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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

17 results, page 1 of 2 17 results
  • Fannie Hurst (1889-1968) was an American short story writer and novelist who was also engaged with social and political issues such as racial equality, women's rights, Jewish causes, and anti-Fascism. The incoming correspondence series of her papers at the Ransom Center reflects these interests and contains correspondence from a variety of people and organizations, including: the American Birth Control League, the ACLU, the American Jewish Congress, Elizabeth Arden, Authors League of America, Lillian Becker, Albert Berg, B'nai B'rith, Books & Authors War Bond Rally, Theda Bara Brabin, Madeleine Borg, Pearl S. Buck, Jonathan Cape, Jacques Chambrun, the City Wide Citizens' Committee on Harlem, Alma Clayburgh, Louis Cohen, Cosmopolitan, Hume Cronyn, Curtis Brown, the Democratic National Party, Theodore Dreiser, Marie Dressler, Edna Ferber, Daniel Frohman, Zona Gale, Hadassah, Harpers, the Constance Hope Foundation, Zora Neale Hurston, Blanche Knopf, Fiorella H. La Guardia, Sinclair Lewis, NBC, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, the New York Times, Charles and Kathleen Norris, Ruth Bryan Owen, Paramount Pictures, PEN, RKO, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Charles Edward Russell, the Salvation Army, and Carl Van Vechten.

    English
    ca. 1910s-1965
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The diaries kept by George Cecil Ives (1867–1950), a contemporary of Oscar Wilde and a campaigner for penal reform and fairer treatment of homosexuals, span more than half a century (1890s–1940s) and offer rich accounts of what at least one gay man thought and did, day by day. The Center has 122 diary volumes, photographs, and correspondence, as well as documentation about the Order of Chaeronea, a secret society Ives founded for gay men. Additional Ives correspondence can be found in the archives of the British Society for the Study of Sex Psychology (BSS; 1910s–1940s). BSS, co-founded by Ives, Havelock Ellis, Edward Carpenter, and others, concerned itself with all sorts of sexual matters and from the beginning had a strong and loyal membership of homosexuals. The BSS archive contains correspondence, meeting minutes, and other documentation.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1874-1949
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The large French collection of Carlton Lake contains several collections of particular interest to sexuality scholars. Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) knew everybody and was a prolific writer and correspondent. The Ransom Center has only a few works of hers in manuscript, including "Composition as Explanation" (1926), but holds a more significant number of letters to and from her. One group of correspondence is between Stein and Charles Henri Ford, and another large group consists of letters from Stein to the artist Sir Francis Rose (1909–1979). There is also a cache of photographs of Stein and a small archive of her secretary and companion, Alice B. Toklas (1877–1967).

    English, French
    1914-1973, (bulk: 1946-1967)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The lawyer H. Montgomery Hyde (1907–1989) created a collection that documents his research on Oscar Wilde, Henry James, and Roger Casement, as well as the history of pornography. Roger Casement (1864–1916) was a consular diplomat, tireless campaigner for human rights, and Irish nationalist who was convicted of high treason and hanged in 1916. Although Casement's homosexuality was not an explicit factor during his trial, it was exploited afterward to discourage any case for clemency. The small collection created by Hyde while he was preparing The Trial of Sir Roger Casement (1960) includes a transcript of Casement's 1910 diary from when he was in Peru and Brazil, a transcript of Casement's interrogation at Scotland Yard, and other documents relating to Hyde's work and the authenticity of Casement's diaries.

    Europe and Russia
    English
    1907-1989
    Harry Ransom Center
  • This photography collection consists of original materials from an exhibition excerpted from the book El Salvador: Work of Thirty Photographers, including 69 gelatin silver prints by various photographers, one large chromogenic color print of the image from the book's cover, 13 bilingual text panels written by Carolyn Forché, and the paper work and comments book from the original exhibition tour. The first section of the exhibition was made up of 67 images taken by 30 international photojournalists during the intensely brutal period of conflict between 1979 and 1983. Photographers Susan Meiselas and Harry Mattison gathered these images into a traveling exhibition and book in 1983 to raise global awareness about the conflict. At a time when the Reagan administration insisted that military aid to El Salvador's government was essential to stopping the spread of communism and that progress was being made on human rights, the photographs contributed to the debate by providing a contrary eyewitness account. The images are accompanied by texts written by poet Carolyn Forché.

    English, Spanish
    1979-1983
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Jessica Mitford (1917-1996) worked as executive secretary for the Civil Rights Congress and taught sociology at San Jose State University. After resigning from the Communist Party in 1958, she devoted her time to writing. Her first book, The American Way of Death (1963), exposed the avarice and unscrupulous practices of the American funeral industry. Mitford's second investigative study, The Trial of Dr. Spock (1969), documents the 1968 conspiracy trial of Dr. Benjamin Spock, the famous pediatrician and vocal opponent of the Vietnam War, in order to illustrate the American legal system's intolerance of civil disobedience. In Kind and Usual Punishment: The Prison Business (1973), her book about the American penal system, Mitford condemns sentencing procedures, the parole system, and the use of prisoners in psychological and physiological research. These three books are represented in the 67 boxes of correspondence, printed material, reports, notes, interviews, manuscripts, legal documents, and other materials in the Mitford Papers at the Ransom Center.

    English
    1949-1973
    Harry Ransom Center
  • There is one small folder in the Joseph Abeles photojournalism archive in the performing arts collection that contains photographs documenting homosexuality as a subject. The small collection was formed by Michael Emory and consists solely of prints used to illustrate his compilation The Gay Picture Guide Book (1978). The photographs depict men congregating near a section of New York's Central Park called The Rambles. The nearly 100 images of New York gays milling about, a short time after the Stonewall riots (June 1969), are historically important.

    English
    1935-1975, (bulk: 1950-1970)
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Nathan "Babe" Leopold (1904–1971) and Dickie Loeb (1905–1936) were convicted of murder in 1924. There are photographs, many unpublished, of these and other notorious homosexual murderers and victims in the photograph morgue of the New York Journal American. The correspondence between Leopold and Erle Stanley Gardner (1889–1970) in Gardner's "Court of Last Resort" archive provides more insight into the Leopold-Loeb case. Additional unpublished photographs of Leopold are scattered among the correspondence there, along with intriguing third-party correspondence, including a lengthy letter from one of Leopold's fellow prisoners that confirms the continuing homosexual practices and attitudes of both Leopold and Loeb after their imprisonment. There is no finding aid available for these materials.

    English
    contact the Harry Ransom Center for more information
    Harry Ransom Center
  • The papers of Maurice Cranston (1920-1993) span his professional career as an author, free-lance reviewer, and professor of political philosophy. In 1967 Cranston published the influential essay "Human Rights, Real and Supposed." His papers include the page proofs for What are Human Rights? (The Bodley Head Ltd., 1973), as well as subject files related to human rights.

    English, French, Italian
    1943-1997
    Harry Ransom Center
  • Following a decade of work in post-World War II Europe with various U.S. government offices, Michael Josselson decided to help lead the newly created Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF), a liberal, anti-Communist organization founded by American and European intellectuals to expose Communist cultural oppression and to oppose all forms of totalitarian rule. As the Administrative Secretary of the CCF, Josselson arranged for financing of organizations that operated as fronts to channel CIA funds. After his resignation, Josselson continued to informally advise former CCF associates who created a new organization, the International Association for Cultural Freedom, which disavowed the CCF and the CIA but continued many of the CCF's programs. Collection documents include research notes, reports, maps and correspondence.

    English
    1914-1991, (bulk: 1960-1978)
    Harry Ransom Center