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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

24 results, page 2 of 3 24 results
  • This photography collection consists of original materials from an exhibition excerpted from the book El Salvador: Work of Thirty Photographers, including 69 gelatin silver prints by various photographers, one large chromogenic color print of the image from the book's cover, 13 bilingual text panels written by Carolyn Forché, and the paper work and comments book from the original exhibition tour. The first section of the exhibition was made up of 67 images taken by 30 international photojournalists during the intensely brutal period of conflict between 1979 and 1983. Photographers Susan Meiselas and Harry Mattison gathered these images into a traveling exhibition and book in 1983 to raise global awareness about the conflict. At a time when the Reagan administration insisted that military aid to El Salvador's government was essential to stopping the spread of communism and that progress was being made on human rights, the photographs contributed to the debate by providing a contrary eyewitness account. The images are accompanied by texts written by poet Carolyn Forché.

    English, Spanish
    1979-1983
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Jessica Mitford (1917-1996) worked as executive secretary for the Civil Rights Congress and taught sociology at San Jose State University. After resigning from the Communist Party in 1958, she devoted her time to writing. Her first book, The American Way of Death (1963), exposed the avarice and unscrupulous practices of the American funeral industry. Mitford's second investigative study, The Trial of Dr. Spock (1969), documents the 1968 conspiracy trial of Dr. Benjamin Spock, the famous pediatrician and vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, in order to illustrate the American legal system's intolerance of civil disobedience. In Kind and Usual Punishment: The Prison Business (1973), her book about the American penal system, Mitford condemns sentencing procedures, the parole system, and the use of prisoners in psychological and physiological research. These three books are represented in the 67 boxes of correspondence, printed material, reports, notes, interviews, manuscripts, legal documents, and other materials in the Mitford Papers at the Ransom Center.

    English
    1949-1973
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Charles Edmund Horman, a Harvard educated American freelance journalist, was abducted, tortured, and executed in Chile during General Augusto Pinochet's coup d'état that began on September 11, 1973 to overthrow the government of Salvador Allende. The Hormans sued Henry Kissinger and Nixon Administration officials over Charles Horman's wrongful death and its concealment. The collection contains materials written and collected by Joyce Horman and Edmund Horman, wife and father of Charles Horman, that document events resulting from Charles Horman's death.

    English, Spanish
    1973-present
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Audio recordings and scripts of the news report and interview segments of the "Latin American Press Review" (1973-1974) and "Latin American Review" (1976-1984) radio programs from the Longhorn Radio Network and the Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of Texas at Austin.

    Latin America
    English, Spanish
    1973-1984
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Orlando Letelier, a former Chilean diplomat and opponent of the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, was assassinated by a car bomb in Washington, D.C. on September 21, 1976, together with Mrs. Ronni Moffitt. An investigation conducted by an international commission established by bilateral treaty concluded that Chilean secret police were responsible for the assassination and determined the settlement. The bulk of these materials consist of four bound volumes of briefs filed by the governments of the United States and the Republic of Chile before the international commission.

    English
    1980-1991
    Tarlton Law Library
  • The papers of Maurice Cranston (1920-1993) span his professional career as an author, free-lance reviewer, and professor of political philosophy. In 1967 Cranston published the influential essay "Human Rights, Real and Supposed." His papers include the page proofs for What are Human Rights? (The Bodley Head Ltd., 1973), as well as subject files related to human rights.

    English, French, Italian
    1943-1997
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The Mexican American Programs of the Longhorn Radio Network collection consists of 198 recordings for two series of radio programs: The Mexican American Experience, which first aired in October, 1976, and A esta hora conversamos, which first aired in October, 1981. Both programs were part of the Longhorn Radio Network, a distribution service and production center of public service content for radio stations across Texas and the greater Southwest. The project may also be accessed through its own web page (http://www.laits.utexas.edu/onda_latina) for additional information. The collection contains interviews, music, and informational programs related to the Mexican American community and their concerns. Topics covered on these programs include political activities of Mexican Americans, Mexican American folklore and folk medicine, corridos, Tejano music, Mexican American musicians, voting rights, education, health, farm workers' unions and working conditions, and some Mexican and Central American topics.

    English, Spanish
    1976-1982
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Following a decade of work in post-World War II Europe with various U.S. government offices, Michael Josselson decided to help lead the newly created Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF), a liberal, anti-Communist organization founded by American and European intellectuals to expose Communist cultural oppression and to oppose all forms of totalitarian rule. As the Administrative Secretary of the CCF, Josselson arranged for financing of organizations that operated as fronts to channel CIA funds. After his resignation, Josselson continued to informally advise former CCF associates who created a new organization, the International Association for Cultural Freedom, which disavowed the CCF and the CIA but continued many of the CCF's programs. Collection documents include research notes, reports, maps and correspondence.

    English
    1914-1991, (bulk: 1960-1978)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • This artificial collection describes various individual manuscripts or small manuscript groups that have been accessioned into the Benson Latin American Collection over many years.

    Latin America
    English, Spanish
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Morris Ernst (1888-1976) was an American lawyer and one of the leading advocates of civil liberties in 20th-century America. Ernst served on President Truman’s Committee on Civil Rights and as counsel to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) (and later director emeritus) where he defended individual rights and freedom in numerous landmark federal cases on privacy, libel, slander, obscenity, censorship, birth control, abortion, and labor issues. However, Ernst also feared communist influence and helped establish a loyalty oath policy within the ACLU. In his lifetime, Ernst worked with controversial figures such as birth control activist Margaret Sanger, Dominican Republic dictator Rafael Trujuillo, and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover.

    The career and personal life of Ernst are documented from 1904 to 2000 through correspondence and memoranda; research materials and notes; minutes, reports, briefs, and other legal documents; handwritten and typed manuscripts; galley proofs; clippings; scrapbooks; audio recordings; photographs; and ephemera.

    English
    1904-2000
    Harry Ransom Center