, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rwanda, Afghanistan and Mexico.

Language: English, French, Spanish
Date:
1998-2000


Coverage: Africa

“Operation Fine Girl: Rape Used As a Weapon of War in Sierra Leone” looks at the widespread and strategic use of rape and sexual violence against women – many of them young girls and teenagers – during the decade-long civil war in Sierra Leone, the world’s poorest country. “Operation Fine Girl” was produced by and for the Oxygen network's Worth The Risk series, in partnership with WITNESS, who put together Binta Mansaray, their local partner in Sierra Leone, and Academy Award-nominated director Lilibet Foster to make the documentary. The collection includes interviews with victims of sexual violence; interviews with medical, legal, and other professionals; footage of political figures; footage of ceremonies, parades, commemoration events, campaign events, and other events; and raw footage of daily life in Sierra Leone. The collection also includes the finished documentary in English and Krio, as well as an excerpted version in English. Materials are in English and Krio.

Language: English
Date:
2001-2002, undated


Coverage: Africa

Ruth First (1925-1982) was a South African journalist, university lecturer, and anti-apartheid activist. She helped draft the Freedom Charter of the African National Congress (ANC) and was a member of Umkhonto we Sizwe, the ANC's military wing. She was forced into exile in 1964 and assassinated with a parcel bomb in 1982. She was married to Joe Slovo, long-time president of the South African Communist Party (SACP), and for many years First edited the Johannesburg weekly paper for the SACP. First's papers include documents from her work as a journalist, anti-apartheid activist, and books and articles she authored. UT owns microfilm copies of Ruth First's papers. The originals are housed in the University of London's Institute of Commonwealth Studies.

Language: English
Date:
1889-1991, (bulk: 1946-1982)
Contributing Library: Perry-Castañeda Library


The tutorial is tailored to working with women's human rights archival collections at the University of Texas, but can be useful for anyone doing archival research. The tutorial walks you through finding an archival collection, preparing for research, viewing archival collections, conducting archival research, and emotional and ethical engagement with archival material.

Language: English
Date:
present


Coverage: Africa

The Genocide Archive of Rwanda (GAR) features video testimonies from genocide survivors, video recordings of the Gacaca Court proceedings and remembrance ceremonies, photographs, and archival documents that provide context to the history of the 1994 Genocide. Materials are in Kinyarwanda. Select videos have English subtitles and translations and French translations. Select archival materials have abstracts in English and French. GAR is a collaborative project of the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre, Aegis Trust, and Rwanda’s National Commission for the Fight Against Genocide.

Language: English, French, Kinyarwanda
Date:
1987-2007