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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

104 results, page 4 of 11 104 results
  • The large French collection of Carlton Lake contains several collections of particular interest to sexuality scholars. Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) knew everybody and was a prolific writer and correspondent. The Ransom Center has only a few works of hers in manuscript, including "Composition as Explanation" (1926), but holds a more significant number of letters to and from her. One group of correspondence is between Stein and Charles Henri Ford, and another large group consists of letters from Stein to the artist Sir Francis Rose (1909–1979). There is also a cache of photographs of Stein and a small archive of her secretary and companion, Alice B. Toklas (1877–1967).

    English, French
    1914-1973, (bulk: 1946-1967)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Bought & Sold: An Investigative Documentary About the International Trade in Women, filmed between 1995-1997, investigates the illegal trafficking of women out of Russia and into Asia, Europe and the United States through interviews with trafficked women, traffickers, law enforcement officials, social workers, and mafia members in Russia, eastern Europe, and Japan. In partnership with WITNESS, Steve Galster, Executive Director, and Gillian Caldwell, Co-Director of the non-governmental organization Global Survival Network, filmed and conducted the investigative journalism for the documentary. In order to gain entry to trafficking networks, Galster and Caldwell established a dummy business that claimed to import foreign women. To the extent permissible by law, Galster and Caldwell secretly filmed in the environments in which trafficked women worked. Whenever possible, Galster and Caldwell disclosed their research intentions. The film was released in 1997 and received widespread media coverage in the US and abroad, including specials on ABC Primetime Live, CNN, and BBC.

    English, German, Russian
    1995-1997
  • Internationally recognized cultural theorist, creative writer, and independent scholar Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa, one of the first openly lesbian Chicana writers, played a major role in redefining Chicana/o, queer, feminist and female identities, and in developing inclusionary movements for social justice. Her theories of mestizaje, the borderlands, and the new mestiza, as well as her code-switching, have had an impact far beyond the field of Chicano/a studies. Her insistence on community and coalition-building united feminist concerns with issues of race, gender, class, sexuality, health, and spirituality. Anzaldúa also played a formative role in the development of Queer Theory.

    English, Spanish
    1942-2004
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The discovery of the National Police Historical Archive in 2005 opened an extensive and timely resource for the study of Guatemalan history and human rights in the region, spanning a broad array of topics from Guatemala's armed conflict between 1960 and 1996 to the sexually transmitted disease experiments performed at the behest of the United States government in the 1940s. This site currently includes over 10 million scanned images of documents from the National Police Historical Archive. This digital archive mirrors and extends the physical archive that remains preserved in Guatemala as an important historical patrimony of the Guatemalan people. To make best use of this resource, we suggest taking some time to read the tutorial and examples found on the About this Site page, learning the organizational structure of the National Police, and then patiently exploring the archive. This is not a full text search engine like Google, but rather the digital iteration of what you would encounter working in the massive paper archive in Guatemala. When you go to an archive, you will seldom find the exact document you are looking for right away. It will often take many hours of investigation to find relevant documents, if they exist at all. This Archive is arranged in accordance with the professional archival principles of provenance and original order to reflect the Guatemalan National Police administrative structure, and understanding that structure is a valuable way to start.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1870-1997
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Gustavo C. García was an attorney who advocated on behalf of Chicano rights to education and adequate workplace conditions. García is most known for his arguments against jury segregation in the Hernandez v. The State of Texas case that reached the U.S. Supreme Court in 1954. The García collection is small and includes photocopies of correspondence, legal documents and newspaper clippings reflecting his career-long involvement with Chicano rights.

    English
    1936-1977
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The lawyer H. Montgomery Hyde (1907–1989) created a collection that documents his research on Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Roger Casement, as well as the history of pornography. Roger Casement (1864–1916) was a consular diplomat, tireless campaigner for human rights, and Irish nationalist who was convicted of high treason and hanged in 1916. Although Casement's homosexuality was not an explicit factor during his trial, it was exploited afterward to discourage any case for clemency. The small collection created by Hyde while he was preparing The Trial of Sir Roger Casement (1960) includes a transcript of Casement's 1910 diary from when he was in Peru and Brazil, a transcript of Casement's interrogation at Scotland Yard, and other documents relating to Hyde's work and the authenticity of Casement's diaries.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1907-1989
    Harry Ransom Center
  • This photography collection consists of original materials from an exhibition excerpted from the book El Salvador: Work of Thirty Photographers, including 69 gelatin silver prints by various photographers, one large chromogenic color print of the image from the book's cover, 13 bilingual text panels written by Carolyn Forché, and the paper work and comments book from the original exhibition tour. The first section of the exhibition was made up of 67 images taken by 30 international photojournalists during the intensely brutal period of conflict between 1979 and 1983. Photographers Susan Meiselas and Harry Mattison gathered these images into a traveling exhibition and book in 1983 to raise global awareness about the conflict. At a time when the Reagan administration insisted that military aid to El Salvador's government was essential to stopping the spread of communism and that progress was being made on human rights, the photographs contributed to the debate by providing a contrary eyewitness account. The images are accompanied by texts written by poet Carolyn Forché.

    English, Spanish
    1979-1983
    Harry Ransom Center
  • James Farmer founded the Committee on Racial Equality (later the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE) in 1942 with a group of fellow students devoted to the principles of non-violent protest of racism and segregation. The organization is best known for launching the Freedom Rides of the summer of 1961 and for participating in the lobbying effort for the Civil Rights Bill of 1964. James Farmer and his wife, Lula, were active in civil rights work through the late 1990s, founding several civil rights organizations such as the Center for Community Action Education and the Council for Minority Planning and Strategy (COMPAS). James received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bill Clinton in 1998. The collection includes extensive documentation of CORE, COMPAS and Farmer's other organizations, and Farmer's involvement with national politics and his speaking engagements.

    English
    1921-1999
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • Jessica Mitford (1917-1996) worked as executive secretary for the Civil Rights Congress and taught sociology at San Jose State University. After resigning from the Communist Party in 1958, she devoted her time to writing. Her first book, The American Way of Death (1963), exposed the avarice and unscrupulous practices of the American funeral industry. Mitford's second investigative study, The Trial of Dr. Spock (1969), documents the 1968 conspiracy trial of Dr. Benjamin Spock, the famous pediatrician and vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, in order to illustrate the American legal system's intolerance of civil disobedience. In Kind and Usual Punishment: The Prison Business (1973), her book about the American penal system, Mitford condemns sentencing procedures, the parole system, and the use of prisoners in psychological and physiological research. These three books are represented in the 67 boxes of correspondence, printed material, reports, notes, interviews, manuscripts, legal documents, and other materials in the Mitford Papers at the Ransom Center.

    English
    1949-1973
    Harry Ransom Center
  • This collection contains video footage shot by WITNESS partner Jesús Tecú Osorio, an activist and survivor of the March 13, 1982 massacre in which 177 Mayan-Achi women and children in Río Negro, Rabinal were tortured, raped, and slaughtered by the Guatemalan army and army-led civil patrol groups. Río Negro was one of the 440 villages that were razed and destroyed during the Guatemalan government's counter-insurgency campaign. This collection includes recorded interviews and footage from the Rabinal area of exhumations, memorial ceremonies and re-burials, political actions against amnesty for those responsible for the killings, gatherings of former civil patrollers, and legal proceedings against former civil patrollers involved in the massacres. There is also footage of various indigenous Maya Achí rituals and performances. This collection includes two WITNESS co-productions, A Right to Justice and A Massacre Remembered. Materials are in English, Spanish, and Achí.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1996-2002, undated