The Transcription Centre began its brief but significant life in February 1962 under the direction of Dennis Duerden (1927-2006), producing and distributing radio programs for and about Africa. The organization was created with funding provided initially by the Congress for Cultural Freedom (CCF) to foster non-totalitarian cultural values in sub-Saharan Africa in implicit opposition to Soviet-encouraged committed political attitudes among African writers and artists. The records of the Transcription Centre comprise scripts and manuscripts, correspondence, legal documents, business records, ephemera, photographs, and clippings. Particularly noteworthy is a large file of scripts and script fragments arranged topically as a broadcast and publishing resource, including material not represented elsewhere in the papers. Making up about a quarter of the papers, the correspondence series contains significant evidence of the Transcription Centre's efforts on behalf of African art, writing, and scholarship through broadcasting, conferences, and cultural festivals. The correspondence files include artists (Jimo Akolo, Julian Bienart) and writers (Chinua Achebe, Ezekiel Mphahlele, Rajat Neogy, David Rubadiri), as well as academics and other scholars (Ulli Beier, Sillaty K. Dabo, Gerhard Kubik, Margaret Laurence, Ivan van Sertima). The extensive body of correspondence with Wole Soyinka is especially noteworthy.

Date:
1979-1983, (bulk: 1960-1977)
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center


The Women's Caucus for Gender Justice's (WCGJ) documentary footage for If Hope Were Enough contains the documentary production in English, Spanish, and French as well as raw footage of panels for the Preparatory Commission of the International Criminal Court (ICC Prepcom) and interviews with survivors of gender-based violence conducted for the documentary. If Hope Were Enough documents the ways in which women have worked to bring accountability for crimes of sexual and gender violence in conflict and non-conflict situations around the world and the struggles of gender-based violence survivors in Korea, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Rwanda, Afghanistan and Mexico.

Language: English, French, Spanish
Date:
1998-2000


The papers of Maurice Cranston (1920-1993) span his professional career as an author, free-lance reviewer, and professor of political philosophy. In 1967 Cranston published the influential essay "Human Rights, Real and Supposed." His papers include the page proofs for What are Human Rights? (The Bodley Head Ltd., 1973), as well as subject files related to human rights.

Language: English, French, Italian
Date:
1943-1997
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center


Coverage: Africa

The Genocide Archive of Rwanda (GAR) features video testimonies from genocide survivors, video recordings of the Gacaca Court proceedings and remembrance ceremonies, photographs, and archival documents that provide context to the history of the 1994 Genocide. Materials are in Kinyarwanda. Select videos have English subtitles and translations and French translations. Select archival materials have abstracts in English and French. GAR is a collaborative project of the Kigali Genocide Memorial Centre, Aegis Trust, and Rwanda’s National Commission for the Fight Against Genocide.

Language: English, French, Kinyarwanda
Date:
1987-2007


The large French collection of Carlton Lake contains several collections of particular interest to sexuality scholars. Gertrude Stein (1874–1946) knew everybody and was a prolific writer and correspondent. The Ransom Center has only a few works of hers in manuscript, including "Composition as Explanation" (1926), but holds a more significant number of letters to and from her. One group of correspondence is between Stein and Charles Henri Ford, and another large group consists of letters from Stein to the artist Sir Francis Rose (1909–1979). There is also a cache of photographs of Stein and a small archive of her secretary and companion, Alice B. Toklas (1877–1967).

Language: English, French
Date:
1914-1973, (bulk: 1946-1967)
Contributing Library: Harry Ransom Center