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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

82 results, page 6 of 9 82 results
  • The Mexican American Programs of the Longhorn Radio Network collection consists of 198 recordings for two series of radio programs: The Mexican American Experience, which first aired in October, 1976, and A esta hora conversamos, which first aired in October, 1981. Both programs were part of the Longhorn Radio Network, a distribution service and production center of public service content for radio stations across Texas and the greater Southwest. The project may also be accessed through its own web page (http://www.laits.utexas.edu/onda_latina) for additional information. The collection contains interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns. Topics covered on these programs include political activities of Mexican Americans, Mexican American folklore and folk medicine, corridos, Tejano music, Mexican American musicians, voting rights, education, health, farm workers' unions and working conditions, and some Mexican and Central American topics.

    English, Spanish
    1976-1982
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Following a decade of work in post-World War II Europe with various U.S. government offices, Michael Josselson decided to help lead the newly created Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF), a liberal, anti-Communist organization founded by American and European intellectuals to expose Communist cultural oppression and to oppose all forms of totalitarian rule. As the Administrative Secretary of the CCF, Josselson arranged for financing of organizations that operated as fronts to channel CIA funds. After his resignation, Josselson continued to informally advise former CCF associates who created a new organization, the International Association for Cultural Freedom, which disavowed the CCF and the CIA but continued many of the CCF's programs. Collection documents include research notes, reports, maps and correspondence.

    English
    1914-1991, (bulk: 1960-1978)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • In 1979, Carla J. Hagen and four other researchers and photographers ‪(‬Dan Dickey, María Flores, Félix Peña, and Scott Van Osdol‪)‬ worked on a project funded by a National Endowment for the Humanities grant and administered through the Southwest Center for Policy Studies in Austin, Texas. They collected 60 songs from migrant workers in the Rio Grande Valley region of Texas, and photographed musicians, informants, and the environment in which migrants live and work.

    This collection documents the music and experiences of migrant agricultural workers in the Texas border region. A 403-page manuscript ‪(‬titled La compusimos pizcando: Texas migrant ballads‪)‬ describes the lives and music of Mexican and Mexican American migrant workers and includes an appendix with Spanish language song lyrics and English translations; 7 cassette tapes contain interviews with informants including musical performances; 81 black-and-white photographs by Dan Dickey, María Flores, and Scott Van Osdol show musicians, researchers, and the working and living conditions of migrant workers.

    English, Spanish
    1979
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Morris Ernst (1888-1976) was an American lawyer and one of the leading advocates of civil liberties in 20th-century America. Ernst served on President Truman’s Committee on Civil Rights and as counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) (and later director emeritus) where he defended individual rights and freedom in numerous landmark federal cases on privacy, libel, slander, obscenity, censorship, birth control, abortion, and labor issues. However, Ernst also feared communist influence and helped establish a loyalty oath policy within the ACLU. In his lifetime, Ernst worked with controversial figures such as birth control activist Margaret Sanger, Dominican Republic dictator Rafael Trujuillo, and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover.

    The career and personal life of Ernst are documented from 1904 to 2000 through correspondence and memoranda; research materials and notes; minutes, reports, briefs, and other legal documents; handwritten and typed manuscripts; galley proofs; clippings; scrapbooks; audio recordings; photographs; and ephemera.

    English
    1904-2000
    Harry Ransom Center
  • LLEGÓ, the National Latino/a Lesbian and Gay Organization, was founded in 1987 during the National March for Lesbian and Gay Rights in Washington, DC. The organization provided a variety of programs, campaigns and publications to the Latino gay and lesbian community until its close in 2004. LLEGÓ's work focused particularly on local political leadership, national policy work and AIDS awareness. Materials in the collection include administrative and program documents for the organization's 17 years of work.

    English, Spanish
    1987-2004
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Anthropologist and novelst, Oliver LaFarge, helped draft a constitution for the Hopi Indians, which he documented in his 116-page manuscript, Running Narrative of the Organization of the Hopi Tribe of Indians (1936). The LaFarge collection contains papers, manuscripts, and correspondence relating to Indian rights and the Hopi Constitution. The collection also includes works of non-fiction, novels and short stories, and the book A Pictorial History of the American Indians.

    English
    1886-1966, (bulk: 1924-1966)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Aurora Estrada Orozco and her four daughters - María Teresa, Sylvia, Irma, and Cynthia - have been active in the fields of art, politics, journalism, and historical research. The collection contains letters, articles, press releases, clippings, handbills and posters relating to Chicano student activism at the University of Texas and elsewhere, Chicano cultural events in Austin, Texas, feminist issues, and political campaigns. Several issues of Para la gente, and Austin paper edited by Irma which supported the Raza Unida Party, are included.

    English
    1976-present
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Consists of 59 original photonegatives and corresponding prints showing Mexican American communities in South Texas. The photographs were taken in June, 1941. Images show housing, schools, water supplies, sanitation, and construction techniques in several South Texas counties. Includes pictures of winter housing of migrant agricultural workers, and the small communities of Concepcion, El Sauz, La Grulla, Las Cuevitas, Los Ojuelos, San Ygnacio, and others. The photographs are said to have been taken with a borrowed Kodak as part of a report on conditions in South Texas for the U. S. Department of Agriculture.

    English
    1941
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The records of PEN International, a writers' organization, consist of letters and documents dating from 1921 to 1972, including correspondence from writer-members, as well as files relating to the organization's political and social activities. The aims of PEN, as outlined on their website, are to promote literature, defend freedom of expression, and develop a community of writers worldwide. To that end PEN "acts as a powerful voice in opposing political censorship and speaking for writers harassed, imprisoned, sometimes murdered for the expression of their views." The 228 boxes of records at the Ransom Center include materials related to Writers in Exile, BLED (an international gathering organized by the Slovene PEN Centre and the Writers for Peace Committee of International PEN), the Fund for Intellectual Freedom, and the London Fund for Exiled Writers.

    English
    1921-1973
    Harry Ransom Center
  • In 1988, the Political Asylum Project of Austin / Proyecto Asilo Político de Austin (PAPA) began with two employees and by 2003, PAPA had grown into a staff of ten, including four attorneys. Its original mission was to promote the human rights of refugees and immigrants in Central Texas through legal representation, public education, and advocacy. Its mission today is to ensure that asylum seekers and immigrants in Central Texas continue to receive the resources and advocacy that they need to stay in the United States. The organization also provides education for other advocates and for law enforcement on legal and social issues related to immigration issues and political asylum. The collection includes documents from PAPA’s founding in the 1980s as well as PAPA publications and outreach documents from 1990-2001.

    English, Spanish
    1987-2002
    Benson Latin American Collection