University of Texas at Austin
Libraries Home | Mobile | My Account | Renew Items | Sitemap | Help |
support us
University of Texas Libraries
Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

14 results, page 1 of 2 14 results
  • Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants (C.U.R.E.) was founded in 1972 by Charles and Pauline Sullivan in San Antonio, Texas as a membership organization of families of prisoners, prisoners, former prisoners, and other concerned citizens who work to reduce crime through criminal justice reform. The collection contains correspondence, newsletters, legal material, videotapes, photographs, and printed material that document the work of the organization at both the national and state levels.

    English
    ca. 1947, 1972-2010
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • From 1940 to 1988, the Field Foundation provided support to organizations promoting human rights, civil rights, civil liberties, child welfare and social change, including the NAACP, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and the Children's Defense Fund. This collection includes correspondence, reports, legal documents, printed material, clippings, and photographs documenting the many movements and groups the foundation supported as well as the foundation's role as an active participant in social change.

    English
    1940-1990
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • As an attorney working for the Legal Aid and Defender Society of Travis County, Frances Jalet-Cruz represented Texas inmates in suits against the Texas prison system and became one of the central figures in the Texas prison reform movement during the late 1960s and 1970s. The collection includes correspondence, legal documents, newspapers, clippings, and printed material documenting Jalet-Cruz's activities as an attorney and activist on this issue.

    English
    1966-1986
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • The papers document Frances "Sissy" Tarlton Farenthold's support of women’s rights and women’s increased involvement in politics; activism in the nuclear disarmament and peace movements; promotion of civil and prisoners’ rights; international relations in China, the U.S.S.R., South Africa, and other countries; as well as education, health, militarization, and other social and political issues in developing countries. The archive covers her career as a Texas state legislator, lawyer, professor, college president, and founder of two women's equality organizations. Papers consist of legal, political, and personal correspondence; legal, political, legislative, and committee files; newsletters, reports, and bulletins; research material; newspaper clippings; maps; video cassettes; audio tapes; and photographs. An online collection exhibit is hosted by the UT Rapoport Center for Human Rights and Justice.

    English
    1913-2012
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • James Farmer founded the Committee on Racial Equality (later the Congress of Racial Equality, or CORE) in 1942 with a group of fellow students devoted to the principles of non-violent protest of racism and segregation. The organization is best known for launching the Freedom Rides of the summer of 1961 and for participating in the lobbying effort for the Civil Rights Bill of 1964. James Farmer and his wife, Lula, were active in civil rights work through the late 1990s, founding several civil rights organizations such as the Center for Community Action Education and the Council for Minority Planning and Strategy (COMPAS). James received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from President Bill Clinton in 1998. The collection includes extensive documentation of CORE, COMPAS and Farmer's other organizations, and Farmer's involvement with national politics and his speaking engagements.

    English
    1921-1999
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • Juanita Craft was a member of NAACP leadership in the Dallas area from 1935 until her retirement, working as a state field organizer and the Dallas Youth Advisor. As leader of the Youth Council, Craft helped to end segregation of lunch counters and restaurants, the Texas State Fair and North Texas State University through non-violent protest. In 1967, she received an additional award for exposing fraudulent trade schools that preyed on young people around the state. Her persistent work on behalf of civil rights concerns has earned her repeated awards for civic leadership, including national recognition. Her collection includes materials dating back to her early work with the Dallas Youth Council, including a scrap book documenting the Council's work. Printed materials include copies of the NAACP publication, The Crisis, correspondence and documentation of NAACP work more generally, and pamphlets from related organizations.

    English
    1939-1983
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • A former Texas bank president who spent 21 years in prison for armed robbery, Lawrence C. Pope assisted other inmates in filing lawsuits against state and federal prison systems. After his parole in 1982, he devoted his time to prison reform and rehabilitation of prisoners. The collection includes correspondence, newspaper clippings, legal documents, reports, financial records, and printed materials were gathered by Pope from 1961 to 1989. The materials focus primarily on the Texas Department of Corrections, and they provide information on most apsects of prison operations and conditions. In addition, materials on banks and banking in Texas are included. Nineteen audio cassettes of interviews with Pope recount his life's work.

    English
    1961-1989
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • R.C. Hickman was a Dallas photojournalist who documented the school desegregation process for the NAACP while working for the Dallas Star Post, Jet and Express during the 1950s and 1960s. His collection includes his photographic work for each of these publications, including coverage of news events, entertainers, and local schools, social events, etc. in addition to coverage of NAACP events and the school desegregation work mentioned above. The collection is divided into two parts, but these documents are included in both section.

    English
    1945-1970
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • Richard Morehead was a Texas journalist who focused his work on politics and civil rights issues during the tumultuous 1960s and 1970s. Morehead also paid special attention to the unfolding of school desegregation in Texas, and he won several journalistic awards for his writing. Materials in this collection include copies of his writing and publications, as well as correspondence and research for his various pieces.

    English
    1922-1995
    Briscoe Center for American History
  • In the court order in the case of Ruiz v. Estelle, Federal District Judge William Wayne Justice found widespread abuses of prisoners in the Texas state prison system and placed it in federal receivership administered by the Office of Special Master. The Special Master records span the period of federal receivership from 1979 to 1992, including trial transcripts and exhibits, prison medical testimony and administrative documents.

    English
    1979-1992
    Briscoe Center for American History