University of Texas at Austin
Libraries Home | Mobile | My Account | Renew Items | Sitemap | Help |
support us
University of Texas Libraries
Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

104 results, page 10 of 11 104 results
  • Tejiendo la Memoria is a weekly radio program produced by the Museo de la Palabra y la Image / Museum of the Word and Image (MUPI). Each program is between five and seven minutes and relates an aspect of the social, cultural, or political history of El Salvador. The program was originally broadcast by the news program, Voces en Contacto, by the Association of Participatory Radio and Programs of El Salvador (ARPAS). The program currently airs on Conexión Comunitaria.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    2009-present
  • The career of Terrence McNally (1939– ), the author of plays, musicals, and other works, is well documented by the drafts, scripts, correspondence, and production materials in his papers. Several of his works with homosexual characters or that explore the deepening AIDS crisis of the 1980s and 1990s are represented in the collection, including Lisbon Traviata (1985, 1989), Lips Together, Teeth Apart (1991), Love! Valour! Compassion! (1994), Kiss of the Spider Woman (1992), Corpus Christi (1998), the television movie Andre's Mother (1988, 1990), and others. The materials related to these works, as well as the correspondence McNally received from viewers and readers about the stories he depicts, including letters from the mothers of AIDS sufferers, may be of interest to researchers.

    English
    1950s-2002
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The Texas After Violence Project (TAVP) is an independent, Austin-based, nonprofit organization. TAVP’s oral history archive documents the effects of murder and capital punishment in Texas and aims to serve as a resource for public dialogue on alternative ways to prevent and respond to violence. The TAVP collection includes video testimonies and transcripts from survivors of violence; religious actors; law enforcement officials; legal actors; media witnesses; and activists and scholars.

    English
    2008-present
  • The Texas Farm Workers Union (TFWU) was established in August 1975 under the leadership of Antonio Orendain. Wanting a union that was accountable to them, a core of Rio Grande Valley farmworkers supported the foundation of the TFWU. Despite the financial problems it faced, the TFWU was able to focus the media spotlight on the plight of farmworkers. They campaigned for the establishment of a Texas Agricultural Board and the right of farmworkers to vote on union representation, but legislation died in subcommittee. In 1977 union members started a 420-mile march from San Juan to Austin. To gain more public support for their cause, Orendain led forty union members on a historical 1,600-mile march from Austin to Washington, DC. However, unable to maintain firm financial backing, the union continued to have a sporadic existence until its demise in the mid-1980s. In addition to the correspondence of TFWU labor organizer Orendain, the collection includes promotional materials such as the newspaper El Cuhamil, a half-hour film titled Los Trabajadores Agricolas de Tejas and several phonodiscs of songs for TFWU written by Esteban Jordan. Other items found in this collection are posters, buttons, bumper stickers, and banners.

    English
    1977-1980
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Founded in 1977 by Robert "Mort" Schwab, the Texas Human Rights Foundation is devoted to protecting the human rights of Texans, with the primary goal of ending discrimination against homosexuals, bisexuals, transsexuals, and persons living with AIDS and HIV. The collection includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, audio-visual recordings and other documents relating to the work of this organization between 1978 and 1992.

    English
    1978-1992
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • The Texas Resource Center represented Texas' death row inmates during their trials and subsequent appeals processes from 1977-1999. The Center lost its federal funding after passage of the Effective Death Penalty and Anti-Terrorism Act in 1996. The collection contains the legal records of these cases, and it is grouped alphabetically by the inmate's last name.

    English
    1977-1999
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • Tom C. Clark served as a U.S. Supreme Court justice from 1949-1967, presiding over some of the most well-known cases decided during the Warren Court period. The collection highlights court documents on desegregation, the constitutionality of school prayer, the Miranda rights, the expansion of 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure, and other key civil rights decisions. Materials in the collection include case files, bench memorandum, briefs, and slip opinions from these cases, as well as personal correspondence and speeches by Justice Clark.

    English
    ca. 1910-1977, (bulk: 1949-1977)
    Tarlton Law Library
  • The Transcription Centre began its brief but significant life in February 1962 under the direction of Dennis Duerden (1927-2006), producing and distributing radio programs for and about Africa. The organization was created with funding provided initially by the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF) to foster non-totalitarian cultural values in sub-Saharan Africa in implicit opposition to Soviet-encouraged committed political attitudes among African writers and artists. The records of the Transcription Centre comprise scripts and manuscripts, correspondence, legal documents, business records, ephemera, photographs, and clippings. Particularly noteworthy is a large file of scripts and script fragments arranged topically as a broadcast and publishing resource, including material not represented elsewhere in the papers. Making up about a quarter of the papers, the correspondence series contains significant evidence of the Transcription Centre's efforts on behalf of African art, writing, and scholarship through broadcasting, conferences, and cultural festivals. The correspondence files include artists (Jimo Akolo, Julian Bienart) and writers (Chinua Achebe, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Rajat Neogy, David Rubadiri), as well as academics and other scholars (Ulli Beier, Sillaty K. Dabo, Gerhard Kubik, Margaret Laurence, Ivan van Sertima). The extensive body of correspondence with Wole Soyinka is especially noteworthy.

    1979-1983, (bulk: 1960-1977)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Nine members of the military junta that ruled Argentina from 1976 to 1982 were put on trial by the Buenos Aires Federal Court of Criminal Appeals, a civilian court, and were charged with crimes including homicide, torture, illegal detention, and robbery. The collection consists of photocopies of case transcripts of testimonies by 828 witnesses at the 1985 trial of these military commanders. The 7630 sheets of testimonies, chiefly by released prisoners like Jacobo Timmerman, document instances of kidnapping, illegal detention in clandestine centers, systematic torture, coerced collaboration, and death under torture. Transcripts are arranged chronologically and a list of witnesses is included.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1985
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Teodoro Cantos was a Philippine national who served as a member of the Japanese Civilian Army during World War II under the name of Teodoro Tatishi. Following the war he was accused of murder and treason and tried in the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and appealed in the Supreme Court of the Philippines. Tatishi argued that he could not be tried in this court because he was a national of the Philippines and therefore a U.S. citizen. The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review this case, but then dismissed it as moot when the Philippines gained its independence. The collection includes the documents, exhibits and transcript of evidence of his war crimes trial. No finding aid is available for this collection.

    War Crimes
    English
    contact Tarlton Law Library for information
    Tarlton Law Library