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Following a decade of work in post-World War II Europe with various U.S. government offices, Michael Josselson decided to help lead the newly created Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF), a liberal, anti-Communist organization founded by American and European intellectuals to expose Communist cultural oppression and to oppose all forms of totalitarian rule. As the Administrative Secretary of the CCF, Josselson arranged for financing of organizations that operated as fronts to channel CIA funds. After his resignation, Josselson continued to informally advise former CCF associates who created a new organization, the International Association for Cultural Freedom, which disavowed the CCF and the CIA but continued many of the CCF's programs. Collection documents include research notes, reports, maps and correspondence.

Language: English
Date:
1914-1991, (bulk: 1960-1978)
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center


Gloria "G.K." Sprinkle worked extensively with the National Organization for Women (NOW) in leadership positions from 1979 to 1985. Her papers include organization documents from meetings and conferences during this period, as well as newspaper clippings and publications related to both NOW and general women's rights.

Language: English
Date:
1973-1991
Contributing Library: Briscoe Center for American History


Texas author and journalist Dick J. Reavis has written much on the topic of the Mexican people, including pieces on undocumented immigrants, guerrilla movements and their leaders, Mexican American civil rights activists, and the cultural formation of modern Mexico. The collection is comprised of personal papers of Texas author and journalist Dick J. Reavis, and more specifically those materials relating to Mario Cantú, Güero Medrano and the Partido Proletario Unido de America, and the Campamento 2 de Octubre, a squatter camp outside of Mexico City. These include articles, photographs and reflections composed by the Reavis, as well as various newspaper clippings on each subject.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1968-2002
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Printed materials, including announcements, handbills, invitations, newsletters, posters, programs, and tickets, document the activities of several gay Hispanic organizations in Houston, Austin, and El Paso, Texas, and Guadalajara, Mexico. The bulk of the collection consists of publications of Houston's Gay Hispanic Caucus (later Gay & Lesbian Hispanics Unidos). Also includes newsletter of the Austin Latino/a Lesbian & Gay Organization (ALLGO).

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1979-1986
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


The Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) is a national organization founded in 1980 by American activists to fight against U.S. military intervention in the Salvadoran civil war. CISPES and other organizations advocated for U.S. non-intervention in this and other Central American conflicts and the right of undocumented refugees to sanctuary in the U.S. CISPES is best known for the series of law suits it brought against the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the late 1980s following FBI infiltration and surveillance of the organization. This collection includes materials from the Dallas branch of CISPES that operated from approximately 1981 to 1990 and it documents the FBI infiltration and subsequent law suits, the CISPES sanctuary work in the Dallas area, and Holy Cross community initiatives for the urban poor in Dallas.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1968-1990
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Coverage: Latin America

The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) was a government security agency created in 1947 during the presidency of Miguel Alemán. Organizationally part of the Secretaria de Gobernación, the DFS was assigned the duty of preserving the internal stability of Mexico against all forms of subversion and terrorist threats. During Mexico's Guerra Sucia (c. 1960s-1980s), the security forces were implicated in the Tlateloco Massacre and the El Halconazo attack on peaceful student protesters in 1971. The group was disbanded in 1985 after decades of monitoring and collecting intelligence on leftist organizations, students and university faculty. The collection includes the Dirección's daily reports to the president from 1970 to 1977. The reports detail the proceedings of meetings and activities in Mexico City and other regions of Mexico, as well as information regarding abductions and killings of organization leaders.

Language: Spanish
Date:
1970-1977
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


From 1983 to 1999 the Central America Resource Center (CARC) compiled a collection of news articles on the current events in the U.S. and Central America. A similar project was undertaken for Mexico, the Mexico Newspak, from 1993-1999. The articles documented human rights violations in Central America that immigration attorneys used in political asylum petitions on their clients’ behalf. In 1992, CARC changed its name to the Human Rights Documentation Exchange (HRDE) and expanded its mission to collect documentation for asylum cases worldwide.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1985-1999
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Dr. Ramiro R. Casso was a civil rights activist that fought for school desegregation and equal educational opportunities for Mexican American children. As a member of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Casso also advocated on behalf of Texas farm workers and promoted public health issues along the Texas-Mexico border. Active also in politics, Casso ran for mayor of McAllen, Texas, in 1981, campaigning for increased vigilance on issues of police brutality directed at Mexican Americanss and immigrants. Casso also served on the Texas Board of Health and the Texas Human Rights Commission. Materials in the collection include print documents such as speeches, testimonies and correspondence from each of Casso's endeavors, with a particular focus on health and education issues along the border.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1960-2007
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Legal papers, correspondence, minutes, agendas, printed materials, clippings, photographs, and memorabilia document the strike and other efforts of the Upholsterers' International Union (UIU) Local No. 456 to win collective bargaining rights at the Economy Furniture Company plant in Austin, Texas, from 1968-1972. The non-violent efforts of workers to win union recognition and a signed contract ended in 1971 after a two-and-a-half-year strike also known as the "Austin Chicano Huelga." The collection contains legal records from Sam Houston Clinton and Dave R. Richards, attorneys for the Upholsterers' International Union Local No. 456; miscellaneous briefs and papers relating to court proceedings and settlement of strike; strike and boycott materials; union correspondence; and external publications.

Language: English
Date:
1968-1972
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


Eduardo Idar was a Mexican American lawyer and legal rights activist. The materials document Idar's career as an attorney in Texas with the Attorney General's office, his involvement with organizations such as the American G.I. Forum, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, the Political Association of Spanish Speaking People, and his activism for Mexican American rights in schools and in the political and legal process. A large part of the collection documents the case of Ruiz v. Estelle, which found widespread abuses of prisoners in the Texas state prison system and placed it in federal receivership.

Language: English, Spanish
Date:
1941-2002, (bulk: 1941-1981)
Contributing Library: Benson Latin American Collection


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