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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

33 results, page 2 of 4 33 results
  • The diaries kept by George Cecil Ives (1867–1950), a contemporary of Oscar Wilde and a campaigner for penal reform and fairer treatment of homosexuals, span more than half a century (1890s–1940s) and offer rich accounts of what at least one gay man thought and did, day by day. The Center has 122 diary volumes, photographs, and correspondence, as well as documentation about the Order of Chaeronea, a secret society Ives founded for gay men. Additional Ives correspondence can be found in the archives of the British Society for the Study of Sex Psychology (BSS; 1910s–1940s). BSS, co-founded by Ives, Havelock Ellis, Edward Carpenter, and others, concerned itself with all sorts of sexual matters and from the beginning had a strong and loyal membership of homosexuals. The BSS archive contains correspondence, meeting minutes, and other documentation.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1874-1949
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The large French collection of Carlton Lake contains several collections of particular interest to sexuality scholars. Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) knew everybody and was a prolific writer and correspondent. The Ransom Center has only a few works of hers in manuscript, including "Composition as Explanation" (1926), but holds a more significant number of letters to and from her. One group of correspondence is between Stein and Charles Henri Ford, and another large group consists of letters from Stein to the artist Sir Francis Rose (1909–1979). There is also a cache of photographs of Stein and a small archive of her secretary and companion, Alice B. Toklas (1877–1967).

    English, French
    1914-1973, (bulk: 1946-1967)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Bought & Sold: An Investigative Documentary About the International Trade in Women, filmed between 1995-1997, investigates the illegal trafficking of women out of Russia and into Asia, Europe and the United States through interviews with trafficked women, traffickers, law enforcement officials, social workers, and mafia members in Russia, eastern Europe, and Japan. In partnership with WITNESS, Steve Galster, Executive Director, and Gillian Caldwell, Co-Director of the non-governmental organization Global Survival Network, filmed and conducted the investigative journalism for the documentary. In order to gain entry to trafficking networks, Galster and Caldwell established a dummy business that claimed to import foreign women. To the extent permissible by law, Galster and Caldwell secretly filmed in the environments in which trafficked women worked. Whenever possible, Galster and Caldwell disclosed their research intentions. The film was released in 1997 and received widespread media coverage in the US and abroad, including specials on ABC Primetime Live, CNN, and BBC.

    English, German, Russian
    1995-1997
  • Internationally recognized cultural theorist, creative writer, and independent scholar Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa, one of the first openly lesbian Chicana writers, played a major role in redefining Chicana/o, queer, feminist and female identities, and in developing inclusionary movements for social justice. Her theories of mestizaje, the borderlands, and the new mestiza, as well as her code-switching, have had an impact far beyond the field of Chicano/a studies. Her insistence on community and coalition-building united feminist concerns with issues of race, gender, class, sexuality, health, and spirituality. Anzaldúa also played a formative role in the development of Queer Theory.

    English, Spanish
    1942-2004
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The lawyer H. Montgomery Hyde (1907–1989) created a collection that documents his research on Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Roger Casement, as well as the history of pornography. Roger Casement (1864–1916) was a consular diplomat, tireless campaigner for human rights, and Irish nationalist who was convicted of high treason and hanged in 1916. Although Casement's homosexuality was not an explicit factor during his trial, it was exploited afterward to discourage any case for clemency. The small collection created by Hyde while he was preparing The Trial of Sir Roger Casement (1960) includes a transcript of Casement's 1910 diary from when he was in Peru and Brazil, a transcript of Casement's interrogation at Scotland Yard, and other documents relating to Hyde's work and the authenticity of Casement's diaries.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1907-1989
    Harry Ransom Center
  • There is one small folder in the Joseph Abeles photojournalism archive in the performing arts collection that contains photographs documenting homosexuality as a subject. The small collection was formed by Michael Emory and consists solely of prints used to illustrate his compilation The Gay Picture Guide Book (1978). The photographs depict men congregating near a section of New York's Central Park called The Rambles. The nearly 100 images of New York gays milling about, a short time after the Stonewall riots (June 1969), are historically important.

    English
    1935-1975, (bulk: 1950-1970)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Nathan "Babe" Leopold (1904–1971) and Dickie Loeb (1905–1936) were convicted of murder in 1924. There are photographs, many unpublished, of these and other notorious homosexual murderers and victims in the photograph morgue of the New York Journal American. The correspondence between Leopold and Erle Stanley Gardner (1889–1970) in Gardner's "Court of Last Resort" archive provides more insight into the Leopold-Loeb case. Additional unpublished photographs of Leopold are scattered among the correspondence there, along with intriguing third-party correspondence, including a lengthy letter from one of Leopold's fellow prisoners that confirms the continuing homosexual practices and attitudes of both Leopold and Loeb after their imprisonment. There is no finding aid available for these materials.

    English
    contact the Harry Ransom Center for more information
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Peruvian author, poet, and political activist Magda Portal became active in leftist politics in Peru and Bolivia and was active in the Alianza Popular Revolucionaria Americana (APRA). In 1927, she was exiled to Cuba and in 1930, she was incarcerated in Chile. Upon returning to Peru, she founded the Peruvian Aprista Party. Through PAP she worked for women's rights and started educational and political programs for women. She became the leader of the Feminine Sector of APRA's National Executive Committee and was in charge of organizing feminist groups throughout Peru. Portal also helped edit the party magazine Apra and published variouspolitical pamphlets and essays. During the presidency of dictator Sánchez Cerro and his persecution of Aprista leaders in 1932, Portal was forced to go underground for some 16 months but was later arrested in 1934 and sentenced to 500 days in Santo Tomás women's prison in Lima. After release from prison Portal continued her work for APRA and spent time working in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay. The collection contains Portal’s correspondence, written works and radio transcripts, as well as a variety of political ephemera related to the PAP.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1922-1986
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Writer and political activist Martha Cotera founded Information Systems Development, a consulting firm in Austin, Texas, and was the publisher of the Austin Hispanic Directory. Active in Raza Unida Party politics, the feminist movement, and educational and social agencies, Cotera is also the author of several books and articles on Chicanas. The collection contains manuscripts of works by Cotera and others, as well as clippings, correspondence, publications, and ephemera such as broadsides, bumper stickers, leaflets, posters, and tickets. The collection also includes an address book, audiovisual material, calendars, organizational records, scripts, and teaching materials.

    English
    1964-present
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Morris Ernst (1888-1976) was an American lawyer and one of the leading advocates of civil liberties in 20th-century America. Ernst served on President Truman’s Committee on Civil Rights and as counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) (and later director emeritus) where he defended individual rights and freedom in numerous landmark federal cases on privacy, libel, slander, obscenity, censorship, birth control, abortion, and labor issues. However, Ernst also feared communist influence and helped establish a loyalty oath policy within the ACLU. In his lifetime, Ernst worked with controversial figures such as birth control activist Margaret Sanger, Dominican Republic dictator Rafael Trujuillo, and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover.

    The career and personal life of Ernst are documented from 1904 to 2000 through correspondence and memoranda; research materials and notes; minutes, reports, briefs, and other legal documents; handwritten and typed manuscripts; galley proofs; clippings; scrapbooks; audio recordings; photographs; and ephemera.

    English
    1904-2000
    Harry Ransom Center