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Celebrating the Life

UT Collections

42 results, page 1 of 5 42 results
  • An active participant in the national leadership of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) during the late 1930's, a feminist, and, later in life, a folk artist, Alice Dickerson Montemayor joined LULAC and quickly rose within the women's chapter, becoming secretary from 1936-1937 and president from 1938-1939. Having garnered national attention through her reporting of the council's activities in LULAC News, she served as a national delegate at the 1937 Houston LULAC convention. There she was elected to the position of second national vice president general. Alice Montemayor became the first woman elected to a national office in the organization. By 1940 she had become the associate editor of LULAC News and director of Junior LULAC. In her role as vice president she became a leading voice for women at the national level. She promoted the creation of more ladies’ councils and wrote articles and editorials such as “Son Muy Hombres”, which denounced notions of male superiority and pushed for a more active role for women in the organization. The same year Mrs. Montemayor left LULAC. Having retired as school registrar in 1972, Alice Montemayor started painting and establishing herself as a folk artist. In 1988 she was the focus of a presentation at fifty-ninth Annual LULAC Convention and at the Smithsonian Institution. The collection contains articles, clippings, correspondence, interviews, photographs and other papers documenting the life of Alice Dickerson Montemayor as a private individual, activist, feminist, and artist.

    English, Spanish
    1920-1989
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • This annotated guide identifies and describes 2636 ephemeral publications which are part of the Taracena Flores Collection. Most of the publications cited in this guide can be termed street literature, since they were intended to be read or distributed widely and/or posted in public places, and they represent a broad range of organizations and interest groups.

    These publications came to the Benson Collection as part of the collection of Arturo Taracena Flores, a Guatemalan bibliophile who spent a lifetime gathering printed and other materials about his country. The Taracena Flores Collection, purchased by the University of Texas at Austin in two installments (1963 and 1970), consisted of some 7,000 books and pamphlets, more than 5,000 broadsides, several hundred periodical and newspaper titles, newspaper clippings, maps, and miscellaneous items on all subjects. The dates of publication for most of the items were between 1821 and 1963. All of the major issues that concerned Guatemalans during this period (except for the Belize question) are reflected in the materials cited in these materials: agrarian reform, freedom of speech, voting rights for illiterates, communism, anticommunism, the labor movement, rural development, the role of the Church in political affairs, and foreign intervention in Guatemala's internal politics are among them. Also well represented are important events related to these issues--elections, strikes, demonstrations, political conventions, May Day celebrations, presidential inaugurations, political assassinations, and student events with political overtones, such as the Huelga de Dolores.

    This guide is Part One of three total for the guide Revolution and Counterrevolution in Guatemala, 1944-1963.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1944-1949
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Clemente Nicasio Idar, American Federation of Labor (AFL) organizer, writer, and orator was the first Mexican American organizer in the mainstream labor movement and fought to improve wages and working conditions for Mexicans and Mexican Americans in the United States. In 1911, Clemente and his family members organized El Congreso Mexicanista, a conference in Laredo that brought together delegates from across Texas to build a federation of community organizations that could work together to improve the social, economic, and cultural status of Mexican Americans. In 1918, Samuel Gompers, president of AFL, selected Idar to help coordinate and translate at the Pan American Federation of Labor Conference in Laredo. Soon thereafter, Idar began working as an AFL organizer. The collection includes correspondence, personal documents, photographs and ephemera from the AFL and other organizations’ campaigns.

    English, Spanish
    1875-1938, (bulk: 1905-1934)
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The collection of physician, writer, and community activist, Dr. Clotilde P. Garcia, contains correspondence, printed materials, and publications related to AGIF and Mexican American civil rights. She participated in many community and Mexican American organizations, serving on several advisory and executive boards on the county, state, and national levels. She published historical works dealing with South Texas and northern Mexico.

    English, Spanish
    1949-1988, (bulk: 1970-1980)
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Between the 16th and the first half of the 19th century, approximately 400,000 African slaves were brought to Nueva Granada through the ports of Havana, Veracruz, Buenos Aires and Cartagena. Cartagena received more than sixty percent of the slave traffic destined for the Virreinato Peruano. The late 18th century saw the rise of movements to abolish the institution of slavery, movements that were often part of the struggles for independence from Spain. In 1851 Colombian President José Hilario López signed the Ley de Manumisión o de Liberación de los Esclavos en la Nueva Granada that abolished slavery in Colombia. The collection contains edicts and other historical manuscripts documenting slavery, manumission and related subjects in Colombia.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1779-1852
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The Committee in Solidarity with the People of El Salvador (CISPES) is a national organization founded in 1980 by American activists to fight against U.S. military intervention in the Salvadoran civil war. CISPES and other organizations advocated for U.S. non-intervention in this and other Central American conflicts and the right of undocumented refugees to sanctuary in the U.S. CISPES is best known for the series of law suits it brought against the Federal Bureau of Investigation in the late 1980s following FBI infiltration and surveillance of the organization. This collection includes materials from the Dallas branch of CISPES that operated from approximately 1981 to 1990 and it documents the FBI infiltration and subsequent law suits, the CISPES sanctuary work in the Dallas area, and Holy Cross community initiatives for the urban poor in Dallas.

    English, Spanish
    1968-1990
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Printed materials, including announcements, handbills, invitations, newsletters, posters, programs, and tickets, document the activities of several gay Hispanic organizations in Houston, Austin, and El Paso, Texas, and Guadalajara, Mexico. The bulk of the collection consists of publications of Houston's Gay Hispanic Caucus (later Gay & Lesbian Hispanics Unidos). Also includes newsletter of the Austin Latino/a Lesbian & Gay Organization (ALLGO).

    English, Spanish
    1979-1986
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • Texas author and journalist Dick J. Reavis has written much on the topic of the Mexican people, including pieces on undocumented immigrants, guerrilla movements and their leaders, Mexican American civil rights activists, and the cultural formation of modern Mexico. The collection is comprised of personal papers of Texas author and journalist Dick J. Reavis, and more specifically those materials relating to Mario Cantú, Güero Medrano and the Partido Proletario Unido de America, and the Campamento 2 de Octubre, a squatter camp outside of Mexico City. These include articles, photographs and reflections composed by the Reavis, as well as various newspaper clippings on each subject.

    English, Spanish
    1968-2002
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • The Dirección Federal de Seguridad (DFS) was a government security agency created in 1947 during the presidency of Miguel Alemán. Organizationally part of the Secretaria de Gobernación, the DFS was assigned the duty of preserving the internal stability of Mexico against all forms of subversion and terrorist threats. During Mexico's Guerra Sucia (c. 1960s-1980s), the security forces were implicated in the Tlateloco Massacre and the El Halconazo attack on peaceful student protesters in 1971. The group was disbanded in 1985 after decades of monitoring and collecting intelligence on leftist organizations, students and university faculty. The collection includes the Dirección's daily reports to the president from 1970 to 1977. The reports detail the proceedings of meetings and activities in Mexico City and other regions of Mexico, as well as information regarding abductions and killings of organization leaders.

    Latin America
    Spanish
    1970-1977
    Benson Latin American Collection
  • From 1983 to 1999 the Central America Resource Center (CARC) compiled a collection of news articles on the current events in the U.S. and Central America. A similar project was undertaken for Mexico, the Mexico Newspak, from 1993-1999. The articles documented human rights violations in Central America that immigration attorneys used in political asylum petitions on their clients’ behalf. In 1992, CARC changed its name to the Human Rights Documentation Exchange (HRDE) and expanded its mission to collect documentation for asylum cases worldwide.

    English, Spanish
    1985-1999
    Benson Latin American Collection