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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

42 results, page 2 of 5 42 results
  • Dr. Ramiro R. Casso was a civil rights activist that fought for school desegregation and equal educational opportunities for Mexican American children. As a member of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Casso also advocated on behalf of Texas farm workers and promoted public health issues along the Texas-Mexico border. Active also in politics, Casso ran for mayor of McAllen, Texas, in 1981, campaigning for increased vigilance on issues of police brutality directed at Mexican Americanss and immigrants. Casso also served on the Texas Board of Health and the Texas Human Rights Commission. Materials in the collection include print documents such as speeches, testimonies and correspondence from each of Casso's endeavors, with a particular focus on health and education issues along the border.

    English, Spanish
    1960-2007
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Eduardo Idar was a Mexican American lawyer and legal rights activist. The materials document Idar's career as an attorney in Texas with the Attorney General's office, his involvement with organizations such as the American G.I. Forum, the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund, the Political Association of Spanish Speaking People, and his activism for Mexican American rights in schools and in the political and legal process. A large part of the collection documents the case of Ruiz v. Estelle, which found widespread abuses of prisoners in the Texas state prison system and placed it in federal receivership.

    English, Spanish
    1941-2002, (bulk: 1941-1981)
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Both Erasmo and Sally Andrade were activists who advocated for the fulfillment of the rights of Mexican Americans to education, social services, economic justice and political participation. With these purposes in mind, Erasmo founded three organizations during the 1960s - Bishop's Committee for the Spanish Speaking, the Political Association of Spanish-Speaking Organizations (PASSO), and the Federation for the Advancement of Mexican Americans (FAMA). Erasmo's portion of the collection includes documents and correspondence from each of these initiatives and materials related to various political campaigns and partnerships with other civil rights organizations. Sally's papers focus on the Governor's Task Force on Inhalant Abuse and also include collected writings on the changing roles of women in Latino families.

    English, Spanish
    1931-1994
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The collection of writer, educator, and civil rights advocate George I. Sánchez, contains correspondence, written works, speeches and interviews, photographs, and reference materials document Sánchez's career as an educator in New Mexico and Texas, his involvement with organizations such as the American Council of Spanish-speaking People, the University of Texas and the League of United Latin American Citizens, and his activism against the segregation of Mexican American schoolchildren in the southwestern United States.

    English, Spanish
    1919-1986
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Internationally recognized cultural theorist, creative writer, and independent scholar Gloria Evangelina Anzaldúa, one of the first openly lesbian Chicana writers, played a major role in redefining Chicana/o, queer, feminist and female identities, and in developing inclusionary movements for social justice. Her theories of mestizaje, the borderlands, and the new mestiza, as well as her code-switching, have had an impact far beyond the field of Chicano/a studies. Her insistence on community and coalition-building united feminist concerns with issues of race, gender, class, sexuality, health, and spirituality. Anzaldúa also played a formative role in the development of Queer Theory.

    English, Spanish
    1942-2004
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The discovery of the National Police Historical Archive in 2005 opened an extensive and timely resource for the study of Guatemalan history and human rights in the region, spanning a broad array of topics from Guatemala's armed conflict between 1960 and 1996 to the sexually transmitted disease experiments performed at the behest of the United States government in the 1940s. This site currently includes over 10 million scanned images of documents from the National Police Historical Archive. This digital archive mirrors and extends the physical archive that remains preserved in Guatemala as an important historical patrimony of the Guatemalan people. To make best use of this resource, we suggest taking some time to read the tutorial and examples found on the About this Site page, learning the organizational structure of the National Police, and then patiently exploring the archive. This is not a full text search engine like Google, but rather the digital iteration of what you would encounter working in the massive paper archive in Guatemala. When you go to an archive, you will seldom find the exact document you are looking for right away. It will often take many hours of investigation to find relevant documents, if they exist at all. This Archive is arranged in accordance with the professional archival principles of provenance and original order to reflect the Guatemalan National Police administrative structure, and understanding that structure is a valuable way to start.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1870-1997
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • This photography collection consists of original materials from an exhibition excerpted from the book El Salvador: Work of Thirty Photographers, including 69 gelatin silver prints by various photographers, one large chromogenic color print of the image from the book's cover, 13 bilingual text panels written by Carolyn Forché, and the paper work and comments book from the original exhibition tour. The first section of the exhibition was made up of 67 images taken by 30 international photojournalists during the intensely brutal period of conflict between 1979 and 1983. Photographers Susan Meiselas and Harry Mattison gathered these images into a traveling exhibition and book in 1983 to raise global awareness about the conflict. At a time when the Reagan administration insisted that military aid to El Salvador's government was essential to stopping the spread of communism and that progress was being made on human rights, the photographs contributed to the debate by providing a contrary eyewitness account. The images are accompanied by texts written by poet Carolyn Forché.

    English, Spanish
    1979-1983
    Harry Ransom Center
  • This collection contains video footage shot by WITNESS partner Jesús Tecú Osorio, an activist and survivor of the March 13, 1982 massacre in which 177 Mayan-Achi women and children in Río Negro, Rabinal were tortured, raped, and slaughtered by the Guatemalan army and army-led civil patrol groups. Río Negro was one of the 440 villages that were razed and destroyed during the Guatemalan government's counter-insurgency campaign. This collection includes recorded interviews and footage from the Rabinal area of exhumations, memorial ceremonies and re-burials, political actions against amnesty for those responsible for the killings, gatherings of former civil patrollers, and legal proceedings against former civil patrollers involved in the massacres. There is also footage of various indigenous Maya Achí rituals and performances. This collection includes two WITNESS co-productions, A Right to Justice and A Massacre Remembered. Materials are in English, Spanish, and Achí.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1996-2002, undated
  • The José Angel Gutiérrez Papers gather together information on the career and interests of the political organizer who founded the Raza Unida Party and other Chicano organizations in the 1960s and 1970s. Materials originate from Gutiérrez's work with the Committee for Rural Democracy, Crystal City Independent School District, the Raza Unida Party, Zavala County Economic Development Corporation, and Zavala County Health Association, among others. Issues included in the collection range from rights to education and health, farm workers' and immigrants' rights, and the economic development of the border region. Correspondence, legal documents, Gutiérrez's writings, audio-visual materials and political artifacts are included in the collection.

    English, Spanish
    1954-1990
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • José de la Luz Sáenz was a founding member of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), serving on the LULAC Board of Trustees from 1930-1932. As a young man, Sáenz fought for the U.S. Army in World War I, and following the war he published a diary arguing that Mexican American service to the U.S. military should translate into the full realization of Mexican American civil rights. These experiences and publications helped to inspire the Mexican American rights movement in Texas and the foundation of organizations such as LULAC. The Sáenz Papers include biographical materials for Sáenz, his professional and activist correspondence and his written works, published or unpublished.

    English, Spanish
    1908-1998
    Benson Latin American Collection