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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

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  • John Greer was a defense attorney for the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate during the International Military Tribunal for the Far East following World War II. The collection contains trial and background materials relating to the prosecution of Japanese war crime trials before the Military Tribunal following World War II. A finding aid is available in the Tarlton Law Library's Rare Books & Special Collections office.

    Asia
    War Crimes
    English
    1945-1948
    Tarlton Law Library
  • From 1944-1946, the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry on Jewish Problems in Palestine and Europe analyzed the suitability of Palestine as a homeland for Jewish refugees. Joseph C. Hutcheson, Jr., was a federal judge who served on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and on the aforementioned Committee of Inquiry. Collection documents include testimonies from both sides of the debate - that of victimized Jewish refugees in need of a home and of displaced Palestinians. Relevant documents include memoranda; photographs; speeches by Hutcheson; transcripts of hearings held in the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East; reports by the committee; and reports submitted to the committee by other bodies including the Jewish Agency for Palestine and the American Jewish Committee.

    English
    1853-1979, (bulk: 1900-1970)
    Tarlton Law Library
  • Leo Blackstock prosecuted Japanese war criminals as Chief of the Prosecution Division, General Headquarters, Tokyo (1945-1948). After he was released from active duty as a colonel in 1946 he remained in Japan as a civilian attached to the army and continued his work in the prosecution of war criminals. The collection contains correspondence, reports, and case files relating to Blackstock's service as prosecutor in trials of Class B and Class C war criminals in Japan, and courts-martial.

    Asia
    War Crimes
    English
    1925-1979, (bulk: 1940-1955)
    Tarlton Law Library
  • Orlando Letelier, a former Chilean diplomat and opponent of the dictatorship of Gen. Augusto Pinochet, was assassinated by a car bomb in Washington, D.C. on September 21, 1976, together with Mrs. Ronni Moffitt. An investigation conducted by an international commission established by bilateral treaty concluded that Chilean secret police were responsible for the assassination and determined the settlement. The bulk of these materials consist of four bound volumes of briefs filed by the governments of the United States and the Republic of Chile before the international commission.

    English
    1980-1991
    Tarlton Law Library
  • Tom C. Clark served as a U.S. Supreme Court justice from 1949-1967, presiding over some of the most well-known cases decided during the Warren Court period. The collection highlights court documents on desegregation, the constitutionality of school prayer, the Miranda rights, the expansion of 4th Amendment rights against unreasonable search and seizure, and other key civil rights decisions. Materials in the collection include case files, bench memorandum, briefs, and slip opinions from these cases, as well as personal correspondence and speeches by Justice Clark.

    English
    ca. 1910-1977, (bulk: 1949-1977)
    Tarlton Law Library
  • Teodoro Cantos was a Philippine national who served as a member of the Japanese Civilian Army during World War II under the name of Teodoro Tatishi. Following the war he was accused of murder and treason and tried in the International Military Tribunal for the Far East and appealed in the Supreme Court of the Philippines. Tatishi argued that he could not be tried in this court because he was a national of the Philippines and therefore a U.S. citizen. The U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review this case, but then dismissed it as moot when the Philippines gained its independence. The collection includes the documents, exhibits and transcript of evidence of his war crimes trial. No finding aid is available for this collection.

    War Crimes
    English
    contact Tarlton Law Library for information
    Tarlton Law Library
  • Better known as "The Justice Case", Case No. 3: U.S. v. Joseph Alstötter et al. was a war crimes trial specifically for members of the German judicial system. The defendants included nine officials in the Reich Ministry of Justice and several prosecutors of the People's Court and the Special Courts. As representatives of a Nazi judicial system that persecuted Poles, Jews, and others in occupied territories, they were accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity. Case No. 3 was heard by the United States Nuremberg Military Tribunal (NMT) III and was part of a second set of twelve trials that focused on the mechanisms of Nazi aggression. The bench notebooks of Judge Mallory Blair, a Texas judge appointed to the Tribunal by U.S. President Truman, include procedural materials, testimony, and personal notes relating to Case No. 3, U.S. v. Josef Alstötter, et al., jurists of the Reich Ministry of Justice.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1942, 1947
    Tarlton Law Library